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CLAS0132A-F16

Cross-Listed As:
HIST0132A-F16

CRN: 92227

History of Rome
History of Rome
This course is an introductory survey of Roman history, from the emergence of the Republic to the influence of Rome on the western world. In the first half of the course we will study the origins of Rome's rise to dominance, the conquest of the Mediterranean and its effect on Roman society, and the crumbling of political structures under the weight of imperial expansion. In the second half, we will study the empire more broadly, starting with the emperors and moving out to the daily lives of people around the Mediterranean. The course will end with the importance of Rome for the Founding Fathers. We will read from authors including Polybius, Plutarch, Appian, Caesar, Suetonius, Tacitus, Juvenal, and Pliny. 2 hrs. lect./1 hr. disc.

CLAS0132X-F16

Cross-Listed As:
HIST0132X-F16

CRN: 92228

History of Rome
Discussion
History of Rome
This course is an introductory survey of Roman history, from the emergence of the Republic to the influence of Rome on the western world. In the first half of the course we will study the origins of Rome's rise to dominance, the conquest of the Mediterranean and its effect on Roman society, and the crumbling of political structures under the weight of imperial expansion. In the second half, we will study the empire more broadly, starting with the emperors and moving out to the daily lives of people around the Mediterranean. The course will end with the importance of Rome for the Founding Fathers. We will read from authors including Polybius, Plutarch, Appian, Caesar, Suetonius, Tacitus, Juvenal, and Pliny. 2 hrs. lect./1 hr. disc.

CLAS0132Y-F16

Cross-Listed As:
HIST0132Y-F16

CRN: 92229

History of Rome
Discussion
History of Rome
This course is an introductory survey of Roman history, from the emergence of the Republic to the influence of Rome on the western world. In the first half of the course we will study the origins of Rome's rise to dominance, the conquest of the Mediterranean and its effect on Roman society, and the crumbling of political structures under the weight of imperial expansion. In the second half, we will study the empire more broadly, starting with the emperors and moving out to the daily lives of people around the Mediterranean. The course will end with the importance of Rome for the Founding Fathers. We will read from authors including Polybius, Plutarch, Appian, Caesar, Suetonius, Tacitus, Juvenal, and Pliny. 2 hrs. lect./1 hr. disc.

CLAS0132Z-F16

Cross-Listed As:
HIST0132Z-F16

CRN: 92230

History of Rome
Discussion
History of Rome
This course is an introductory survey of Roman history, from the emergence of the Republic to the influence of Rome on the western world. In the first half of the course we will study the origins of Rome's rise to dominance, the conquest of the Mediterranean and its effect on Roman society, and the crumbling of political structures under the weight of imperial expansion. In the second half, we will study the empire more broadly, starting with the emperors and moving out to the daily lives of people around the Mediterranean. The course will end with the importance of Rome for the Founding Fathers. We will read from authors including Polybius, Plutarch, Appian, Caesar, Suetonius, Tacitus, Juvenal, and Pliny. 2 hrs. lect./1 hr. disc.

CLAS0150A-F16

Cross-Listed As:
CMLT0150A-F16 CLAS0150B-F16 CMLT0150B-F16

CRN: 91121

Greek and Roman Epic Poetry
Greek and Roman Epic Poetry
Would Achilles and Hector have risked their lives and sacred honor had they understood human life and the Olympian gods as Homer portrays them in the Iliad? Why do those gods decide to withdraw from men altogether following the Trojan War, and why is Odysseus the man Athena chooses to help her carry out that project? And why, according to the Roman poet Vergil, do these gods command Aeneas, a defeated Trojan, to found an Italian town that will ultimately conquer the Greek cities that conquered Troy, replacing the Greek polis with a universal empire that will end all wars of human freedom? Through close study of Homer's Iliad and Odyssey, and Vergil's Aeneid, we explore how the epic tradition helped shape Greece and Rome, and define their contributions to European civilization. 3 hrs. lect., 1 hr. disc.

CLAS0150B-F16

Cross-Listed As:
CLAS0150A-F16 CMLT0150A-F16 CMLT0150B-F16

CRN: 92132

Greek and Roman Epic Poetry
Greek and Roman Epic Poetry
Would Achilles and Hector have risked their lives and sacred honor had they understood human life and the Olympian gods as Homer portrays them in the Iliad? Why do those gods decide to withdraw from men altogether following the Trojan War, and why is Odysseus the man Athena chooses to help her carry out that project? And why, according to the Roman poet Vergil, do these gods command Aeneas, a defeated Trojan, to found an Italian town that will ultimately conquer the Greek cities that conquered Troy, replacing the Greek polis with a universal empire that will end all wars of human freedom? Through close study of Homer's Iliad and Odyssey, and Vergil's Aeneid, we explore how the epic tradition helped shape Greece and Rome, and define their contributions to European civilization. 3 hrs. lect., 1 hr. disc.

CLAS0150Z-F16

Cross-Listed As:
CMLT0150Z-F16

CRN: 91148

Greek and Roman Epic Poetry
Discussion - CW
Greek and Roman Epic Poetry
Would Achilles and Hector have risked their lives and sacred honor had they understood human life and the Olympian gods as Homer portrays them in the Iliad? Why do those gods decide to withdraw from men altogether following the Trojan War, and why is Odysseus the man Athena chooses to help her carry out that project? And why, according to the Roman poet Vergil, do these gods command Aeneas, a defeated Trojan, to found an Italian town that will ultimately conquer the Greek cities that conquered Troy, replacing the Greek polis with a universal empire that will end all wars of human freedom? Through close study of Homer's Iliad and Odyssey, and Vergil's Aeneid, we explore how the epic tradition helped shape Greece and Rome, and define their contributions to European civilization. 3 hrs. lect., 1 hr. disc.

