Middlebury

 

Courses

Courses offered in the past four years.
indicates offered in the current term
indicates offered in the upcoming term[s]

CRWR 0106 - Writing for the Screen I      

Writing for the Screen I
In this course we will examine the fundamental elements of dramatic narrative as they relate to visual storytelling. We will emphasize the process of generating original story material and learning the craft of screenwriting, including topics such as story, outline, scene structure, subtext, character objectives, formatting standards, and narrative strategies. Weekly writing assignments will emphasize visual storytelling techniques, tone and atmosphere, character relationships, and dialogue. Students will be required to complete two short screenplays. Required readings will inform and accompany close study of selected screenplays and films. (FMMC 0101 OR CRWR 0170 or approval of instructor) (Formerly FMMC/ENAM 0106) 3 hrs. sem.

ART

Fall 2012, Fall 2013, Fall 2014

More Information »

CRWR 0170 - Writing: Poetry, Fiction, NonF      

Writing: Poetry, Fiction, NonFiction
An introduction to the writing of poetry, short fiction, and nonfiction through analysis of writings by modern and contemporary poets and prose writers and regular discussion of student writing. Different instructors may choose to emphasize one literary form or another in a given semester. Workshops will focus on composition and revision, with particular attention to the basics of form and craft. This course is a prerequisite to CRWR 0380, CRWR 0385, CRWR 0370, and CRWR 0375. (This course is not a college writing course.) (Formerly ENAM 0170) 3 hrs. sem.

ART

Fall 2012, Spring 2013, Fall 2013, Spring 2014, Fall 2014, Spring 2015

More Information »

CRWR 0172 - Writing Gender & Sexuality      

Writing Gender and Sexuality
In this course we will analyze and produce writing that focuses on expressions of gender and sexuality. Readings will include work by Collette, Baldwin, Leavitt, Powell, Tea, Claire, and others. Students will draft and revise creative non-fiction and fiction with some attention to poetry. During class we will discuss form, craft, and the writing process; experiment with writing exercises; and critique student work in writing workshops. Each student will meet with the instructor a minimum of three times and produce a portfolio of 20 revised pages. (This course is a prerequisite to ENAM 0370, 0375, 0380, or 0385).

ART

Spring 2014

More Information »

CRWR 0173 - Environmental Lit Workshop      

Environmental Literature: Reading & Writing Workshop
This course is an introduction to the reading and writing of environmental literature. We will analyze classic and contemporary model works in prose and poetry, in nonfiction and fiction, all directed at human interaction with the natural world. Our writing assignments will explore this theme in personal essays, poems, literary reportage, poetry, and fiction. Workshops will focus on inspiration, form, craft, and thematic issues associated with the environment. This course is a prerequisite to CRWR 0370, CRWR 0375, CRWR 0380, and CRWR 0385.

ART LIT

Fall 2014

More Information »

CRWR 0174 - Environ/Adventure Writing      

Get Outdoors! Environmental and Adventure Writing in the Digital Age
In this course we will explore the environmental and adventure narrative. Equipped with laptop, camera, and audio and video recorders-the tools of today's writers- each student will undertake an investigation in the Middlebury area (anything from wind energy to local hunting), then sharpen their skills as writers, focusing on setting, character, and narrative thread. We will read from a wide selection of authors including Jack London, Joe Kane, Ernest Hemingway, Gretel Ehrlich, Peter Matthiessen, Robyn Davidson, and Jack Kerouac. Students will explore the line between fiction and nonfiction as they incorporate their own experience with interviews, photos, and audio and video files in their final written and digital projects. (Students will need a laptop, camera, and a small hard drive to house Final Cut Pro files for video editing.) (Not open to students who have taken INTD 1105) 3 hrs. lect./3 hrs. lab

LIT

Fall 2012

More Information »

CRWR 0175 - Structure of Poetry      

The Structure of Poetry
This course is an introduction to the reading and writing of poetry with a focus on its structural aspects. We will look closely at a range of exemplary poems in English to explore how a poem is built through form, image, figurative language, and other poetic tools. Among the poets we shall read are Seamus Heaney and Elizabeth Bishop. Students will write their own poems and give oral presentations on contemporary poets. (Formerly ENAM 0175)

ART

Fall 2012, Winter 2013, Spring 2013, Fall 2013, Fall 2014, Spring 2015

More Information »

CRWR 0185 - Writing for Children      

Writing for Children and Young Adults
This course is an introduction to writing for children and young adults through analysis of model short fiction and novels, and regular discussion of student writing. We will focus on craft and form with particular attention to the demands of writing for a young audience. Emphasis will be on composition and revision. 3 hrs. lect.

ART

Spring 2013, Fall 2013, Fall 2014

More Information »

CRWR 0218 - Playwriting I: Beginning      

Playwriting I: Beginning
The purpose of the course is to gain a theoretical and practical understanding of writing for the stage. Students will read, watch, and analyze published plays, as well as work by their peers, but the focus throughout will remain on the writing and development of original work. (Formerly THEA/ENAM 0218) 2 1/2 hrs. lect./individual labs

ART CW

Fall 2012, Spring 2013, Spring 2014, Fall 2014

More Information »

CRWR 0225 - Feminist Blogging      

Feminist Blogging
Blogging is a genre that lends itself to both feminist theory and practice because it involves writing from a particular place and a particular embodiment, about how power operates in our social worlds. Feminist theory demands intersectionality: an ability to weave race, class, gender, sexuality and other forms of power into a single theoretical approach. Feminist blogging transforms intersectionality into a single narrative arc. In this course we will think about blogging as a genre and how feminist theory can infuse that genre into a more vibrant, complex, and even transformative site. Throughout the course we will read feminist theory, analyze feminist blogs, and produce our own feminist blogs. 3 hrs. lect.

CMP LIT NOR SOC

Spring 2015

More Information »

CRWR 0318 - Playwriting II: Advanced      

Playwriting II: Advanced
For students with experience writing short scripts or stories, this workshop will provide a support structure in which to write a full-length stage play. We will begin with extended free and guided writing exercises intended to help students write spontaneously and with commitment. Class discussions will explore scene construction, story structure, and the development of character arc. (ENAM 0170 or THEA 0218 or ENAM/THEA 0240; by approval) (Formerly THEA/ENAM 0318) 2 1/2 hrs. lect./individual labs

ART CW

Fall 2013, Spring 2015

More Information »

CRWR 0323 - Cinematic Movement: Poetry      

The Cinematic Movement: Poetry
This is a class not only on the craft of writing but also the craft of thinking visually about writing. We will examine artistic problems with writing across cultural lines and gender lines; essentially, we will explore approaches to writing in the voice of "the other." On a craft level, we will explore film and examine ways in which artistic problems can be solved on a visual level, and, ultimately, translated into the craft of writing poetry. At the same time, we will examine ways in which form within poetry and film can inform each other.

ART

Spring 2014

More Information »

CRWR 0341 - Writing for the Screen II      

Writing for the Screen II
Building on the skills acquired in Writing for the Screen I, students will complete the first drafts of their feature-length screenplay. Class discussion will focus on feature screenplay structure and theme development using feature films and screenplays. Each participant in the class will practice pitching, writing coverage, and outlining, culminating in a draft of a feature length script. (Approval required, obtain application on the FMMC website and submit prior to spring registration) 3 hrs. sem/3 hrs. screen.

ART

Spring 2013, Spring 2014, Spring 2015

More Information »

CRWR 0360 - Fiction in Practice & Theory      

Fiction in Practice and Theory
This literature/writing course will emphasize the practice and theory of formal elements in fiction. It will be a craft-level investigation of both traditional fictional forms (including epistolary, monologue, and collage) and texts conscious of themselves as texts. Readings will include examples of traditional forms as well as experimental works by literary groups such as OULIPO, the surrealists, minimalists, post-modernists, and hypertextualists. This course may replace one of the 0300-level requirements for students doing a Creative Writing concentration, but is open to all.

ART

Fall 2013

More Information »

CRWR 0370 - Advanced Fiction Workshop      

Workshop: Fiction
Study and practice in techniques of fiction writing through workshops and readings in short fiction and novels. Class discussions will be based on student manuscripts and published model works. Emphasis will be placed on composition and revision. (ENAM/CRWR 0170, ENAM/CRWR 0175, or ENAM/CRWR 0185) (Approval required; please apply online at http://www.middlebury.edu/academics/enam/resources/forms or at the Department office) (Formerly ENAM 0370) (This course is not a college writing course) 3 hrs. sem.

ART

Fall 2012, Spring 2013, Fall 2013, Spring 2014, Fall 2014, Spring 2015

More Information »

CRWR 0375 - Advanced Poetry Workshop      

Workshop: Poetry
This course will involve the reading and writing of contemporary poetry. It is designed for students who already possess some familiarity with poetry and its traditions and who want to concentrate especially on contemporary work as an adjunct to their own development as poets. Students will read a good deal of poetry, including such writers as Elizabeth Bishop, Seamus Heaney, and Charles Simic. Assignments will include the keeping of a daily notebook, writing poems on a regular basis, and giving oral reports. Close attention will be paid to poetic form and the conventions of poetry. A final portfolio will include revisions of poems and critical writing. (ENAM/CRWR 0170, ENAM/CRWR 0175, or ENAM/CRWR 0185) (Approval required; please apply online at http://www.middlebury.edu/academics/enam/resources/forms or at the Department office.) (Formerly ENAM 0375) (This course is not a college writing course.) 3 hrs. sem.

ART

Fall 2012, Spring 2013, Fall 2013, Spring 2014, Fall 2014, Spring 2015

More Information »

CRWR 0380 - Advanced Non-Fiction Workshop      

Workshop: Nonfiction
In this course we will study and practice techniques of nonfiction writing through contemporary essay and narrative nonfiction workshops and readings in the contemporary essay. Class discussions will be based on student manuscripts and published model works. Emphasis will be placed on composition and revision. (ENAM 0170, 0175, or 0185) (Approval Required; please apply at the department office in Axinn) (formerly ENAM 0380)

ART

Winter 2013, Winter 2014, Fall 2014

More Information »

CRWR 0386 - Writing the Journey      

Writing the Journey
In this course we will write personal journey narratives that fuse objective observation and exposition with strong narrative and subjective experience. Readings will include works of literary travel writing including The Song Lines and The Snow Leopard, as well as the picaresque novel On the Road. We will also practice the travel article. For the final project students must write about a journey they plan and take during the semester, preferably during Spring Break. (ENAM/CRWR 0170) (or approval from instructor required; please apply online at http://www.middlebury.edu/academics/enam/resources/forms or at the Department office) (Formerly ENAM 0386) 3 hrs. sem.

ART CW LIT

Spring 2013, Spring 2014

More Information »

CRWR 0560 - Special Project: Writing      

Special Project: Creative Writing
Approval Required.

Fall 2012, Winter 2013, Spring 2013, Fall 2013, Winter 2014, Spring 2014, Fall 2014, Spring 2015

More Information »

CRWR 0701 - Senior Thesis:Creative Writing      

Senior Thesis: Creative Writing
Discussions, workshops, tutorials for those undertaking one-term projects in the writing of fiction, poetry, or creative nonfiction. (Formerly ENAM 0701)

Fall 2012, Spring 2013, Fall 2013, Spring 2014, Fall 2014, Spring 2015

More Information »

CRWR 0711 - Senior Thesis: Creative Writ.      

Senior Thesis: Creative Writing
Discussions, workshops, tutorials for those undertaking two-term projects in the writing of fiction, poetry, or creative nonfiction. (Formerly ENAM 0711)

Fall 2012, Winter 2013, Spring 2013, Fall 2013, Winter 2014, Spring 2014, Fall 2014

More Information »

CRWR 1001 - Reporting From Life      

Reporting from Life
In this course we will discuss and practice methods and standards of current reporting techniques in journalism, creative non-fiction, fiction and even fields such as ethnography and acting. We will devote significant time off-campus collecting and recording first-hand information, and organizing it into stories for the reader’s edification and entertainment rather than for self-expression. We will then write and workshop a story a week, culminating in a 10-15 page final paper. (Approval required; ENAM 0170 or 0300-level writing course).

ART CW WTR

Winter 2013

More Information »

CRWR 1005 - Adventure Writing      

Adventure Writing & Digital Storytelling
In this class we will explore the adventure narrative in the digital age. Equipped with laptop, camera, audio recorder, and/or video camera--the tools of today's investigative journalists--students will undertake their own adventure in the Middlebury area (anything from dog sledding to ice-fishing on Lake Champlain), then sharpen their skills as writers, focusing on setting, character, history, and narrative thread. In addition to blogs and essays from Outside Magazine, we will read from adventure books such as Joe Kane’s Running the Amazon and Joan Didion’s Salvador, and write in the adventure-travel genre, incorporating interviews, photos, audio, and video files in the final writing project. (Students will need a laptop, camera, and a small hard drive to house Final Cut Pro files for video editing. This course counts as a Creative Writing elective. (Approval Required; please complete an application form available on the following website: http://www.middlebury.edu/academics/enam/resources/forms). Not open to students who have taken INTD 1105.

LIT WTR

Winter 2014

More Information »

ENAM 0102 - Gender/Sexuality/Literature      

Introduction to Gender, Sexuality and Literature
This course offers an introduction to the ways in which literature reflects, influences, creates, and reveals cultural beliefs about gender and sexuality. We will read a wide range of novels, poems, and plays from a diversity of eras and national traditions; we will also study seminal works in feminist theory, queer studies, and the history of sexuality, from early thinkers to today's cutting-edge theorists. Throughout the course, we will explore the ways in which gender intersects with other crucial cultural issues such as race, nationhood, globalization, and class. 3 hrs. lect./disc.

