Middlebury

 

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CLAS0143A-F14

Cross-Listed As:
CLAS0143B-F14

CRN: 92232

Rise & Fall of Roman Republic

The Rise and Fall of the Roman Republic
This course is an introduction to the literature, politics, culture and history of the Roman Republic (c.509-31BCE) - a period which saw Rome grow from a small city on the Tiber to the supreme power in the Mediterranean, and also saw the development of Latin literature. Our readings cover a broad variety of literary genres and authors: comedy (Plautus and Terence), lyric (Catullus), epic (Ennius), political speeches and letters (Cicero), history (Caesar, Sallust, Polybius), and didactic philosophy (Lucretius). As we read we will be careful to investigate how these texts present different and often conflicting ideas of what it means to be Roman, as well as how different ideologies of Rome compete throughout each work. 3 hrs. lect. 1hr. disc.

CLAS0143B-F14

Cross-Listed As:
CLAS0143A-F14

CRN: 92538

Rise & Fall of Roman Republic

The Rise and Fall of the Roman Republic
This course is an introduction to the literature, politics, culture and history of the Roman Republic (c.509-31BCE) - a period which saw Rome grow from a small city on the Tiber to the supreme power in the Mediterranean, and also saw the development of Latin literature. Our readings cover a broad variety of literary genres and authors: comedy (Plautus and Terence), lyric (Catullus), epic (Ennius), political speeches and letters (Cicero), history (Caesar, Sallust, Polybius), and didactic philosophy (Lucretius). As we read we will be careful to investigate how these texts present different and often conflicting ideas of what it means to be Roman, as well as how different ideologies of Rome compete throughout each work. 3 hrs. lect. 1hr. disc.

CLAS0143Z-F14

CRN: 92233

Rise & Fall of Roman Republic
Discussion - CW only

The Rise and Fall of the Roman Republic
This course is an introduction to the literature, politics, culture and history of the Roman Republic (c.509-31BCE) - a period which saw Rome grow from a small city on the Tiber to the supreme power in the Mediterranean, and also saw the development of Latin literature. Our readings cover a broad variety of literary genres and authors: comedy (Plautus and Terence), lyric (Catullus), epic (Ennius), political speeches and letters (Cicero), history (Caesar, Sallust, Polybius), and didactic philosophy (Lucretius). As we read we will be careful to investigate how these texts present different and often conflicting ideas of what it means to be Roman, as well as how different ideologies of Rome compete throughout each work. 3 hrs. lect. 1hr. disc.

CLAS0150A-F14

Cross-Listed As:
CMLT0150A-F14

CRN: 91294

Greek and Roman Epic Poetry

Greek and Roman Epic Poetry
Would Achilles and Hector have risked their lives and sacred honor had they understood human life and the Olympian gods as Homer portrays them in the Iliad? Why do those gods decide to withdraw from men altogether following the Trojan War, and why is Odysseus the man Athena chooses to help her carry out that project? And why, according to the Roman poet Vergil, do these gods command Aeneas, a defeated Trojan, to found an Italian town that will ultimately conquer the Greek cities that conquered Troy, replacing the Greek polis with a universal empire that will end all wars of human freedom? Through close study of Homer's Iliad and Odyssey, and Vergil's Aeneid, we explore how the epic tradition helped shape Greece and Rome, and define their contributions to European civilization. 3 hrs. lect., 1 hr. disc.

CLAS0150X-F14

Cross-Listed As:
CMLT0150X-F14

CRN: 91324

Greek and Roman Epic Poetry
Discussion

Greek and Roman Epic Poetry
Would Achilles and Hector have risked their lives and sacred honor had they understood human life and the Olympian gods as Homer portrays them in the Iliad? Why do those gods decide to withdraw from men altogether following the Trojan War, and why is Odysseus the man Athena chooses to help her carry out that project? And why, according to the Roman poet Vergil, do these gods command Aeneas, a defeated Trojan, to found an Italian town that will ultimately conquer the Greek cities that conquered Troy, replacing the Greek polis with a universal empire that will end all wars of human freedom? Through close study of Homer's Iliad and Odyssey, and Vergil's Aeneid, we explore how the epic tradition helped shape Greece and Rome, and define their contributions to European civilization. 3 hrs. lect., 1 hr. disc.