CLAS0276A-F16

Cross-Listed As:
PHIL0276A-F16

CRN: 92235

Roman Philosophy
Roman Philosophy
In this course we will seek to answer the question of what is Roman philosophy - philosophia togata. Is it simply Greek philosophy in Roman dress? Or, while based in its Greek origins, does it grow to have a distinctive and rigorous character of its own, designed and developed to focus on uniquely "Roman" questions and problems, in particular, ethical, social, and political questions? We will investigate how some of the main schools of Hellenistic Greek thought came to be developed in Latin: Epicureanism (Lucretius), Academic Skepticism (Cicero), and Stoicism (Seneca). As we read we will investigate how each school offers different answers to crucial questions such as what is the goal of life? What is the highest good? Should one take part in politics or not? What is the nature of the soul? What is the nature of Nature itself? Is there an afterlife? Can we ever have a certain answer to any of these questions? 3 hrs. lect.

CLAS0450A-F16

Cross-Listed As:
CLAS0701A-F16 CMLT0450A-F16

CRN: 90121

History of Class Lit
History of Classical Literature
A comprehensive overview of the major literary, historical, and philosophical works of Greece and Rome. Greek authors studied include Homer, Aeschylus, Sophocles, Herodotus, Aristophanes, Thucydides, Plato, and Aristotle. Roman authors include Lucretius, Cicero, Livy, Vergil, Petronius, and Tacitus. Required of senior majors in Classics/Classical Studies (see CLAS 0701 below) and open to all interested students with some background in Greek and Roman literature, history, or philosophy. 3 hrs. lect.

CLAS0500A-F16

CRN: 90379

Independent Study
Independent Study
(Approval required)

CLAS0500B-F16

CRN: 90402

Independent Study
Independent Study
(Approval required)

CLAS0500D-F16

CRN: 90768

Independent Study
Independent Study
(Approval required)

CLAS0500E-F16

CRN: 90404

Independent Study
Independent Study
(Approval required)

CLAS0500F-F16

CRN: 90741

Independent Study
Independent Study
(Approval required)

CLAS0505A-F16

CRN: 90135

Ind Senior Project
(Approval Required)

CLAS0505B-F16

CRN: 90137

Ind Senior Project
(Approval Required)

CLAS0505C-F16

CRN: 90139

Ind Senior Project
(Approval Required)

CLAS0505D-F16

CRN: 90140

Ind Senior Project
(Approval Required)

CLAS0505E-F16

CRN: 90519

Ind Senior Project
(Approval Required)

CLAS0505F-F16

CRN: 90771

Ind Senior Project
(Approval Required)

CLAS0700A-F16

CRN: 90141

Sr Essay Classics/Cy
Senior Essay for Classics/Classical Studies Majors
(Approval required)

CLAS0700B-F16

CRN: 90520

Sr Essay Classics/Cy
Senior Essay for Classics/Classical Studies Majors
(Approval required)

CLAS0700D-F16

CRN: 90522

Sr Essay Classics/Cy
Senior Essay for Classics/Classical Studies Majors
(Approval required)

CLAS0700E-F16

CRN: 90523

Sr Essay Classics/Cy
Senior Essay for Classics/Classical Studies Majors
(Approval required)

CLAS0700F-F16

CRN: 90742

Sr Essay Classics/Cy
Senior Essay for Classics/Classical Studies Majors
(Approval required)

CLAS0701A-F16

Cross-Listed As:
CLAS0450A-F16 CMLT0450A-F16

CRN: 90126

Hist of Class Lit: Gen Exam
Hist of Class Lit
History of Classical Literature
A comprehensive overview of the major literary, historical, and philosophical works of Greece and Rome. Greek authors studied include Homer, Aeschylus, Sophocles, Herodotus, Aristophanes, Thucydides, Plato, and Aristotle. Roman authors include Lucretius, Cicero, Livy, Vergil, Petronius, and Tacitus. Required of senior majors in Classics/Classical Studies and open to all interested students with some background in Greek and Roman literature, history, or philosophy. 3 hrs. lect.

GREK0201A-F16

CRN: 92237

Intermediate Greek: Prose
Intermediate Greek: Attic Prose-Lysias & Plato *
Readings in major authors. 3 hrs. lect.

GREK0401A-F16

CRN: 92238

Adv Readings Greek Lit I
Advanced Readings in Greek Literature: Homer's /Iliad/
Readings in major authors. 3 hrs. lect.

HEBR0500A-F16

CRN: 91596

Independent Study
Independent Study
Approval required.

LATN0301A-F16

CRN: 92239

Readings in Latin Literature I
Readings in Latin Literature I
Readings in major authors. 3 hrs. lect.

LATN0501A-F16

CRN: 92240

Adv Readings in Latin III
Advanced Readings in Latin III
Readings in major authors. 3 hrs lect.

Eve Adler Department of Classics

Twilight Hall
50 Franklin Street
Middlebury College
Middlebury, VT 05753

fax 802-443-2077