CMP LIT

Fall 2012, Spring 2015

More Information »

ENAM 0103 - Reading Literature      

Reading Literature
This course seeks to develop skills for the close reading of literature through discussion of and writing about selected poems, plays, and short stories. A basic vocabulary of literary terms and an introductory palette of critical methods will also be covered, and the course's ultimate goal will be to enable students to attain the literary-critical sensibility vital to further course work in the major. At the instructor's discretion, the texts employed in this class may share a particular thematic concern or historical kinship. 3 hrs. lect./disc.

CW LIT

Fall 2010, Winter 2011, Spring 2011, Fall 2011, Spring 2012, Fall 2012, Spring 2013, Fall 2013, Spring 2014, Fall 2014, Spring 2015

More Information »

ENAM 0106 - Screenwriting Workshop I      

Writing for the Screen I
This course will introduce the fundamental elements of dramatic narrative as they relate to visual storytelling. Special emphasis will be placed on the process of generating original story material and learning the craft of screenwriting-including (but not limited to) topics such as treatments, step-outlines, act structure, beat sheets, character biographies, back-story, formatting standards, and narrative strategies. Students will be required to write both short scripts and to author the first half of an original feature-length screenplay. Required readings in theory and practice will inform and accompany close study of selected screenplays and films. (FMMC 0101 OR ENAM 0170 or approval of instructor) 3 hrs. sem./3 hrs. screen.

ART CW

Fall 2010, Fall 2011

More Information »

ENAM 0107 - The Experience of Tragedy      

The Experience of Tragedy
For over two millennia tragedy has raised ethical questions and represented conflicts between the divine and the mortal, nature and culture, household and polity, individual and society. What is tragedy? What led to its production and what impact did it have, in ancient times? Why was it reborn in Shakespeare's time? How has tragedy shaped, and been shaped by, gender, class, religion, and nationality? We will address these questions and explore how tragedy continues to influence our literary expectations and experience. Authors may include Aeschylus, Sophocles, Euripides, Thucydides, Aristotle, Seneca, Marlowe, Shakespeare, Goethe, Nietzsche, O'Neill, Beckett, Kennedy, and Kushner. 3 hrs. lect.

EUR LIT

Fall 2014

More Information »

ENAM 0108 - Animals in Literature      

Animals in Literature and Culture
Animals, wrote anthropologist Claude Levi-Strauss, are good to think with. They are good to write with as well; almost all works of literature include animals, their importance varying from the merely peripheral to the absolutely central. Among other narrative functions, animals serve as essential metaphors for understanding the human animal. In this course we will read a wide variety of fiction, poetry, children's literature, philosophy, science, history, and cultural theory from Ancient Greek sources (in translation) to the present. We will consider theoretical, ethical, religious, psychological, linguistic, and political issues pertaining to animals and their representation in literary texts. lect./disc.

EUR LIT

Fall 2011, Spring 2014

More Information »

ENAM 0110 - Continental Fiction      

Continental Fiction
An introduction to some major novels and shorter works by 19th and 20th century European authors, including Flaubert's Madame Bovary, Zola's L'Assommoir, Tolstoy's Anna Karenina, Dostoevsky's Crime and Punishment, Mann's The Magic Mountain, Kafka's The Trial, Sartre's Nausea, Camus's The Stranger, and others. These works of fiction are triumphs of achievement and innovation aesthetically and conceptually; and they give us a powerful sense of significant and significantly different levels of society, culture, and periods of history. 3 hrs. lect./disc.

EUR LIT

Fall 2010, Spring 2013

More Information »

ENAM 0114 - Reading Women's Writing      

Reading Women's Writing
Why and how do women write? Does literary history reveal distinctive styles, patterns, and continuities in the works of female authors? We will begin to address these questions through our close reading of a wide variety of women's literature in English, including poetry, fiction, essays, and drama from the eighteenth through the twentieth centuries. Secondary readings will reflect on the concept of gender as a central organizing principle. Employing various methods of literary analysis, the course will address issues of interest to students in a wide range of disciplines, including philosophy, psychology, and history, as well as literature. 3 hrs. lect./3 hrs. disc.

LIT

Spring 2012

More Information »

ENAM 0117 - The Short Story      

The Short Story (AL)
This course approaches the short story as a distinct prose genre, beginning with work by Edgar Allen Poe and Guy de Maupassant and concluding with stories by contemporary authors. We will examine the particularly notable growth of the genre in America and survey various trends in the form, from "local color" sketches and realistic tales to experiments in modernism and postmodernism. Throughout, we will consider issues of structure, characterization, style, and voice. Other authors may include Anderson, Barthelme, Cheever, Chekhov, Hemingway, Joyce, Moore, O'Connor, Twain, and Welty. 3 hrs. lect./disc.

LIT NOR

Spring 2013, Fall 2013

More Information »

ENAM 0136 - Dramatizing Black Experience      

Dramatizing the Black Experience for the American Stage
In this course we will explore how influential contemporary African American dramatists bring to the American stage different aspects of the black experience. From William Branch’s A Medal For Willie (1951) to Dominique Morriseau’s Detroit ’67 (2013), readings will provide students the opportunity to investigate how plays are interpreted by actors and directors, and wrestle with topics such as voting rights, cultural appropriation, housing discrimination, gender inequality, and equal access to education. Beyond dramatic texts and critical readings, students will hear some of the playwrights (via video conferencing) offer their views on topics and issues we will discuss in class. 3 hrs. lect.

ART CMP LIT NOR

Fall 2014

More Information »

ENAM 0170 - Writing: Poetry, Fiction, NonF      

Writing: Poetry, Fiction, NonFiction
An introduction to the writing of poetry, short fiction, and nonfiction through analysis of writings by modern and contemporary poets and prose writers and regular discussion of student writing. Different instructors may choose to emphasize one literary form or another in a given semester. Workshops will focus on composition and revision, with particular attention to the basics of form and craft. This course is a prerequisite to ENAM 0370, ENAM 0375, ENAM 0380, and ENAM 0385. 3 hrs. lect.

ART

Fall 2010, Spring 2011, Fall 2011, Spring 2012

More Information »

ENAM 0172 - Writing Gender and Sexuality      

Writing Gender and Sexuality
In this course we will analyze and produce writing that focuses on expressions of gender and sexuality. Readings will include work by Collette, Baldwin, Leavitt, Powell, Tea, Claire, and others. Students will draft and revise creative non-fiction and fiction with some attention to poetry. During class we will discuss form, craft, and the writing process; experiment with writing exercises; and critique student work in writing workshops. Each student will meet with the instructor a minimum of three times and produce a portfolio of 20 revised pages. (This course is a prerequisite to ENAM 0370, 0375, 0380, or 0385).

ART

Spring 2012

More Information »

ENAM 0175 - Structure of Poetry      

The Structure of Poetry
This course is a workshop for beginning students in the field of creative writing. Students will read a selection of poems each week and write their own poems, producing a portfolio of their work at the end of the term. There will be an emphasis on revision. Students will be introduced to a range of forms as well, including prose poems, epistles, the tanka, the long poem, and the sonnet.

ART

Fall 2010, Winter 2011, Fall 2011, Winter 2012, Spring 2012

More Information »

ENAM 0180 - Intro to Biblical Literature      

An Introduction to Biblical Literature (I)
This course is a general introduction to biblical history, literature, and interpretation. It aims to acquaint students with the major characters, narratives, and poetry of the Jewish and Christian scriptures, with special emphasis on the ways scripture has been used and interpreted in Western culture. Students interested in more detailed analysis of the material should enroll in RELI 0280 and RELI 0281. 3 hrs. lect./1 hr. disc.

LIT PHL

Spring 2012, Spring 2013, Spring 2014, Spring 2015

More Information »

ENAM 0201 - British Lit. and Culture I      

British Literature and Culture I (Origins-1700) (I)
Topic is determined by the instructor - refer to section for the course description.

EUR LIT

Fall 2010, Fall 2011, Fall 2012, Fall 2013, Fall 2014

More Information »

ENAM 0202 - British Lit. & Culture II      

British Literature and Culture II (1700-Present): Home and Away
This course introduces the extraordinary diversity and complexity of British literature from 1700 to the present. We will read seminal works of poetry, fiction, and drama from this period, focusing our attention on key issues such as national identity, stylistic revolution, canon formation, sexual politics, and the representation of cultural otherness. We will trace changes and continuity in this rich literary tradition and discuss literature's relation to key social and historical developments. Writers to be studied include Swift, Austen, the Romantic poets, the Brontës, Tennyson, Browning, Wilde, Yeats, Eliot, Woolf, Roy and Stoppard. For majors and non-majors. 3 hrs. lect.

EUR LIT

Spring 2012

More Information »

ENAM 0203 - Taboos and Trends      

Taboos and Trends in Literature for Children and Young Adults
In this course we will examine groundbreaking works of literature for children and young adults. From Mark Twain to contemporary authors such as Lowry, Myers, and Farmer, writers for young people have pressed hard on societal notions about what is acceptable for young readers. We will look at taboos that have existed and been broken, as well as current trends in the field. We will pay particular attention to developmental issues in youth and sociocultural mores, including censorship.

LIT

Fall 2011, Spring 2015

More Information »

ENAM 0204 - Foundations of English Lit.      

Foundations of English Literature (I)
Students will study Chaucer's Canterbury Tales and Milton's Paradise Lost, as well as other foundational works of English literature that may include Shakespeare, non-Shakespearean Elizabethan drama, the poetry of Donne, and other 16th and 17th century poetry. 3 hrs. lect./dsc.

EUR LIT

Fall 2010, Spring 2011, Fall 2011, Spring 2012, Fall 2012, Spring 2013, Fall 2013, Spring 2014, Fall 2014, Spring 2015

More Information »

ENAM 0205 - Intro:Contemporary Lit. Theory      

Introduction to Contemporary Literary Theory
This course will introduce several major schools of contemporary literary theory. By reading theoretical texts in close conjunction with works of literature, we will illuminate the ways in which these theoretical stances can produce various interpretations of a given poem, novel, or play. The approaches covered will include New Criticism, Psychoanalysis, Marxism and Cultural Criticism, Feminism, and Post-Structuralism. These theories will be applied to works by Shakespeare, Wordsworth, The Brontës, Conrad, Joyce, and others. The goal will be to make students critically aware of the fundamental literary, cultural, political, and moral assumptions underlying every act of interpretation they perform. 3 hrs. lect/disc.

EUR LIT

Fall 2010, Spring 2011, Fall 2011, Spring 2012, Fall 2012, Spring 2013, Fall 2013, Spring 2014, Fall 2014, Spring 2015

More Information »

ENAM 0206 - 19th Century American Lit.      

Nineteenth-Century American Literature (II, AL)
This course will examine major developments in the literary world of 19th century America. Specific topics to be addressed might include the transition from Romanticism to Regionalism and Realism, the origins and evolution of the novel in the United States, and the tensions arising from the emergence of a commercial marketplace for literature. Attention will also be paid to the rise of women as literary professionals in America and the persistent problematizing of race and slavery. Among others, authors may include J. F. Cooper, Emerson, Melville, Douglass, Chopin, Whitman, Dickinson, Twain, Hawthorne, Stowe, Alcott, Wharton, and James. . 3 hrs. lect./disc.

LIT NOR

Fall 2010, Spring 2011, Fall 2011, Spring 2012, Fall 2012, Spring 2013, Fall 2013, Spring 2015

More Information »

ENAM 0208 - Literary Landscapes, 1700-1900      

English Literary Landscapes, 1700-1900
In this course we will examine literary and related works that take as their focus the natural world and man's relationship to it. We will consider transformations of taste in representations of landscape in England in the 18th and 19th centuries. Works to be discussed will include poems, gardening tracts, philosophical treatises, notebooks, letters, travel accounts, natural histories, and novels. Pope, Crabbe, Wordsworth, Tennyson, Clare, Hopkins, and Hardy will be central figures in this course.

EUR LIT

Spring 2013, Spring 2014

More Information »

ENAM 0209 - Am. Lit. & Cult: origins-1830      

American Literature and Culture: Origins-1830 (II, AL)
A study of literary and other cultural forms in early America, including gravestones, architecture, furniture and visual art. We will consider how writing and these other forms gave life to ideas about religion, diversity, civic obligation and individual rights that dominated not only colonial life but that continue to influence notions of "Americanness" into the present day. 3 hrs. lect./dics.

LIT NOR

Fall 2010, Fall 2011, Fall 2012, Fall 2013, Fall 2014

More Information »

ENAM 0210 - American Modernists      

The American Modernists (AL)
American writers at the turn of the 20th century faced social, intellectual, and technological change on an unprecedented scale. Individually and collectively they worked to answer William Carlos Williams’s pressing question: “How can I be a mirror to this modernity?” In this course we will read, discuss, and write about poetry by writers such as Williams, T.S. Eliot, Ezra Pound, and Wallace Stevens; and prose by Henry Adams, Edith Wharton, Hemingway, Faulkner, Fitzgerald, Nella Larsen, Richard Wright, and others. (Not open to students who have taken ENAM 0207)

LIT NOR

Spring 2012, Fall 2014

More Information »

ENAM 0211 - Global Literature for Youth      

Global Perspectives on Literature for Youth
Literature in translation, post-colonial English literature, and the literature of immigrants are a growing part of literature available to American children. We will examine literature from Africa, the Middle East, Europe, and Asia originally written in English or in translation. What makes international literature distinct from multicultural literature? Do these literary traditions bridge cultural gaps? What issues arise in translating for children? What is the phenomenon of "Americanization?" What are the implicit and explicit cultural and/or ethnic expectations regarding authorship and criticism in international literature? In this class we will examine these questions through the lens of literature for children.