CLAS0150Y-F14

Cross-Listed As:
CMLT0150Y-F14

CRN: 91325

Greek and Roman Epic Poetry
Discussion

Greek and Roman Epic Poetry
Would Achilles and Hector have risked their lives and sacred honor had they understood human life and the Olympian gods as Homer portrays them in the Iliad? Why do those gods decide to withdraw from men altogether following the Trojan War, and why is Odysseus the man Athena chooses to help her carry out that project? And why, according to the Roman poet Vergil, do these gods command Aeneas, a defeated Trojan, to found an Italian town that will ultimately conquer the Greek cities that conquered Troy, replacing the Greek polis with a universal empire that will end all wars of human freedom? Through close study of Homer's Iliad and Odyssey, and Vergil's Aeneid, we explore how the epic tradition helped shape Greece and Rome, and define their contributions to European civilization. 3 hrs. lect., 1 hr. disc.

CLAS0150Z-F14

Cross-Listed As:
CMLT0150Z-F14

CRN: 91326

Greek and Roman Epic Poetry
Discussion

Greek and Roman Epic Poetry
Would Achilles and Hector have risked their lives and sacred honor had they understood human life and the Olympian gods as Homer portrays them in the Iliad? Why do those gods decide to withdraw from men altogether following the Trojan War, and why is Odysseus the man Athena chooses to help her carry out that project? And why, according to the Roman poet Vergil, do these gods command Aeneas, a defeated Trojan, to found an Italian town that will ultimately conquer the Greek cities that conquered Troy, replacing the Greek polis with a universal empire that will end all wars of human freedom? Through close study of Homer's Iliad and Odyssey, and Vergil's Aeneid, we explore how the epic tradition helped shape Greece and Rome, and define their contributions to European civilization. 3 hrs. lect., 1 hr. disc.

CLAS0151A-F14

CRN: 91776

The Golden Age of Athens

The Golden Age of Athens: History and Literature
In this course we will trace the unprecedented intellectual innovation that begins with Greece’s triumph over the Persian invasions in 490 and 480-479 BC, continues through the emergence of radical democracy and imperialism at Athens, and culminates in the Peloponnesian War and Athens’ defeat in 404 BC by her former ally, Sparta. Through intensive study of selected works of historiography (Herodotus, Thucydides), tragedy (Aeschylus, Sophocles, Euripides), comedy (Aristophanes), and philosophy (Plato), we will explore the central concerns of 5th-century Athenians: freedom and power, knowledge and virtue, law and nature, and the place of the divine in the human world. 3 hr. lect., 1 hr. disc.

CLAS0151Y-F14

CRN: 91796

The Golden Age of Athens
Discussion

The Golden Age of Athens: History and Literature
In this course we will trace the unprecedented intellectual innovation that begins with Greece’s triumph over the Persian invasions in 490 and 480-479 BC, continues through the emergence of radical democracy and imperialism at Athens, and culminates in the Peloponnesian War and Athens’ defeat in 404 BC by her former ally, Sparta. Through intensive study of selected works of historiography (Herodotus, Thucydides), tragedy (Aeschylus, Sophocles, Euripides), comedy (Aristophanes), and philosophy (Plato), we will explore the central concerns of 5th-century Athenians: freedom and power, knowledge and virtue, law and nature, and the place of the divine in the human world. 3 hr. lect., 1 hr. disc.

CLAS0151Z-F14

CRN: 91797

The Golden Age of Athens
Discussion

The Golden Age of Athens: History and Literature
In this course we will trace the unprecedented intellectual innovation that begins with Greece’s triumph over the Persian invasions in 490 and 480-479 BC, continues through the emergence of radical democracy and imperialism at Athens, and culminates in the Peloponnesian War and Athens’ defeat in 404 BC by her former ally, Sparta. Through intensive study of selected works of historiography (Herodotus, Thucydides), tragedy (Aeschylus, Sophocles, Euripides), comedy (Aristophanes), and philosophy (Plato), we will explore the central concerns of 5th-century Athenians: freedom and power, knowledge and virtue, law and nature, and the place of the divine in the human world. 3 hr. lect., 1 hr. disc.

CLAS0450A-F14

Cross-Listed As:
CLAS0701A-F14 CMLT0450A-F14

CRN: 90137

History of Class Lit

History of Classical Literature
A comprehensive overview of the major literary, historical, and philosophical works of Greece and Rome. Greek authors studied include Homer, Aeschylus, Sophocles, Herodotus, Aristophanes, Thucydides, Plato, and Aristotle. Roman authors include Lucretius, Cicero, Livy, Vergil, Petronius, and Tacitus. Required of senior majors in Classics/Classical Studies (see CLAS 0701 below) and open to all interested students with some background in Greek and Roman literature, history, or philosophy. 3 hrs. lect.

