Middlebury

 

Two Middlebury Graduates receive Fulbright Scholarships for Study Abroad

August 15, 2007

Fulbright photo

Jennifer Higgins will travel to Mongolia and Amber Rydberg to South Korea

 

MIDDLEBURY, Vt. - Two recent Middlebury College graduates, Jennifer L. Higgins and Amber L. Rydberg, have received Fulbright U.S. Student Scholarships to work, study, and travel abroad in 2007-2008.

Higgins, of Rochester, N.Y., who graduated in February 2007, will travel to the Darhad Valley of Mongolia to study the traditional animal care and veterinary practices of nomadic herders. She will explore the seasonal movements of the herds from a veterinary perspective, and research the conditioning processes used to prepare the animals for their annual migration.

Higgins has particular interest in ethnoveterinary medicine, the study of the traditional practices of indigenous people. After her Fulbright service, she hopes to enter a veterinary program and pursue a joint D.V.M. and Ph.D. While at Middlebury she received a Barry M. Goldwater Scholarship in science and Vermont Genetics Network Award for Thesis Research. A biochemistry and biology major who graduated summa cum laude, Jennifer also participated in the outing club, varsity ski team, and the alternative energy "Biobus" project.

Rydberg, from North Easton, Mass., and also a February 2007 graduate, will travel to South Korea to undertake an English teaching assistantship with local children. A native of South Korea who was adopted by a Massachusetts couple when she was four months old, Rydberg says, "I am eager to return to my birthplace to teach English and American culture to Korean children."

Rydberg was a double major in Chinese and political science and studied at Middlebury's School in China. She plans to volunteer at the 2008 Olympic Games in Beijing after her Fulbright service. While at Middlebury, Amber was a Chinese department tutor, and a member of the student activities board and winter carnival social committee. She hopes to study international law or pursue a career in the Foreign Service.

The Fulbright international education exchange program, sponsored by the U.S. Department of State and the Bureau of Educational and Cultural Affairs, was established in 1946 under legislation introduced by the late Senator J. William Fulbright of Arkansas. The Fulbright program operates in more than 150 countries. In its 61-year history, more than 105,000 Americans have studied, taught, or researched abroad, and 174,000 people from other countries have engaged in similar activities here.