Offerings By Semester

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CRWR0106A-F16

Cross-Listed As:
FMMC0106A-F16

CRN: 91231

Writing for the Screen I
Please register via FMMC 0106A
Writing for the Screen I
In this course we will examine the fundamental elements of dramatic narrative as they relate to visual storytelling. We will emphasize the process of generating original story material and learning the craft of screenwriting, including topics such as story, outline, scene structure, subtext, character objectives, formatting standards, and narrative strategies. Weekly writing assignments will emphasize visual storytelling techniques, tone and atmosphere, character relationships, and dialogue. Students will be required to complete two short screenplays. Required readings will inform and accompany close study of selected screenplays and films. (FMMC 0101 OR CRWR 0170 or approval of instructor) (Formerly FMMC/ENAM 0106) 3 hrs. sem.

CRWR0106B-F16

Cross-Listed As:
FMMC0106B-F16

CRN: 91313

Writing for the Screen I
Please register for FMMC 0106B
Writing for the Screen I
In this course we will examine the fundamental elements of dramatic narrative as they relate to visual storytelling. We will emphasize the process of generating original story material and learning the craft of screenwriting, including topics such as story, outline, scene structure, subtext, character objectives, formatting standards, and narrative strategies. Weekly writing assignments will emphasize visual storytelling techniques, tone and atmosphere, character relationships, and dialogue. Students will be required to complete two short screenplays. Required readings will inform and accompany close study of selected screenplays and films. (FMMC 0101 OR CRWR 0170 or approval of instructor) (Formerly FMMC/ENAM 0106) 3 hrs. sem.

CRWR0170A-F16

CRN: 91232

Writing: Poetry, Fiction, NonF
Writing: Poetry, Fiction, NonFiction
An introduction to the writing of poetry, short fiction, and nonfiction through analysis of writings by modern and contemporary poets and prose writers and regular discussion of student writing. Different instructors may choose to emphasize one literary form or another in a given semester. Workshops will focus on composition and revision, with particular attention to the basics of form and craft. This course is a prerequisite to CRWR 0380, CRWR 0385, CRWR 0370, and CRWR 0375. (This course is not a college writing course.) (Formerly ENAM 0170) 3 hrs. sem.

CRWR0170B-F16

CRN: 91233

Writing: Poetry, Fiction, NonF
Writing: Poetry, Fiction, NonFiction
An introduction to the writing of poetry, short fiction, and nonfiction through analysis of writings by modern and contemporary poets and prose writers and regular discussion of student writing. Different instructors may choose to emphasize one literary form or another in a given semester. Workshops will focus on composition and revision, with particular attention to the basics of form and craft. This course is a prerequisite to CRWR 0380, CRWR 0385, CRWR 0370, and CRWR 0375. (This course is not a college writing course.) (Formerly ENAM 0170) 3 hrs. sem.

CRWR0173A-F16

CRN: 91687

Environmental Lit Workshop
Environmental Literature: Reading & Writing Workshop
This course is an introduction to the reading and writing of environmental literature. We will analyze classic and contemporary model works in prose and poetry, in nonfiction and fiction, all directed at human interaction with the natural world. Our writing assignments will explore this theme in personal essays, poems, literary reportage, poetry, and fiction. Workshops will focus on inspiration, form, craft, and thematic issues associated with the environment. This course is a prerequisite to CRWR 0370, CRWR 0375, CRWR 0380, and CRWR 0385.

CRWR0175A-F16

CRN: 91234

Structure of Poetry
The Structure of Poetry
This course is a workshop for beginning students in the field of creative writing. Students will read a selection of poems each week and write their own poems, producing a portfolio of their work at the end of the term. There will be an emphasis on revision. Students will be introduced to a range of forms as well, including prose poems, epistles, the tanka, the long poem, and the sonnet.

CRWR0185A-F16

Cross-Listed As:
EDST0185A-F16

CRN: 91489

Writing for Children
Please register via EDST 0185A
Writing for Children and Young Adults
This course is an introduction to writing for children and young adults through analysis of model short fiction and novels, and regular discussion of student writing. We will focus on craft and form with particular attention to the demands of writing for a young audience. Emphasis will be on composition and revision. 3 hrs. lect.