CMP LIT

Spring 2012

More Information »

ENAM 0212 - American Literature Since 1945      

American Literature Since 1945 (AL)
In this course we will trace the development of the postmodern sensibility in American literature since the Second World War. We will read works in four genres: short fiction, novels, non-fiction (the "new journalism"), and poetry. Authors will include Saul Bellow, Joseph Heller, Ralph Ellison, Flannery O'Connor, Jack Kerouac, Vladimir Nabokov, Tom Wolfe, Joan Didion, Toni Morrison, and Don DeLillo. 3 hrs. lect./disc.

LIT NOR

Spring 2011, Spring 2013

More Information »

ENAM 0213 - Modernist Movement      

The Modernist Moment
British Modernism is the literary movement that dominated the first half of the 20th century and whose aftershocks are still strongly felt today. By engaging with major authors of the period such as James Joyce, Virginia Woolf, and D. H. Lawrence, we will explore the aspirations and accomplishments of this revolutionary band of writers. We will then read some contemporary works in order to determine whether Modernist methods have become the default setting of 21st century literary fiction, or whether we can justly claim that we are all now thoroughly “post-modern” writers and readers. 3 hrs. lect.

EUR LIT

Fall 2013

More Information »

ENAM 0214 - Renaissance Lit and Cult      

Renaissance Literature and Culture (Pre-1800)
In this course we will explore the contribution of various aspects of society to literature and literary self-consciousness during the Renaissance, the "golden age" of English literature. The course will cover literatures of the Court and state, love and sex, city and country, science and discovery, and religion and reformation. We will discuss historical difference, political and social conflict, subjectivity and creativity, ethnic and cultural confrontation, and authorship and ownership. Readings will include prose fiction and non-fiction, lyric and epic, and drama by such authors as More, Wyatt, Sidney, Spenser, Marlowe, Shakespeare, Wroth, Bacon, Jonson, Donne, Marvell, and Milton.

EUR LIT

Spring 2011

More Information »

ENAM 0215 - Nature's Meanings      

Nature's Meanings: The American Experience (AL)
What we think of as "nature" today is the result of a complex and fascinating history. The many meanings of nature emerge from Americans' experiences of the physical world and their understandings of, and contests over, their place in that world. This course will investigate how American meanings of nature have changed from European-Native contact to the present. How have changing meanings reshaped American culture and the natural environment? These questions will be addressed from historical, literary, religious, and philosophical perspectives. Readings may include: Emerson, Thoreau, Marsh, Muir, Leopold, and Carson, as well as other Euro-American and Native American writers. 3 hrs. lect.

LIT NOR

Spring 2011, Fall 2012, Fall 2013, Spring 2015

More Information »

ENAM 0216 - The Tragedy of Revenge      

The Tragedy of Revenge (I)
In this course we will explore the vogue for mutilation, murder, madness (real and feigned), torture, vengeful ghosts, plot twists, and meta-plays within plays, all combined with macabre humor and plenty of blood for an afternoon’s entertainment on the English stage circa 1600. Why must revenge be so ghastly and so utterly irresistible? Readings include masterpieces of dramatic literature by Thomas Kyd, George Chapman, Christopher Marlowe, John Marston, William Shakespeare, Thomas Middleton, and John Webster. In addition to examining the moral, ethical, historical, and social implications of the genre in its own day, we will compare them with how fictional narratives of vengeance and vigilantism seem to function for popular audiences today. 3 hrs. lect/disc.

EUR LIT

Spring 2012, Fall 2014

More Information »

ENAM 0218 - Playwriting I      

Playwriting I: Beginning
The purpose of the course is to gain a theoretical and practical understanding of writing for the stage. Students will read, watch, and analyze published plays, as well as work by their peers, but the focus throughout will remain on the writing and development of original work. (Formerly THEA/ENGL 0218) 2 1/2 hrs. lect./individual labs

ART CW

Spring 2011, Fall 2011

More Information »

ENAM 0220 - The Early English Novel      

Castaways, Courtesans, and Criminals: The Early English Novel (II)
The novel was a young and scandalous literary genre in the 18th century. The reading public found the novel to be confusing, unpredictable, racy, morally dangerous--and of course very exciting. In this course we will examine the rise of the novel as a controversial literary genre, tracing its development from Defoe’s Robinson Crusoe and Moll Flanders in the early part of the century, through Richardson’s didactic Pamela and Clarissa and Fielding’s lively Tom Jones in mid-century, to Sterne’s wildly experimental Tristram Shandy and the more familiar world of Jane Austen at the century’s end. We will also consider the ways in which this history has shaped the fiction of today by reading a 21st century novel, to be determined by the course participants.

EUR LIT

Fall 2010, Spring 2013, Spring 2015

More Information »

ENAM 0225 - Eighteenth-Century Literature      

Travails of the Self: Eighteenth-Century Literature (II)
The 'long' 18th century opens with poems of affairs of state and ends with intensely private and often anguished meditations on the self. In this course we will examine the rich range and complexity of 18th century literary concerns through a loosely chronological look at major works of poetry, drama, and fiction of the period: poems of Gay, Pope, Swift, Cowper, and Gray; Congreve's The Way of the World and Sheridan's The School for Scandal; and Fielding's Joseph Andrews and Inchbald's A Simple Story. 3 hrs. lect./disc.

LIT

Fall 2012

More Information »

ENAM 0226 - Boarding School Fiction & Fact      

The Boarding School in Fiction and Fact
From Tom Brown's School Days to Prep, writers have commemorated the boarding school experience. Through studying novels, short stories, memoir excerpts, and films, we will identify recurring archetypes and consider how these have changed over time. We will examine the reciprocal relationship between these schools and society. Do these schools have an agenda beyond their professed ones? How do they contribute to the formation of social power structures? We will look at not only the traditional Anglo-American experience but also that of Native Americans, Chinese, Indian, and others. Readings will include works by John Knowles, P. G. Wodehouse, Curtis Sittenfeld, Anita Shreve, and Han Han. (This course is not open to students who have taken ENAM/EDST 1019)

CMP LIT

Spring 2013

More Information »

ENAM 0227 - Nature, Culture, Poetry      

Encounters With the Wild: Nature, Culture, Poetry (I)
Civilization is often defined against wilderness. The two ideas are not exclusive but mutually constitutive, for wilderness and the wild turn out to be central to notions of the civil and the civilized. Poets have long been preoccupied by the boundaries and connections between these ideas. The word "poetry" itself comes from a Greek word for "craft" or "shaping"; thus, poetry implies the shaping of natural elements into an artful whole. In this course we will examine the literary history of this ongoing dialectic by reading and discussing masterpieces of Western literature, from ancient epics to modern poetry and folklore. As we do so we will rethink the craft of poetry, and the role of the poet, in mapping the wild. Readings will include Gilgamesh, The Odyssey, sections of The Bible and Ovid's Metamorphoses, Beowulf, Sir Gawain and the Green Knight, A Midsummer Night's Dream, The Tempest, and poems by Wyatt, Marlowe, Jonson, Donne, Marvell, Pope, and Thompson. (This course counts toward the ENVS Literature focus and the ENVS Environmental Non-Fiction Focus) lect./disc.

CMP EUR LIT

Fall 2011, Spring 2014

More Information »

ENAM 0228 - ContemporaryBritishPlaywrights      

Contemporary British Playwrights
This course will explore Great Britain's controversial theatrical movement, beginning in the late sixties, which came to be known as "The Fringe." Plays by David Hare, Howard Brenton, Stephan Poliakoff, Howard Barker, David Edgar, Caryl Churchill, Snoo Wilson, Trevor Griffiths, and others will be discussed. Particular focus will be on the plays' dramaturgical and theatrical values, as well as their impact on the overall development of the Fringe theatre movement and its influence on the more traditional theatrical establishment. 3 hrs. lect.

ART EUR LIT

Fall 2010, Fall 2014

More Information »

ENAM 0229 - Neoclassic/Romantic/Victorian      

Neoclassic, Romantic, Victorian: Changes in English Poetry, 1700-1900 (II)
In this course we will examine important shifts of style and sensibility in English poetry of the neoclassic, romantic, and Victorian periods. We will consider issues of poetic genre, structure, and diction, as well as transforming notions of knowledge, nature, and the self. Major poets will include Pope, Swift, Wordsworth, Keats, Tennyson, and Hardy. 3 hrs. lect.

EUR LIT

Fall 2014

More Information »

ENAM 0236 - Contemp. American Playwrights      

Contemporary American Playwrights
In this course we will explore through discussion and in-class dramatic presentations the plays of a selection of contemporary American writers since 1974. Students will give one oral presentation and submit a concluding essay. Authors read will include Sam Shepard, August Wilson, John Patrick Shanley, Marsha Norman, Tracey Letts, Miguel Pinero, and Ntozake Shange. (Formerly THEA/AMLT 0216) 3 hrs. lect.

ART LIT NOR

Winter 2012

More Information »

ENAM 0237 - Emergence of Black Modernism      

Emergence of Black Modernism, 1900-1938
The modern period stands as one of the landmarks of African American literary, artistic, political, and intellectual history. At the crossroads of rebellion and experimentation that defined modernism, black writers—American and immigrants—forged new genres to express the complexity of the black experience. In this course we will track their creations by closely reading key texts like those of W.E.B. Du Bois, Langston Hughes, Zora Neale Hurston, Nella Larsen, and Jean Toomer. At the same time, we will examine the broader intellectual and cultural terrain that influenced these authors such as film, music, and visual arts. 3 hrs. lect.

HIS LIT NOR

Fall 2014

More Information »

ENAM 0239 - The Cinema of Alfred Hitchcock      

The Cinema of Alfred Hitchcock
The cinematic artistry of Alfred Hitchcock in a dozen of his major films (mainly from the 1950s, including North by Northwest, Psycho, Rear Window, The Trouble with Harry, Vertigo) with attention to Hitchcock's style and technique, his obsessive images (such as dangling over the abyss), and his characteristic themes (the transfer of guilt, the double, etc.) and with a focus on the figure of the artist in Hitchcock's work. Issues such as the relationship of film to narrative fiction and to dramatic literature will also be explored. 3 hrs. lect./disc./screening

ART LIT NOR

Fall 2011, Spring 2015

More Information »

ENAM 0240 - Captivity Narratives      

Captivity Narratives
Captivity narratives—first-person accounts of people's experiences of being forcibly taken and held against their will by an "other"—were immensely popular and important in early America; the captivity motif has been perpetuated and transformed throughout later American literature and film. In this course we will explore what these types of tales reveal about how Americans have handled the issues of race and racism, religion, gender, violence and sexuality that experiences of captivity entail. Beginning with classic Puritan narratives (Mary Rowlandson) and moving forward through the 19th and 20th centuries, we will consider the ways that novels (The Last of the Mohicans), autobiographies (Patty Hearst, Iraqi captivity of Pvt. Jessica Lynch) and films (The Searchers, Little Big Man, Dances with Wolves) do cultural work in shaping and challenging images of American national identity. 3 hrs. lect.

ART LIT NOR

Spring 2014, Spring 2015

More Information »

ENAM 0241 - 19th Century Literature      

From Austen to Dracula: The Transformation of 19th Century English Literature (II)
In this course we will trace the development of 19th century literature from the polite and decorous world of Austen in the early decades to the blood-thirsty depravity of Dracula and his kin in the fin de siecle. Far from merely reflecting the society that created it, 19th century literature played an active part in constructing its readers' ideas of gender and sexuality, imperialism and colonialism, class, religion, and technology. We will read novels by Austen, the Brontës, Dickens, George Eliot, Thomas Hardy, and Stoker; poetry by Wordsworth, Tennyson, Browning, Arnold, and Christina Rossetti; and works by Oscar Wilde and others that defy classification. We will pay special attention to authors' efforts to make literature relevant and revelatory in a time of swift and sometimes frightening social and intellectual innovation. 3 hrs lect./disc.

EUR LIT

Fall 2012, Spring 2015

More Information »

ENAM 0243 - Maritime Literature & Culture      

Maritime Literature and Culture (II)
Writers have long found the sea to be a cause of wonder and reflection. A mirror for some and a desert for others, the sea has influenced the imaginations of writers throughout history in vastly different ways. In this course we will read a variety of literary works, both fiction and non-fiction, in which the sea acts as the setting, a body of symbolism, an epistemological challenge, and a reason to reflect on the human relationship to nature. Readings will be drawn from the Bible, Homer's Odyssey, Old English Poetry, Shakespeare, Tennyson, Kipling, Conrad, Melville, Hemingway, Walcott, O'Brian, and others. 3 hrs. lect./disc.

LIT

Fall 2010, Spring 2013, Fall 2014

More Information »

ENAM 0244 - 20th Century English Novel      

Twentieth-Century English Novel
This course will explore the development of the novel in this century, with a primary focus on writers of the modernist period and later attention to more contemporary works. We will examine questions of formal experimentation, the development of character, uses of the narrator, and the problem of history, both personal and political, in a novelistic context. Readings will include novels by Conrad, Joyce, Forster, Woolf, and others. 3 hrs. lect./disc.

