Middlebury

 

Courses

Courses offered in the past four years.
indicates offered in the current term
indicates offered in the upcoming term[s]

CHEM 0101 - World of Chemistry      

World of Chemistry
The goal of this course is to investigate how chemistry impacts our daily lives in both common and extraordinary ways. After learning basic concepts of elements, atoms, and molecules, we will explore topics in energy (petroleum, nuclear, batteries, and solar), environment (global warming and the ozone hole), health (food and drug), and art (color, conservation, and forgery detection). We will perform occasional hands-on activities.

SCI

Spring 2011, Winter 2013, Spring 2014

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CHEM 0102 - Chem of Mind-Altering Drugs      

The Chemistry of Mind-Altering Drugs
In this course we will investigate basic principles of chemical signaling in the brain and how commonly-abused drugs alter brain chemistry to distort perception. We will survey the molecular structure of drugs, principles of drug-receptor interactions, and the mechanisms of drug action in five major classes of drugs: opiates, stimulants, cannabinoids, sedatives, and hallucinogens. We will also examine chemical dependency and current research into pharmaceutical treatments for addiction. This course does not require prior experience in chemistry. 3 hrs. lect.

SCI

Fall 2014

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CHEM 0103 - General Chemistry I      

General Chemistry I
Major topics will include atomic theory and atomic structure; chemical bonding; stoichiometry; introduction to chemical thermodynamics. States of matter; solutions and nuclear chemistry. Laboratory work deals with testing of theories by various quantitative methods. Students with strong secondary school preparation are encouraged to consult the department chair for permission to elect CHEM 0104 or CHEM 0107 in place of this course. CHEM 0103 is also an appropriate course for a student with little or no prior preparation in chemistry who would like to learn about basic chemical principles while fulfilling the SCI or DED distribution requirement. 3 hrs. lect., 3 hrs. lab, 1 hr. disc.

DED SCI

Fall 2010, Spring 2011, Fall 2011, Spring 2012, Fall 2012, Spring 2013, Fall 2013, Spring 2014, Fall 2014, Spring 2015

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CHEM 0104 - General Chemistry II      

General Chemistry II
Major topics include chemical kinetics, chemical equilibrium, acid-base equilibria, chemical thermodynamics, electrochemistry, descriptive inorganic chemistry, and coordination chemistry. Lab work includes inorganic synthesis, qualitative analysis, and quantitative analysis in kinetics, acid-base and redox chemistry. (CHEM 0103 or by waiver) 3 hrs. lect., 3 hrs. lab, 1 hr. disc.

DED SCI

Fall 2010, Spring 2011, Fall 2011, Spring 2012, Fall 2012, Spring 2013, Fall 2013, Spring 2014, Fall 2014, Spring 2015

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CHEM 0107 - Advanced General Chemistry      

Advanced General Chemistry
This course is a one-semester alternative to one year of general chemistry (CHEM 0103 and CHEM 0104). It is open to all students who have received a 4 or 5 on the Advanced Placement test in Chemistry. Students who have two or more years of high school chemistry without AP credit may enroll with permission of the instructor. Topics will be drawn from the traditional general chemistry curriculum, but discussed in greater detail with a more thorough mathematical treatment. Special emphasis will be placed on chemical bonding, coordination chemistry, and real world research in chemistry. (AP Chemistry or equivalent.) 3 hrs. lect., 3 hrs. lab, 1 hr dis.

DED SCI

Fall 2010, Fall 2011, Fall 2012, Fall 2013, Fall 2014

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CHEM 0203 - Organic I: Struct & Reactivity      

Organic Chemistry I: Structure and Reactivity
This course will provide students with an introduction to the structure and reactivity of organic molecules sufficient to continue directly to study of biochemistry (CHEM 0322). Topics covered will include models of chemical bonding, acid-base relationships, three-dimensional molecular structure (conformations and stereochemistry), reaction mechanisms and energy diagrams, substitution and elimination reactions, carbonyl reactions (additions, reductions, interconversions, and alpha-reactivity), and the fundamentals of biological molecules (carbohydrates, DNA, and RNA). Laboratory experiments will include purification techniques (recrystallization, distillation, extraction, and chromatography) as well as microscale organic reactions that complement the lecture portion of the course. (CHEM 0104 or CHEM 0107) 3 hrs. lect., 3 hrs. lab, 1 hr. prelab.

