Offerings By Semester

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CRWR0218A-W17

Cross-Listed As:
THEA0218A-W17

CRN: 11444

Playwriting I: Beginning
Please Register Via THEA 0218
Playwriting I: Beginning
The purpose of the course is to gain a theoretical and practical understanding of writing for the stage. Students will read, watch, and analyze published plays, as well as work by their peers, but the focus throughout will remain on the writing and development of original work. (Formerly THEA/ENAM 0218)

CRWR0360A-W17

CRN: 11369

Fiction in Practice & Theory
Fiction in Practice and Theory
This literature/writing course will emphasize the practice and theory of formal elements in fiction. It will be a craft-level investigation of both traditional fictional forms (including epistolary, monologue, and collage) and texts conscious of themselves as texts. Readings will include examples of traditional forms as well as experimental works by literary groups such as OULIPO, the surrealists, minimalists, post-modernists, and hypertextualists. This course may replace one of the 0300-level requirements for students doing a Creative Writing concentration, but is open to all.

CRWR0375A-W17

CRN: 11403

Advanced Poetry Workshop
The Walk of A Poem
Advanced Poetry Workshop: The Walk of a Poem
As Lyn Hejinian writes, “Language makes tracks.” Poets from Chaucer to Whitman to O’Hara have used walking as a poetic method, thematic subject, narrative device, and pedestrian act. The walk is literal and imaginary, metrical and meandering; it traverses urban grids and bucolic landscapes, junctions of space, time, and lexis. In this workshop we will read the topographies of poems, focusing on lyrical cities from Paris to Harlem, Thoreauvian ambles through woods and field, and other literary wanderings and linguistic itinerancies, in order to examine how language gets made and mirrored in the act of moving through place. Students will also set out on walks through the local landscape as they produce their own work. Students will address crucial questions and challenges focused on the craft of poetry through rigorous readings, in-class writing exercises, critical discussions, collaborations, and the development of a portfolio of writing, including drafts and revisions. By the end of the course, students will have engaged deeply with the practice of poetry, established a writing discipline, honed their skills, generated new work, explored by foot, and extended their sense of the possibilities of a poem.

CRWR0380A-W17

CRN: 10957

Advanced Non-Fiction Workshop
Advanced Nonfiction Workshop
In this course we will study and practice techniques of nonfiction writing through contemporary essay and narrative nonfiction workshops and readings in the contemporary essay. Class discussions will be based on student manuscripts and published model works. Emphasis will be placed on composition and revision. (CRWR 0170, CRWR 0175, or CRWR 0185) (Approval Required; please apply at the department office in Axinn) (formerly ENAM 0380)

CRWR0560A-W17

CRN: 10958

Special Project: Writing
Special Project: Creative Writing
Approval Required.

CRWR0560B-W17

CRN: 10959

Special Project: Writing
Special Project: Creative Writing
Approval Required.

CRWR0560C-W17

CRN: 10960

Special Project: Writing
Special Project: Creative Writing
Approval Required.

CRWR0560E-W17

CRN: 10962

Special Project: Writing
Special Project: Creative Writing
Approval Required.

CRWR0560F-W17

CRN: 10963

Special Project: Writing
Special Project: Creative Writing
Approval Required.

CRWR0560G-W17

CRN: 10964

Special Project: Writing
Special Project: Creative Writing
Approval Required.

CRWR0560H-W17

CRN: 10965

Special Project: Writing
Special Project: Creative Writing
Approval Required.

CRWR0560I-W17

CRN: 11035

Special Project: Writing
Special Project: Creative Writing
Approval Required.

CRWR0560J-W17

CRN: 11037

Special Project: Writing
Special Project: Creative Writing
Approval Required.

CRWR0560L-W17

CRN: 11468

Special Project: Writing
Special Project: Creative Writing
Approval Required.

CRWR1005A-W17

CRN: 11074

Adventure Writing
Adventure Writing & Digital Storytelling
In this class we will explore the adventure narrative in the digital age. Equipped with laptop, camera, audio recorder, and/or video camera—the tools of today's investigative journalists--students will undertake their own adventure in the Middlebury area (anything from dog sledding to ice-fishing on Lake Champlain), then sharpen their skills as writers, focusing on setting, character, history, and narrative thread. In addition to blogs and essays from Outside Magazine, we will read from adventure books such as Joe Kane’s Running the Amazon and Joan Didion’s Salvador, and write in the adventure-travel genre, incorporating interviews, photos, audio, and video files in the final writing project. (Students will need a laptop, camera, and a small hard drive to house Final Cut Pro files for video editing. This course can count as an introductory CRWR workshop. (Approval required; please complete an application form available on the following website: http://www.middlebury.edu/academics/enam/resources/forms). Not open to students who have taken INTD 1105.

ENAM0500A-W17

CRN: 10532

Special Project: Lit
Special Project: Literature
Approval Required.

ENAM0500B-W17

CRN: 10533

Special Project: Lit
Special Project: Literature
Approval Required.

ENAM0500C-W17

CRN: 10534

Special Project: Lit
Special Project: Literature
Approval Required.

ENAM0500D-W17

CRN: 10535

Special Project: Lit
Special Project: Literature
Approval Required.

ENAM0500E-W17

CRN: 10536

Special Project: Lit
Special Project: Literature
Approval Required.

