Middlebury

 

Courses

Courses offered in the past four years.
indicates offered in the current term
indicates offered in the upcoming term[s]

CMLT 0101 - Intro to World Literature      

Introduction to World Literature
This course is an introduction to the critical analysis of imaginative literature of the world, the dissemination of themes and myths, and the role of translation as the medium for reaching different cultures. Through the careful reading of selected classic texts from a range of Western and non-Western cultures, students will deepen their understanding and appreciation of the particular texts under consideration, while developing a critical vocabulary with which to discuss and write about these texts, both as unique artistic achievements of individual and empathetic imagination and as works affected by, but also transcending their historical periods. 3 hrs. lect./disc.

CMP CW LIT

Spring 2012, Spring 2013, Spring 2014, Spring 2015

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CMLT 0107 - The Experience of Tragedy      

The Experience of Tragedy
For over two millennia tragedy has raised ethical questions and represented conflicts between the divine and the mortal, nature and culture, household and polity, individual and society. What is tragedy? What led to its production and what impact did it have, in ancient times? Why was it reborn in Shakespeare's time? How has tragedy shaped, and been shaped by, gender, class, religion, and nationality? We will address these questions and explore how tragedy continues to influence our literary expectations and experience. Authors may include Aeschylus, Sophocles, Euripides, Thucydides, Aristotle, Seneca, Marlowe, Shakespeare, Goethe, Nietzsche, O'Neill, Beckett, Kennedy, and Kushner. 3 hrs. lect.

EUR LIT

Fall 2014

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CMLT 0110 - Continental Fiction      

Continental Fiction
An introduction to some major novels and shorter works by 19th and 20th century European authors, including Flaubert's Madame Bovary, Zola's L'Assommoir, Tolstoy's Anna Karenina, Dostoevsky's Crime and Punishment, Mann's The Magic Mountain, Kafka's The Trial, Sartre's Nausea, Camus's The Stranger, and others. These works of fiction are triumphs of achievement and innovation aesthetically and conceptually; and they give us a powerful sense of significant and significantly different levels of society, culture, and periods of history. 3 hrs. lect./disc.

EUR LIT

Spring 2013

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CMLT 0150 - Greek and Roman Epic Poetry      

Greek and Roman Epic Poetry
Would Achilles and Hector have risked their lives and sacred honor had they understood human life and the Olympian gods as Homer portrays them in the Iliad? Why do those gods decide to withdraw from men altogether following the Trojan War, and why is Odysseus the man Athena chooses to help her carry out that project? And why, according to the Roman poet Vergil, do these gods command Aeneas, a defeated Trojan, to found an Italian town that will ultimately conquer the Greek cities that conquered Troy, replacing the Greek polis with a universal empire that will end all wars of human freedom? Through close study of Homer's Iliad and Odyssey, and Vergil's Aeneid, we explore how the epic tradition helped shape Greece and Rome, and define their contributions to European civilization. 3 hrs. lect., 1 hr. disc.

CMP EUR LIT PHL

Fall 2012, Fall 2013, Fall 2014

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CMLT 0190 - Greek and Roman Comedy      

Greek and Roman Comedy
A survey of the comic playwrights of Greece (Aristophanes and Menander) and Rome (Plautus and Terence) in light of their ancient social, political, and religious contexts as well as modern theoretical approaches to laughter (including psychoanalysis and structural anthropology). We will trace enduring aspects of the comic tradition that can be found in both Greece and Rome and also look forward to Renaissance and modern comedy. These include: the nature of the comic hero; the patterns of comic plots; the dependence of comedy on language; the comic poet's concern with questions of freedom and slavery, desire and repression. (formerly CLAS 0160) 3 hrs. lect., 1 hr. disc.

EUR LIT

Spring 2012, Spring 2013

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CMLT 0200 - Folk-Fairy Tales of the World      

Once Upon A Time ... Folk Fairy Tales Of The World
Tell me a story! We will examine the complex, inter-connected fairy tale traditions found in every society. Comparing fairy tale variants from around the world-including Japan, China, India, Near East, Africa-we will explore their convoluted and fertile relationships as observed in the rise of fairy tale collections in 15th-century Europe, reaching a culmination in the Brothers Grimm collection, often synonymous with the fairy tale itself. To attain a more dispassionate critical perspective we will explore theoretical approaches to the fairy tales through authors such as Zipes, Bottigheimer, Tatar, and Rölleke, and conclude by examining modern variants in prose, poetry, and film.

