Middlebury

 

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CLAS0140A-S14

Cross-Listed As:
CLAS0140B-S14

CRN: 21484

Augustus and World of Rome

Augustus and the World of Rome
In 44 B.C., Julius Caesar was assassinated. Within two months his adoptive son, Augustus, still in his teens, traveled to Rome, soon extorted the highest office of the Roman Republic, and after 13 years of civil war became the state's first emperor. The resulting "Augustan Age" (31 B.C. to A.D. 14) produced a period of political change and cultural achievement unparalleled in Rome's long history. In this course we will examine the literature, art, history, and politics of this era, evaluate the nature of Augustus's accomplishments, and explore the Roman world. Readings include: Augustus, Vergil, Suetonius, and I, Claudius. 2 hrs. lect., 1 hr. disc.

CLAS0140B-S14

Cross-Listed As:
CLAS0140A-S14

CRN: 22510

Augustus and World of Rome

Augustus and the World of Rome
In 44 B.C., Julius Caesar was assassinated. Within two months his adoptive son, Augustus, still in his teens, traveled to Rome, soon extorted the highest office of the Roman Republic, and after 13 years of civil war became the state's first emperor. The resulting "Augustan Age" (31 B.C. to A.D. 14) produced a period of political change and cultural achievement unparalleled in Rome's long history. In this course we will examine the literature, art, history, and politics of this era, evaluate the nature of Augustus's accomplishments, and explore the Roman world. Readings include: Augustus, Vergil, Suetonius, and I, Claudius. 2 hrs. lect., 1 hr. disc.

CLAS0140C-S14

CRN: 22511

Augustus and World of Rome

Augustus and the World of Rome
In 44 B.C., Julius Caesar was assassinated. Within two months his adoptive son, Augustus, still in his teens, traveled to Rome, soon extorted the highest office of the Roman Republic, and after 13 years of civil war became the state's first emperor. The resulting "Augustan Age" (31 B.C. to A.D. 14) produced a period of political change and cultural achievement unparalleled in Rome's long history. In this course we will examine the literature, art, history, and politics of this era, evaluate the nature of Augustus's accomplishments, and explore the Roman world. Readings include: Augustus, Vergil, Suetonius, and I, Claudius. 2 hrs. lect., 1 hr. disc.

CLAS0276A-S14

Cross-Listed As:
PHIL0276A-S14

CRN: 22113

Roman Philosophy

Roman Philosophy
In this course we will seek to answer the question of what is Roman philosophy - philosophia togata. Is it simply Greek philosophy in Roman dress? Or, while based in its Greek origins, does it grow to have a distinctive and rigorous character of its own, designed and developed to focus on uniquely "Roman" questions and problems, in particular, ethical, social, and political questions? We will investigate how some of the main schools of Hellenistic Greek thought came to be developed in Latin: Epicureanism (Lucretius), Academic Skepticism (Cicero), and Stoicism (Seneca). As we read we will investigate how each school offers different answers to crucial questions such as what is the goal of life? What is the highest good? Should one take part in politics or not? What is the nature of the soul? What is the nature of Nature itself? Is there an afterlife? Can we ever have a certain answer to any of these questions? 3hrs. lect./1 hr. disc.

CLAS0332A-S14

Cross-Listed As:
HIST0332A-S14

CRN: 22115

Roman Law

Roman Law
The Romans' codification of civil law is often considered their greatest intellectual achievement and most original and influential contribution to the world. This course treats the four main divisions of Roman law (persons, property, obligations, and succession). Great emphasis is placed on the role of law in Roman society. How did the law influence the lives of Roman citizens living under it? How did ordinary Roman citizens shape the law? Students will come to understand the principles of Roman law through actual cases. Designed for students with some background in Roman history and/or literature. 2 hrs. lect./1 disc.

CLAS0332Y-S14

Cross-Listed As:
HIST0332Y-S14

CRN: 22117

Roman Law
Discussion

Roman Law
The Romans' codification of civil law is often considered their greatest intellectual achievement and most original and influential contribution to the world. This course treats the four main divisions of Roman law (persons, property, obligations, and succession). Great emphasis is placed on the role of law in Roman society. How did the law influence the lives of Roman citizens living under it? How did ordinary Roman citizens shape the law? Students will come to understand the principles of Roman law through actual cases. Designed for students with some background in Roman history and/or literature. 2 hrs. lect./1 disc.

CLAS0332Z-S14

Cross-Listed As:
HIST0332Z-S14

CRN: 22118

Roman Law
Discussion

Roman Law
The Romans' codification of civil law is often considered their greatest intellectual achievement and most original and influential contribution to the world. This course treats the four main divisions of Roman law (persons, property, obligations, and succession). Great emphasis is placed on the role of law in Roman society. How did the law influence the lives of Roman citizens living under it? How did ordinary Roman citizens shape the law? Students will come to understand the principles of Roman law through actual cases. Designed for students with some background in Roman history and/or literature. 2 hrs. lect./1 disc.