EUR LIT

Spring 2012, Fall 2013

More Information »

ENAM 0245 - The Historical Novel      

The Historical Novel
Although 19th century Europeans and Americans regarded their era as the vanguard of international peace and progress, the century was filled with the brutalities of class revolt and the carnage of revolution. The historical novel arose concurrent with these volatile conditions, during the turbulent wake of the American and French Revolutions. We will trace the beginnings of the historical novel in works by Scott and Pushkin, and then its later development in works by Stendhal, Dickens, Anatole France and Pasternak. The central text of the course will be Tolstoy's War and Peace. (Formerly LITS 0220) 3 hrs. lect.

EUR LIT

Fall 2010

More Information »

ENAM 0246 - Literature and Social Protest      

Books that Changed the World: Literature and Social Protest
Can literature change the world? In this course we will examine a wide range of texts written in response to war, economic and social crises (such as the Great Depression or environmental crises), health crises (the AIDS pandemic, for example), social and political oppression (slavery; racial, gender or sexual discrimination), and other historical events. We will explore the profound impact literature can have on the world and examine the rhetorical strategies writers use to effect real-world social change. Readings will include social theories and historiographies as well as literature. lect./disc

LIT

Spring 2014

More Information »

ENAM 0247 - Victorian Literature      

Victorian Literature
The Victorian Period witnessed the novel's heroic attempts to depict the whole of modern society's complexity as well as poetry's struggle to come to grips with industrialized landscapes and imperial aspirations. In this course we will read works by the era's preeminent novelists-the Brontës, Dickens, George Eliot, and Thomas Hardy-and those by such major poets as Tennyson, Browning, Arnold, and Christina Rossetti. We will pay special attention to our various authors' efforts to make literature relevant and revelatory in a time of swift and sometimes frightening social and intellectual innovation. 3 hrs. lect.

EUR LIT

Fall 2010

More Information »

ENAM 0249 - Literature and Race      

Literary Form and the Experience of Race
What does it mean to be a person of color in America? In this course we will look at how African American, Asian American, Chicana, Latina, and Native American writers have dealt with this question in fiction, autobiography, poetry, and film. We will analyze the differences and similarities between the literatures of these cultural groups. We will also look at how these writers have used the distinctly literary nature of their texts in grappling with race in America. Authors may include Julia Alvarez, Octavia Butler, Lorraine Hansberry, Maxine Hong Kingston, Malcolm X, Richard Rodriguez, Leslie Silko, and Amy Tan. 3 hrs. lect./disc.

CMP LIT NOR SOC

Spring 2015

More Information »

ENAM 0250 - The Romantic Revolution      

The Romantic Revolution (II)
he generation of British poets and novelists known collectively as the Romantics decisively rebelled against earlier conceptions of what literature could speak about, how it could best describe a rapidly changing world, and who was fit to be its reader. Arguably the first environmentalists, the Romantics also initiated our modern discussions of gender, class, race, and nationalism. To encounter the Romantics is to witness intellectual courage taking up arms against habit, prejudice, and tyranny. We will trace their genius and daring (and follow their personal attachments for, and rivalries with, each other) through the poetry of Blake, Wordsworth, Coleridge, Byron, Shelley, and Keats, and the novels of Mary Shelley and Emily Brönte. 3 hrs. lect./disc.

EUR LIT

Fall 2011, Fall 2012

More Information »

ENAM 0252 - African American Literature      

African American Literature (AL)
This course surveys developments in African American fiction, drama, poetry, and essays during the 20th century. Reading texts in their social, historical, and cultural contexts—and often in conjunction with other African American art forms like music and visual art—we will explore the evolution and deployment of various visions of black being and black artistry, from the Harlem Renaissance through social realism and the Black Arts Movement, to the contemporary post-soul aesthetic. Authors may include Langston Hughes, Zora Neale Hurston, Gwendolyn Brooks, Ralph Ellison, Lorraine Hansberry, Amiri Baraka, Ishmael Reed, Toni Morrison, Charles Johnson, and Octavia Butler. 3 hrs lect./disc.

LIT NOR

Spring 2011, Fall 2011, Spring 2013, Spring 2015

More Information »

ENAM 0253 - Science Fiction      

Science Fiction
Time travel, aliens, androids, robots, corporate and political domination, reimaginings of race, gender, sexuality and the human body--these concerns have dominated science fiction over the last 150 years. But for all of its interest in the future, science fiction tends to focus on technologies and social problems relevant to the period in which it is written. In this course, we'll work to understand both the way that authors imagine technology's role in society and how those imaginings create meanings for science and its objects of study and transformation. Some likely reading and films include Mary Shelley, Frankenstein, H. G. Wells, The Island of Doctor Moreau, Ridley Scott, Blade Runner, and works by William Gibson, Ursula LeGuin, Octavia Butler and other contemporary writers. (Students who have taken FYSE 1162 are not eligible to register for this course). 3 hrs. lect./disc.

LIT

Spring 2012, Spring 2014

More Information »

ENAM 0259 - Cultural Crossings      

Cultural Crossings: Studies in Literary Influence
Centered on a range of provocative works conceived at different historical moments and in different cultural situations, this course will explore some of the persistent imaginative preoccupations and far-reaching literary ambitions that serve to link authors working in a wide variety of genres and traditions. Authors to be considered this semester will include Jonathan Swift, F. Scott Fitzgerald, Petronius, Thomas Carlyle, Herman Melville, Ivan Turgenev, Ernest Hemingway, Gustave Flaubert, Gertrude Stein, Fyodor Dostoevsky, and Saul Bellow. Depending on individual backgrounds and interests, students may be encouraged to undertake independent comparisons between some of the author’s works we are reading and works by other authors not included on this spring's list. 3 hr. lect.

CMP EUR LIT

Spring 2011, Spring 2012

More Information »

ENAM 0260 - Modern British Drama      

Style and Ideas in Modern British Drama
During the 19th century the craft of Shakespeare devolved into mere popular entertainment, but in the1890s Oscar Wilde and Bernard Shaw re-established drama as literature, to be taken as seriously as the best poetry and fiction. In Ireland, Lady Gregory, Synge, and O’Casey critiqued the moral condition of their nation. And in the 1930s T.S. Eliot used his poetic power to revive verse drama, while Noel Coward and Terence Rattigan created comedies and dramas that used the style/form of dialogue in newly expressive ways. We will explore the superb art and craft of playwriting by these masters of dramatic form.

EUR LIT

Spring 2013

More Information »

ENAM 0261 - Contemporary British Drama      

Contemporary British Drama: 1950 to the Present
Analysis of the language, style, dramaturgy, and meaning of plays by Rattigan, Beckett, Osborne, Pinter, Shaffer, Gray, Bolt, and Stoppard, with some attention paid to contemporary British cinema. 3 hrs. lect./1 hr. disc./3hrs. screen

EUR LIT

Fall 2013

More Information »

ENAM 0262 - American Drama 1930-1960      

American Drama 1930-1960
The 1930s, 1940s, and 1950s saw an unparalleled achievement in dramatic literature as the works of Eugene O'Neill, Lillian Hellman, Arthur Miller, Tennessee Williams, and William Inge were produced. This course will seek to analyze their plays both as dramatic art and in some cases as responses to social and political context. We will study film versions of the plays, as well as additional films that respond to themes in the plays, films such as High Noon and On the Waterfront. 3 hrs. lect./disc.

ART LIT NOR

Spring 2011

More Information »

ENAM 0263 - American Psycho      

American Psycho: Disease, Doctors, and Discontents (II) (AL) *
What constitutes a pathological response to the pressures of modernity? How do pathological protagonists drive readers toward the precariousness of their own physical and mental health? The readings for this class center on the provisional nature of sanity and the challenges to bodily health in a world of modern commerce, media, and medical diagnoses. We will begin with 19th century texts and their engagement with seemingly "diseased" responses to urbanization, new forms of work, and new structures of the family and end with contemporary fictional psychopaths engaged in attacks on the world of images we inhabit in the present. Nineteenth century texts will likely include stories by Edgar Allan Poe, Nathaniel Hawthorne, Herman Melville, and Charlotte Perkins Gilman. Later 20th-century works will likely include Ken Kesey, /One Flew Over the Cuckoo's Nest/, Thomas Harris, /The Silence of the Lambs/, Susanna Kaysen, /Girl, Interrupted/, and Bret Easton Ellis, /American Psycho/.

LIT NOR

Spring 2014

More Information »

ENAM 0270 - South Asian African Carib Lit      

In Other Worlds: South Asian, African, and Caribbean Fiction*
In the last decades, writers from postcolonial South Asia, Africa, and the Caribbean have come into their own, winning international prizes and garnering attention because of the literary quality of their work as well as their nuanced engagement with important issues of our age--issues such as imperialism, orientalism, colonial rule, political resistance, subaltern studies, nationalism, economic development, gender and sexuality, immigration, diaspora, and globalization. We will discuss a range of works by writers such as Chinua Achebe, Chimamanda Ngozi Adichie, J. M. Coetzee, Tsitsi Dangarembga, Assia Djebar, Frantz Fanon, Hanif Kureishi, Nadine Gordimer, C.L.R. James, Jamaica Kincaid, George Lamming, Ngugi Wa Thiong'o, Rohinton Mistry, Arundhati Roy, Salman Rushdie, Edward Said, Zadie Smith, and Wole Soyinka. Texts will vary from semester to semester. 3 hrs. lect/disc.

AAL CMP LIT

Fall 2011, Spring 2013, Fall 2013, Fall 2014

More Information »

ENAM 0273 - Fictions of Globalization      

Slumdogs and Millionaires: Fictions of Globalization
In this course we will explore the rich and still growing body of creative writing addressing the processes (cultural, social, and economic) we now know as globalization. Viewing English as a global literary language, we will read both established and lesser-known authors to examine their sense of globalization's human impact. Special attention will be paid to literary representations of migration, and to certain narratives of self-making and economic possibility shared by fictional, cinematic, and "official" accounts of the recent past. Authors will include V.S. Naipaul, Jamaica Kincaid, Amitav Ghosh, R. Zamora Linmark, Kiren Desai, Aravind Adiga, and Monica Ali.

CMP LIT

Spring 2011, Spring 2014

More Information »

ENAM 0275 - Multi-Ethnic British Lit      

Multi-Ethnic British Literatures
"My name is Karim Amir," announces the protagonist of a Hanif Kureishi novel, "and I am an Englishman born and bred, almost." In this course we will investigate the complex subject of ethnic and national identity in the writing of British authors of Asian, African, and Caribbean descent. We will trace the shifting meanings of "black" and "British" as we move from 1950s migrant fictions to more recent reckonings with British multiculturalism. Topics to be considered will include diaspora and the work of memory; race and religion after 9/11; the representation of urban space; and the experience of asylum-seekers and refugees. 3 hrs. lect./disc.

CMP EUR LIT

Fall 2012, Spring 2015

More Information »

ENAM 0276 - Fictional Worlds      

Fictional Worlds
What makes the imaginary world created by a novel feel “real”? What aspects of narrative in any medium contribute to our sense of being immersed in a coherent and convincing universe? From the Victorians who addressed letters to Mr. Sherlock Holmes at 221B Baker Street, to fans of a Middle Earth that now encompasses multiple books and films, readers have always been drawn to narratives that create a place that seems large and vivid enough to enter. In this course, we will look at novels from the 18th century through the present that create compelling fictional worlds, comparing them to a few works in contemporary media that cultivate a similar sense of immersion in the worlds they represent. Works to be studied will include Defoe, Robinson Crusoe; Eliot, Middlemarch; Joyce, Dubliners; Tolkien, The Fellowship of the Ring; Herbert, Dune; the film, The Matrix, and television episodes of Battlestar Galactica.

LIT

Fall 2010, Fall 2011

More Information »

ENAM 0278 - Protestant or Puritan      

Protestant or Puritan? (II, AL)
What is in a name? The community of English Reformers known as "Puritans," some of whom emigrated to New England, were part of the larger Reformation group called "Protestants." The connotations of the two terms are quite different. We will begin by assessing their quest for reform by reading the New Testament, Calvin, and Milton. We will then explore "Puritanism" in America. We will study writings by John Winthrop, Edward Taylor, and Jonathan Edwards, as well as the image of American Puritanism in literature by Hawthorne, Arthur Miller, and Robert Lowell. We will conclude by considering the transformation of "Puritan" ideas in the social thought of Reinhold Niebuhr. 3 hrs. lect./disc.

CMP LIT NOR PHL

Spring 2013

More Information »

ENAM 0279 - Bible and American Literature      

The Bible and American Literature (AL) (II)
In this course we will study American literary responses to the spiritual and social demands of Christianity as expressed in select Biblical passages and narratives. We will examine how writers of different times and regions responded to this tradition, raising and exploring such questions as: How is Christian conduct to be defined in a political democracy? In an increasingly secular society, can a life lived “in imitation of Christ” result in more than victimization? How can a minister, serving a worldly congregation, know the degree to which his words are sacred or profane? Writers will include Stowe, Melville, Eliot, West, Baldwin, and Robinson. 3 hrs. lect.