CMP LIT

Spring 2013, Spring 2014

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CMLT 0205 - Intro:Contemporary Lit. Theory      

Introduction to Contemporary Literary Theory
This course will introduce several major schools of contemporary literary theory. By reading theoretical texts in close conjunction with works of literature, we will illuminate the ways in which these theoretical stances can produce various interpretations of a given poem, novel, or play. The approaches covered will include New Criticism, Psychoanalysis, Marxism and Cultural Criticism, Feminism, and Post-Structuralism. These theories will be applied to works by Shakespeare, Wordsworth, The Brontës, Conrad, Joyce, and others. The goal will be to make students critically aware of the fundamental literary, cultural, political, and moral assumptions underlying every act of interpretation they perform. 3 hrs. lect/disc.

EUR LIT

Fall 2012, Spring 2013, Fall 2013, Spring 2014, Fall 2014, Spring 2015

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CMLT 0210 - Arabia: A Literary Approach      

Arabia: A Literary Approach (in English)
In this course we will examine the Arabian Peninsula as a literary topos that has beguiled representation in both Eastern and Western literature. Whether it is depicted as a glittering spectacle of petro-dollars, the haunt of Bedouin tribesmen or as a sacred focal point, Arabia is an open canvas on which successive societies have sketched their anxieties and aspirations Simultaneously, Arabia has its own rich legacy of self-representation that has been shaped by its harsh environment and unique resources. We will sift through these representations in texts that range among pre-Islamic poetry, the accounts of foreign explorers, novels by modern Arab authors, and contemporary Bedouin oral poetry. All readings will be in English and no previous knowledge of Arabic is required. 3 hrs. sem.

AAL CW LIT

Spring 2014

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CMLT 0221 - Please register via ARBC 0221A      

Modern Arabic Literature
This course is a survey of the most important moments in the development of Modern Arabic Literature from the end of 19th century to the present. We will map the developments, achievements, and innovations by Arab writers against a double background of rising nationalism, decolonization, and wars on the one hand and the idea and experiences of modernity and the west on the other. We will examine works of fiction by both male and female writers including novels, short stories, and drama, as well as poetry representing several different Arab countries. Students are encouraged to read in advance Albert Hourani's A History of the Arab People. (Open to all, no previous knowledge of Arabic is required). 3 hrs. Sem

AAL LIT

Fall 2014

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CMLT 0230 - Myth & Contemporary Experience      

Myth and Contemporary Experience: Modern Poems on Classical Myths*
Greek mythology, an enduring presence in Western thought, has provided, according to Carl Jung, the foundation of one half of our spiritual tradition. In this course we shall study how this rich mythical material has shaped modern poetry. Through close readings of modern poems and their ancient models, we will trace the way 20th-century poets appropriate and transform the classical past in order to reflect on their historical present. While viewing this function of myth as an element of modernity, we shall also explore how these poets build connections between the archetypal meaning of the ancient stories, the questions of existence, and our own contemporary lives. Readings will include Rilke, Eliot, Pound, Cavafy, Montale, Akhmatova, Borges, as well as Sylvia Plath, Joseph Brodsky, Derek Walcott, Louise Glück, and Seamus Heaney. 3 hrs. lect., 1 hr. disc.

CMP LIT PHL

Spring 2013

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CMLT 0238 - Literature Mystical Experience      

Literature and the Mystical Experience
In this course we will explore how narrative art articulates spiritual perception by examining selected works of 20th century writers such as Miguel De Unamuno, Nikos Kazantzakis, J. D. Salinger, Charles Williams, Flannery O'Connor, Thomas Merton, Alice Munroe, Marilynne Robinson, and Annie Dillard. Drawing on theology and philosophy as an interpretative mode, we will consider the following questions: How does literature illuminate selfhood and interiority? How do contemplation and ascetic practice guide the self to divine knowledge and cosmic unification? How do language, imagery and symbols shape the unitive experience as a tool for empathy and understanding of the other? 3 hrs. lect./1 hr. disc.