CRWR0370A-F16

CRN: 91235

Advanced Fiction Workshop
Workshop: Fiction
Study and practice in techniques of fiction writing through workshops and readings in short fiction and novels. Class discussions will be based on student manuscripts and published model works. Emphasis will be placed on composition and revision. (ENAM/CRWR 0170, ENAM/CRWR 0175, or ENAM/CRWR 0185) (Approval required; please apply online at http://www.middlebury.edu/academics/enam/resources/forms or at the Department office) (Formerly ENAM 0370) (This course is not a college writing course) 3 hrs. sem.

CRWR0375A-F16

CRN: 91236

Advanced Poetry Workshop
Workshop: Poetry
This course will involve the reading and writing of contemporary poetry. It is designed for students who already possess some familiarity with poetry and its traditions and who want to concentrate especially on contemporary work as an adjunct to their own development as poets. Students will read a good deal of poetry, including such writers as Elizabeth Bishop, Seamus Heaney, and Charles Simic. Assignments will include the keeping of a daily notebook, writing poems on a regular basis, and giving oral reports. Close attention will be paid to poetic form and the conventions of poetry. A final portfolio will include revisions of poems and critical writing. (ENAM/CRWR 0170, ENAM/CRWR 0175, or ENAM/CRWR 0185) (Approval required; please apply online at http://www.middlebury.edu/academics/enam/resources/forms or at the Department office.) (Formerly ENAM 0375) (This course is not a college writing course.) 3 hrs. sem.

CRWR0560A-F16

CRN: 91237

Special Project: Writing
Special Project: Creative Writing
Approval Required.

CRWR0560B-F16

CRN: 91238

Special Project: Writing
Special Project: Creative Writing
Approval Required.

CRWR0560C-F16

CRN: 91239

Special Project: Writing
Special Project: Creative Writing
Approval Required.

CRWR0560D-F16

CRN: 91240

Special Project: Writing
Special Project: Creative Writing
Approval Required.

CRWR0560E-F16

CRN: 91241

Special Project: Writing
Special Project: Creative Writing
Approval Required.

CRWR0560F-F16

CRN: 91242

Special Project: Writing
Special Project: Creative Writing
Approval Required.

CRWR0560G-F16

CRN: 91243

Special Project: Writing
Special Project: Creative Writing
Approval Required.

CRWR0560H-F16

CRN: 91244

Special Project: Writing
Special Project: Creative Writing
Approval Required.

CRWR0560I-F16

CRN: 91245

Special Project: Writing
Special Project: Creative Writing
Approval Required.

CRWR0560J-F16

CRN: 91246

Special Project: Writing
Special Project: Creative Writing
Approval Required.

CRWR0560K-F16

CRN: 91247

Special Project: Writing
Special Project: Creative Writing
Approval Required.

CRWR0560L-F16

CRN: 91248

Special Project: Writing
Special Project: Creative Writing
Approval Required.

CRWR0560M-F16

CRN: 91249

Special Project: Writing
Special Project: Creative Writing
Approval Required.

CRWR0560N-F16

CRN: 91250

Special Project: Writing
Special Project: Creative Writing
Approval Required.

CRWR0560O-F16

CRN: 91251

Special Project: Writing
Special Project: Creative Writing
Approval Required.

CRWR0560P-F16

CRN: 91252

Special Project: Writing
Special Project: Creative Writing
Approval Required.

CRWR0560Q-F16

CRN: 91253

Special Project: Writing
Special Project: Creative Writing
Approval Required.

CRWR0560R-F16

CRN: 91254

Special Project: Writing
Special Project: Creative Writing
Approval Required.

CRWR0560S-F16

CRN: 91255

Special Project: Writing
Special Project: Creative Writing
Approval Required.

CRWR0560U-F16

CRN: 91257

Special Project: Writing
Special Project: Creative Writing
Approval Required.

CRWR0560V-F16

CRN: 91258

Special Project: Writing
Special Project: Creative Writing
Approval Required.

CRWR0560W-F16

CRN: 91260

Special Project: Writing
Special Project: Creative Writing
Approval Required.

CRWR0560X-F16

CRN: 91259

Special Project: Writing
Special Project: Creative Writing
Approval Required.

CRWR0560Y-F16

CRN: 91261

Special Project: Writing
Special Project: Creative Writing
Approval Required.

CRWR0560Z-F16

CRN: 91262

Special Project: Writing
Special Project: Creative Writing
Approval Required.

CRWR0701A-F16

CRN: 91263

Senior Thesis:Creative Writing
Senior Thesis: Creative Writing
Discussions, workshops, tutorials for those undertaking one-term projects in the writing of fiction, poetry, or creative nonfiction.