LIT NOR PHL

Fall 2012, Fall 2013, Fall 2014

More Information »

ENAM 0285 - Magical Realism(s)      

Magical Realism(s)
Novels that juxtapose the marvelous with the everyday have shadowed (and mocked) mainstream realism for the better part of two centuries, and have proliferated in recent years to the point where they may constitute the predominant genre of our globalized culture. Why should such strange mélanges of the quotidian and the supernatural strike so many authors as the perfect vehicle to express 20th and 21st century anxieties and possibilities? We will explore examples of these boundary-defying fictions across several decades and various national literatures. Authors to be studied will include Woolf, Kafka, Calvino, Morrison, Pynchon, Rushdie, and Garcia-Marquez.

CMP LIT

Spring 2012, Spring 2014

More Information »

ENAM 0288 - Writing Race and Class      

Writing Race and Class
In this course we will take a literary and intersectional approach to topics of race and class. Readings will include essays, stories, and poems by modern and contemporary writers such as: James Baldwin, Audre Lorde, Adrienne Rich, Gloria Anzaldua, Toni Morrison, Dorothy Allison, Amy Tan, Tim Wise, Sherman Alexie, Suheir Hammad, Junot Diaz, Ellen Gilchrist, and Kelly Zen-Yie Tsai. We will discuss the content and the style of these texts as well as engage in writing workshops, contemplative exercises, and a service learning exchange with high school writers in NYC. Writing assignments will consist of creative non-fiction, narrative criticism, and a research paper or project.

CW LIT WTR

Winter 2014

More Information »

ENAM 0302 - Unquiet Minds:Gender & Madness      

Unquiet Minds: Gender and Madness in Literature and Medicine (I)
In this course we will explore the fascinating intersection of gender, literature, and medicine from the Greeks to the present day, focusing in particular on the early modern period. We will consider why and how such diseases as melancholy and hysteria became flashpoints for anxieties about gender and sexuality in this period, turning to both literary and medical narratives to illuminate the troubled interface between mind and body in the social construction of melancholic illness. Alongside literary texts that dramatize mental illness (such as Chrétien's Yvain and Shakespeare's Hamlet) we will read sections from Robert Burton's Anatomy of Melancholy as well as the recently published account by a 17th century woman of her own private struggles with madness. We will conclude with a consideration of contemporary texts that explore the experience of madness, including Kay Redfield Jamison's memoir An Unquiet Mind and Sarah Ruhl's Melancholy Play. In this final section we will also explore the work being done in the exciting emerging field of "narrative medicine," which brings together literature and medicine in quite explicit and strategic ways.

CMP EUR LIT

Spring 2013

More Information »

ENAM 0305 - Love Stories      

Love Stories: Desire & Gender in Medieval and Early Modern Europe
Our modern conceptions of desire, self, body and gender are informed in complex and often invisible ways by earlier narratives of love. We will investigate the conflicting accounts of love written during the medieval and early modern periods, considering in particular the relationship between the idealized notion of "courtly love" and the darker, medical picture of love as a form of madness or melancholia. Reading a variety of works including lyric, drama, romance and medical texts, we will look at the construction of gender and sexuality, the relationship between desire and subjectivity, and the gendering of certain "diseases" of love (such as hysteria) during this period. Authors to be studied will include: Chaucer, Boccaccio, Petrarch, Dante, Shakespeare, and a selection of male and female lyric poets. 3 hrs. lect./disc.

EUR LIT

Spring 2011, Spring 2015

More Information »

ENAM 0309 - Contemporary Literature      

Contemporary Literature
In this course we will explore seminal works of the post-World War II literature written in English. In the course of our readings we will move through the cultural and social transformations beginning with the paranoia and alienation of the Cold War, and continuing with the Civil Rights era, the national crisis of Vietnam, the rise of multiculturalism and the culture wars in the 1980s, the wide ranging effects of the information revolution, the profits and perils of globalization, and the profound anxiety of the war on terror. Writers studied will include Thomas Pynchon, Vladimir Nabokov, Don DeLillo, Donald Barthelme, William S. Burroughs, Toni Morrison, Ishmael Reed, Ana Castillo, and Art Spiegelman. 3 hrs. lect.

LIT

Spring 2012, Spring 2015

More Information »

ENAM 0312 - Modern Poetry      

Modern Poetry
This course will examine the nature and achievement of the major modern poets of Britain and America during the modern period, beginning with the origins of poetic modernism in the work of Gerard Manley Hopkins, Emily Dickinson, and Walt Whitman. The central figures to be studied are William Butler Yeats, T.S. Eliot, Robert Frost, Wallace Stevens, and W.H. Auden. The course will conclude with a look at some after-echoes of modernism in the work of Elizabeth Bishop and others. Two papers, one exam, with occasional oral presentations in class 3 hrs. lect./disc.

LIT

Fall 2010, Fall 2012, Fall 2013, Fall 2014

More Information »

ENAM 0314 - Recent American Poetry      

Recent American Poetry
In this course we will examine the phenomenon of the "important" book of late 20th century American poetry, books that in some way changed how poetry was written and practiced in their time. In looking at the event of each publication, we will study not only individual poems, but also the way those poems are arranged in the volume, the moment in literary and cultural history when the book appeared, and how the book was received. Texts will include Lowell, Life Studies; Plath, Ariel; Berryman, 77 Dream Songs; Rich, The Dream of a Common Language; Snyder, Turtle Island; and Hejinian, My Life. 3 hrs. lect.

LIT NOR

Fall 2011

More Information »

ENAM 0316 - Poetry and Spiritual Tradition      

Poetry and the Spiritual Tradition
In this course we will examine the long and intimate connection between poetry and spirituality, looking especially at the influence of Christian thinking on such English and American poets as John Donne, George Herbert, Gerard Manley Hopkins, and T.S. Eliot. The course will begin with a study of the King James Version of the Book of Psalms, which deeply affected later British and American poetry. We will also read early Taoist and Islamic poets, including Lao Tse and Rumi. The course will conclude with a look at the work of several contemporary poets: Charles Wright, Louis Glück, and Mary Oliver.

CMP LIT PHL

Spring 2013, Spring 2015

More Information »

ENAM 0317 - Lost & Found in Translation      

Lost & Found in Translation
In this course we will explore the fundamental philosophical, sociological, and linguistic questions raised by translingual communication through a survey of the greatest theoretical writings on translation together with a comparative study of multiple translations of coherent sections from major works such as the Bible, the Iliad, One Thousand and One Nights, and the Tao Te Ching, as well as other shorter texts. Questions to be considered include: How much does language determine how we think? How much of language is culture? What is unique to translating sacred texts, poetry, “exotic” languages, and dead languages? How do we define the “untranslatable”? Are translators traitors, drudges, or artists? Can machines translate? 3 hrs. lect./disc.

AAL CMP LIT

Spring 2015

More Information »

ENAM 0318 - Playwriting II: Advanced      

Playwriting II: Advanced
For students with experience writing short scripts or stories, this workshop will provide a support structure in which to write a full-length stage play. We will begin with extended free and guided writing exercises intended to help students write spontaneously and with commitment. Class discussions will explore scene construction, story structure, and the development of character arc. (ENAM 0170 or THEA 0218 or ENAM/THEA 0240; by approval) 2 1/2 hrs. lect./individual labs

ART CW

Spring 2012, Spring 2015

More Information »

ENAM 0319 - Shakespeare      

Shakespeare: Culture, Text, Performance (I)
In this course we will read Shakespeare's plays and poems in the context of the religious, political, and domestic culture of early modern England, yet also with the goal of understanding their relevance today-especially in terms of character, gender, race, and moral agency. We will pay particular attention to Elizabethan and Jacobean staging conventions, and to the tension between the plays as poetic works to be read and as scripts to be performed in aristocratic households and popular amphitheaters. We will also touch on modern film adaptations and interpretations, comparing them with original stagings and contexts.

EUR LIT

Spring 2013, Spring 2014

More Information »

ENAM 0323 - Cinematic Movement: Poetry      

The Cinematic Movement: Poetry
This is a class not only on the craft of writing but also the craft of thinking visually about writing. We will examine artistic problems with writing across cultural lines and gender lines; essentially, we will explore approaches to writing in the voice of "the other." On a craft level, we will explore film and examine ways in which artistic problems can be solved on a visual level, and, ultimately, translated into the craft of writing poetry. At the same time, we will examine ways in which form within poetry and film can inform each other.

ART

Spring 2014

More Information »

ENAM 0325 - Chinese Poetry in the Far West      

Chinese Poetry in the Far West
Although Tang poetry is recognized as one of the great achievements of world literature, its beauty is often lost in translation since so much of that beauty is integrally related to the structure of classical Chinese. In this course—intended for students with no knowledge of Chinese—we will thus spend a significant portion of our time learning from scratch how to read Tang poetry in the original by studying the most common characters and the most fundamental grammatical structures found in the Tang “sonnet.” Our energy will equally be devoted to examining such topics as: differences between Chinese and European poetics; differing theories of translation and intercultural adaptation; Orientalist fantasies of the ideogram; and the impact of ancient Chinese poetry on modern European and American poetry, especially the Imagism movement. Students will both study and write multiple translations in various styles. Readings will include both poetry and critical theory. Students who already know Chinese are not allowed to enroll. 3 hrs. lect/disc.

CMP LIT

Spring 2011, Spring 2014

More Information »

ENAM 0330 - Shakespeare and Contexts      

Shakespeare and Contexts (I)
This course is designed to sample the breadth of Shakespeare's dramatic art, from Titus Andronicus to The Tempest, with an eye to understanding both how the plays may have resonated for his first audiences on stage and how subsequent readers have drawn their own meanings from the published texts. We will therefore pay particular attention to such dramaturgical issues as the construction of character and of plot, the reworking of sources, spectacle, meta-theatricality, and versification, as well as consider what political and commercial implications these plays might have had during Shakespeare's life and what meaning they hold for us today. 3 hrs. lect./3 hr. disc./3 hrs. screen.

EUR LIT

Fall 2011, Fall 2013, Spring 2015

More Information »

ENAM 0331 - Shakespeare's Comedies      

Shakespeare's Comedies and Romances (I)
Close analysis and appreciation of the development of Shakespeare’s comic vision of courtship, love, and marriage, from his earliest comedies, The Comedy of Errors, Taming of the Shrew, and Midsummer Night’s Dream, through the major comedies, Much Ado About Nothing, As You Like It, and Twelfth Night, to the final romances, Pericles, The Winter’s Tale, and The Tempest.
3 hrs. lect./3 hrs. disc./screen.

EUR LIT

Fall 2012

More Information »

ENAM 0332 - Shakespeare's Histories      

Shakespeare's Tragedies and Histories
An intensive consideration of language, style, character, and structure, first in Shakespeare's epic history-play cycle, Richard II, Henry IV, and Henry V, and then in the major tragedies, Hamlet, King Lear, and Anthony and Cleopatra. 3 hrs. lect.; disc; screening

EUR LIT

Fall 2010, Spring 2012, Fall 2014

More Information »

ENAM 0341 - Writing for the Screen II      

Writing for the Screen II
Building on the skills acquired in Writing for the Screen I, students will complete the first draft of their feature-length screenplays. Class discussion will explore the links between conventional notions of visual storytelling and alternative modes and media of writing for the screen, such as television (including sitcoms, one-hour dramas, and long form serials), non-linear and experimental forms, gaming, documentaries, etc. Students will also be required to write either one 'spec script' of a television show of their choosing, or a short-form work in their choice of medium. (Approval required, obtain application on website and submit prior to spring registration) (Formerly FMMC 0106) 3 hrs. sem/3 hrs. screen.

ART

Spring 2011, Spring 2012

More Information »

ENAM 0342 - Southern American Literature      

Southern American Literature
In William Faulkner's Absolom, Absolom! Canadian Shreve McCannon commands his roommate, Mississippian Quentin Compson, "Tell about the South. What's it like there. What do they do there. Why do they live there. Why do they live at all?" Our course will take on writers who want to "tell about the South" in the post-Civil War era and beyond, as they seek to help re-define and revitalize their region. We will focus our regional exploration on the "Southern Renascence," when writers and theorists like the Agrarians re-examined Southern history and reconsidered their role in relation to their regional community. Authors including William Faulkner, Zora Neale Hurston, Robert Penn Warren, Eudora Welty, and Tennessee Williams developed a new awareness of the restrictions of racial and gender roles, an interest in literary experimentation, and an increasingly realistic presentation of social conditions in the south. We will consider the legacy of these writers in later 20th century texts by authors such as Flannery O'Connor, Walker Percy, Alice Walker, Cormac McCarthy, Ernest Gaines, Randall Kenan and even relative newcomers such as Jackson Tippett McCrea. 3 hrs. lect./disc.

LIT NOR

Fall 2010

More Information »

ENAM 0347 - Families-American Ethnic Lits      

Families in American Ethnic Literatures
In this course we will explore depictions of "the family" by authors of various ethnicities-in every case interaction with/integration into "American life" is at issue. Under that broad rubric, we will discuss a range of topics, including: the processes of individual and group identity erasure and formation; experiences of intergenerational conflict; considerations of the burden and promise of personal and communal histories; examinations of varied understandings of race, class, and gender; and interrogations of "Americanness." Authors include Ronald Takaki, Gloria Naylor, Arturo Islas, Sherman Alexie, Philip Roth, Julie Otsuka, Jhumpa Lahiri, Junot Diaz, Gish Jen, and Dinaw Mengestu. 3 hrs. lect.