LIT NOR PHL

Fall 2013, Spring 2015

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CMLT 0270 - South Asian African Carib Lit.      

In Other Worlds: South Asian, African, and Caribbean Fiction*
In the last decades, writers from postcolonial South Asia, Africa, and the Caribbean have come into their own, winning international prizes and garnering attention because of the literary quality of their work as well as their nuanced engagement with important issues of our age--issues such as imperialism, orientalism, colonial rule, political resistance, subaltern studies, nationalism, economic development, gender and sexuality, immigration, diaspora, and globalization. We will discuss a range of works by writers such as Chinua Achebe, Chimamanda Ngozi Adichie, J. M. Coetzee, Tsitsi Dangarembga, Assia Djebar, Frantz Fanon, Hanif Kureishi, Nadine Gordimer, C.L.R. James, Jamaica Kincaid, George Lamming, Ngugi Wa Thiong'o, Rohinton Mistry, Arundhati Roy, Salman Rushdie, Edward Said, Zadie Smith, and Wole Soyinka. Texts will vary from semester to semester. 3 hrs. lect/disc.

AAL CMP LIT

Fall 2014

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CMLT 0285 - Magical Realism(s)      

CMP LIT

Spring 2014

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CMLT 0299 - Literary Feasts      

Literary Feasts: Representations of Food in Modern Narrative (in English)
This course will consider food and eating practices within specific cultural and historical contexts. We will analyze realistic, symbolic, religious, erotic, and political functions surrounding the preparation and consumption of food. Readings will be drawn from several national traditions, with a focus on Europe. Authors will include, among others, I. Dinesen, L. Esquivel, J. Harris, E. Hemingway, T. Lampedusa, P. Levi, C. Petrini, M. Pollan, E. Vittorini, and B. Yoshimoto. Viewing of several films where food and eating play an important role will supplement class discussion. 3 hrs. lect./disc.

EUR LIT

Spring 2012, Spring 2014

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CMLT 0300 - Translation: Theory & Practice      

History of Translation: Theory and Practice
In this course we will examine the history and practice of the act of translation in a global context. Readings will include selected theoretical works by authors such as Goethe, Benjamin, Borges, Jakobson, Derrida, and Appiah, as well as studies of the specific technical and cultural challenges translators have faced in carrying texts across cultural boundaries. As a final project, students will either attempt their own translation of an artistic text into English (with an accompanying explanation of their translation method) or write a research paper engaging with the theories examined in the course. 3 hrs. sem.

CMP

Fall 2013

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CMLT 0305 - Love Stories      

Love Stories: Desire & Gender in Medieval and Early Modern Europe (Pre 1800)
Our modern conceptions of desire, self, body and gender are informed in complex and often invisible ways by earlier narratives of love. We will investigate the conflicting accounts of love written during the medieval and early modern periods, considering in particular the relationship between the idealized notion of "courtly love" and the darker, medical picture of love as a form of madness or melancholia. Reading a variety of works including lyric, drama, romance and medical texts, we will look at the construction of gender and sexuality, the relationship between desire and subjectivity, and the gendering of certain "diseases" of love (such as hysteria) during this period. Authors to be studied will include: Chaucer, Boccaccio, Petrarch, Dante, Shakespeare, and a selection of male and female lyric poets. 3 hrs. lect./disc.

EUR LIT

Spring 2015

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CMLT 0309 - Contemporary Literature      

Contemporary Literature
In this course we will explore seminal works of the post-World War II literature written in English. In the course of our readings we will move through the cultural and social transformations beginning with the paranoia and alienation of the Cold War, and continuing with the Civil Rights era, the national crisis of Vietnam, the rise of multiculturalism and the culture wars in the 1980s, the wide ranging effects of the information revolution, the profits and perils of globalization, and the profound anxiety of the war on terror. Writers studied will include Thomas Pynchon, Vladimir Nabokov, Don DeLillo, Donald Barthelme, William S. Burroughs, Toni Morrison, Ishmael Reed, Ana Castillo, and Art Spiegelman. 3 hrs. lect.

