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CLAS0140A-S13

CRN: 21983

Augustus and World of Rome

Augustus and the World of Rome
In 44 B.C., Julius Caesar was assassinated. Within two months his adoptive son, Augustus, still in his teens, traveled to Rome, soon extorted the highest office of the Roman Republic, and after 13 years of civil war became the state's first emperor. The resulting "Augustan Age" (31 B.C. to A.D. 14) produced a period of political change and cultural achievement unparalleled in Rome's long history. In this course we will examine the literature, art, history, and politics of this era, evaluate the nature of Augustus's accomplishments, and explore the Roman world. Readings include: Augustus, Vergil, Suetonius, and I, Claudius. 2 hrs. lect., 1 hr. disc.

CLAS0152A-S13

Cross-Listed As:
CLAS0152B-S13

CRN: 21984

Greek Tragedy

Greek Tragedy
A survey of selected tragedies by Aeschylus, Sophocles, and Euripides, exploring the relation between tragedy and political freedom and empire in fifth century B.C. Athens. The course examines the tragic poets' use of traditional Greek myths to question not only the wisdom of contemporary Athenian imperialism but also traditional Greek views on relations between the sexes; between the family and the city; between man's presumed dignity and his belief in gods. Mythical and historical background is supplied through additional readings from Homer and Thucydides. The course asks how the tragedians managed to raise publicly, in the most solemn religious settings, the kind of questions for which Socrates was later put to death. The course culminates in a reading of Aristotle's Poetics. 3 hrs. lect., 1 hr. disc.

CLAS0152B-S13

Cross-Listed As:
CLAS0152A-S13

CRN: 22583

Greek Tragedy

Greek Tragedy
A survey of selected tragedies by Aeschylus, Sophocles, and Euripides, exploring the relation between tragedy and political freedom and empire in fifth century B.C. Athens. The course examines the tragic poets' use of traditional Greek myths to question not only the wisdom of contemporary Athenian imperialism but also traditional Greek views on relations between the sexes; between the family and the city; between man's presumed dignity and his belief in gods. Mythical and historical background is supplied through additional readings from Homer and Thucydides. The course asks how the tragedians managed to raise publicly, in the most solemn religious settings, the kind of questions for which Socrates was later put to death. The course culminates in a reading of Aristotle's Poetics. 3 hrs. lect., 1 hr. disc.

CLAS0152Y-S13

CRN: 21986

Greek Tragedy
Discussion

Greek Tragedy
A survey of selected tragedies by Aeschylus, Sophocles, and Euripides, exploring the relation between tragedy and political freedom and empire in fifth century B.C. Athens. The course examines the tragic poets' use of traditional Greek myths to question not only the wisdom of contemporary Athenian imperialism but also traditional Greek views on relations between the sexes; between the family and the city; between man's presumed dignity and his belief in gods. Mythical and historical background is supplied through additional readings from Homer and Thucydides. The course asks how the tragedians managed to raise publicly, in the most solemn religious settings, the kind of questions for which Socrates was later put to death. The course culminates in a reading of Aristotle's Poetics. 3 hrs. lect., 1 hr. disc.

CLAS0152Z-S13

CRN: 21987

Greek Tragedy
Discussion

Greek Tragedy
A survey of selected tragedies by Aeschylus, Sophocles, and Euripides, exploring the relation between tragedy and political freedom and empire in fifth century B.C. Athens. The course examines the tragic poets' use of traditional Greek myths to question not only the wisdom of contemporary Athenian imperialism but also traditional Greek views on relations between the sexes; between the family and the city; between man's presumed dignity and his belief in gods. Mythical and historical background is supplied through additional readings from Homer and Thucydides. The course asks how the tragedians managed to raise publicly, in the most solemn religious settings, the kind of questions for which Socrates was later put to death. The course culminates in a reading of Aristotle's Poetics. 3 hrs. lect., 1 hr. disc.

CLAS0190A-S13

Cross-Listed As:
CMLT0190A-S13

CRN: 21562

Greek and Roman Comedy

Greek and Roman Comedy
A survey of the comic playwrights of Greece (Aristophanes and Menander) and Rome (Plautus and Terence) in light of their ancient social, political, and religious contexts as well as modern theoretical approaches to laughter (including psychoanalysis and structural anthropology). We will trace enduring aspects of the comic tradition that can be found in both Greece and Rome and also look forward to Renaissance and modern comedy. These include: the nature of the comic hero; the patterns of comic plots; the dependence of comedy on language; the comic poet's concern with questions of freedom and slavery, desire and repression. 3 hrs. lect., 1 hr. disc.