CRWR0701B-F16

CRN: 91264

Senior Thesis:Creative Writing
Senior Thesis: Creative Writing
Discussions, workshops, tutorials for those undertaking one-term projects in the writing of fiction, poetry, or creative nonfiction.

CRWR0701C-F16

CRN: 91265

Senior Thesis:Creative Writing
Senior Thesis: Creative Writing
Discussions, workshops, tutorials for those undertaking one-term projects in the writing of fiction, poetry, or creative nonfiction.

CRWR0701D-F16

CRN: 91266

Senior Thesis:Creative Writing
Senior Thesis: Creative Writing
Discussions, workshops, tutorials for those undertaking one-term projects in the writing of fiction, poetry, or creative nonfiction.

CRWR0701E-F16

CRN: 91267

Senior Thesis:Creative Writing
Senior Thesis: Creative Writing
Discussions, workshops, tutorials for those undertaking one-term projects in the writing of fiction, poetry, or creative nonfiction.

CRWR0701F-F16

CRN: 91268

Senior Thesis:Creative Writing
Senior Thesis: Creative Writing
Discussions, workshops, tutorials for those undertaking one-term projects in the writing of fiction, poetry, or creative nonfiction.

CRWR0701G-F16

CRN: 91269

Senior Thesis:Creative Writing
Senior Thesis: Creative Writing
Discussions, workshops, tutorials for those undertaking one-term projects in the writing of fiction, poetry, or creative nonfiction.

CRWR0701H-F16

CRN: 91270

Senior Thesis:Creative Writing
Senior Thesis: Creative Writing
Discussions, workshops, tutorials for those undertaking one-term projects in the writing of fiction, poetry, or creative nonfiction.

CRWR0701I-F16

CRN: 91271

Senior Thesis:Creative Writing
Senior Thesis: Creative Writing
Discussions, workshops, tutorials for those undertaking one-term projects in the writing of fiction, poetry, or creative nonfiction.

CRWR0701K-F16

CRN: 91273

Senior Thesis:Creative Writing
Senior Thesis: Creative Writing
Discussions, workshops, tutorials for those undertaking one-term projects in the writing of fiction, poetry, or creative nonfiction.

CRWR0701L-F16

CRN: 91274

Senior Thesis:Creative Writing
Senior Thesis: Creative Writing
Discussions, workshops, tutorials for those undertaking one-term projects in the writing of fiction, poetry, or creative nonfiction.

CRWR0701M-F16

CRN: 91275

Senior Thesis:Creative Writing
Senior Thesis: Creative Writing
Discussions, workshops, tutorials for those undertaking one-term projects in the writing of fiction, poetry, or creative nonfiction.

CRWR0701O-F16

CRN: 91277

Senior Thesis:Creative Writing
Senior Thesis: Creative Writing
Discussions, workshops, tutorials for those undertaking one-term projects in the writing of fiction, poetry, or creative nonfiction.

CRWR0701P-F16

CRN: 91278

Senior Thesis:Creative Writing
Senior Thesis: Creative Writing
Discussions, workshops, tutorials for those undertaking one-term projects in the writing of fiction, poetry, or creative nonfiction.

CRWR0701Q-F16

CRN: 91279

Senior Thesis:Creative Writing
Senior Thesis: Creative Writing
Discussions, workshops, tutorials for those undertaking one-term projects in the writing of fiction, poetry, or creative nonfiction.

CRWR0701S-F16

CRN: 91281

Senior Thesis:Creative Writing
Senior Thesis: Creative Writing
Discussions, workshops, tutorials for those undertaking one-term projects in the writing of fiction, poetry, or creative nonfiction.

CRWR0701T-F16

CRN: 91282

Senior Thesis:Creative Writing
Senior Thesis: Creative Writing
Discussions, workshops, tutorials for those undertaking one-term projects in the writing of fiction, poetry, or creative nonfiction.

CRWR0701U-F16

CRN: 91283

Senior Thesis:Creative Writing
Senior Thesis: Creative Writing
Discussions, workshops, tutorials for those undertaking one-term projects in the writing of fiction, poetry, or creative nonfiction.

CRWR0701V-F16

CRN: 91284

Senior Thesis:Creative Writing
Senior Thesis: Creative Writing
Discussions, workshops, tutorials for those undertaking one-term projects in the writing of fiction, poetry, or creative nonfiction.