CMP LIT NOR

Spring 2014

More Information »

ENAM 0350 - Shakespeare and History      

Shakespeare and History (Pre-1800)
In this course, students will explore a selection of Shakespeare's history plays (plus one tragedy and one comedy) alongside the chief issues of Tudor and Stuart history. The professors will employ a fully cross-disciplinary approach to literature and history laying equal stress on Shakespeare's plays and the cultural, political, and religious questions of the 16th and early 17th centuries. Topics will include the Reformation, the cult of Elizabeth, witchcraft, domestic life, urban London, and the English empire. 3 hrs. lect./disc.

EUR HIS LIT

Spring 2011

More Information »

ENAM 0356 - Chicago Stories      

Chicago Stories
This course offers a survey of literature about Chicago, starting in the 1890s, when America's "shock city" first began to imagine itself in fiction and continue up through the present day and contemporary imaginings of the post-industrial city. Readings will include works by Theodore Dreiser, Sherwood Anderson, Carl Sandburg, Willa Cather, Richard Wright, Saul Bellow, Gwendolyn Brooks, Sandra Cisneros, and Stuart Dybek. In addition to landmark examples of Chicago literature, we will consider non-fictional representations of the city's history and culture (e.g. sociology, urban reform writing) as well as critical analyses that illuminate the Chicago literary tradition and urban literature in general. 3 hrs. lect.

LIT NOR

Spring 2011

More Information »

ENAM 0358 - Reading Slavery and Abolition      

Reading, Slavery, and Abolition (II, AL)
In this course we will study both black and white writers' psychological responses to, and their verbal onslaughts on, the "peculiar institution" of chattel slavery. We will work chronologically and across genres to understand how and by whom the written word was deployed in pursuit of physical and mental freedom and racial and socioeconomic justice. As the course progresses, we will deepen our study of historical context drawing on the substantial resources of Middlebury's special collections, students will have the opportunity to engage in archival work if they wish. Authors will include Emerson, Douglass, Jacobs, Thoreau, Stowe, Walker, and Garrison. 3 hrs. sem.

HIS LIT NOR

Fall 2013, Fall 2014

More Information »

ENAM 0359 - The Art Of Nabokov      

The Art of Vladimir Nabokov (in English)
A study of the "perverse" aesthetics of this Russian-American writer. We will expose the hidden plots under the surface of his fiction, follow and arbitrate the ongoing contest between the author and his fictional heroes, and search for the roots of Nabokov's poetics in Western and Russian literary traditions. An attempt will be made to show the continuity between the Russian and English works of this bilingual and bicultural writer. 3 hrs. lect.

LIT NOR

Spring 2015

More Information »

ENAM 0360 - Fiction in Practice and Theory      

Fiction in Practice and Theory
This literature/writing course will emphasize the practice and theory of formal elements in fiction. It will be a craft-level investigation of both traditional fictional forms (including epistolary, monologue, and collage) and texts conscious of themselves as texts. Readings will include examples of traditional forms as well as experimental works by literary groups such as OULIPO, the surrealists, minimalists, post-modernists, and hypertextualists. This course may replace one of the 0300-level requirements for students doing a Creative Writing concentration, but is open to all.

ART

Fall 2011, Fall 2013

More Information »

ENAM 0370 - Advanced Fiction Workshop      

Workshop: Fiction
Study and practice in techniques of fiction writing through workshops and readings in short fiction and novels. Class discussions will be based on student manuscripts and published model works. Emphasis will be placed on composition and revision. (ENAM 0170, ENAM 0175, or ENAM 0185) (Approval required; please apply at the department office in Axinn) 3 hrs. lect.

ART

Fall 2010, Spring 2011, Fall 2011, Winter 2012, Spring 2012

More Information »

ENAM 0371 - Postcolonial Women Writers      

In Different Voices: Postcolonial Writing by Women
In her important essay “Under Western Eyes,” Chandra Talpade Mohanty suggests that the experiences of women from the so-called Third World have to be understood in their own terms, rather than through the lens of Western feminism. Focusing on writings by Assia Djebar, Tsitsi Dangarembga, Merle Hodge, Dionne Brand, Mahasweta Devi, Arundhati Roy, among others, we will examine how women from South Asia, Africa, and the Caribbean use fiction, poetry, and memoir to address a variety of concerns: familial relationships, caste, class, race, religious identity, history, education, work, national liberation, modernization, development, migration, diaspora, and globalization. 3 hrs. lect./disc.

AAL CMP LIT

Spring 2014

More Information »

ENAM 0373 - The Novel and the City      

The Novel and the City
In this course we will examine a number of novels from the 20th and 21st centuries that are about life in the city, taking a global and trans-national approach. We will explore formations of urban life alongside transformations in the novel as a genre. We will put these novels of city life in dialogue with critical theory—that is, theories of culture and society that have as their aim human emancipation (for example, Marxism, feminism, critical race studies, and postcolonial studies). The novels we read will reflect important literary movements such as realism, modernism, and postmodernism. (Not open to students who have taken ENAM 0447)

CMP LIT SOC

Spring 2014, Spring 2015

More Information »

ENAM 0375 - Advanced Poetry Workshop      

Workshop: Poetry
This course will involve the reading and writing of contemporary poetry. It is designed for students who already possess some familiarity with poetry and its traditions and who want to concentrate especially on contemporary work as an adjunct to their own development as poets. Students will read a good deal of poetry, including such writers as Elizabeth Bishop, Seamus Heaney, and Charles Simic. Assignments will include the keeping of a daily notebook, writing poems on a regular basis, and giving oral reports. Close attention will be paid to poetic form and the conventions of poetry. A final portfolio will include revisions of poems and critical writing. (ENAM 0170, 0175, or 0185) (Approval required; please apply at department office.) 3 hrs. lect.

ART

Fall 2010, Spring 2011, Spring 2012

More Information »

ENAM 0380 - Advanced Non-Fiction Workshop      

Workshop: Nonfiction
In this course we will study and practice techniques of nonfiction writing through contemporary essay and narrative nonfiction workshops and readings in the contemporary essay. Class discussions will be based on student manuscripts and published model works. Emphasis will be placed on composition and revision. (ENAM 0170, 0175, or 0185) (Approval required; please apply at the department office in Axinn)

ART

Fall 2010, Winter 2011, Winter 2012

More Information »

ENAM 0385 - Nature Writing Workshop      

Workshop for Nature Writing
Our focus in this workshop will be on producing essays that combine close observation of the natural world with personal narrative and reflection. Journal-keeping, the study of natural history, exercises in writing and drawing out of doors, and reading of such contemporary nature writers as Annie Dillard and Barry Lopez will help to inform both our discussions and the portfolios of finished work which members of the class produce. (Approval required; please apply at department office.) 3 hrs. lect.

ART

Fall 2011

More Information »

ENAM 0386 - Writing the Journey      

Writing the Journey
In this course we will write personal journey narratives that fuse objective observation and exposition with strong narrative and subjective experience. Readings will include works of literary travel writing including The Song Lines and The Snow Leopard, as well as the picaresque novel On the Road. We will also practice the travel article. For the final project students must write about a journey they plan and take during the semester, preferably during Spring Break. (ENAM 0170 or approval from instructor)

ART CW LIT

Spring 2011, Spring 2012

More Information »

ENAM 0402 - The Modernist Moment      

The Modernist Moment
High Modernism can be defined as the unlikely attempt to faithfully depict the fragmentation and randomness of modernity while remaining committed to the notion that art can construct a vision of coherence and beauty that might explain, reconcile, and even heal. Does this enterprise result in a dramatic break with traditional realism, or merely refine and interiorize it? Does its fine-grained psychology mark a retreat from engagement with political issues, or mount a daring challenge to the powers that be? We will press Conrad, Joyce, Woolf, Faulkner, T. S, Eliot, and others for answers to these defining questions.

EUR LIT

Spring 2011, Fall 2013

More Information »

ENAM 0406 - Shaw, Stoppard:the Play Ideas      

Seminar: Shaw, Stoppard and the Play of Ideas
In the 1890s Bernard Shaw introduced into British drama the play of ideas—a play which takes as its theme a social or philosophical problem—and combined it with the traditions of farce and high comedy to create an idiosyncratic kind of drama. For the pasts three decades Tom Stoppard has continued that tradition of wit and intellectual comedy. This seminar will study closely how these two playwrights have given vital form to the play of ideas in a dozen of their major plays. 3 hrs. lect.

Spring 2012

More Information »

ENAM 0408 - D.H. Lawrence      

D.H. Lawrence
We will explore the ways in which Lawrence’s dynamic literary style dramatizes his vision of how the destructive forces of the will, linked with consciousness, industrialization, and the collective mass, are in mortal conflict with the redemptive and salvific forces of sexual passion, linked to the unconscious, nature and natural processes, and the absolute integrity and otherness of the individual. We will also consider how Lawrence’s literary representation has diminished in recent years in America (though much less so in England and elsewhere), and why he is now so infrequently taught in American colleges and universities. Works to be studied include the collected short stories, Sons and Lovers, The Rainbow, Women in Love, St. Mawr, Lady Chatterley’s Lover, selected essays, and poems 3 hrs. lect. (D. Price)

Spring 2011, Spring 2015

More Information »

ENAM 0409 - Seminar: James Joyce      

Seminar: James Joyce
In this seminar we will study two of Joyce’s major works of fiction: Dubliners, A Portrait of the Artist as a Young Man, and Ulysses. There will be some emphasis on background material to illustrate and clarify the rich array of specific details, settings, persons, and events which make up the turn-of-the-century world of Irish Catholic Dublin, the exclusive scene of all of Joyce’s fiction. We will also consider various critical approaches to Joyce’s monuments of modernism. 3 hrs. sem.

Fall 2012

More Information »

ENAM 0416 - Nature of Shakespeare      

The Nature of Shakespeare (Pre-1800)
The plays and poems of William Shakespeare contain some of the best-known commentary on nature, human nature, and the relationship between the two. In this seminar we will focus on what Shakespeare wrote about the physical environment and humanity's relationship to it. As we read selections from the sonnets, narrative poems, histories, comedies, tragedies, and romances, along with a substantial amount of scholarship, we will pay particular attention to such topics as forests, the sea, human-animal relations, floral symbolism, the discursive construction of gender, and the supernatural. Texts will include Venus and Adonis, The Rape of Lucrece, selected sonnets, Richard III, As You Like It, A Midsummer Night's Dream, Henry V, Hamlet, Macbeth, King Lear, Pericles, and The Tempest. 3 hrs. sem.

EUR LIT

Spring 2011

More Information »

ENAM 0417 - Truth and Other Fictions      

Pulling Reality’s Hair: Truth and Other Fictions
We will, in this seminar, occupy ourselves with works that straddle or blur or occasionally just flat out ignore the aesthetic divide between fiction and non-fiction, in the hopes of getting a better grip on the relation between self and other, word and world, narrative strategy and fidelity to truths both large and small. Hence readings will include biographical and autobiographical novels, novelistic treatments of biography and autobiography, and a number of hybrid composites that cannot be classified, though we will surely try. Readings will include Nabokov, Proust, Henry Adams, J.M. Coetzee, W.G. Sebald, Lydia Davis, Joan Didion, Gregoire Bouillier, Art Spiegelman, and Spalding Gray. In addition we will view films by Ross McElwee, Andre Gregory, and Charlie Kaufman. (3 hrs. sem.)

Fall 2010, Fall 2012

More Information »

ENAM 0419 - Gender, Power and Politics      

Gender, Power, and Politics on the Early Modern Stage (I)
In this class we will explore the representation of embodiment on the early modern stage, considering as we do so how theatrical embodiment intersects with other treatments of the body in early modern culture. As we consider the representation of the gendered body on stage or in so-called "closet" dramas, we will read both early modern and contemporary theoretical accounts of gender as performance, investigating among other issues the use of boy actors, the representation of specifically "female" disorders (e.g., "suffocation" or hysteria), the performance of maternity, the portrayal of female "voice" or vocality, and the treatment of same-sex eroticism. We will also study the dramatic use of related cultural codes pertaining to betrothal, marriage, cross-dressing, and sexual slander. Primary readings will include: Shakespeare's The Winter's Tale, Webster's Duchess of Malfi, Cary's Tragedy of Mariam, and Cavendish's Convent of Pleasure. Historical sources will include midwifery manuals, conduct books, medical treatises on hysteria, and legal accounts of betrothal and marriage. 3 hrs. lect.

EUR LIT

Fall 2011, Spring 2014

More Information »

ENAM 0421 - Hamlet      

Hamlet (Pre-1800)
/Hamlet/ is the most written-about of all literary texts. In this seminar we will examine its enduring centrality, which its lurid preoccupation with revenge, murder, incest, and ambition cannot fully explain. What did it mean in 1599, when first performed, and how has its meaning changed, as evident in modern editions and films? Why is the character Hamlet often mistaken for a real person? How has the play contributed to philosophy, art, and conceptions of self and gender throughout its history? Materials include the playtext in various renaissance and modern editions and contextual sources (literary and non-literary texts, art, film, and criticism).