CLAS0190Y-S13

Cross-Listed As:
CMLT0190Y-S13

CRN: 21862

Greek and Roman Comedy
Discussion

Greek and Roman Comedy
A survey of the comic playwrights of Greece (Aristophanes and Menander) and Rome (Plautus and Terence) in light of their ancient social, political, and religious contexts as well as modern theoretical approaches to laughter (including psychoanalysis and structural anthropology). We will trace enduring aspects of the comic tradition that can be found in both Greece and Rome and also look forward to Renaissance and modern comedy. These include: the nature of the comic hero; the patterns of comic plots; the dependence of comedy on language; the comic poet's concern with questions of freedom and slavery, desire and repression. 3 hrs. lect., 1 hr. disc.

CLAS0190Z-S13

Cross-Listed As:
CMLT0190Z-S13

CRN: 21863

Greek and Roman Comedy
Discussion

Greek and Roman Comedy
A survey of the comic playwrights of Greece (Aristophanes and Menander) and Rome (Plautus and Terence) in light of their ancient social, political, and religious contexts as well as modern theoretical approaches to laughter (including psychoanalysis and structural anthropology). We will trace enduring aspects of the comic tradition that can be found in both Greece and Rome and also look forward to Renaissance and modern comedy. These include: the nature of the comic hero; the patterns of comic plots; the dependence of comedy on language; the comic poet's concern with questions of freedom and slavery, desire and repression. 3 hrs. lect., 1 hr. disc.

CLAS0230A-S13

Cross-Listed As:
CMLT0230A-S13

CRN: 22463

Myth & Contemporary Experience
Please register via CMLT 0230A

Myth and Contemporary Experience: Modern Poems on Classical Myths
Greek mythology, an enduring presence in Western thought, has provided, according to Carl Jung, the foundation of one half of our spiritual tradition. In this course we shall study how this rich mythical material has shaped modern poetry. Through close readings of modern poems and their ancient models, we will trace the way 20th-century poets appropriate and transform the classical past in order to reflect on their historical present. While viewing this function of myth as an element of modernity, we shall also explore how these poets build connections between the archetypal meaning of the ancient stories, the questions of existence, and our own contemporary lives. Readings will include Rilke, Eliot, Pound, Cavafy, Montale, Akhmatova, Borges, as well as Sylvia Plath, Joseph Brodsky, Derek Walcott, Louise Glück, and Seamus Heaney. 3 hrs. lect., 1 hr. disc.

CLAS0230Y-S13

Cross-Listed As:
CMLT0230Y-S13

CRN: 22464

Myth & Contemporary Experience
Please register via CMLT 0230Y

Myth and Contemporary Experience: Modern Poems on Classical Myths
Greek mythology, an enduring presence in Western thought, has provided, according to Carl Jung, the foundation of one half of our spiritual tradition. In this course we shall study how this rich mythical material has shaped modern poetry. Through close readings of modern poems and their ancient models, we will trace the way 20th-century poets appropriate and transform the classical past in order to reflect on their historical present. While viewing this function of myth as an element of modernity, we shall also explore how these poets build connections between the archetypal meaning of the ancient stories, the questions of existence, and our own contemporary lives. Readings will include Rilke, Eliot, Pound, Cavafy, Montale, Akhmatova, Borges, as well as Sylvia Plath, Joseph Brodsky, Derek Walcott, Louise Glück, and Seamus Heaney. 3 hrs. lect., 1 hr. disc.

CLAS0230Z-S13

Cross-Listed As:
CMLT0230Z-S13

CRN: 22465

Myth & Contemporary Experience
Please register via CMLT 0230Z

Myth and Contemporary Experience: Modern Poems on Classical Myths
Greek mythology, an enduring presence in Western thought, has provided, according to Carl Jung, the foundation of one half of our spiritual tradition. In this course we shall study how this rich mythical material has shaped modern poetry. Through close readings of modern poems and their ancient models, we will trace the way 20th-century poets appropriate and transform the classical past in order to reflect on their historical present. While viewing this function of myth as an element of modernity, we shall also explore how these poets build connections between the archetypal meaning of the ancient stories, the questions of existence, and our own contemporary lives. Readings will include Rilke, Eliot, Pound, Cavafy, Montale, Akhmatova, Borges, as well as Sylvia Plath, Joseph Brodsky, Derek Walcott, Louise Glück, and Seamus Heaney. 3 hrs. lect., 1 hr. disc.