LIT

Spring 2015

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CMLT 0315 - Hotel and Modern Experience      

"A Home Away From home": The Hotel and the Modern Experience (in English)*
In this course we will examine the hotel as a quintessentially modern social and cultural space. Sex and love, death and crime, money and leisure, and architecture and commerce find a special "home away from home" in the hotel, a quality that has inspired the cultural imagination for generations. Theories by G. Simmel, S. Kracauer, and Th. Veblen will help explain the complex dynamics between time, space, and money underlying the hotel's special aura. By “reading" real and fictional hotels in the arts and media (E. Hopper, Th. Mann, A. Hailey, St. Zweig), we will show the hotel's complex significance as a symbol of modern life. 3 hrs sem.

EUR LIT SOC

Spring 2013

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CMLT 0317 - Lost & Found in Translation      

Lost & Found in Translation
In this course we will explore the fundamental philosophical, sociological, and linguistic questions raised by translingual communication through a survey of the greatest theoretical writings on translation together with a comparative study of multiple translations of coherent sections from major works such as the Bible, the Iliad, One Thousand and One Nights, and the Tao Te Ching, as well as other shorter texts. Questions to be considered include: How much does language determine how we think? How much of language is culture? What is unique to translating sacred texts, poetry, “exotic” languages, and dead languages? How do we define the “untranslatable”? Are translators traitors, drudges, or artists? Can machines translate? 3 hrs. lect./disc.

AAL CMP LIT

Spring 2015

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CMLT 0320 - Narratives Fascist Past      

Narratives of the Fascist Past: Memory, Forgetting, and the Myth of the Good Italian (In English)
In this course we will examine a troublingly persistent trope in post-fascist Italian culture: the myth of the “Good Italian” or the belief that Italians, benevolent by nature, overwhelmingly opposed the ideals of the fascist regime, protected Jews from deportation, and regularly subverted fascist law. Students will read several key literary texts—Gadda’s That Awful Mess on the Via Merulana, Loy’s First Words, Eco’s The Mysterious Flame of Queen Loana, and Lucarelli’s Carte Blanche—alongside academic historiography, popular histories, journalism, and testimonies in order to fully grasp what is at stake in the heated public and scholarly debate over the “Good Italian”. We will consider issues such as the possibility of knowing history through literature, the ethical implications that arise from that possibility, and the narrative mechanisms through which the literary text engages or fails to engage questions of individual and collective accountability. (ENAM 0103 or CMLT 0101 or permission of the instructor) 3 hrs. sem.

EUR HIS LIT

Fall 2014

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CMLT 0325 - Chinese Poetry in the Far West      

Chinese Poetry in the Far West
Although Tang poetry is recognized as one of the great achievements of world literature, its beauty is often lost in translation since so much of that beauty is integrally related to the structure of classical Chinese. In this course—intended for students with no knowledge of Chinese—we will thus spend a significant portion of our time learning from scratch how to read Tang poetry in the original by studying the most common characters and the most fundamental grammatical structures found in the Tang “sonnet.” Our energy will equally be devoted to examining such topics as: differences between Chinese and European poetics; differing theories of translation and intercultural adaptation; Orientalist fantasies of the ideogram; and the impact of ancient Chinese poetry on modern European and American poetry, especially the Imagism movement. Students will both study and write multiple translations in various styles. Readings will include both poetry and critical theory. Students who already know Chinese are not allowed to enroll. 3 hrs. lect/disc.

CMP LIT

Spring 2014

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CMLT 0333 - Dealing With The Devil      

Dealing with the Devil: The "Faust" Tradition (in English)
Would you sell your soul to the devil if you could receive whatever you wanted in return? Faust made that deal for ultimate knowledge. Did he achieve his goal? Can the devil be trusted? Who wins in such a scenario: Faust or the devil? The search for knowledge and its inherent pitfalls have occupied cultures for centuries. The "Faust" Stoff emanates from a literary tradition that revolves around this search and connects it with the inexplicable forces of the supernatural. We can find "Faust" in music, literature, and the visual arts not only all over Europe, but also in the United States. This course focuses on a discussion of "Faust" in music and literature, primarily in the works of Marlowe, Goethe, Gounod, Liszt, Mann, Bulgakov, and Kerouac. 3 hrs. lect./disc.