EUR LIT

Fall 2010

More Information »

ENAM 0422 - Gender, Power, and Politics      

Gender, Power, and Politics on the Stage
In this course we will explore the construction of gender in modern and pre-modern culture primarily through an analysis of the theatrical embodiment of gender. We will read both early modern and contemporary theoretical accounts of gender as a performance, using Judith Butler's conception of performativity as a touchstone for our investigation. Beginning with such critical theatrical issues as the use of boy actors on the early modern English stage, the representation of specifically "female" disorders (e.g., "suffocation" or hysteria) in both medical and dramatic texts, the scapegoating of powerful female figures as witches, and the treatment of same-sex eroticism in Cavendish's early lesbian drama, we will consider how some of these issues reappear in contemporary plays, including for instance David Hwang's M Butterfly. The class will also explore the transgender themes in playwrights such as Doug Wright and Michel Marc-Bouchard. We will play close attention to other cultural products that shed light on these dramatic representations of gender, including medical texts, betrothal and marriage law, sumptuary codes, contemporary films, and contemporary marketing products that highlight the performative nature of gender. (This course satisfies the ENAM seminar requirement; this course meets the major requirement for WAGS 0400 for 2010-2011 only).

ART EUR LIT

Spring 2011

More Information »

ENAM 0423 - Return of the Screw      

Return of the Screw: Tangled Texts
In this course we will explore the ambiguous and incomplete in fiction, and where these qualities take readers. We will start out by reading Henry James's The Turn of the Screw, the most mind-blowing, sinister, and perplexing ghost story in literature. (Or maybe it's not a ghost story.) By looking at the ways in which several generations of readers and critics have grappled with the story's essential ambiguity, we will ask questions about the complicated issue of authorial intent in fiction, the relevance of biography, and the limits of interpretation. Besides criticism and biographical excerpts we will read other fictions that have reimagined the novella, such as A.N. Wilson's A Jealous Ghost. We will then look at other literary pairings (such as Bronte's Jane Eyre and Rhys's Wide Sargasso Sea) and self-contradictory texts by one author (such as Salinger's Seymour and A Perfect Day for Bananafish) to consider other ways in which texts have responded to each other. We will end by considering some contemporary works (online and off) that break down the boundaries between author and reader. In the course of the readings we will be investigating such concepts as originality and plagiarism, intertextuality, and authenticity.

LIT

Spring 2012, Fall 2014

More Information »

ENAM 0425 - Booker Prize Fiction      

Booker Prize Fiction
The Man Booker Prize for Fiction is awarded annually to a writer from the British Commonwealth or the Republic of Ireland for the best full-length novel published in the UK that year. In this seminar, we will study a selection of winners since the award was established in 1968, including this year's winner to be announced in October. Readings will reflect a diversity of writers, settings, and styles, such as Salman Rushdie's Midnight's Children (1981), Penelope Lively’s Moon Tiger (1987), Peter Cary's Oscar and Lucinda (1988), Kasuo Ishiguro’s The Remains of the Day (1989), Michael Ondaatje’s The English Patient (1992), J. M. Coetzee's Disgrace (1997), Arundhati Roy's The God of Small Things (1999), Yann Martel’s Life of Pi (2001), and Howard Jacobson's The Finkler Question (2010). Topics of research and discussion will include literary innovation, authorial reputation, the politics of prizes, publicity, and film adaptation. 3 hrs. sem.

EUR LIT

Fall 2011

More Information »

ENAM 0426 - Genius and Madness      

Genius and Madness in the Novel
Perhaps because the authors of literary works have often been described as suffering from the “divine madness” of inspiration, literature has often depicted the borderline between productive genius and dangerous insanity as a thin and porous one. Through an encounter with such novels as Frankenstein, The Bell Jar, The Hours, and Lolita, as well as works by James, DeLillo, and Calvino, we will investigate why and how our society insists that those capacities which allow the mind to create triumphantly are also feared as the selfsame ones that may alienate it from happiness and a healthy grasp of reality.

Spring 2011

More Information »

ENAM 0431 - In The American Grain      

Senior Seminar: In the American Grain
How are the preoccupations of mid 19th century American literature reflected in the 20th and 21st centuries? In this seminar, we will read works by major U.S. authors with an eye to developing definitions for ourselves of “the American Grain” in modern and postmodern literature. Readings may include Emerson, Hawthorne, Williams, Faulkner, Pound, Stevens, Delillo, and Morrison, as well as a number of works of criticism. 3 hrs. sem/disc.

Fall 2010

More Information »

ENAM 0434 - The Transformation of Desire      

The Transformation of Desire
In this course we will focus on the ways that novels near the turn of the 20th century imagine epic changes in the experience of desire and longing-for consumer goods, for wealth, for fame, for sex, and for happiness. In the face of urbanization, industrialization, and a burgeoning consumer culture, how was the nature of yearning altered and what can novelists tell us about that change? The course will focus significantly on the novels of Edith Wharton and Willa Cather, but will also include works by Jane Austen (to provide an earlier portrait of desire), Thomas Hardy, Henry James, F. Scott Fitzgerald, and W. Somerset Maugham. Some particular texts might include Wharton’s, The House of Mirth and The Age of Innocence; Cather’s, My Antonia and The Professor's House; Hardy’s, Tess of the D'Urbervilles and Jude the Obscure. 3 hr sem.

LIT

Fall 2011

More Information »

ENAM 0440 - Postcolonial Literature Theory      

Postcolonial Literature and Theory
The field of postcolonial studies addresses the literature and culture of regions that have been marked by the experience of European colonialism. Today Postcolonial writers and critics are at the cutting edge of creative and scholarly work around the world. We will read literature by writers such as Wole Soyinka, Assia Djebar, Patrick Chamoiseau, Michelle Cliff, Mahasweta Devi, and Salman Rushdie, We will consider these works alongside theory, history, and anthropology in order to explore their political, cultural, and literary dynamics. We will address such topics as: critiques of colonialism, nationalism, social movements, postcolonial gender studies, development, neocolonialism, globalization, migration, and diaspora.

AAL CMP LIT SOC

Spring 2012

More Information »

ENAM 0441 - Literature and Seduction      

Literature and Seduction
This course will look at works of erotic and emotional persuasion: some represent seductions, some (love poems and love letters) are intended as persuasive documents themselves, while others (some first person narratives) are arguably designed to seduce the reader. As we explore material from antiquity through the 21st century, we will examine the ways in which the idea of seduction has (or has not) changed, and what cultural conceptions of seduction say about ideologies of gender, subjectivity, sexuality, and literary representation. Texts will include works by Ovid, Plutarch, Keats, Wilde, Bronte, Nabokov, Rostand, Laclos, Wittig, and others; numerous historical documents and theoretical texts; and contemporary treatments of the subject from Nora Roberts to Cosmo to Neil Strauss. (This course satisfies the ENAM seminar requirement; this course meets the major requirement for WAGS 0400 for 2011-2012 only). Sem.

EUR LIT

Spring 2012

More Information »

ENAM 0442 - Religious Poetry      

Batter My Heart: Religious Poetry from Donne to Mary Oliver
In this seminar we will look closely at some of the major religious poets (broadly defined to include a variety of traditions) in the course of English and American poetry from the 17th century writers John Donne and George Herbert to the contemporary American poet Mary Oliver. Major figures will look at include Donne, Herbert, Wordsworth, Hopkins, Dickinson, T. S. Eliot, W.H. Auden, Charles Wright, and Mary Oliver. There will be prose selections from various poets and spiritual writers, including Emerson.

LIT PHL

Spring 2012, Spring 2014

More Information »

ENAM 0443 - Literature's Body      

Writing in Blood: Literature’s Body
To what extent is our condition defined and our destiny determined by the physical bodies that envelop us? In this seminar we will accompany poets, playwrights, and novelists as they investigate the ecstasies, agonies, ambiguities, and transformations that flesh imposes upon our daily lives. Simultaneously, we will consider their various attempts to transcend our bodily limitations, whether by means of religion, imagination, sexuality, or pharmaceuticals. Along the way, we will collaborate with our writers as they scrutinize the human form as a biological fact, social segregator, philosophical conundrum, and undiscovered country. Authors will include Dickinson, Yeats, Shakespeare, Beckett, Ondaatje, and Coetzee. 3 hrs. sem.

EUR LIT

Spring 2013

More Information »

ENAM 0445 - Novels Environmental Justice      

Recent Novels of Environmental Justice
In recent years environmental justice has emerged as a major topic in the humanities. This intersection of environmentalism and social justice is motivated by a concern for the differential access to natural resources (clean water, clean air, tillable land) afforded to different groups of people within particular social systems. Students will encounter these themes through the reading of many global Anglophone novels, including Waterland, by Graham Swift; The Hungry Tide, by Amitav Ghosh; Animal's People, by Indra Sinha; A Thousand Acres, by Jane Smiley; Ceremony, by Leslie Marmon Silko; and Disgrace, by J.M. Coetzee. 3 hrs. sem.

CMP LIT

Spring 2014

More Information »

ENAM 0447 - The Novel and the City      

The Novel and the City
In this course we will take a global and transnational approach as we examine a number of 20th and 21st century British and Anglophone novels about life in the city. We will explore formations of urban life alongside transformations in the novel as a genre. We will put these novels of city life in dialogue with critical theory-that is, theories of culture and society that have as their aim human emancipation (for example, Marxism, feminism, critical race studies, and postcolonial studies). The novels we read will reflect important literary movements such as realism, modernism, and postmodernism. 3 hrs. sem.

CMP LIT SOC

Spring 2013

More Information »

ENAM 0448 - Portraits of the Lady      

Portraits of the Lady: American Literature at a Moment of Transition (II AL)
From the end of the Civil War to the close of WWI, America was obsessed with issues of national identity. Cultural changes abounded: accelerating immigration and urbanization, intensifying class conflict, and advances in the social and physical sciences. In this transitional era, Americans sought a lost cultural homogeneity, as illusory as that may have been. One way to satisfy that longing was to depict ideas and ideals about American women. Images of women—literary and pictorial—became a way to represent the values of the nation and codify the fears and desires of its citizens. In this seminar we will consider the works of writers contemplating the position of the American woman, including Edith Wharton, Henry James, William Dean Howells, Kate Chopin, and Willa Cather. In addition, in keeping with the era's interest in realism and its focus on the visual, we will examine representations of women in painting, portraiture, sculpture, photography, and popular media. 3 hrs. sem.

ART LIT NOR

Fall 2012

More Information »

ENAM 0450 - Faulkner and His Influence      

Faulkner and His Influence (AL)
William Faulkner was extreme: the most radical formal innovator among the American Modernist novelists and an outrageous (and subtle) thinker about the complex social and racial history of the American south. In this course we will read Faulkner’s major works (As I Lay Dying; The Sound and the Fury; Light in August; Absalom, Absalom!; and Go Down, Moses) and works by Flannery O'Connor, Charles Johnson, and others influenced by Faulkner's style and vision. 3 hrs. sem.

LIT NOR

Spring 2013

More Information »

ENAM 0455 - Problems in Narrative      

Problems in Narrative Analysis, 1814 to 2013
In this seminar we will examine issues of genre, theme, and style that pose particularly demanding problems of analysis in the novel as it develops into the 21st century. Among works to be discussed will be Austen's Mansfield Park, Joyce's Portrait of the Artist as a Young Man, and the 2013 Man Booker Prize winner (to be announced in October). We will scrutinize point of view, narrative style, authorial investment in or resistance to plot and/or character, and breadth of moral and political vision. 3 hrs sem.

EUR LIT

Fall 2013

More Information »

ENAM 0456 - Othellos      

Othellos
In this course we will read Shakespeare's Othello from a number of different perspectives, including those of race, religion, gender, staging, form, and literary legacy. We will engage the play at the level of rhetorical analysis, textual history, character analysis, source analysis, staging, and stage history. We will also study contemporary dramas resembling Othello (e.g., Titus Andronicus, Selimus, the Renegado, The Duchess of Malfi, and The Winter's Tale), and examine its legacy in texts such as Woolf's Orlando and Ellison's Invisible Man, and popular films (e.g., "O," Kalyattam, and Jarum Halus). At every point, we will consider critical reception and theoretical implications. 3 hrs. sem.

CMP EUR LIT

Fall 2013

More Information »

ENAM 0458 - Merchants of Venice      

Merchants of Venice
In this course we will read Shakespeare's The Merchant of Venice from different perspectives, including those of race, religion, gender, staging, and form. We will engage the play at the level of rhetorical analysis, textual history, character analysis, source analysis, and stage history. We will also study contemporary dramas resembling The Merchant of Venice (e.g., Three Ladies of London, Jew of Malta, Othello), and examine its legacy in film adaptations and in works by such authors as Charles Dickens, Philip Roth, Wladislaw Szpilman, and Christopher Moore. At every point, we will consider critical reception and theoretical implications. 3 hrs. sem.

EUR LIT

Spring 2015

More Information »

ENAM 0460 - Affect, Emotion, Feeling      

Affect, Emotion, and Structures of Feeling
What is the role of emotion in the shaping of identities, communities, and political cultures? How have narratives of shame, love, melancholy, anger, and “muddle” allowed writers to address experiences of injury and stigmatization? In this seminar we will explore the growing body of interdisciplinary scholarship on affect. Readings will include theoretical approaches (Deleuze, Berlant, Ngai, Hardt/Negri, Williams, Love) and literary works drawn mostly from queer and postcolonial archives. Topics considered will include affective citizenship; embodiment and touch; antisocial behavior; empathy, hospitality, and conviviality; care-giving and affective labor; and the recent embrace of tragedy in postcolonial studies. 3 hrs. sem.

LIT SOC

Fall 2014

More Information »

ENAM 0500 - Special Project: Lit      

Special Project: Literature
Approval Required.

Fall 2010, Winter 2011, Spring 2011, Fall 2011, Winter 2012, Spring 2012, Fall 2012, Winter 2013, Spring 2013, Fall 2013, Winter 2014, Spring 2014, Fall 2014, Spring 2015

More Information »

ENAM 0520 - Special Project: Dramatic Lit.      

