Lesley-Ann Giddings

Asst. Professor of Chemistry/Biochemistry

 
 work802.443.5744
 Fall 2017: Monday 2:00-4:00PM, Tuesday 11:00AM-12:00PM, 1:00-2:00PM, Wednesday 10:00AM-12:00PM, and by appointment
 McCardell Bicentennial Hall 447

Professor Lesley-Ann Giddings earned her B.A. in Chemistry at Smith College in Northampton, MA and Ph.D. in Biological Chemistry in the laboratory of Sarah O’Connor at the Massachusetts Institute of Technology in Cambridge, MA. After completing a 3-year postdoctoral fellowship with David Newman at the National Cancer Institute in Frederick, MD, she joined the chemistry & biochemistry faculty at Middlebury College in January of 2015. She currently teaches biochemistry, biochemistry lab, and metabolism.

Professor Giddings is a natural products chemist interested in exploiting and characterizing secondary metabolic biosynthetic pathways to identify new broad-spectrum antimicrobial agents as well as understand how Nature crafts novel pharmacophores. The Giddings lab approaches these problems by studying microbes (including extremophiles obtained from various EPA Superfund sites in Vermont) and using stressful growth conditions to induce cryptic gene clusters involved in secondary metabolism. The lab also uses basic biochemical techniques to characterize enzymes involved in secondary metabolic pathways found in microbes. Click here to learn more.

 

Courses

Course List: 

Courses offered in the past four years.
indicates offered in the current term
indicates offered in the upcoming term[s]

CHEM 0104 - General Chemistry II      

General Chemistry II
Major topics include chemical kinetics, chemical equilibrium, acid-base equilibria, chemical thermodynamics, electrochemistry, descriptive inorganic chemistry, and coordination chemistry. Lab work includes inorganic synthesis, qualitative analysis, and quantitative analysis in kinetics, acid-base and redox chemistry. (CHEM 0103 or by waiver) 3 hrs. lect., 3 hrs. lab, 1 hr. disc. DED SCI

Fall 2017

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CHEM 0313 - Biochemistry Laboratory      

Biochemistry Laboratory
Experimental biochemistry emphasizing the isolation, purification and characterization of enzymes and the cloning of genes and expression of recombinant protein. Traditional biochemical techniques such as UV-VIS spectroscopy, gel filtration, ion exchange and affinity chromatography, electrophoresis, and immunoblotting will be used in the investigation of several enzymes. Specific experiments will emphasize enzyme purification, enzyme kinetics, and enzyme characterization by biochemical and immunochemical methods. Major techniques in molecular biology will be introduced through an extended experiment that will include DNA purification, polymerase chain reaction, bacterial transformation, DNA sequencing, and the expression, purification, and characterization of the recombinant protein. Class discussions emphasize the underlying principles of the biochemical and molecular techniques employed in the course, and how these experimental tools are improved for particular applications. Laboratory reports stress experimental design, data presentation, and interpretation of results. (CHEM 0322) 2 hr. lect., 6 hrs. lab. CW

Spring 2015, Spring 2016, Spring 2017, Spring 2018

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CHEM 0322 - Biochemistry of Macromolecules      

Biochemistry of Macromolecules
This course is an introduction to biochemistry that focuses on the chemical and physical properties of amino acids, proteins, lipids, carbohydrates, and nucleic acids. Specific topics include the structure and function of proteins, enzyme mechanisms and kinetics, how carbohydrates and lipids contribute to vital cellular and organismal functions, and informational biochemistry (DNA, RNA, and specific enzymes and processes leading to the production of regulatory RNA and proteins). Specific topics from the primary literature will be explored to illustrate how particular techniques and experimental approaches are used to gain a new understanding of biochemistry and molecular biology. (CHEM 0203 or CHEM 0242) 3 hrs. lect., 1 hr. disc.

Spring 2015, Fall 2015, Spring 2016, Fall 2016, Spring 2017, Spring 2018

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CHEM 0425 - Biochemistry Of Metabolism      

Biochemistry of Metabolism
A living organism requires thousands of coordinated individual chemical reactions for life. In this course we will survey the major integrated metabolic pathways of living cells and whole organisms, with particular attention to enzyme mechanisms, as well as the regulation, and integration of metabolism from the molecular to the whole organism level. The synthesis and degradation of carbohydrates, amino acids, lipids, and nucleotides are investigated, along with the mechanisms of energy flow and cell-to-cell communication. While common metabolic processes are emphasized, unique aspects of metabolism that permit cells to function in unusual niches will also be considered. Mechanistic and regulatory aspects of metabolic processes will be reinforced through an investigation of inborn errors and organic defects that lead to disease. (CHEM 0322) 3 hrs. lect., 1 hr. disc.