EUR LIT

Spring 2014

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CMLT 0358 - Non-Conformism in Lit & Art      

The Art and Life of Non-Conformism in Twentieth-Century America and Russia (in English)
In this course we will explore the artistic production of Non-Conformists in 20th century Russia and America. Starting with the Russian Futurists, who stood behind the Soviet Revolution, we will consider how literature and art moved into the dissident realm as the new Soviet state increased its pressure to conform. We will read works by Russian dissidents within the Soviet Union and those written by political émigrés. We will compare these works to those by American non-conformists, including the New Orleans Second Line parades, Hobo, Beat Generation, Hippie, Punk, and the Burning Man cultures. 3 hrs. lect.

ART CMP EUR LIT

Spring 2014

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CMLT 0361 - Ancient Poetics      

Ancient Poetics: China and the Greco-Roman World
In this course we will examine questions that have rankled human beings for millennia: What constitutes a great work of literature? What ends does it serve, and how does its structure aesthetically achieve these ends? While we will not endeavor to answer these questions definitively, we will explore theories of aesthetics elaborated in two of the world’s great literary traditions, the Chinese and the Greco-Roman. To what extent do these cultures’ answers resemble one another, and where do they diverge? Is poetic value culturally circumscribed, or do both traditions attempt to articulate universal norms, each within its unique context? Through close readings of primary texts, we will examine some of the guidelines ancient theorists established for the production of literature that not only expresses the author’s innermost sentiments but also—in Horace’s words—both pleases and instructs. Primary texts to be examined from the Chinese tradition include the Great Preface to the Book of Poetry, Lu Ji’s Poetic Exposition on Literature, and Liu Xie’s Literary Mind and the Carving of Dragons. Texts from the Western tradition include selections from Plato’s Republic, Aristotle’s Poetics, and Horace’s Art of Poetry. (Three college-level literature courses or approval of instructor) 3 hrs. sem. CMP (R. Handler-Spitz)

CMP

Spring 2012

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CMLT 0371 - Don Quixote/Visual Culture      

Don Quixote/ and Its Representation in Visual Culture*
In this course we will read Cervantes’ masterpiece, Don Quixote. Special attention will be given to the historical, philosophical, and cultural context of the period. Emphasis will be placed on specific topics such as religion, governance, intercultural relationships, madness, parody, authorship, and love. We will also study the novel’s representation and adaption in a selection of illustrations, graphic novels, animated films, comics, children’s books, and music. Representation in contemporary global cinema, television, and advertising will also be examined. Students will study different adaptations from Europe, Latin America, Asia, and the United States. (At least two courses at the 0300-level or above or by waiver). 3 hrs. lect../screening.

CMP EUR LIT LNG

Fall 2014

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CMLT 0373 - The Novel and the City      

The Novel and the City
In this course we will examine a number of novels from the 20th and 21st centuries that are about life in the city, taking a global and trans-national approach. We will explore formations of urban life alongside transformations in the novel as a genre. We will put these novels of city life in dialogue with critical theory—that is, theories of culture and society that have as their aim human emancipation (for example, Marxism, feminism, critical race studies, and postcolonial studies). The novels we read will reflect important literary movements such as realism, modernism, and postmodernism. (Not open to students who have taken ENAM 0447)

CMP LIT SOC

Spring 2014

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CMLT 0375 - Colonial Discourse/Lusophone      

Colonial Discourse and the “Lusophone World”
In this course we will analyze how European colonialism and imperial endeavors produced meaning, particularly in the interconnected realms of culture, race, language, gender, sexuality, and place. In addition to studying the colonial period, we will pay particular attention to the role and manifestations of colonial discourse more contemporarily in the contexts of nationhood, globalization, sports, and cultural consumption. In doing so, we will address the problematics of the concept of “Lusophone,” starting with the historical legacies and cultural implications of such a transnational entity. Course materials will include critical theory, literary texts, primary historical sources, visual media, and music from Brazil, Lusophone Africa, Lusophone Asia, and Portugal. (PGSE 0215 or equivalent) 3 hrs. lect./disc.

