Sections

« Winter 2016 Spring 2016 Summer Study 2016 »

CLAS0140A-S16

Cross-Listed As:
CLAS0140B-S16

CRN: 21242

Augustus and World of Rome
Augustus and the World of Rome
In 44 B.C., Julius Caesar was assassinated. Within two months his adoptive son, Augustus, still in his teens, traveled to Rome, soon extorted the highest office of the Roman Republic, and after 13 years of civil war became the state's first emperor. The resulting "Augustan Age" (31 B.C. to A.D. 14) produced a period of political change and cultural achievement unparalleled in Rome's long history. In this course we will examine the literature, art, history, and politics of this era, evaluate the nature of Augustus's accomplishments, and explore the Roman world. Readings include: Augustus, Vergil, Suetonius, and I, Claudius. 2 hrs. lect.

CLAS0140B-S16

Cross-Listed As:
CLAS0140A-S16

CRN: 22498

Augustus and World of Rome
Augustus and the World of Rome
In 44 B.C., Julius Caesar was assassinated. Within two months his adoptive son, Augustus, still in his teens, traveled to Rome, soon extorted the highest office of the Roman Republic, and after 13 years of civil war became the state's first emperor. The resulting "Augustan Age" (31 B.C. to A.D. 14) produced a period of political change and cultural achievement unparalleled in Rome's long history. In this course we will examine the literature, art, history, and politics of this era, evaluate the nature of Augustus's accomplishments, and explore the Roman world. Readings include: Augustus, Vergil, Suetonius, and I, Claudius. 2 hrs. lect.

CLAS0140Z-S16

CRN: 22549

Augustus and World of Rome
Discussion-CW Students Only
Augustus and the World of Rome
In 44 B.C., Julius Caesar was assassinated. Within two months his adoptive son, Augustus, still in his teens, traveled to Rome, soon extorted the highest office of the Roman Republic, and after 13 years of civil war became the state's first emperor. The resulting "Augustan Age" (31 B.C. to A.D. 14) produced a period of political change and cultural achievement unparalleled in Rome's long history. In this course we will examine the literature, art, history, and politics of this era, evaluate the nature of Augustus's accomplishments, and explore the Roman world. Readings include: Augustus, Vergil, Suetonius, and I, Claudius. 2 hrs. lect.

CLAS0280A-S16

Cross-Listed As:
GSFS0280A-S16 CLAS0280B-S16 GSFS0280B-S16

CRN: 22387

Gender, Sexuality, Antiquity
Gender and Sexuality in the Ancient World
In this course we will examine gender and sexuality in ancient Greece and Rome. Through close analyses of primary texts and material remains, we will discuss representations of gender in literature and art, sexual norms and codes, medical theories concerning the male and female body, and views on marriage, rape, adultery, and prostitution. We will also examine the relationship between the construction of gender identities and sexuality in literature, and whether or not modern constructions of sexuality are applicable to the ancient world. Authors and texts include Homer, Hesiod, Sappho, Sophocles, Euripides, Aristophanes, the Hippocratic Corpus, Livy, Ovid, Catullus, and Sulpicia. Not open to students who have taken CLAS/GSFS 1016. 3 hrs. lect.

CLAS0280B-S16

Cross-Listed As:
CLAS0280A-S16 GSFS0280A-S16 GSFS0280B-S16

CRN: 22499

Gender, Sexuality, Antiquity
Gender and Sexuality in the Ancient World
In this course we will examine gender and sexuality in ancient Greece and Rome. Through close analyses of primary texts and material remains, we will discuss representations of gender in literature and art, sexual norms and codes, medical theories concerning the male and female body, and views on marriage, rape, adultery, and prostitution. We will also examine the relationship between the construction of gender identities and sexuality in literature, and whether or not modern constructions of sexuality are applicable to the ancient world. Authors and texts include Homer, Hesiod, Sappho, Sophocles, Euripides, Aristophanes, the Hippocratic Corpus, Livy, Ovid, Catullus, and Sulpicia. Not open to students who have taken CLAS/GSFS 1016. 3 hrs. lect.

CLAS0280X-S16

Cross-Listed As:
GSFS0280X-S16

CRN: 22501

Gender, Sexuality, Antiquity
Discussion
Gender and Sexuality in the Ancient World
In this course we will examine gender and sexuality in ancient Greece and Rome. Through close analyses of primary texts and material remains, we will discuss representations of gender in literature and art, sexual norms and codes, medical theories concerning the male and female body, and views on marriage, rape, adultery, and prostitution. We will also examine the relationship between the construction of gender identities and sexuality in literature, and whether or not modern constructions of sexuality are applicable to the ancient world. Authors and texts include Homer, Hesiod, Sappho, Sophocles, Euripides, Aristophanes, the Hippocratic Corpus, Livy, Ovid, Catullus, and Sulpicia. Not open to students who have taken CLAS/GSFS 1016. 3 hrs. lect.