SCI

Fall 2014, Spring 2015

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CHEM 0204 - Organic II: Synthesis & Spect      

Organic Chemistry II: Synthesis and Spectroscopy
In this course we will explore the ways that organic molecules are made and their structures identified. The study of organic reactions will continue from CHEM 0203 with radical reactions, alkene and alkyne additions, aromatic reactions, oxidations and reductions, and additional carbonyl reactions. Emphasis in this course will be placed on using reactions in sequences to synthesize larger and more complex molecules. The theory and practice of mass spectrometry and UV-Vis, IR, and NMR spectroscopy will be studied as a means to elucidate the exact structures of organic molecules. Laboratory experiments will focus on synthetic techniques that complement the lecture portion of the course and the identification of complex unknowns via GC-MS, IR, and NMR. (CHEM 0203) 3 hrs. lect., 3 hrs. lab, 1 hr. prelab.

Spring 2015

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CHEM 0230 - Metals in Biology      

Metals in Biology
Life depends on the proper functioning of metalated proteins and nucleic acids. In this course we will study the structures and reactivities of metalloproteins and other metallobiomolecules. We will begin with an overview of biological inorganic chemistry that includes metal ions in proteins, metal cofactors, transport and storage of metals, and metals in medicine. We will then proceed to a variety of special topics (e.g., oxygen metabolism, nitrogen fixation, and electron transfer), depending on the specific interests of the students. The textbook will be Biological Inorganic Chemistry: Structure and Reactivity by Bertini, Gray, Stiefel, and Valentine. (CHEM 0104 or CHEM 0107).

SCI

Winter 2012, Spring 2013, Fall 2013

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CHEM 0270 - Environmental Chemistry      

Environmental Chemistry
In this course we will investigate fundamental physical and chemical processes within soils, natural waters, and the atmosphere that affect the fate and transport of contaminants. Processes to be studied include dissolution, volatilization, sorption, and transformation reactions. Laboratory experiments will explore laboratory, field, and computational methods for pollution monitoring, contaminant characterization, and prediction of pollution fate and transport. (CHEM 0104 or CHEM 0107) 3 hrs. lect., 3 hrs lab

SCI

Spring 2011, Spring 2012, Spring 2013, Spring 2014, Spring 2015

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CHEM 0301 - Medicinal Chemistry      

Medicinal Chemistry
Medicinal chemistry combines organic chemistry with biochemistry, analytical chemistry, physical chemistry, molecular biology, pharmacology, medicine, and related fields both to understand disease and to develop new pharmaceutical treatments (i.e., "drugs"). As chemists we try to correlate molecular structure with biological activity. In this course we will survey the major categories of diseases, drug targets, and drugs using a case-study approach. In addition to one mid-term exam, short oral presentations, and brief written assignments, the course will culminate with small-group based final projects (oral and written) about the design, development, and proposed future directions of pharmaceutical treatments targeting a specific disease. (CHEM 0203 or CHEM 0242) 3 hrs. lect.

Spring 2012, Spring 2014, Spring 2015

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CHEM 0311 - Instrumental Analysis      

Instrumental Analysis
This course introduces fundamental concepts of analytical chemistry, instrumental analysis, and scientific writing. Lecture topics include experimental design and quality control; sample collection and preparation; calibration, error, and data analysis; statistics; and the theory and operation of chemical instrumentation. Multi-week laboratory projects provide hands-on experience in qualitative and quantitative analysis using a variety of research-quality instrumentation (e.g., graphite furnace atomic absorption spectroscopy, UV/Vis spectrometry, gas chromatography mass spectrometry, circular dichroism spectroscopy, high pressure liquid chromatography). Writing workshops promote professional scientific writing skills through guided practice in writing analysis, peer review, and revision. (CHEM 0204 or CHEM 0242) 3 hr. lect., 6 hrs. lab.

CW

Fall 2010, Fall 2011, Fall 2012, Fall 2013, Fall 2014

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CHEM 0312 - Inorganic & Physical Chemistry      

Inorganic and Physical Chemistry Laboratory
In this course students will carry out experiments in the field of inorganic and physical chemistry and write journal-style reports based on their results. In the first half of the semester students will conduct a multi-step synthesis and characterization of a Mo-Mo complex with a quadruple bond. Students will learn inert atmosphere synthetic techniques and how to use a glove box. The synthesized Mo-Mo complex will be characterized by UV-Vis, IR, 1H and 31P NMR spectroscopies, and cyclic voltammetry. In the second half of the semester students will conduct two physical chemistry experiments. First students will carry out a kinetic study of the isomerization of the Mo-Mo (alpha to beta or beta to alpha) complex by UV-Vis spectroscopy. Finally, students will obtain the high-resolution IR spectra of acetylene and deuterated acetylene and analyze the rotation-vibration spectra using statistical and quantum mechanics to obtain structural data and interpret the peak intensities. In addition to the laboratory activities, there will be lectures on metal quadruple bonds, principles of UV-Vis , IR, 1H and 31P NMR spectroscopies, cyclic voltammetry, and statistical mechanics. (CHEM 0311, CHEM 0351, and CHEM 0355. CHEM 0355 can be taken concurrently.) 3 hrs. lect. 3 hrs. lab

