Sections

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CLAS0144A-S17

Cross-Listed As:
CLAS0144B-S17

CRN: 22172

Literature of the Roman Empire
Literature of the Roman Empire
In this course we will investigate the literature, culture, and history of the Roman Empire, focusing on how Romans sought, often at the cost of their own lives, to define the role and powers of the emperor and their place as subjects to this new, autocratic power. Texts we will read include: epic (Lucan), tragedy (Seneca), history (Tacitus), biography (Suetonius), prose fiction (Petronius), as well as early Christian literature. As we read we will seek to answer questions about the nature of freedom and empire, what is gained and lost by replacing a republican with an autocratic political system, and whether literature in this period can offer an accurate reflection of reality, function as an instrument of change and protest, or of fearful praise and flattery. 3 hrs lect. 1 hr. disc.

CLAS0144B-S17

Cross-Listed As:
CLAS0144A-S17

CRN: 22173

Literature of the Roman Empire
Literature of the Roman Empire
In this course we will investigate the literature, culture, and history of the Roman Empire, focusing on how Romans sought, often at the cost of their own lives, to define the role and powers of the emperor and their place as subjects to this new, autocratic power. Texts we will read include: epic (Lucan), tragedy (Seneca), history (Tacitus), biography (Suetonius), prose fiction (Petronius), as well as early Christian literature. As we read we will seek to answer questions about the nature of freedom and empire, what is gained and lost by replacing a republican with an autocratic political system, and whether literature in this period can offer an accurate reflection of reality, function as an instrument of change and protest, or of fearful praise and flattery. 3 hrs lect. 1 hr. disc.

CLAS0144Z-S17

CRN: 22174

Literature of the Roman Empire
Discussion
Literature of the Roman Empire
In this course we will investigate the literature, culture, and history of the Roman Empire, focusing on how Romans sought, often at the cost of their own lives, to define the role and powers of the emperor and their place as subjects to this new, autocratic power. Texts we will read include: epic (Lucan), tragedy (Seneca), history (Tacitus), biography (Suetonius), prose fiction (Petronius), as well as early Christian literature. As we read we will seek to answer questions about the nature of freedom and empire, what is gained and lost by replacing a republican with an autocratic political system, and whether literature in this period can offer an accurate reflection of reality, function as an instrument of change and protest, or of fearful praise and flattery. 3 hrs lect. 1 hr. disc.

CLAS0151A-S17

CRN: 22175

The Golden Age of Athens
The Golden Age of Athens: History and Literature
In this course we will trace the unprecedented intellectual innovation that begins with Greece’s triumph over the Persian invasions in 490 and 480-479 BC, continues through the emergence of radical democracy and imperialism at Athens, and culminates in the Peloponnesian War and Athens’ defeat in 404 BC by her former ally, Sparta. Through intensive study of selected works of historiography (Herodotus, Thucydides), tragedy (Aeschylus, Sophocles, Euripides), comedy (Aristophanes), and philosophy (Plato), we will explore the central concerns of 5th-century Athenians: freedom and power, knowledge and virtue, law and nature, and the place of the divine in the human world. 3 hr. lect., 1 hr. disc.

CLAS0151Y-S17

CRN: 22176

The Golden Age of Athens
Discussion
The Golden Age of Athens: History and Literature
In this course we will trace the unprecedented intellectual innovation that begins with Greece’s triumph over the Persian invasions in 490 and 480-479 BC, continues through the emergence of radical democracy and imperialism at Athens, and culminates in the Peloponnesian War and Athens’ defeat in 404 BC by her former ally, Sparta. Through intensive study of selected works of historiography (Herodotus, Thucydides), tragedy (Aeschylus, Sophocles, Euripides), comedy (Aristophanes), and philosophy (Plato), we will explore the central concerns of 5th-century Athenians: freedom and power, knowledge and virtue, law and nature, and the place of the divine in the human world. 3 hr. lect., 1 hr. disc.

