Middlebury

 

Randall Ganiban

Professor of Classics

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Phone: work802.443.5888
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Professor Ganiban earned his B.A. in Latin from Yale University, and his M.A. and Ph.D. in Classics from Princeton University. Between college and graduate school, he attended the post-Baccalaureate program in Classics at the University of Pennsylvania.

Professor Ganiban's teaching concentrates on the language and literature of the Classical world, with a special focus on ancient Rome. He offers courses in ancient Greek and Latin at all levels and has taught authors such as Homer, Apollonius, Callimachus, Cicero, Catullus, Caesar, Seneca, Sallust, Vergil, Ovid, Lucan, Statius, and Apuleius. In addition, he offers an array of Classical Studies courses (with all readings in English): introductory lecture classes on Roman literature, the age of Augustus and Classical epic, seminars on the history of Classical literature, ancient heroism, and Roman epic. (See recent courses below.)

Professor Ganiban’s research focuses on the literature and society of the early Roman Empire, from the emperor Augustus (27 BCE-14 CE) to Domitian (81-96 CE). In addition to his work on college-level Latin commentaries, he is interested in how poets allude to their predecessors in order to create meaning in their own poems, and how writers (more generally) represent and comment on violence and political power under the emperors.

Books

Vergil: Aeneid 7-12 (co-general editor with J. O'Hara; contributors include J. Farrell, A. Rossi, C. McNelis, C. Perkell; Focus Publishing, in preparation)

Vergil: Aeneid 1-6 (general editor; contributors include C. Perkell, J. O’Hara, J. Farrell, P. Johnston; Focus Publishing 2012)

Series Editor and Contributor, Commentaries on Vergil’s Aeneid for intermediate students (Focus Publishing):

  • R. Ganiban, Vergil: Aeneid 1 (2009)
  • R. Ganiban, Vergil: Aeneid 2 (2008)
  • C. Perkell, Vergil: Aeneid 3 (2010)
  • J. O’Hara, Vergil: Aeneid 4 (2011)
  • J. Farrell, Vergil: Aeneid 5 (in preparation)
  • P. Johnston, Vergil: Aeneid 6 (2012)

Statius and Virgil: The Thebaid and the Reinterpretation of the Aeneid (Cambridge University Press 2007)

 

Recent articles and reviews

"Vergilian prophecy and the reign of Jupiter in Valerius’ Argonautica," in the Brill Companion to Valerius Flaccus (eds. M. Heerink and G. Manuwald) (Brill, forthcoming)

“The beginnings of Statius' Achilleid,” in the Brill Companion to Statius (eds. W. Dominik and C. Newlands) (Brill, forthcoming)

"Chiasmus," “Flight from Troy,” “Misenus/Misenum,” “Neptune,” and “Rhetorical Figures”; appendix on “Stylistic Terms” (6,000 words), in The Virgil Encyclopedia (eds. R. Thomas and J. Ziolkowski) (Wiley-Blackwell 2013)

"The death and funeral rites of Opheltes in Statius' Thebaid," in Religion and Ritual in Flavian Epic (ed. A. Augoustakis) (Oxford University Press 2013)

Review of P. Thibodeau, Playing the Farmer: Representations of Rural Life in Vergil's Georgics (Univ. California 2011), New England Classical Journal (2012) 39.3: 225-7.

Review of A. Augoustakis, Motherhood and the Other: Fashioning Female Power in Flavian Epic (Oxford 2010), Classical Journal (2011)

“The theme of crime in Lucan and Statius,” in the Brill Companion to Lucan (ed. P. Asso) (Brill 2011): 327-44.

“Dido and the heroism of Hannibal in Silius’ Punica,” in the Brill Companion to Silius Italicus (ed. A. Augoustakis) (Brill 2010): 73-98.

Review of V. Panoussi, Greek Tragedy in Vergil’s Aeneid: Ritual, Empire, and Intertext (Cambridge 2009), New England Classical Journal (2010)

Review of J.J.L. Smolenaars, H.-J. van Dam, and R.R. Nauta (eds.), The Poetry of Statius (Brill 2008),Journal of Roman Studies (2010)

“The dolus and glory of Ulysses in Aeneid 2,” in Material e discussioni per l’analisi dei testi classici 61 (2009):149-62.

“Jupiter” and “Venus,” in the Oxford Encyclopedia of Ancient Greece and Rome (2,500 words), (ed. M. Gagarin) (Oxford, 2009)


 
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Courses

Courses offered in the past four years.
indicates offered in the current term
indicates offered in the upcoming term[s]

CLAS 0140 - Augustus and World of Rome      

Augustus and the World of Rome
In 44 B.C., Julius Caesar was assassinated. Within two months his adoptive son, Augustus, still in his teens, traveled to Rome, soon extorted the highest office of the Roman Republic, and after 13 years of civil war became the state's first emperor. The resulting "Augustan Age" (31 B.C. to A.D. 14) produced a period of political change and cultural achievement unparalleled in Rome's long history. In this course we will examine the literature, art, history, and politics of this era, evaluate the nature of Augustus's accomplishments, and explore the Roman world. Readings include: Augustus, Vergil, Suetonius, and I, Claudius. 2 hrs. lect., 1 hr. disc.