CLAS0280Y-S16

Cross-Listed As:
GSFS0280Y-S16

CRN: 22503

Gender, Sexuality, Antiquity
Discussion
Gender and Sexuality in the Ancient World
In this course we will examine gender and sexuality in ancient Greece and Rome. Through close analyses of primary texts and material remains, we will discuss representations of gender in literature and art, sexual norms and codes, medical theories concerning the male and female body, and views on marriage, rape, adultery, and prostitution. We will also examine the relationship between the construction of gender identities and sexuality in literature, and whether or not modern constructions of sexuality are applicable to the ancient world. Authors and texts include Homer, Hesiod, Sappho, Sophocles, Euripides, Aristophanes, the Hippocratic Corpus, Livy, Ovid, Catullus, and Sulpicia. Not open to students who have taken CLAS/GSFS 1016. 3 hrs. lect.

CLAS0280Z-S16

Cross-Listed As:
GSFS0280Z-S16

CRN: 22505

Gender, Sexuality, Antiquity
Discussion
Gender and Sexuality in the Ancient World
In this course we will examine gender and sexuality in ancient Greece and Rome. Through close analyses of primary texts and material remains, we will discuss representations of gender in literature and art, sexual norms and codes, medical theories concerning the male and female body, and views on marriage, rape, adultery, and prostitution. We will also examine the relationship between the construction of gender identities and sexuality in literature, and whether or not modern constructions of sexuality are applicable to the ancient world. Authors and texts include Homer, Hesiod, Sappho, Sophocles, Euripides, Aristophanes, the Hippocratic Corpus, Livy, Ovid, Catullus, and Sulpicia. Not open to students who have taken CLAS/GSFS 1016. 3 hrs. lect.

CLAS0337A-S16

Cross-Listed As:
HIST0337A-S16

CRN: 22507

From Alexander to Rome
From Alexander to Rome
At the age of 19, Alexander the Great set out to conquer the world. His successful domination of the eastern Mediterranean led to a new world order known as the Hellenistic Age. Under Alexander's successors, literature, art, and philosophy flourished, but a little more than a century later the Hellenistic Greeks found themselves on a collision course with Rome's expanding republic. This course will investigate the political and cultural history of the Greeks and Romans in this period and consider the forces that created the Graeco-Roman world. Readings include Arrian, the Alexandrian poets, Polybius, Livy, and Plutarch. (This course replaces CLAS/HIST 0338: The Hellenistic World and the Foundations of Graeco-Roman Culture.)

CLAS0337X-S16

Cross-Listed As:
HIST0337X-S16

CRN: 22509

From Alexander to Rome
Discussion
From Alexander to Rome
At the age of 19, Alexander the Great set out to conquer the world. His successful domination of the eastern Mediterranean led to a new world order known as the Hellenistic Age. Under Alexander's successors, literature, art, and philosophy flourished, but a little more than a century later the Hellenistic Greeks found themselves on a collision course with Rome's expanding republic. This course will investigate the political and cultural history of the Greeks and Romans in this period and consider the forces that created the Graeco-Roman world. Readings include Arrian, the Alexandrian poets, Polybius, Livy, and Plutarch. (This course replaces CLAS/HIST 0338: The Hellenistic World and the Foundations of Graeco-Roman Culture.)

CLAS0337Y-S16

Cross-Listed As:
HIST0337Y-S16

CRN: 22511

From Alexander to Rome
Discussion
From Alexander to Rome
At the age of 19, Alexander the Great set out to conquer the world. His successful domination of the eastern Mediterranean led to a new world order known as the Hellenistic Age. Under Alexander's successors, literature, art, and philosophy flourished, but a little more than a century later the Hellenistic Greeks found themselves on a collision course with Rome's expanding republic. This course will investigate the political and cultural history of the Greeks and Romans in this period and consider the forces that created the Graeco-Roman world. Readings include Arrian, the Alexandrian poets, Polybius, Livy, and Plutarch. (This course replaces CLAS/HIST 0338: The Hellenistic World and the Foundations of Graeco-Roman Culture.)