Spring 2011, Spring 2012, Spring 2013, Spring 2014, Spring 2015

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CHEM 0313 - Biochemistry Laboratory      

Biochemistry Laboratory
Experimental biochemistry emphasizing the isolation, purification and characterization of enzymes and the cloning of genes and expression of recombinant protein. Traditional biochemical techniques such as UV-VIS spectroscopy, gel filtration, ion exchange and affinity chromatography, electrophoresis, and immunoblotting will be used in the investigation of several enzymes. Specific experiments will emphasize enzyme purification, enzyme kinetics, and enzyme characterization by biochemical and immunochemical methods. Major techniques in molecular biology will be introduced through an extended experiment that will include DNA purification, polymerase chain reaction, bacterial transformation, DNA sequencing, and the expression, purification, and characterization of the recombinant protein. Class discussions emphasize the underlying principles of the biochemical and molecular techniques employed in the course, and how these experimental tools are improved for particular applications. Laboratory reports stress experimental design, data presentation, and interpretation of results. (CHEM 0322) 2 hr. lect., 6 hrs. lab.

CW

Spring 2011, Spring 2012, Spring 2013, Spring 2014, Spring 2015

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CHEM 0322 - Biochemistry of Macromolecules      

Biochemistry of Macromolecules
This course is an introduction to biochemistry that focuses on the chemical and physical properties of amino acids, proteins, lipids, carbohydrates, and nucleic acids. Specific topics include the structure and function of proteins, enzyme mechanisms and kinetics, how carbohydrates and lipids contribute to vital cellular and organismal functions, and informational biochemistry (DNA, RNA, and specific enzymes and processes leading to the production of regulatory RNA and proteins). Specific topics from the primary literature will be explored to illustrate how particular techniques and experimental approaches are used to gain a new understanding of biochemistry and molecular biology. (CHEM 0203 or CHEM 0242) 3 hrs. lect., 1 hr. disc.

Fall 2010, Fall 2011, Fall 2012, Fall 2013, Fall 2014, Spring 2015

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CHEM 0351 - Quantum Chemistry/Spectroscopy      

Quantum Chemistry and Spectroscopy
Quantum theory is developed and applied to atomic structure and molecular bonding. Spectroscopy is examined as an application of quantum theory. (CHEM 0204 or CHEM 0241 co-requisite, MATH 0122 and PHYS 0110, or by waiver) 3 hrs. lect., 1 hr. disc.

Fall 2010, Fall 2011, Fall 2012, Fall 2013, Fall 2014

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CHEM 0355 - Thermodynamics and Kinetics      

Thermodynamics and Kinetics for Chemical and Biological Sciences
In this course students will learn the central ideas that frame thermodynamics and kinetics. The application of these ideas to chemical, biological, and the environmental processes will be covered using examples such as refrigerators, heat pumps, fuel cells, bioenergetics, lipid membranes, and catalysts (including enzymes). (PHYS 0109, MATH 0122, CHEM 0242) 3 hrs lect., 1 hr disc.

Spring 2013, Spring 2014, Spring 2015

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CHEM 0400 - Seminar In Chemical Research      

Seminar in Chemical Research
This seminar provides students with experiences to support the preparation of a senior thesis. As the course involves participation in a mentored laboratory project and the intent to complete a senior thesis, students must make arrangements to work with a faculty advisor prior to gaining approval for course registration. The classroom portion of this seminar focuses on reading the scientific literature, giving effective oral presentations, and writing the thesis introduction. Particular emphasis will be given to computer and technology issues related to oral and written presentations. Participation will normally be followed by registration for CHEM 0500 or CHEM 0700 (winter term and spring). (Senior standing; Approval only) 2 hrs. sem., 12 hrs. lab.

Fall 2010, Fall 2011, Fall 2012, Fall 2013, Fall 2014

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CHEM 0422 - Advanced Biomacromolecules      

Advanced Biomacromolecules
Proteins, nucleic acids, lipids, and carbohydrates are the basic chemical entities that make life possible. In this course we will delve into the macromolecular systems that bring about important biological processes. We will study the mechanisms of cell signaling, viral membrane fusion, RNA silencing, immune recognition, enzymatic catalysis, and other cellular activities at the molecular level. Special emphasis will be placed on the structure and biochemical underpinnings of recent 'hot' or high-profile systems from the primary literature. (CHEM 0322 or by approval) 3 hrs. lect.

