Middlebury

 

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CMLT0150A-F13

Cross-Listed As:
CLAS0150A-F13

CRN: 91869

Greek and Roman Epic Poetry
Please register via CLAS 0150A

Greek and Roman Epic Poetry
Would Achilles and Hector have risked their lives and sacred honor had they understood human life and the Olympian gods as Homer portrays them in the Iliad? Why do those gods decide to withdraw from men altogether following the Trojan War, and why is Odysseus the man Athena chooses to help her carry out that project? And why, according to the Roman poet Vergil, do these gods command Aeneas, a defeated Trojan, to found an Italian town that will ultimately conquer the Greek cities that conquered Troy, replacing the Greek polis with a universal empire that will end all wars of human freedom? Through close study of Homer's Iliad and Odyssey, and Vergil's Aeneid, we explore how the epic tradition helped shape Greece and Rome, and define their contributions to European civilization. 3 hrs. lect., 1 hr. disc.

CMLT0150X-F13

Cross-Listed As:
CLAS0150X-F13

CRN: 92054

Greek and Roman Epic Poetry
Please register via CLAS 0150X

Greek and Roman Epic Poetry
Would Achilles and Hector have risked their lives and sacred honor had they understood human life and the Olympian gods as Homer portrays them in the Iliad? Why do those gods decide to withdraw from men altogether following the Trojan War, and why is Odysseus the man Athena chooses to help her carry out that project? And why, according to the Roman poet Vergil, do these gods command Aeneas, a defeated Trojan, to found an Italian town that will ultimately conquer the Greek cities that conquered Troy, replacing the Greek polis with a universal empire that will end all wars of human freedom? Through close study of Homer's Iliad and Odyssey, and Vergil's Aeneid, we explore how the epic tradition helped shape Greece and Rome, and define their contributions to European civilization. 3 hrs. lect., 1 hr. disc.

CMLT0150Y-F13

Cross-Listed As:
CLAS0150Y-F13

CRN: 92055

Greek and Roman Epic Poetry
Please register via CLAS 0150Y

Greek and Roman Epic Poetry
Would Achilles and Hector have risked their lives and sacred honor had they understood human life and the Olympian gods as Homer portrays them in the Iliad? Why do those gods decide to withdraw from men altogether following the Trojan War, and why is Odysseus the man Athena chooses to help her carry out that project? And why, according to the Roman poet Vergil, do these gods command Aeneas, a defeated Trojan, to found an Italian town that will ultimately conquer the Greek cities that conquered Troy, replacing the Greek polis with a universal empire that will end all wars of human freedom? Through close study of Homer's Iliad and Odyssey, and Vergil's Aeneid, we explore how the epic tradition helped shape Greece and Rome, and define their contributions to European civilization. 3 hrs. lect., 1 hr. disc.

CMLT0150Z-F13

Cross-Listed As:
CLAS0150Z-F13

CRN: 92056

Greek and Roman Epic Poetry
Please register via CLAS 0150Z

Greek and Roman Epic Poetry
Would Achilles and Hector have risked their lives and sacred honor had they understood human life and the Olympian gods as Homer portrays them in the Iliad? Why do those gods decide to withdraw from men altogether following the Trojan War, and why is Odysseus the man Athena chooses to help her carry out that project? And why, according to the Roman poet Vergil, do these gods command Aeneas, a defeated Trojan, to found an Italian town that will ultimately conquer the Greek cities that conquered Troy, replacing the Greek polis with a universal empire that will end all wars of human freedom? Through close study of Homer's Iliad and Odyssey, and Vergil's Aeneid, we explore how the epic tradition helped shape Greece and Rome, and define their contributions to European civilization. 3 hrs. lect., 1 hr. disc.

CMLT0205A-F13

Cross-Listed As:
ENAM0205A-F13

CRN: 91637

Intro:Contemporary Lit. Theory
Please register via ENAM 0205A

Introduction to Contemporary Literary Theory
This course will introduce several major schools of contemporary literary theory. By reading theoretical texts in close conjunction with works of literature, we will illuminate the ways in which these theoretical stances can produce various interpretations of a given poem, novel, or play. The approaches covered will include New Criticism, Psychoanalysis, Marxism and Cultural Criticism, Feminism, and Post-Structuralism. These theories will be applied to works by Shakespeare, Wordsworth, The Brontës, Conrad, Joyce, and others. The goal will be to make students critically aware of the fundamental literary, cultural, political, and moral assumptions underlying every act of interpretation they perform. 3 hrs. lect/disc.