Special Project: Dramatic Literature
The department will consider applications from qualified students who wish to undertake advanced tutorials in dramatic literature. A student proposing a tutorial should, after discussion with a possible project director and with his/her advisor, submit a brief written proposal to the department office two weeks prior to registration. Approval required. Please apply online at http://www.middlebury.edu/academics/enam/resources/forms or at the Department office. (Staff)

Fall 2010, Winter 2011, Spring 2011, Fall 2011, Winter 2012, Spring 2012, Fall 2012

More Information »

ENAM 0560 - Special Project: Writing      

Special Project: Creative Writing
(Approval Required)

Fall 2010, Winter 2011, Spring 2011, Fall 2011, Winter 2012, Spring 2012, Winter 2013, Winter 2014

More Information »

ENAM 0700 - Senior Essay: Critical Writing      

Senior Thesis: Critical Writing
Individual guidance and seminar (discussions, workshops, tutorials) for those undertaking one-term projects in literary criticism or analysis. All critical thesis writers also take the essay workshop (ENAM 700Z) in either Fall or Spring Term.

Fall 2010, Spring 2011, Fall 2011, Spring 2012, Fall 2012, Spring 2013, Fall 2013, Spring 2014, Fall 2014, Spring 2015

More Information »

ENAM 0701 - Senior Essay: Creative Writing      

Senior Essay: Creative Writing
Discussions, workshops, tutorials for those undertaking one-term projects in the writing of fiction, poetry, or creative nonfiction.

Fall 2010, Spring 2011, Fall 2011, Spring 2012

More Information »

ENAM 0705 - Senior Colloquium      

Senior Colloquium in Literary Studies
In this course we will study, discuss, and analyze great works of world literature from the perspective of their achievement in thought and literary art. We will further consider them as part of a vital literary tradition in which the works enter into dialogue with one another. Among the authors to be appreciated this term are: Homer, Tolstoy, Dostoevsky, Mann, Proust, Joyce. (Open to non-majors with approval of instructor). 3 hrs. sem.

Fall 2010, Fall 2011, Fall 2012, Fall 2013, Fall 2014

More Information »

ENAM 0708 - Joint Senior Work: ENAM-THEA      

Senior Work: Joint Majors in English & American Literatures and Theatre
Approval required.

Fall 2014, Spring 2015

More Information »

ENAM 0710 - Senior Thesis: Critical Writ.      

Senior Thesis: Critical Writing
Individual guidance and seminar (discussions, workshops, tutorials) for those undertaking two-term projects in literary criticism or analysis. All critical thesis writers also take the thesis workshop (ENAM 710z) in both Fall and Spring terms.

Fall 2010, Winter 2011, Spring 2011, Fall 2011, Winter 2012, Spring 2012, Fall 2012, Winter 2013, Spring 2013, Fall 2013, Winter 2014, Spring 2014, Fall 2014

More Information »

ENAM 0711 - Senior Thesis: Creative Writ.      

Senior Thesis: Creative Writing
Discussions, workshops, tutorials for those undertaking two-term projects in the writing of fiction, poetry, or creative nonfiction.

Fall 2010, Winter 2011, Spring 2011, Fall 2011, Winter 2012, Spring 2012

More Information »

ENAM 0720 - Senior Comprehensive Program      

Senior Comprehensive Program
This course will include readings and discussions of a range of poems, plays, fiction, and theory from 1400 to the present. Discussion of these texts will take place in intense daily seminars, supplemented by three lectures by literary scholars. Four papers are also required, one for each week of seminars. Three informal receptions will round out the communal aspect of this culminating enterprise.

WTR

Winter 2011

More Information »

ENAM 1001 - Fictional Fictions      

Fictional Fictions
In this course we will engage with novels whose primary focus is the novel itself—how the genre is imagined, structured, written, sold, read, celebrated, and denounced. Our chosen meta-fictions will variously focus on the psychology of artistic production, on the philosophical issues surrounding the telling of “true lies,” on the social function of novels in our culture, and on what is at stake in the supposedly private act of reading. Our texts will include works such as Joyce’s Portrait of the Artist as a Young Man, McEwan’s Atonement, Graham Greene’s The End of the Affair, Cunningham’s The Hours, and DeLillo’s Mao II. This course counts as an ENAM elective.

LIT WTR

Winter 2012, Winter 2014

More Information »

ENAM 1002 - Shakespeare: Extreme Sonnets      

Shakespeare: Extreme Sonnets
In this course, we will devote four weeks of intensive study to Shakespeare's 154 sonnets in extreme detail, primarily through a close reading of their poetic language, but also with consideration to questions of historical and biographical context, the sonnet sequence as a genre, problems of interpretation, and theories about their genesis. Extensive in-class reading and discussion of the sonnets will follow nightly critical readings. A significant amount of time will also be spent on the art of recitation. Students will be required to memorize and recite several sonnets over the course of the term in addition to composing one or two original sonnets of their own. This course counts as an ENAM Pre-1800 elective.

EUR LIT WTR

Winter 2012

More Information »

ENAM 1003 - Madame Bovary      

Madame Bovary
Gustave Flaubert’s Madame Bovary is widely regarded as the first “modern” novel and as one of the best novels ever written. First published in serial form in France in 1856, this story of a deeply dissatisfied provincial wife provoked a sensation, culminating in a spectacular state trial of author and publisher on charges of public immorality. Those events have long since faded into history, but the novel’s freshness, brilliance, psychological power, and literary influence can be felt to this day. In this course we will read the novel in two English translations, briefly review its historical and cultural context and its enduring literary heritage, and conclude with its most recent film adaptation, by Claude Chabrol (1991).

LIT WTR

Winter 2011, Winter 2013

More Information »

ENAM 1004 - Short Dickens      

Short Dickens
“Whatever the word ‘great’ means,” wrote Chesterton, “Dickens was what it means.” In this course we will study five of the shortest of Dickens’s fifteen novels, which appeared serially between 1837 and 1870: Oliver Twist, Hard Times, A Tale of Two Cities, Great Expectations, and the unfinished Mystery of Edwin Drood. We will discuss, in addition, Dickens’s rise to fame, Victorian London, serial publication, sentimentalism, the illustrations to Dickens’s novels, as well as various commercial enterprises based on the mania for Dickens—among them the ill-fated Dickens World in Kent.

EUR LIT WTR

Winter 2014

More Information »

ENAM 1007 - Into the Forest: Fairy Tales      

Into the Forest: Fairy Tales and their Cultural Contexts
In this course we will study the evolving history of fairy tales from Apuleius’ Golden Ass to the present day. Beginning with early versions of particular well-known stories--including Little Red Riding Hood, The Juniper Tree, and Bluebeard--by Giambattista Basile, the brothers Grimm, and Charles Perrault, we will also focus on the Lais of Marie de France, which incorporate fairy tale elements into romance in strikingly unconventional ways. The second half of the course will focus on feminist revisions of fairy tales by Angela Carter and A. S. Byatt, whose narratives interrogate the problematic conjunction of sex and violence in these stories. A central theoretical focus throughout the course will be the representation of sex and gender in these tales. In addition to literary narratives we will also study films inspired by fairy tales, including Pan’s Labyrinth by Guillermo del Toro, and Neil Gaiman’s Coraline (both book and film). This course counts as elective credit towards the WAGS major or as an ENAM Pre-1800 elective. (This course is not open to students who have taken FYSE 1201).

EUR LIT WTR

Winter 2012

More Information »

ENAM 1008 - Writing Poems      

Writing Poems This Month, For A Lifetime
In this poetry writing and reading workshop, we will learn how personal, national and international “occasions”, events, and news offer us the opportunity to engage language, form, and feeling in writing and revising our poems. We will read published poems, as examples, and respond to prompts, in and out of class, that will allow us to experiment with and refine our own poems. This course counts as an introductory creative writing elective for the ENAM major.

ART WTR

Winter 2012, Winter 2014

More Information »

ENAM 1009 - History of English Language      

History of the English Language
Who was the first “dude”? Is “unfriend” acceptable English? In this course we will explore the story of English as a history of language contacts and language change. We will begin the story in 449 AD with the Germanic dialect of Anglo-Saxon invaders, and end by examining global Englishes in the digital age. Along the way we will study literary and popular texts (from “Caedmon’s Hymn” to Harry Potter) representing the major English periods (Old, Middle, Early Modern, and Modern) in order to understand the changes in spelling, pronunciation, grammar, syntax, and vocabulary resulting from both internal evolution and such external, cultural factors as war, migration, global markets, music, film, television, and the internet.

LIT SOC WTR

Winter 2014

More Information »

ENAM 1010 - Nature of Intimacy      

The Nature of Intimacy
In this course we will investigate how contemporary ideas of nature, environmentalism, and environmental degradation intersect with different notions of intimacy. Scholars such as William Cronon, Val Plumwood, and Jenny Price will provide the backdrop for our exploration of a provocative range of literature and art—including fiction by Don DeLillo, photography by Subhankar Banerjee, poetry by Mary Oliver, and films by Werner Herzog. We will consider the following questions: can art and literature animate questions of intimacy in our environmental context; what kind of environmental politics can aesthetics inspire; and how is digital culture changing the face of nature and intimacy? This course counts as elective credit towards the ENAM major.

ART WTR

Winter 2014

More Information »

ENAM 1011 - Modern Representations of War      

Celebration and Resistance: Modern Representations of War in Literature and Film
In this course we will consider some iconic war novels and films that have defined our modern understanding of war. In particular, we will consider the narrative as a vehicle for both celebration and resistance. Questions we will address include: Does the narrative change from war to war? Is there a “good” war in these narratives? If representation requires a kind of exaggeration to approximate its object, what happens when the object of representation is itself extreme? How is social capital transformed in war? What constitutes bravery in resistance? When does resistance become terrorism? What kinds of resistance are possible in literature? This course counts as elective credit towards the ENAM major.

LIT WTR

Winter 2014

More Information »

ENAM 1015 - Elevated Fictions: Lit of Mtns      

Elevated Fictions: Literatures and Cultures of the Mountains
What is it about an elevated landscape that so captures the human imagination? In different parts of the world, mountains have been the abodes of the gods, sites of reverent reflection, and projections of human desire for advancement and conquest. Through comparative examination of academic, literary, and visual texts from around the world, we will explore why mountain landscapes have drawn humans to reflect their spirit into and onto this particular topographical feature of nature. Authors will include Immanuel Kant, P.B. Shelley, William Wordsworth, Milarepa, Premendra Mitra, Edwidge Dandicat, Robert MacFarlane, and John Elder. (This course satisfies the ENAM elective credit).

LIT WTR

Winter 2011

More Information »

ENAM 1016 - Cinema of David Lean      

Cinema of David Lean
An introduction to the art of cinema through an intensive study of how David Lean uses his camera to tell a story visually and expressively in a dozen of his films: from In Which We Serve (1942) through his famous Dickens adaptations, Great Expectations (1946) and Oliver Twist (1948), to A Passage to India (1984), and including The Bridge on the River Kwai (1957) and Lawrence of Arabia (1962), of which Steven Spielberg observed that he did not know any director who did not genuflect before these two cinematic masterpieces. (Some attention will be paid to Lean’s literary sources.)

ART EUR WTR

Winter 2011

More Information »

ENAM 1019 - Boarding School Fiction & Fact      

The Boarding School in Fiction and Fact
From Tom Brown’s School Days to Prep, writers have commemorated the boarding school experience. Through studying novels, short stories, memoir excerpts, and film, we will identify recurring archetypes and consider how they have changed over time. We will also examine the reciprocal relationship between these schools and society. For example, is the experience of students in these schools fundamentally different from that of students who live at home? Do these schools have an agenda beyond their professed ones? Students will work on independent projects according to individual interest. We will read works by John Knowles, Louis Auchincloss, P. G. Wodehouse, Curtis Sittenfeld, Anita Shreve, and others. LIT (K. Kramer)

LIT WTR

Winter 2011

More Information »

ENAM 1020 - Performing Others: Solo Show      

Performing Others: Writing and Staging the Solo Show
Theatre artists such as Anna Deavere Smith, Danny Hoch, and Sarah Jones make a habit of writing and performing roles they were not born to play. Jumping over barriers of race, religion, ethnicity, gender, sexual orientation, these soloists are committed to embodying “the other.” In addition to analyzing professional works, students in Performing Others will create and develop a variety of monologues featuring characters that may be fictional, biographical, or based upon interviews. Together we will form an ensemble for developing new material and for processing issues that necessarily arise when we dare to imagine ourselves as others.

ART CW WTR

Winter 2011, Winter 2013

More Information »

ENAM 1021 - Fictions of the Far North      

Fictions of the Far North
The far north is the setting for a significant body of North American literature in English. Both “far” and “north” are relative terms defined by cultural parameters rather than strict geographic coordinates. In this discussion-based course we will read novels, short stories, and poems set in Alaska, Newfoundland, the shores of Hudson Bay, and northern Vermont, including such works as The Shipping News, by Annie Proulx; Where the Rivers Flow North, by Howard Frank Mosher; Due North, by Mitchell Smith; Jack London’s short stories of the Klondike, and poems by Robert Service. We will pay particular attention to how these works represent the human relationship to high latitude ecosystems. (Not open to students who have taken FYSE 1370)

LIT NOR WTR

Winter 2013

More Information »