CLAS0151Z-S17

CRN: 22177

The Golden Age of Athens
Discussion
The Golden Age of Athens: History and Literature
In this course we will trace the unprecedented intellectual innovation that begins with Greece’s triumph over the Persian invasions in 490 and 480-479 BC, continues through the emergence of radical democracy and imperialism at Athens, and culminates in the Peloponnesian War and Athens’ defeat in 404 BC by her former ally, Sparta. Through intensive study of selected works of historiography (Herodotus, Thucydides), tragedy (Aeschylus, Sophocles, Euripides), comedy (Aristophanes), and philosophy (Plato), we will explore the central concerns of 5th-century Athenians: freedom and power, knowledge and virtue, law and nature, and the place of the divine in the human world. 3 hr. lect., 1 hr. disc.

CLAS0420A-S17

CRN: 20413

Seminar in Classical Lit
Roman Epic
Seminar in Classical Literature: The Humanism of Herodotus
Herodotus (485-424 BC), “the Father of History,” is also regarded as the first sociologist and ethnographer. The plan and argument of his work, however, including its many fantastic stories, disclose a philosophic intention that resists easy categorization. Herodotus’ subject is the “Greek miracle”: how the tiny and fractious cities of Greece took concerted action against the overwhelming might of the Persian kings who invaded Greece in 490 and 479 BC. The story of this unlikely triumph of political freedom and limited government over despotic empire is told against the background of the Afro-Asiatic origins of Greek civilization, which Herodotus uncovers in wide-ranging investigations of the customs and religions of Greece, Lydia, Media, Persia, Egypt, Libya, and Scythia. In this seminar we will pursue a close reading of Herodotus in translation; the seminar is open to all students with some previous background in Greek and/or Roman literature. 3 hrs. sem.

CLAS0500A-S17

CRN: 20254

Independent Study
Independent Study
(Approval required)

CLAS0500B-S17

CRN: 20544

Independent Study
Independent Study
(Approval required)

CLAS0500D-S17

CRN: 20745

Independent Study
Independent Study
(Approval required)

CLAS0500E-S17

CRN: 20263

Independent Study
Independent Study
(Approval required)

CLAS0500F-S17

CRN: 20546

Independent Study
Independent Study
(Approval required)

CLAS0505A-S17

CRN: 20563

Ind Senior Project
(Approval Required)

CLAS0505B-S17

CRN: 20747

Ind Senior Project
(Approval Required)

CLAS0505D-S17

CRN: 20749

Ind Senior Project
(Approval Required)

CLAS0505E-S17

CRN: 20750

Ind Senior Project
(Approval Required)

CLAS0505F-S17

CRN: 20751

Ind Senior Project
(Approval Required)

CLAS0700A-S17

CRN: 20548

Sr Essay Classics/Cy
Senior Essay for Classics/Classical Studies Majors
(Approval required)

CLAS0700B-S17

CRN: 20754

Sr Essay Classics/Cy
Senior Essay for Classics/Classical Studies Majors
(Approval required)

CLAS0700D-S17

CRN: 20756

Sr Essay Classics/Cy
Senior Essay for Classics/Classical Studies Majors
(Approval required)

CLAS0700E-S17

CRN: 20757

Sr Essay Classics/Cy
Senior Essay for Classics/Classical Studies Majors
(Approval required)

CLAS0700F-S17

CRN: 20758

Sr Essay Classics/Cy
Senior Essay for Classics/Classical Studies Majors
(Approval required)

GREK0202A-S17

CRN: 22178

Intermediate Greek Poetry
Intermediate Greek
Readings in majors authors. 3 hrs. lect.

GREK0402A-S17

CRN: 22179

Adv Readings Greek Literature
Advanced Readings in Greek Literature II: Greek Cosmology–Hesiod and Plato
Readings in major authors. 3 hrs. lect.

LATN0102A-S17

CRN: 22180

Beginning Latin II
Beginning Latin II
This course is a continuation of the introductory winter term course (LATN 0101). After completing the fundamentals of Latin grammar, students translate selections from authors such as Cicero and Ovid. 3 hrs. lect.

LATN0302A-S17

CRN: 22181

Readings Latin Literature II
Readings in Latin Literature II: Vergil’s Aeneid*
Readings in major authors. 3 hrs. lect.

LATN0502A-S17

CRN: 21536

Advanced Readings in Latin IV
Advanced Readings in Latin IV: Flavian Literature
Readings in major authors. 3 hrs lect.

Eve Adler Department of Classics

Twilight Hall
50 Franklin Street
Middlebury College
Middlebury, VT 05753

fax 802-443-2077