AAL CMP LNG SOC

Spring 2015

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CMLT 0396 - Francophone Fiction      

(Re)Constructing Identities: Francophone Colonial and Postcolonial Fiction*
This course will focus on major works written in French by writers from North Africa, sub-Saharan Africa, and the Caribbean. We will explore the complex (re)construction of identities through fiction writing as it evolves from traditional folktale to political criticism, and as it shifts from colonial alienation to post-colonial disillusionment. We will also examine the emergence of cultural blending or métissage. (FREN 0221 or by waiver) 3 hrs. lect./disc.

AAL CMP LIT LNG

Spring 2013

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CMLT 0447 - The Novel and the City      

The Novel and the City
In this course we will take a global and transnational approach as we examine a number of 20th and 21st century British and Anglophone novels about life in the city. We will explore formations of urban life alongside transformations in the novel as a genre. We will put these novels of city life in dialogue with critical theory-that is, theories of culture and society that have as their aim human emancipation (for example, Marxism, feminism, critical race studies, and postcolonial studies). The novels we read will reflect important literary movements such as realism, modernism, and postmodernism. (Not open to students who have taken ENAM/CMLT 0373) 3 hrs. sem.

CMP LIT SOC

Spring 2015

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CMLT 0450 - History of Clas Lit      

History of Classical Literature
A comprehensive overview of the major literary, historical, and philosophical works of Greece and Rome. Greek authors studied include Homer, Aeschylus, Sophocles, Herodotus, Aristophanes, Thucydides, Plato, and Aristotle. Roman authors include Lucretius, Cicero, Livy, Vergil, Petronius, and Tacitus. Required of senior majors in Classics/Classical Studies (see CLAS 0701) and open to all interested students with some background in Greek and Roman literature, history, or philosophy. 3 hrs. lect.

Fall 2012, Fall 2013, Fall 2014

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CMLT 0500 - Independent Study      

Independent Study
Approval Required

Fall 2011, Winter 2012, Spring 2012, Fall 2012, Winter 2013, Spring 2013, Fall 2013, Winter 2014, Spring 2014, Fall 2014, Winter 2015, Spring 2015

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CMLT 0700 - Senior Thesis      

Senior Thesis
Approval required.

Fall 2013, Spring 2014, Fall 2014, Spring 2015

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CMLT 1001 - To Make A Long Story Short      

“To Make a Long Story Short”--Encompassing Larger Worlds within Smaller Frames*
In this course we will focus on the close reading and analysis of artistically compelling short stories, personal narratives, and reportage. We will read short works crafted by leading 20th and 21st century writers such as Joyce, Hemingway, Lu Xun, Kafka, Borges, Maugham, Orwell, Nabokov, Baldwin, Proulx, Munro, and Murakami. Divergent theoretical perspectives will be considered and contrasted.

CW LIT WTR

Winter 2015

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CMLT 1014 - Existential Phil. & Lit.      

Existential Philosophy and Literature
In this course we will examine how existential thinkers and writers confront core dilemmas of existence such as mortality, anxiety, and the paradox of life. Existential thinkers attempt to make sense of a disordered world, but more importantly, to live meaningful lives within a state of ambiguity. Themes such as the comic, the absurd, freedom, choice, and indirect communication will fuel our discussion of authenticity in response to paradox. Existentialism as a way of life will be central to our work, as will the relationship between philosophy and literature. Authors will include Kierkegaard, Kafka, Camus, Sartre, de Beauvoir, and Dostoevsky. This course counts as elective credit towards the Philosophy major and the Comparative Literature major.

LIT PHL WTR

Winter 2014

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CMLT 1117 - Orlando Furioso and Ren Epic      

Orlando Furioso and the Renaissance Epic
The Orlando Furioso by Ludovico Ariosto is among the most influential works of European Renaissance literature. In this course, we will situate this Italian romance epic in its literary and historical context (including its inclusion of the legendary Hippogriff, pre-dating Harry Potter by half a millennium!). Ariosto takes his readers all over the globe, to the moon, and beyond, and does so with a humor that will make 21st century readers laugh and even cringe. Through comparison to other Renaissance epics (e.g., The Fairie Queene and Paradise Lost), students will gain a better understanding of Renaissance literature and the epic genre.

