Middlebury

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CLAS0140A-S15

CRN: 21337

Augustus and World of Rome
Augustus and the World of Rome
In 44 B.C., Julius Caesar was assassinated. Within two months his adoptive son, Augustus, still in his teens, traveled to Rome, soon extorted the highest office of the Roman Republic, and after 13 years of civil war became the state's first emperor. The resulting "Augustan Age" (31 B.C. to A.D. 14) produced a period of political change and cultural achievement unparalleled in Rome's long history. In this course we will examine the literature, art, history, and politics of this era, evaluate the nature of Augustus's accomplishments, and explore the Roman world. Readings include: Augustus, Vergil, Suetonius, and I, Claudius. 2 hrs. lect.

CLAS0152A-S15

Cross-Listed As:
CLAS0152B-S15

CRN: 22157

Greek Tragedy
Greek Tragedy
A survey of selected tragedies by Aeschylus, Sophocles, and Euripides, exploring the relation between tragedy and political freedom and empire in fifth century B.C. Athens. The course examines the tragic poets' use of traditional Greek myths to question not only the wisdom of contemporary Athenian imperialism but also traditional Greek views on relations between the sexes; between the family and the city; between man's presumed dignity and his belief in gods. Mythical and historical background is supplied through additional readings from Homer and Thucydides. The course asks how the tragedians managed to raise publicly, in the most solemn religious settings, the kind of questions for which Socrates was later put to death. The course culminates in a reading of Aristotle's Poetics. 3 hrs. lect., 1 hr. disc.

CLAS0152B-S15

Cross-Listed As:
CLAS0152A-S15

CRN: 22616

Greek Tragedy
Greek Tragedy
A survey of selected tragedies by Aeschylus, Sophocles, and Euripides, exploring the relation between tragedy and political freedom and empire in fifth century B.C. Athens. The course examines the tragic poets' use of traditional Greek myths to question not only the wisdom of contemporary Athenian imperialism but also traditional Greek views on relations between the sexes; between the family and the city; between man's presumed dignity and his belief in gods. Mythical and historical background is supplied through additional readings from Homer and Thucydides. The course asks how the tragedians managed to raise publicly, in the most solemn religious settings, the kind of questions for which Socrates was later put to death. The course culminates in a reading of Aristotle's Poetics. 3 hrs. lect., 1 hr. disc.

CLAS0152Y-S15

CRN: 22158

Greek Tragedy
Discussion
Greek Tragedy
A survey of selected tragedies by Aeschylus, Sophocles, and Euripides, exploring the relation between tragedy and political freedom and empire in fifth century B.C. Athens. The course examines the tragic poets' use of traditional Greek myths to question not only the wisdom of contemporary Athenian imperialism but also traditional Greek views on relations between the sexes; between the family and the city; between man's presumed dignity and his belief in gods. Mythical and historical background is supplied through additional readings from Homer and Thucydides. The course asks how the tragedians managed to raise publicly, in the most solemn religious settings, the kind of questions for which Socrates was later put to death. The course culminates in a reading of Aristotle's Poetics. 3 hrs. lect., 1 hr. disc.

CLAS0152Z-S15

CRN: 22159

Greek Tragedy
Discussion
Greek Tragedy
A survey of selected tragedies by Aeschylus, Sophocles, and Euripides, exploring the relation between tragedy and political freedom and empire in fifth century B.C. Athens. The course examines the tragic poets' use of traditional Greek myths to question not only the wisdom of contemporary Athenian imperialism but also traditional Greek views on relations between the sexes; between the family and the city; between man's presumed dignity and his belief in gods. Mythical and historical background is supplied through additional readings from Homer and Thucydides. The course asks how the tragedians managed to raise publicly, in the most solemn religious settings, the kind of questions for which Socrates was later put to death. The course culminates in a reading of Aristotle's Poetics. 3 hrs. lect., 1 hr. disc.