CLAS0275A-S13

Cross-Listed As:
PHIL0275A-S13 CLAS0275B-S13 PHIL0275B-S13

CRN: 22360

Greek Philosophy

Greek Philosophy: The Problem of Socrates
Why did Socrates “call philosophy down from the heavens, set her in the cities of men and also their homes, and compel her to ask questions about life and morals and things good and evil”? Why was philosophy indifferent to man, then considered dangerous to men when it did pay attention? How was philosophy ultimately transformed by Plato and Aristotle as a consequence of the examination of human knowledge that Socrates made intrinsic to philosophy? In this course we will consider the central questions of ancient Greek philosophy from the pre-Socratics through Plato and Aristotle by focusing on what Nietzsche called "the Problem of Socrates": why Socrates abandoned "pre-Socratic" natural science in order to examine the opinions of his fellow Athenians, and why they put him to death for corruption and impiety. Texts will include selected fragments of the pre-Socratics and sophists, works of Aristophanes, Xenophon, Plato, Aristotle , and Nietzsche. 3 hrs. lect disc.

CLAS0275B-S13

Cross-Listed As:
CLAS0275A-S13 PHIL0275A-S13 PHIL0275B-S13

CRN: 22584

Greek Philosophy

Greek Philosophy: The Problem of Socrates
Why did Socrates “call philosophy down from the heavens, set her in the cities of men and also their homes, and compel her to ask questions about life and morals and things good and evil”? Why was philosophy indifferent to man, then considered dangerous to men when it did pay attention? How was philosophy ultimately transformed by Plato and Aristotle as a consequence of the examination of human knowledge that Socrates made intrinsic to philosophy? In this course we will consider the central questions of ancient Greek philosophy from the pre-Socratics through Plato and Aristotle by focusing on what Nietzsche called "the Problem of Socrates": why Socrates abandoned "pre-Socratic" natural science in order to examine the opinions of his fellow Athenians, and why they put him to death for corruption and impiety. Texts will include selected fragments of the pre-Socratics and sophists, works of Aristophanes, Xenophon, Plato, Aristotle , and Nietzsche. 3 hrs. lect disc.

CLAS0331A-S13

Cross-Listed As:
HIST0331A-S13

CRN: 21988

Sparta And Athens

Sparta and Athens
For over 200 years, Athens and Sparta were recognized as the most powerful Greek city-states, and yet one was a democracy (Athens), the other an oligarchy (Sparta). One promoted the free and open exchange of ideas (Athens); one tried to remain closed to outside influence (Sparta). This course studies the two city-states from the myths of their origins through their respective periods of hegemony to their decline as imperial powers. The goal is to understand the interaction between political success and intellectual and cultural development in ancient Greece. 2 hrs. lect., 1 hr. disc.

CLAS0331B-S13

Cross-Listed As:
HIST0331B-S13

CRN: 21989

Sparta And Athens

Sparta and Athens
For over 200 years, Athens and Sparta were recognized as the most powerful Greek city-states, and yet one was a democracy (Athens), the other an oligarchy (Sparta). One promoted the free and open exchange of ideas (Athens); one tried to remain closed to outside influence (Sparta). This course studies the two city-states from the myths of their origins through their respective periods of hegemony to their decline as imperial powers. The goal is to understand the interaction between political success and intellectual and cultural development in ancient Greece. 2 hrs. lect., 1 hr. disc.

CLAS0331X-S13

Cross-Listed As:
HIST0331X-S13

CRN: 21990

Sparta And Athens
Discussion

Sparta and Athens
For over 200 years, Athens and Sparta were recognized as the most powerful Greek city-states, and yet one was a democracy (Athens), the other an oligarchy (Sparta). One promoted the free and open exchange of ideas (Athens); one tried to remain closed to outside influence (Sparta). This course studies the two city-states from the myths of their origins through their respective periods of hegemony to their decline as imperial powers. The goal is to understand the interaction between political success and intellectual and cultural development in ancient Greece. 2 hrs. lect., 1 hr. disc.

CLAS0331Y-S13

Cross-Listed As:
HIST0331Y-S13

CRN: 21991

Sparta And Athens
Discussion

Sparta and Athens
For over 200 years, Athens and Sparta were recognized as the most powerful Greek city-states, and yet one was a democracy (Athens), the other an oligarchy (Sparta). One promoted the free and open exchange of ideas (Athens); one tried to remain closed to outside influence (Sparta). This course studies the two city-states from the myths of their origins through their respective periods of hegemony to their decline as imperial powers. The goal is to understand the interaction between political success and intellectual and cultural development in ancient Greece. 2 hrs. lect., 1 hr. disc.