CLAS0420A-S14

Cross-Listed As:
CLAS0420B-S14

CRN: 20466

Seminar in Classical Lit
The Humanism of Herodotus

Senior Seminar: The Humanism of Herodotus
Herodotus (485-424 BC), “the Father of History,” is also regarded as the first sociologist and ethnographer. The plan and argument of his work, however, including its many fantastic stories, disclose a philosophic intention that resists easy categorization. Herodotus’ subject is the “Greek miracle”: how the tiny and fractious cities of Greece took concerted action against the overwhelming might of the Persian kings who invaded Greece in 490 and 479 BC. This unlikely triumph of political freedom and limited government over despotic empire is told against the background of the Afro-Asiatic origins of Greek civilization, which Herodotus uncovers in wide-ranging investigations of the customs and religions of Greece, Lydia, Media, Persia, Egypt, Libya, and Scythia. In this course we will pursue a close reading of Herodotus in translation; the seminar is open to all students with some previous background in Greek and/or Roman literature.

CLAS0420B-S14

Cross-Listed As:
CLAS0420A-S14

CRN: 22553

Seminar in Classical Lit
The Humanism of Herodotus

Senior Seminar: The Humanism of Herodotus
Herodotus (485-424 BC), “the Father of History,” is also regarded as the first sociologist and ethnographer. The plan and argument of his work, however, including its many fantastic stories, disclose a philosophic intention that resists easy categorization. Herodotus’ subject is the “Greek miracle”: how the tiny and fractious cities of Greece took concerted action against the overwhelming might of the Persian kings who invaded Greece in 490 and 479 BC. This unlikely triumph of political freedom and limited government over despotic empire is told against the background of the Afro-Asiatic origins of Greek civilization, which Herodotus uncovers in wide-ranging investigations of the customs and religions of Greece, Lydia, Media, Persia, Egypt, Libya, and Scythia. In this course we will pursue a close reading of Herodotus in translation; the seminar is open to all students with some previous background in Greek and/or Roman literature.

CLAS0500A-S14

CRN: 20283

Independent Study

Independent Study
(Approval required)

CLAS0500B-S14

CRN: 20612

Independent Study

Independent Study
(Approval required)

CLAS0500C-S14

CRN: 20718

Independent Study

Independent Study
(Approval required)

CLAS0500D-S14

CRN: 20834

Independent Study

Independent Study
(Approval required)

CLAS0500E-S14

CRN: 20292

Independent Study

Independent Study
(Approval required)

CLAS0500F-S14

CRN: 20614

Independent Study

Independent Study
(Approval required)

CLAS0500H-S14

CRN: 20835

Independent Study

Independent Study
(Approval required)

CLAS0505A-S14

CRN: 20632

Ind Senior Project

(Approval Required)

CLAS0505B-S14

CRN: 20836

Ind Senior Project

(Approval Required)

CLAS0505C-S14

CRN: 20837

Ind Senior Project

(Approval Required)

CLAS0505D-S14

CRN: 20838

Ind Senior Project

(Approval Required)

CLAS0505E-S14

CRN: 20839

Ind Senior Project

(Approval Required)

CLAS0505F-S14

CRN: 20840

Ind Senior Project

(Approval Required)

CLAS0505H-S14

CRN: 20842

Ind Senior Project

(Approval Required)

CLAS0700A-S14

CRN: 20616

Sr Essay Classics/Cy

Senior Essay for Classics/Classical Studies Majors
(Approval required)

CLAS0700B-S14

CRN: 20843

Sr Essay Classics/Cy

Senior Essay for Classics/Classical Studies Majors
(Approval required)

CLAS0700C-S14

CRN: 20844

Sr Essay Classics/Cy

Senior Essay for Classics/Classical Studies Majors
(Approval required)

CLAS0700D-S14

CRN: 20845

Sr Essay Classics/Cy

Senior Essay for Classics/Classical Studies Majors
(Approval required)

CLAS0700E-S14

CRN: 20846

Sr Essay Classics/Cy

Senior Essay for Classics/Classical Studies Majors
(Approval required)

CLAS0700F-S14

CRN: 20847

Sr Essay Classics/Cy

Senior Essay for Classics/Classical Studies Majors
(Approval required)

CLAS0700H-S14

CRN: 20849

Sr Essay Classics/Cy

Senior Essay for Classics/Classical Studies Majors
(Approval required)

GREK0102A-S14

CRN: 22121

Beginning Greek II

Beginning Greek II
This course completes the introductory course offered in Winter Term and will conclude by reading one of Plato's philosophical dialogues. 6 hrs. lect.

GREK0302A-S14

CRN: 22305

Readings in Greek Lit II

Readings in Greek Literature II
Readings in major authors. (formerly CLAS 0304) 3 hrs. lect.

LATN0202A-S14

CRN: 22122

Intermediate Latin: Poetry

Intermediate Latin: Poetry
Readings in major authors. 3 hrs. lect.

LATN0402A-S14

CRN: 22123

Advanced Readings in Latin II

Advanced Readings in Latin II
Readings in major authors. 3 hrs. lect.