CLAS0500A-F14

CRN: 90453

Independent Study

Independent Study
(Approval required)

CLAS0500C-F14

CRN: 90477

Independent Study

Independent Study
(Approval required)

CLAS0500D-F14

CRN: 90868

Independent Study

Independent Study
(Approval required)

CLAS0500E-F14

CRN: 90478

Independent Study

Independent Study
(Approval required)

CLAS0500F-F14

CRN: 90839

Independent Study

Independent Study
(Approval required)

CLAS0500G-F14

CRN: 90869

Independent Study

Independent Study
(Approval required)

CLAS0500H-F14

CRN: 90870

Independent Study

Independent Study
(Approval required)

CLAS0505A-F14

CRN: 90152

Ind Senior Project

(Approval Required)

CLAS0505C-F14

CRN: 90156

Ind Senior Project

(Approval Required)

CLAS0505D-F14

CRN: 90157

Ind Senior Project

(Approval Required)

CLAS0505E-F14

CRN: 90597

Ind Senior Project

(Approval Required)

CLAS0505F-F14

CRN: 90871

Ind Senior Project

(Approval Required)

CLAS0505G-F14

CRN: 90872

Ind Senior Project

(Approval Required)

CLAS0505H-F14

CRN: 90873

Ind Senior Project

(Approval Required)

CLAS0700A-F14

CRN: 90159

Sr Essay Classics/Cy

Senior Essay for Classics/Classical Studies Majors
(Approval required)

CLAS0700C-F14

CRN: 90599

Sr Essay Classics/Cy

Senior Essay for Classics/Classical Studies Majors
(Approval required)

CLAS0700D-F14

CRN: 90600

Sr Essay Classics/Cy

Senior Essay for Classics/Classical Studies Majors
(Approval required)

CLAS0700E-F14

CRN: 90601

Sr Essay Classics/Cy

Senior Essay for Classics/Classical Studies Majors
(Approval required)

CLAS0700F-F14

CRN: 90840

Sr Essay Classics/Cy

Senior Essay for Classics/Classical Studies Majors
(Approval required)

CLAS0700G-F14

CRN: 90874

Sr Essay Classics/Cy

Senior Essay for Classics/Classical Studies Majors
(Approval required)

CLAS0700H-F14

CRN: 90875

Sr Essay Classics/Cy

Senior Essay for Classics/Classical Studies Majors
(Approval required)

CLAS0701A-F14

Cross-Listed As:
CLAS0450A-F14 CMLT0450A-F14

CRN: 90142

Hist of Class Lit: Gen Exam
Hist of Class Lit

History of Classical Literature
A comprehensive overview of the major literary, historical, and philosophical works of Greece and Rome. Greek authors studied include Homer, Aeschylus, Sophocles, Herodotus, Aristophanes, Thucydides, Plato, and Aristotle. Roman authors include Lucretius, Cicero, Livy, Vergil, Petronius, and Tacitus. Required of senior majors in Classics/Classical Studies and open to all interested students with some background in Greek and Roman literature, history, or philosophy. 3 hrs. lect.

GREK0201A-F14

CRN: 92239

Intermediate Greek: Prose

Intermediate Greek: Attic Prose-Lysias & Plato *
Readings in major authors. 3 hrs. lect.

GREK0401A-F14

CRN: 92240

Adv Readings Greek Lit I

Advanced Readings in Greek Literature: Aristotle’s Ethics & Politics
Readings in major authors. 3 hrs. lect.

HEBR0101A-F14

CRN: 92256

Beginning Classical Hebrew I

Beginning Classical Hebrew I
The goal of the Hebrew sequence is to develop students' ability to read the Jewish Bible (Old Testament) and later Hebrew literature. An introduction to classical Hebrew, this course presupposes nothing, begins with mastery of the Hebrew alphabet, and leads students through the noun and the basic structure of the Hebrew verbal system. By the end of the course, students will be reading and translating brief biblical narratives with the use of a lexicon.

HEBR0500A-F14

CRN: 92152

Independent Study

Independent Study
Approval required.

HEBR0500B-F14

CRN: 92153

Independent Study

Independent Study
Approval required.

LATN0301A-F14

CRN: 92241

Readings in Latin Literature I

Readings in Latin Literature I: Roman Epic and Empire
Readings in major authors. 3 hrs. lect.