CRWR0701W-F16

CRN: 91285

Senior Thesis:Creative Writing
Senior Thesis: Creative Writing
Discussions, workshops, tutorials for those undertaking one-term projects in the writing of fiction, poetry, or creative nonfiction.

CRWR0701X-F16

CRN: 91286

Senior Thesis:Creative Writing
Senior Thesis: Creative Writing
Discussions, workshops, tutorials for those undertaking one-term projects in the writing of fiction, poetry, or creative nonfiction.

CRWR0701Y-F16

CRN: 91287

Senior Thesis:Creative Writing
Senior Thesis: Creative Writing
Discussions, workshops, tutorials for those undertaking one-term projects in the writing of fiction, poetry, or creative nonfiction.

CRWR0701Z-F16

CRN: 91288

Senior Thesis:Creative Writing
Senior Thesis: Creative Writing
Discussions, workshops, tutorials for those undertaking one-term projects in the writing of fiction, poetry, or creative nonfiction.

ENAM0103A-F16

CRN: 90648

Reading Literature
Reading Literature: Literature and the City
Today, more than half of the world's people live in cities and that proportion is expected to increase to 70% by 2050. As centers of goods, information, capital, culture, and political power, cities have been crucial to our understanding of modernity. The city is not only a built settlement in a specific place with particular forms of social interaction and power, it is equally to be understood as the symbolic life of that place. The city is constituted by and experienced as the images, sensations, emotions, and memories that it conveys. We will focus on representations of the city and city life in selected poems, short stories, plays and novels. For some of the literary and cultural contexts in which to interpret representations of urban experience, we will read essays on the city. We will also examine short pieces on theoretical approaches to the interpretation of literature, and brief accounts of literary terms and of elements of poetry, narrative fiction, and drama. 3 hrs. lect./disc.

ENAM0103B-F16

CRN: 90650

Reading Literature
Reading Literature: Fantastic Voyages
If every work of literature takes us to some “far country” of a world partly real and partly imagined, this course will be a “grand tour” of far-flung destinations, some of which will possess a gentle beauty, some of which will prove dangerous and harrowing. Our main concern, apart from learning how to appreciate a wide variety of styles, techniques, and genres, will be to acquire the analytical and writing skills that will allow students to convincingly communicate their feelings and insights about literature to others. To accomplish this, we will closely read selected works from Shakespeare to the present, become familiar with a lexicon of helpful literary terms, and introduce ourselves to some basics of literary theory. 3 hrs. lect./disc.

ENAM0103C-F16

CRN: 90651

Reading Literature
Reading Literature
This course seeks to develop skills for the close reading of literature through discussion of and writing about selected poems, plays, and short stories. A basic vocabulary of literary terms and an introductory palette of critical methods will also be covered, and the course's ultimate goal will be to enable students to attain the literary-critical sensibility vital to further course work in the major. At the instructor's discretion, the texts employed in this class may share a particular thematic concern or historical kinship. 3 hrs. lect./disc.

ENAM0107A-F16

Cross-Listed As:
CMLT0107A-F16

CRN: 92334

The Experience of Tragedy
The Experience of Tragedy
For over two millennia tragedy has raised ethical questions and represented conflicts between the divine and the mortal, nature and culture, household and polity, individual and society. What is tragedy? What led to its production and what impact did it have, in ancient times? Why was it reborn in Shakespeare's time? How has tragedy shaped, and been shaped by, gender, class, religion, and nationality? We will address these questions and explore how tragedy continues to influence our literary expectations and experience. Authors may include Aeschylus, Sophocles, Euripides, Thucydides, Aristotle, Seneca, Marlowe, Shakespeare, Goethe, Nietzsche, O'Neill, Beckett, Kennedy, and Kushner. 3 hrs. lect.

ENAM0201A-F16

CRN: 90974

British Lit. and Culture I
The Court and the Wilderness
British Literature and Culture: The Court and the Wilderness (I)
This course will offer a broad overview of the rich and varied British literature written roughly between 1400 and 1700. Reading a diverse body of material (romance, epic, lyric), we will explore competing notions of subjectivity within the courtly context. As we interrogate the relationship between the court and the social/mythical concept of “wilderness,” we will consider ways in which the apparent opposition between the refined courtier/knight and the “wild man” often belies a complex mutual dependence. Within this context we will also examine the ways in which notions of sexuality and gender contribute to polarized readings of female conduct as “chaste” or “wild.” Texts may include: Beowulf, Gawain and the Green Knight, Lais of Marie de France, Chaucer’s Canterbury Tales, Spenser’s The Faerie Queene, and Shakespeare’s As You Like It. 3 hrs. lect.