CMLT0238A-F13

Cross-Listed As:
RELI0238A-F13

CRN: 92372

Literature Mystical Experience

Literature and the Mystical Experience
In this course we will explore how narrative art articulates spiritual perception by examining selected works of 20th century writers such as Miguel De Unamuno, Nikos Kazantzakis, J. D. Salinger, Charles Williams, Flannery O'Connor, Thomas Merton, Alice Munroe, Marilynne Robinson, and Annie Dillard. Drawing on theology and philosophy as an interpretative mode, we will consider the following questions: How does literature illuminate selfhood and interiority? How do contemplation and ascetic practice guide the self to divine knowledge and cosmic unification? How do language, imagery and symbols shape the unitive experience as a tool for empathy and understanding of the other? 3 hrs. lect./1 hr. disc.

CMLT0238Y-F13

Cross-Listed As:
RELI0238Y-F13

CRN: 92498

Literature Mystical Experience
Discussion

Literature and the Mystical Experience
In this course we will explore how narrative art articulates spiritual perception by examining selected works of 20th century writers such as Miguel De Unamuno, Nikos Kazantzakis, J. D. Salinger, Charles Williams, Flannery O'Connor, Thomas Merton, Alice Munroe, Marilynne Robinson, and Annie Dillard. Drawing on theology and philosophy as an interpretative mode, we will consider the following questions: How does literature illuminate selfhood and interiority? How do contemplation and ascetic practice guide the self to divine knowledge and cosmic unification? How do language, imagery and symbols shape the unitive experience as a tool for empathy and understanding of the other? 3 hrs. lect./1 hr. disc.

CMLT0238Z-F13

Cross-Listed As:
RELI0238Z-F13

CRN: 92499

Literature Mystical Experience
Discussion

Literature and the Mystical Experience
In this course we will explore how narrative art articulates spiritual perception by examining selected works of 20th century writers such as Miguel De Unamuno, Nikos Kazantzakis, J. D. Salinger, Charles Williams, Flannery O'Connor, Thomas Merton, Alice Munroe, Marilynne Robinson, and Annie Dillard. Drawing on theology and philosophy as an interpretative mode, we will consider the following questions: How does literature illuminate selfhood and interiority? How do contemplation and ascetic practice guide the self to divine knowledge and cosmic unification? How do language, imagery and symbols shape the unitive experience as a tool for empathy and understanding of the other? 3 hrs. lect./1 hr. disc.

CMLT0300A-F13

CRN: 92451

Translation: Theory & Practice

History of Translation: Theory and Practice
In this course we will examine the history and practice of the act of translation in a global context. Readings will include selected theoretical works by authors such as Goethe, Benjamin, Borges, Jakobson, Derrida, and Appiah, as well as studies of the specific technical and cultural challenges translators have faced in carrying texts across cultural boundaries. As a final project, students will either attempt their own translation of an artistic text into English (with an accompanying explanation of their translation method) or write a research paper engaging with the theories examined in the course. 3 hrs. sem.

CMLT0450A-F13

Cross-Listed As:
CLAS0450A-F13 CLAS0701A-F13

CRN: 91868

History of Clas Lit
Please register via CLAS 0450A

History of Classical Literature
A comprehensive overview of the major literary, historical, and philosophical works of Greece and Rome. Greek authors studied include Homer, Aeschylus, Sophocles, Herodotus, Aristophanes, Thucydides, Plato, and Aristotle. Roman authors include Lucretius, Cicero, Livy, Vergil, Petronius, and Tacitus. Required of senior majors in Classics/Classical Studies (see CLAS 0701) and open to all interested students with some background in Greek and Roman literature, history, or philosophy. 3 hrs. lect.

CMLT0500A-F13

CRN: 91563

Independent Study

Independent Study
Approval Required

CMLT0500B-F13

CRN: 91564

Independent Study

Independent Study
Approval Required

CMLT0500C-F13

CRN: 92226

Independent Study

Independent Study
Approval Required

CMLT0500D-F13

CRN: 92227

Independent Study

Independent Study
Approval Required

CMLT0700A-F13

CRN: 92584

Senior Thesis

Senior Thesis
Approval required.

CMLT0700B-F13

CRN: 92585

Senior Thesis

Senior Thesis
Approval required.

CMLT0700C-F13

CRN: 92672

Senior Thesis

Senior Thesis
Approval required.