CLAS0420A-S16

Cross-Listed As:
CLAS0420B-S16

CRN: 20413

Seminar in Classical Lit
Humanism of Herodotus
Seminar in Classical Literature: The Humanism of Herodotus
Herodotus (485-424 BC), “the Father of History,” is also regarded as the first sociologist and ethnographer. The plan and argument of his work, however, including its many fantastic stories, disclose a philosophic intention that resists easy categorization. Herodotus’ subject is the “Greek miracle”: how the tiny and fractious cities of Greece took concerted action against the overwhelming might of the Persian kings who invaded Greece in 490 and 479 BC. The story of this unlikely triumph of political freedom and limited government over despotic empire is told against the background of the Afro-Asiatic origins of Greek civilization, which Herodotus uncovers in wide-ranging investigations of the customs and religions of Greece, Lydia, Media, Persia, Egypt, Libya, and Scythia. In this seminar we will pursue a close reading of Herodotus in translation; the seminar is open to all students with some previous background in Greek and/or Roman literature. 3 hrs. sem.

CLAS0420B-S16

Cross-Listed As:
CLAS0420A-S16

CRN: 22552

Seminar in Classical Lit
Humanism of Herodotus
Seminar in Classical Literature: The Humanism of Herodotus
Herodotus (485-424 BC), “the Father of History,” is also regarded as the first sociologist and ethnographer. The plan and argument of his work, however, including its many fantastic stories, disclose a philosophic intention that resists easy categorization. Herodotus’ subject is the “Greek miracle”: how the tiny and fractious cities of Greece took concerted action against the overwhelming might of the Persian kings who invaded Greece in 490 and 479 BC. The story of this unlikely triumph of political freedom and limited government over despotic empire is told against the background of the Afro-Asiatic origins of Greek civilization, which Herodotus uncovers in wide-ranging investigations of the customs and religions of Greece, Lydia, Media, Persia, Egypt, Libya, and Scythia. In this seminar we will pursue a close reading of Herodotus in translation; the seminar is open to all students with some previous background in Greek and/or Roman literature. 3 hrs. sem.

CLAS0500A-S16

CRN: 20254

Independent Study
Independent Study
(Approval required)

CLAS0500B-S16

CRN: 20545

Independent Study
Independent Study
(Approval required)

CLAS0500C-S16

CRN: 20644

Independent Study
Independent Study
(Approval required)

CLAS0500D-S16

CRN: 20752

Independent Study
Independent Study
(Approval required)

CLAS0505A-S16

CRN: 20565

Ind Senior Project
(Approval Required)

CLAS0505B-S16

CRN: 20754

Ind Senior Project
(Approval Required)

CLAS0505C-S16

CRN: 20755

Ind Senior Project
(Approval Required)

CLAS0505D-S16

CRN: 20756

Ind Senior Project
(Approval Required)

CLAS0700A-S16

CRN: 20549

Sr Essay Classics/Cy
Senior Essay for Classics/Classical Studies Majors
(Approval required)

CLAS0700B-S16

CRN: 20761

Sr Essay Classics/Cy
Senior Essay for Classics/Classical Studies Majors
(Approval required)

CLAS0700C-S16

CRN: 20762

Sr Essay Classics/Cy
Senior Essay for Classics/Classical Studies Majors
(Approval required)

CLAS0700D-S16

CRN: 20763

Sr Essay Classics/Cy
Senior Essay for Classics/Classical Studies Majors
(Approval required)

GREK0102A-S16

CRN: 22219

Beginning Greek II
Beginning Greek II
This course completes the introductory course offered in Winter Term and will conclude by reading one of Plato's philosophical dialogues. 6 hrs. lect.

GREK0302A-S16

CRN: 22220

Readings in Greek Lit II
Readings in Greek Literature II
Readings in major authors. 3 hrs. lect.

LATN0202A-S16

CRN: 22338

Intermediate Latin: Poetry
Intermediate Latin: Poetry
Readings in major authors. 3 hrs. lect.

LATN0402A-S16

Cross-Listed As:
LATN0502A-S16

CRN: 22221

Advanced Readings in Latin II
Advanced Readings in Latin II
Readings in major authors. 3 hrs. lect.

LATN0502A-S16

Cross-Listed As:
LATN0402A-S16

CRN: 21688

Advanced Readings in Latin IV
Advanced Readings in Latin IV
Readings in major authors. 3 hrs lect.

Department of Classics

Twilight Hall
50 Franklin Street
Middlebury College
Middlebury, VT 05753

fax 802-443-2077