EUR LIT WTR

Winter 2012

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LITP 0101 - Intro to World Literature      

This course is an introduction to the critical analysis of imaginative literature of the world, the dissemination of themes and myths, and the role of translation as the medium for reaching different cultures. Through the careful reading of selected classic texts from a range of Western and non-Western cultures, students will deepen their understanding and appreciation of the particular texts under consideration, while developing a critical vocabulary with which to discuss and write about these texts, both as unique artistic achievements of individual and empathetic imagination and as works affected by, but also transcending their historical periods. 3 hrs. lect./disc.

CMP CW LIT

Spring 2011

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LITP 0110 - Continental Fiction      

Continental Fiction
An introduction to some major novels and shorter works by 19th and 20th century European authors, including Flaubert's Madame Bovary, Zola's L'Assommoir, Tolstoy's Anna Karenina, Dostoevsky's Crime and Punishment, Mann's The Magic Mountain, Kafka's The Trial, Sartre's Nausea, Camus's The Stranger, and others. These works of fiction are triumphs of achievement and innovation aesthetically and conceptually; and they give us a powerful sense of significant and significantly different levels of society, culture, and periods of history. 3 hrs. lect./3 hrs. disc. L

EUR LIT

Fall 2010

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LITP 0230 - Myth & Contemporary Experience      

Myth and Contemporary Experience: Modern Poems on Classical Myths*
Greek mythology, an enduring presence in Western thought, has provided, according to Carl Jung, the foundation of one half of our spiritual tradition. In this course we shall study how this rich mythical material has shaped modern poetry. Through close readings of modern poems and their ancient models, we will trace the way 20th-century poets appropriate and transform the classical past in order to reflect on their historical present. While viewing this function of myth as an element of modernity, we shall also explore how these poets build connections between the archetypal meaning of the ancient stories, the questions of existence, and our own contemporary lives. Readings will include Rilke, Eliot, Pound, Cavafy, Montale, Akhmatova, Borges, as well as Sylvia Plath, Joseph Brodsky, Derek Walcott, Louise Glück, and Seamus Heaney. 3 hrs. lect., 1 hr. disc.

CMP LIT PHL

Fall 2010

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LITP 0299 - Literary Feasts      

Literary Feasts: Representations of Food in Modern Narrative (in English)
This course will consider food and eating practices within specific cultural and historical contexts. We will analyze realistic, symbolic, religious, erotic, and political functions surrounding the preparation and consumption of food. Readings will be drawn from several national traditions, with a focus on Europe. Authors will include, among others, I. Dinesen, L. Esquivel, J. Harris, E. Hemingway, T. Lampedusa, P. Levi, C. Petrini, M. Pollan, E. Vittorini, and B. Yoshimoto. Viewing of several films where food and eating play an important role will supplement class discussion. 3 hrs. lect./disc.

EUR LIT

Spring 2011

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LITP 0305 - Love Stories:      

Love Stories: Desire & Gender in Medieval and Early Modern Europe (Pre 1800)
Our modern conceptions of desire, self, body and gender are informed in complex and often invisible ways by earlier narratives of love. We will investigate the conflicting accounts of love written during the medieval and early modern periods, considering in particular the relationship between the idealized notion of "courtly love" and the darker, medical picture of love as a form of madness or melancholia. Reading a variety of works including lyric, drama, romance and medical texts, we will look at the construction of gender and sexuality, the relationship between desire and subjectivity, and the gendering of certain "diseases" of love (such as hysteria) during this period. Authors to be studied will include: Chaucer, Boccaccio, Petrarch, Dante, Shakespeare, and a selection of male and female lyric poets. 3 hrs. lect./disc.

EUR LIT

Spring 2011

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LITP 0460 - Sexing the Canon      

Sexing the Canon
Human sexuality has been the topic of scientific and artistic explorations for centuries. Regulatory norms of individual cultures enable or deny the expression of specific forms of sexuality in life and literature. As Foucault states: "What is at issue, briefly, is the over-all 'discursive fact,' the way in which sex is 'put into discourse.' In this course we will explore and compare the ways theories of sexuality from different times and places inform and determine our readings of literature. Theoretical texts form the basis for discussions of the works of authors such as Plato, Boccaccio, Choderlos de Laclos, Stifter, Henry James, Woolf, Genet, James Baldwin, Wittig, Thomas Mann, and Santos-Febres. 3 hrs. sem.

CMP EUR LIT

Spring 2011

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