Fall 2015, Fall 2016, Fall 2017

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CHEM 0500 - Independent Study      

Independent Study Project
Individual study for qualified students. (Approval required)

Winter 2015, Spring 2015, Fall 2015, Winter 2016, Spring 2016, Fall 2016, Winter 2017, Spring 2017, Fall 2017, Winter 2018, Spring 2018

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CHEM 0700 - Senior Research      

Senior Research
In this course students complete individual projects involving laboratory research on a topic chosen by the student and a faculty advisor. Prior to registering for CHEM 0700, a student must have discussed and agreed upon a project topic with a faculty member in the Chemistry and Biochemistry Department. Attendance at all Chemistry and Biochemistry Department seminars is expected. (Approval required; open only to seniors)

Winter 2015, Spring 2015, Fall 2015, Winter 2016, Spring 2016, Fall 2016, Winter 2017, Spring 2017, Fall 2017, Winter 2018, Spring 2018

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CHEM 0701 - Senior Thesis      

Senior Thesis
Students who have initiated research projects in CHEM 0400 and who plan to complete a senior thesis should register for CHEM 0701. Students are required to write a thesis, give a public presentation, and defend their thesis before a committee of at least three faculty members. The final grade will be determined by the department. Attendance at all Chemistry and Biochemistry Department seminars is expected. (CHEM 0400; approval required)

Winter 2015, Spring 2015, Fall 2015, Winter 2016, Spring 2016, Fall 2016, Winter 2017, Spring 2017, Fall 2017, Winter 2018, Spring 2018

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MBBC 0700 - Senior Research      

Senior Thesis
Seniors conducting independent study in Molecular Biology and Biochemistry should register for MBBC 0700 unless they are completing a thesis project in which case they should register for MBBC 0701. (Approval required).

Fall 2015, Fall 2016, Winter 2017, Fall 2017, Winter 2018

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MBBC 0701 - Senior Thesis      

Senior Thesis
Students conducting independent thesis research in Molecular Biology and Biochemistry must register for MBBC 0701 while completing research projects initiated in BIOL 0500, MBBC 0700, or CHEM 0400. Students will organize and lead regular discussions of their research and research methods, and attend weekly meetings with their designated laboratory group to foster understanding of their special area, and practice the stylistic and technical aspects of scientific writing needed to write their thesis. (CHEM 0400 or BIOL 0500 or MBBC 0700) (Approval required).

Fall 2015, Fall 2016, Spring 2017, Fall 2017, Spring 2018

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Select Publications

Lesley-Ann Giddings and David J. Newman. Bioactive Compounds from Extremophiles: Genomic Studies, Biosynthetic Gene Clusters, and New Dereplication Methods. Springer Briefs in Microbiology: Extremophilic Bacteria; Sonia M. Tiquia-Arashiro and Melanie Mormile, Eds. Springer: Cham, Germany, 2015.

Lesley-Ann Giddings and David J. Newman. Bioactive Compounds from Marine Extremophiles. Springer Briefs in Microbiology: Extremophilic Bacteria; Sonia M. Tiquia-Arashiro and Melanie Mormile, Eds. Springer: Cham, Germany, 2015.

Lesley-Ann Giddings and David J. Newman. Bioactive Compounds from Terrestrial Extremophiles. Springer briefs in Microbiology: Extremophilic Bacteria; Sonia M. Tiquia-Arashiro and Melanie Mormile, Eds. Springer: Cham, Germany, 2015.

Lesley-Ann Giddings and David J. Newman. Microbial Natural Products: Molecular Blueprints for Antitumor Drugs (2013). Journal of Microbiology and Biotechnology. 40, 1181 – 1210.

David J. Newman and Lesley-Ann Giddings. Natural Products as Leads to Antitumor Drugs (2013). Phytochemical Reviews.13,123 – 137.

Lesley-Ann Giddings*, David K. Liscombe*, and Sarah E. O'Connor. CYP71BJ1 Catalyzes a

Stereoselective Hydroxylation in Alkaloid Biosynthesis in Catharanthus roseus (2011). Journal of Biological Chemistry, 286, 16751 – 16757. (* these authors contributed equally)

Michael A. Hicks, Alan E. Barber II, Lesley-Ann Giddings, Jenna Caldwell, Sarah E. O’Connor, Patricia C. Babbitt. The Evolution of New Function in Strictosidine Synthase-Like Proteins (2011). Proteins: Structure, Function and Bioinformatics. 79, 3082 – 3098.

Justin Maresh, Lesley-Ann Giddings, Anne Friedrich, Elke A. Loris, Santosh Panjikar, Bernhardt L. Trout, Joachim Stöckigt, Baron Peters, and Sarah E O’Connor (2008). Strictosidine Synthase: Mechanism of a Pictet-Spengler Catalyzing Enzyme. Journal of the American Chemical Society. 130, 710 – 723.

Department of Chemistry & Biochemistry

McCardell Bicentennial Hall
276 Bicentennial Way
Middlebury College
Middlebury, VT 05753