Spring 2013

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CHEM 0425 - Biochemistry Of Metabolism      

Biochemistry of Metabolism
A living organism requires thousands of coordinated individual chemical reactions for life. In this course we will survey the major integrated metabolic pathways of living cells and whole organisms, with particular attention to enzyme mechanisms, as well as the regulation, and integration of metabolism from the molecular to the whole organism level. The synthesis and degradation of carbohydrates, amino acids, lipids, and nucleotides are investigated, along with the mechanisms of energy flow and cell-to-cell communication. While common metabolic processes are emphasized, unique aspects of metabolism that permit cells to function in unusual niches will also be considered. Mechanistic and regulatory aspects of metabolic processes will be reinforced through an investigation of inborn errors and organic defects that lead to disease. (CHEM 0322) 3 hrs. lect., 1 hr. disc.

Fall 2010, Fall 2011, Fall 2012, Fall 2013, Fall 2014

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CHEM 0431 - Advanced Inorganic Chemistry      

Advanced Inorganic Chemistry
Atomic structure, bonding theories, and properties applicable to inorganic and organometallic compounds will be developed in depth. Specific topics will include valence bond theory, molecular orbital theory, ligand field theory, applications of group theory, and reaction mechanisms. (CHEM 0351) 3 hrs. lect.

Fall 2010, Fall 2011, Fall 2012, Fall 2013, Fall 2014

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CHEM 0442 - Advanced Organic Chemistry      

Advanced Organic Chemistry
This course covers advanced topics in organic chemistry, with the goal of bringing students to the point where they have the knowledge necessary to become lifelong learners of organic chemistry through primary literature, rather than reliance on textbooks. With this goal in mind, the course will cover qualitative molecular orbital theory and reactive intermediates beyond the anion and cation chemistry which form the main body of the introductory organic chemistry sequence. More advanced techniques in NMR spectroscopy, stereochemistry, and conformational analysis will also be covered, and the course will culminate in literature examples of total synthesis of natural products, and a final project involving authoring a Wikipedia page on a topic of interest relating to organic chemistry. (CHEM 0204 or CHEM 0242)

Spring 2011, Spring 2013

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CHEM 0500 - Independent Study      

Independent Study Project
Individual study for qualified students. (Approval required)

Fall 2010, Winter 2011, Spring 2011, Fall 2011, Winter 2012, Spring 2012, Fall 2012, Winter 2013, Spring 2013, Fall 2013, Winter 2014, Spring 2014, Fall 2014, Spring 2015

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CHEM 0700 - Senior Research      

Senior Research
In this course students complete individual projects involving laboratory research on a topic chosen by the student and a faculty advisor. Prior to registering for CHEM 0700, a student must have discussed and agreed upon a project topic with a faculty member in the Chemistry and Biochemistry Department. Attendance at all Chemistry and Biochemistry Department seminars is expected. (Approval required; open only to seniors)

Fall 2010, Winter 2011, Spring 2011, Fall 2011, Winter 2012, Spring 2012, Fall 2012, Winter 2013, Spring 2013, Fall 2013, Winter 2014, Spring 2014, Fall 2014, Spring 2015

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CHEM 0701 - Senior Thesis      

Senior Thesis
Students who have initiated research projects in CHEM 0400 and who plan to complete a senior thesis should register for CHEM 0701. Students are required to write a thesis, give a public presentation, and defend their thesis before a committee of at least three faculty members. The final grade will be determined by the department. Attendance at all Chemistry and Biochemistry Department seminars is expected. (CHEM 0400; approval required)

Spring 2013, Fall 2013, Winter 2014, Spring 2014, Fall 2014, Spring 2015

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CHEM 1003 - Cavemen Chemistry      

Caveman Chemistry
Beginning with our ancestors’ first control of fire more than a million years ago and sparked by numerous chance discoveries since, humans have transformed mundane natural materials into incredibly useful goods. Mud into ceramics! Stone into bronze tools! Using Caveman Chemistry as our guide, we will create a sampling of our own primitive goods using low-tech methods as we explore the chemistry and significance of these seemingly magical transformations. Not open to students who have taken FYSE 1329.

WTR

Winter 2011, Winter 2013

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CHEM 1004 - Science and Public Policy      

Science and Public Policy in the U.S.A.
Issues of global climate change, nanotechnology, immunization, genomic sequencing, and alternative energy have become hot topics in scientific policy debates. In this course we will explore how science and technology influence, and are in turn influenced by, U.S. public policy. We will analyze scientific policies pre-and post-WWII, while working to understand the impact of these policies on the development of science as well as that of the nation. At the end of the course we will divide into groups and debate current scientific policies such as current funding for NASA, state mandated immunization, and clean energy incentives.

NOR SOC WTR

Winter 2013

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