EUR HIS LIT

Spring 2011, Spring 2013, Spring 2014

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CLAS 0150 - Greek and Roman Epic Poetry      

Greek and Roman Epic Poetry
Would Achilles and Hector have risked their lives and sacred honor had they understood human life and the Olympian gods as Homer portrays them in the Iliad? Why do those gods decide to withdraw from men altogether following the Trojan War, and why is Odysseus the man Athena chooses to help her carry out that project? And why, according to the Roman poet Vergil, do these gods command Aeneas, a defeated Trojan, to found an Italian town that will ultimately conquer the Greek cities that conquered Troy, replacing the Greek polis with a universal empire that will end all wars of human freedom? Through close study of Homer's Iliad and Odyssey, and Vergil's Aeneid, we explore how the epic tradition helped shape Greece and Rome, and define their contributions to European civilization. 3 hrs. lect., 1 hr. disc.

CMP EUR LIT PHL

Fall 2010

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CLAS 0450 / CMLT 0450 - History of Class Lit      

History of Classical Literature
A comprehensive overview of the major literary, historical, and philosophical works of Greece and Rome. Greek authors studied include Homer, Aeschylus, Sophocles, Herodotus, Aristophanes, Thucydides, Plato, and Aristotle. Roman authors include Lucretius, Cicero, Livy, Vergil, Petronius, and Tacitus. Required of senior majors in Classics/Classical Studies (see CLAS 0701 below) and open to all interested students with some background in Greek and Roman literature, history, or philosophy. 3 hrs. lect.

Fall 2012, Fall 2013, Fall 2014

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CLAS 0500 - Independent Study      

Independent Study
(Approval required)

Fall 2010, Winter 2011, Spring 2011, Fall 2012, Spring 2013, Fall 2013, Spring 2014, Fall 2014, Spring 2015

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CLAS 0505 - Ind Senior Project      

(Approval Required)

Fall 2010, Winter 2011, Spring 2011, Fall 2012, Spring 2013, Fall 2013, Spring 2014, Fall 2014, Spring 2015

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CLAS 0700 - Sr Essay Classics/Cy      

Senior Essay for Classics/Classical Studies Majors
(Approval required)

Fall 2010, Winter 2011, Spring 2011, Fall 2012, Spring 2013, Fall 2013, Spring 2014, Fall 2014, Spring 2015

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CLAS 0701 - Hist of Class Lit: Gen Exam      

History of Classical Literature
A comprehensive overview of the major literary, historical, and philosophical works of Greece and Rome. Greek authors studied include Homer, Aeschylus, Sophocles, Herodotus, Aristophanes, Thucydides, Plato, and Aristotle. Roman authors include Lucretius, Cicero, Livy, Vergil, Petronius, and Tacitus. Required of senior majors in Classics/Classical Studies and open to all interested students with some background in Greek and Roman literature, history, or philosophy. 3 hrs. lect.

Fall 2012, Fall 2013, Fall 2014

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FYSE 1238 - The Trojan War      

The Trojan War
The myth of the Trojan War exerted a defining influence on Greek and Roman culture, and has played a central role in the Western tradition ever since. In this seminar we will examine the historicity of the Trojan War and how ancient writers used it to explore themes such as the nature of heroism, the workings of the gods, and the relationship between the individual and society. We will also consider how our modern ideals about heroic action compare with those of ancient times. Readings will include selections from Homer, Aeschylus, Sophocles, Vergil, and Ovid. 3 hrs. sem.

CW EUR LIT

Fall 2014

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GREK 0301 - Readings in Greek Literature I      

Readings in Greek Literature I
Readings in major authors. 3 hrs. lect.

LIT LNG

Fall 2013

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GREK 0401 - Adv Readings Greek Lit I      

Advanced Readings in Greek Literature: Aristotle’s Ethics & Politics
Readings in major authors. 3 hrs. lect.

Fall 2010

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LATN 0101 - Beginning Latin      

Beginning Latin I
The course offers an intensive introduction to the Latin language that prepares students to read the major authors of ancient Roman literature. In addition to their systematic study of grammar and syntax, students translate excerpts from Vergil, Seneca and the Vulgate Bible. This course is designed for students who have had no previous experience with Latin, as well as those who have had some Latin but want to review the fundamentals of grammar.

LNG

Winter 2011, Winter 2013

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LATN 0301 - Readings in Latin Literature I      

Readings in Latin Literature I: Roman Epic and Empire
Readings in major authors. 3 hrs. lect.

LIT LNG

Fall 2012

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LATN 0402 - Advanced Readings in Latin II      

Advanced Readings in Latin II
Readings in major authors. 3 hrs. lect.

Spring 2011, Spring 2014

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LATN 0501 - Adv Readings in Latin III      

Advanced Readings in Latin III: Historians & Historiography
Readings in major authors. 3 hrs lect.

Fall 2012

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LATN 0502 - Advanced Readings in Latin IV      

Advanced Readings in Latin IV
Readings in major authors. 3 hrs lect.

Spring 2011

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