ENAM0500F-W17

CRN: 10537

Special Project: Lit
Special Project: Literature
Approval Required.

ENAM0500G-W17

CRN: 10538

Special Project: Lit
Special Project: Literature
Approval Required.

ENAM0500H-W17

CRN: 10539

Special Project: Lit
Special Project: Literature
Approval Required.

ENAM0500I-W17

CRN: 10540

Special Project: Lit
Special Project: Literature
Approval Required.

ENAM0500J-W17

CRN: 10541

Special Project: Lit
Special Project: Literature
Approval Required.

ENAM0500K-W17

CRN: 10542

Special Project: Lit
Special Project: Literature
Approval Required.

ENAM0500M-W17

CRN: 10544

Special Project: Lit
Special Project: Literature
Approval Required.

ENAM0500N-W17

CRN: 10545

Special Project: Lit
Special Project: Literature
Approval Required.

ENAM0500O-W17

CRN: 10546

Special Project: Lit
Special Project: Literature
Approval Required.

ENAM0500P-W17

CRN: 10547

Special Project: Lit
Special Project: Literature
Approval Required.

ENAM0500Q-W17

CRN: 10548

Special Project: Lit
Special Project: Literature
Approval Required.

ENAM0500S-W17

CRN: 10550

Special Project: Lit
Special Project: Literature
Approval Required.

ENAM0500T-W17

CRN: 10551

Special Project: Lit
Special Project: Literature
Approval Required.

ENAM0500U-W17

CRN: 10552

Special Project: Lit
Special Project: Literature
Approval Required.

ENAM0500V-W17

CRN: 10553

Special Project: Lit
Special Project: Literature
Approval Required.

ENAM0500W-W17

CRN: 10554

Special Project: Lit
Special Project: Literature
Approval Required.

ENAM0500X-W17

CRN: 10555

Special Project: Lit
Special Project: Literature
Approval Required.

ENAM0500Y-W17

CRN: 10556

Special Project: Lit
Special Project: Literature
Approval Required.

ENAM0500Z-W17

CRN: 10648

Special Project: Lit
Special Project: Literature
Approval Required.

ENAM1001A-W17

CRN: 11372

Fictional Fictions
Fictional Fictions
In this course we will engage with novels whose primary focus is the novel itself—how the genre is imagined, structured, written, sold, read, celebrated, and denounced. Our chosen meta-fictions will variously focus on the psychology of artistic production, on the philosophical issues surrounding the telling of “true lies,” on the social function of novels in our culture, and on what is at stake in the supposedly private act of reading. Our texts will include works such as Joyce’s Portrait of the Artist as a Young Man, McEwan’s Atonement, Graham Greene’s The End of the Affair, Cunningham’s The Hours, and DeLillo’s Mao II. This course counts as an ENAM elective.

ENAM1029A-W17

CRN: 11386

Tackling Old English Poetry
Tackling Old English Poetry (I) (Pre-1800)
In this course we will examine the literature, history, and culture of the Germanic tribes known as the Anglo-Saxons, who invaded Britain as the Roman Empire crumbled into the so-called Dark Age. We will study the basics of their language, Old English, by closely reading such poems as "The Wanderer," "The Seafarer," "The Dream of the Rood," and the first part of Beowulf in modern translations as well as in the original. In addition, we will read and discuss selections from historical documents, such as the Venerable Bede's "Ecclesiastical History of the English People," that shed light on the culture and society of the Anglo-Saxons. Students will be expected to have read two works by the great Anglo-Saxonist J.R.R. Tolkien before the course starts: his classic article "Beowulf: The Monsters and the Critics" and The Hobbit. (ENAM 0103, ENAM 0201 and/or ENAM 0204, and ENAM 0205, or by waiver)

ENAM1030A-W17

CRN: 11391

Bibliotherapy
Bibliotherapy: Reading and Writing the Psyche
An inscription over the door of a library in Ancient Egypt purportedly read, “Medicine for the Soul,” and the modern practice known as “Bibliotherapy” similarly claims that reading and writing can have powerful psychological benefits. How can reading books improve your mental health? Can writing about trauma help to heal psychic wounds? In this course we will explore contemporary theories of the therapeutic value of literature; readings will include novels, poems, short stories, memoirs, and psychological articles. Students will write analytical essays as well as creative works, which will be shared with classmates in a writing workshop setting.

ENAM1031A-W17

Cross-Listed As:
ENVS1031A-W17

CRN: 11407

Nonfictions of Env. Justice
Environmental Justice at the Margins: Non/fictions
Does it make sense to talk about environmental justice at the margins of global society, where the political, social, and legal structures that ensure justice tend to fail? With three literary case studies—the toxic slums of a fictionalized Bhopal; the ghost-voices of Chernobyl’s radioactive wasteland; and the land-mined countryside of a post-war Mozambique—we will consider the strategies writers use to fictionalize real contaminated environments. Our three primary texts are Indra Sinha’s Animal’s People, 2015 Nobel laureate Svetlana Alexievich’s Voices from Chernobyl, and Mia Couto’s The Last Flight of the Flamingo, which we will read alongside critical writings and short films. This course counts as an ENVS humanities cognate.

Department of English & American Literatures

Axinn Center at Starr Library
15 Old Chapel Road
Middlebury College
Middlebury, VT 05753