CLAS0331Z-S13

Cross-Listed As:
HIST0331Z-S13

CRN: 21992

Sparta And Athens
Discussion

Sparta and Athens
For over 200 years, Athens and Sparta were recognized as the most powerful Greek city-states, and yet one was a democracy (Athens), the other an oligarchy (Sparta). One promoted the free and open exchange of ideas (Athens); one tried to remain closed to outside influence (Sparta). This course studies the two city-states from the myths of their origins through their respective periods of hegemony to their decline as imperial powers. The goal is to understand the interaction between political success and intellectual and cultural development in ancient Greece. 2 hrs. lect., 1 hr. disc.

CLAS0420A-S13

CRN: 20525

Seminar in Classical Lit
Senior Sem:Cynics/Epicureans

Senior Seminar: Cynics and Epicureans
Cynicism and Epicureanism have become little more than bywords for negative sarcasm or hedonism. However, these were two legitimate philosophical schools in antiquity, whose founders offered comprehensive ethical and political doctrines. It could be said that Cynics were the first hippies, urging people to drop out and reject, often emphatically, all forms of social hypocrisy, whereas Epicureans sought a more refined and peaceful pleasure in which to spend their days. In any case, both were deeply apolitical ways of thinking. In this course we will explore ancient source materials and anecdotes to obtain a picture of what these schools intended and how their adherents were viewed by those around them, as well as to discover how the clichés attached to them were formed. Readings will include Xenophon, Diogenes Laertius, Epicurus, Lucretius, Cicero, Epictetus and Lucian, as well as some modern works that draw on these traditions.

CLAS0500A-S13

CRN: 20324

Independent Study

Independent Study
(Approval required)

CLAS0500B-S13

CRN: 20678

Independent Study

Independent Study
(Approval required)

CLAS0500C-S13

CRN: 20795

Independent Study

Independent Study
(Approval required)

CLAS0500D-S13

CRN: 20917

Independent Study

Independent Study
(Approval required)

CLAS0500E-S13

CRN: 20333

Independent Study

Independent Study
(Approval required)

CLAS0500F-S13

CRN: 20680

Independent Study

Independent Study
(Approval required)

CLAS0505A-S13

CRN: 20701

Ind Senior Project

(Approval Required)

CLAS0505B-S13

CRN: 20919

Ind Senior Project

(Approval Required)

CLAS0505C-S13

CRN: 20920

Ind Senior Project

(Approval Required)

CLAS0505D-S13

CRN: 20921

Ind Senior Project

(Approval Required)

CLAS0505E-S13

CRN: 20922

Ind Senior Project

(Approval Required)

CLAS0505F-S13

CRN: 20923

Ind Senior Project

(Approval Required)

CLAS0700A-S13

CRN: 20682

Sr Essay Classics/Cy

Senior Essay for Classics/Classical Studies Majors
(Approval required)

CLAS0700B-S13

CRN: 20926

Sr Essay Classics/Cy

Senior Essay for Classics/Classical Studies Majors
(Approval required)

CLAS0700C-S13

CRN: 20927

Sr Essay Classics/Cy

Senior Essay for Classics/Classical Studies Majors
(Approval required)

CLAS0700D-S13

CRN: 20928

Sr Essay Classics/Cy

Senior Essay for Classics/Classical Studies Majors
(Approval required)

CLAS0700E-S13

CRN: 20929

Sr Essay Classics/Cy

Senior Essay for Classics/Classical Studies Majors
(Approval required)

CLAS0700F-S13

CRN: 20930

Sr Essay Classics/Cy

Senior Essay for Classics/Classical Studies Majors
(Approval required)

GREK0202A-S13

CRN: 21994

Intermediate Greek Poetry

Intermediate Greek: Attic Drama-Sophocles' Tragic Vision
Readings in majors authors. (formerly CLAS 0204) 3 hrs. lect.

HEBR0102A-S13

CRN: 22291

Beginning Classical Hebrew II

Beginning Classical Hebrew II
This course continues the introductory sequence (HEBR 0101) offered in Winter Term and will conclude by reading a single biblical text such as Jonah or Ruth in its entirety. Selections of biblical poetry and narrative will be read throughout the semester. 3 hrs. lect.

LATN0102A-S13

CRN: 21995

Beginning Latin II

Beginning Latin II
This course is a continuation of the introductory winter term course (LATN 0101). After completing the fundamentals of Latin grammar, students translate selections from authors such as Cicero and Ovid. 6 hrs. lect.

LATN0302A-S13

CRN: 21996

Readings Latin Literature II

Readings in Latin Literature II: Roman Satire*
Readings in major authors. 3 hrs. lect.