CLAS0276A-S15

Cross-Listed As:
PHIL0276A-S15

CRN: 21664

Roman Philosophy
Roman Philosophy
In this course we will seek to answer the question of what is Roman philosophy - philosophia togata. Is it simply Greek philosophy in Roman dress? Or, while based in its Greek origins, does it grow to have a distinctive and rigorous character of its own, designed and developed to focus on uniquely "Roman" questions and problems, in particular, ethical, social, and political questions? We will investigate how some of the main schools of Hellenistic Greek thought came to be developed in Latin: Epicureanism (Lucretius), Academic Skepticism (Cicero), and Stoicism (Seneca). As we read we will investigate how each school offers different answers to crucial questions such as what is the goal of life? What is the highest good? Should one take part in politics or not? What is the nature of the soul? What is the nature of Nature itself? Is there an afterlife? Can we ever have a certain answer to any of these questions? 3 hrs. lect.

CLAS0420A-S15

CRN: 20454

Seminar in Classical Lit
Greek Religion
Senior Seminar: Greek Religion
In this seminar we will examine the religious experience of the Greeks in all its complexity and variety. Drawing on literary, epigraphical, and archaeological sources, we will study the Greek views of the gods as these emerge from various myths and cult practices, especially animal sacrifice. We will explore Greek ideas of personal salvation, but also the importance of religious festivals for the community, most notably the Greek polis. Finally, while looking at such ancient debates as the sophistic and Platonic critiques of the traditional gods, we will consider some similarities and differences between the sacred in Greek civilization and religion in our own society. The seminar is designed for students with some background in Greek literature and/or history. 3 hrs. sem.

CLAS0500A-S15

CRN: 20274

Independent Study
Independent Study
(Approval required)

CLAS0500C-S15

CRN: 20689

Independent Study
Independent Study
(Approval required)

CLAS0500D-S15

CRN: 20801

Independent Study
Independent Study
(Approval required)

CLAS0500E-S15

CRN: 20283

Independent Study
Independent Study
(Approval required)

CLAS0500F-S15

CRN: 20592

Independent Study
Independent Study
(Approval required)

CLAS0500H-S15

CRN: 20802

Independent Study
Independent Study
(Approval required)

CLAS0505A-S15

CRN: 20610

Ind Senior Project
(Approval Required)

CLAS0505C-S15

CRN: 20804

Ind Senior Project
(Approval Required)

CLAS0505D-S15

CRN: 20805

Ind Senior Project
(Approval Required)

CLAS0505E-S15

CRN: 20806

Ind Senior Project
(Approval Required)

CLAS0505F-S15

CRN: 20807

Ind Senior Project
(Approval Required)

CLAS0505H-S15

CRN: 20809

Ind Senior Project
(Approval Required)

CLAS0700A-S15

CRN: 20594

Sr Essay Classics/Cy
Senior Essay for Classics/Classical Studies Majors
(Approval required)

CLAS0700C-S15

CRN: 20811

Sr Essay Classics/Cy
Senior Essay for Classics/Classical Studies Majors
(Approval required)

CLAS0700D-S15

CRN: 20812

Sr Essay Classics/Cy
Senior Essay for Classics/Classical Studies Majors
(Approval required)

CLAS0700E-S15

CRN: 20813

Sr Essay Classics/Cy
Senior Essay for Classics/Classical Studies Majors
(Approval required)

CLAS0700F-S15

CRN: 20814

Sr Essay Classics/Cy
Senior Essay for Classics/Classical Studies Majors
(Approval required)

CLAS0700H-S15

CRN: 20816

Sr Essay Classics/Cy
Senior Essay for Classics/Classical Studies Majors
(Approval required)

GREK0202A-S15

CRN: 22162

Intermediate Greek Poetry
Intermediate Greek: Attic Drama-Sophocles' Tragic Vision
Readings in majors authors. 3 hrs. lect.

GREK0402A-S15

CRN: 22585

Adv Readings Greek Literature
Advanced Readings in Greek Literature II
Readings in major authors. 3 hrs. lect.

LATN0102A-S15

CRN: 22423

Beginning Latin II
Beginning Latin II
This course is a continuation of the introductory winter term course (LATN 0101). After completing the fundamentals of Latin grammar, students translate selections from authors such as Cicero and Ovid. 3 hrs. lect.

LATN0302A-S15

CRN: 22163

Readings Latin Literature II
Readings in Latin Literature II: Roman Satire*
Readings in major authors. 3 hrs. lect.

LATN0502A-S15

CRN: 22164

Advanced Readings in Latin IV
Advanced Readings in Latin IV
Readings in major authors. 3 hrs lect.

Department of Classics

Twilight Hall
50 Franklin Street
Middlebury College
Middlebury, VT 05753

fax 802-443-2077