ENAM0204A-F16

CRN: 90059

Foundations of English Lit.
Foundations of English Literature (I) (Pre-1800)
Students will study Chaucer's Canterbury Tales and Milton's Paradise Lost, as well as other foundational works of English literature that may include Shakespeare, non-Shakespearean Elizabethan drama, the poetry of Donne, and other 16th- and 17th-century poetry. 3 hrs. lect./disc.

ENAM0205A-F16

Cross-Listed As:
CMLT0205A-F16

CRN: 90880

Intro:Contemporary Lit. Theory
Introduction to Contemporary Literary Theory
This course will introduce several major schools of contemporary literary theory. By reading theoretical texts in close conjunction with works of literature, we will illuminate the ways in which these theoretical stances can produce various interpretations of a given poem, novel, or play. The approaches covered will include New Criticism, Psychoanalysis, Marxism and Cultural Criticism, Feminism, and Post-Structuralism. These theories will be applied to works by Shakespeare, Wordsworth, The Brontës, Conrad, Joyce, and others. The goal will be to make students critically aware of the fundamental literary, cultural, political, and moral assumptions underlying every act of interpretation they perform. 3 hrs. lect/disc.

ENAM0209A-F16

Cross-Listed As:
AMST0209A-F16

CRN: 90879

Am. Lit. & Cult: origins-1830
Please register via AMST 0209A
American Literature and Culture: Origins-1830 (II, AL) (Pre-1900 AL)
A study of literary and other cultural forms in early America, including gravestones, architecture, furniture and visual art. We will consider how writing and these other forms gave life to ideas about religion, diversity, civic obligation and individual rights that dominated not only colonial life but that continue to influence notions of "Americanness" into the present day. 3 hrs. lect./disc.

ENAM0220A-F16

CRN: 92336

The Early English Novel
Castaways, Courtesans, and Criminals: The Early English Novel (II)
The novel was a young and scandalous literary genre in the 18th century. The reading public found the novel to be confusing, unpredictable, racy, morally dangerous--and of course very exciting. In this course we will examine the rise of the novel as a controversial literary genre, tracing its development from Defoe’s Robinson Crusoe and Moll Flanders in the early part of the century, through Richardson’s didactic Pamela and Clarissa and Fielding’s lively Tom Jones in mid-century, to Sterne’s wildly experimental Tristram Shandy and the more familiar world of Jane Austen at the century’s end. We will also consider the ways in which this history has shaped the fiction of today by reading a 21st century novel, to be determined by the course participants.

ENAM0234A-F16

CRN: 92190

English Poetry 18-20C
English Poetry, Romantic to Modern
This course offers an intensive survey of innovations and revolutions in English poetry from late-18th century Romantic poetry through Victorian poetry of the 19th century to the advent of Modern poetry in the early 20th century. We will read poems by Wordsworth, Keats, Browning, Tennyson, Bronte, Hardy, Hopkins, Eliot, and many others. Readings will also include critical and theoretical articles on individual writers and on poetry more generally. We will make a close study of poetic form and technique as well as explore a wide range of central literary themes across the period such as gender, sexuality, imperialism, race relations, and war).

ENAM0236A-F16

Cross-Listed As:
THEA0236A-F16

CRN: 92500

Contemp. American Playwrights
Please Register via THEA 0236A
Contemporary American Playwrights
In this course we will explore through discussion and in-class dramatic presentations the plays of a selection of contemporary American writers since 1974. Students will give one oral presentation and submit a concluding essay. Authors read will include Sam Shepard, August Wilson, John Patrick Shanley, Marsha Norman, Tracey Letts, Miguel Pinero, and Ntozake Shange. (Formerly THEA/AMLT 0216) 3 hrs. lect. (Dramatic Literature)/

ENAM0240A-F16

Cross-Listed As:
AMST0240A-F16

CRN: 92312

Captivity Narratives
Please register via AMST 0240A
Captivity Narratives (II) (Pre-1900 AL)
Captivity narratives—first-person accounts of people's experiences of being forcibly taken and held against their will by an "other"—were immensely popular and important in early America; the captivity motif has been perpetuated and transformed throughout later American literature and film. In this course we will explore what these types of tales reveal about how Americans have handled the issues of race and racism, religion, gender, violence and sexuality that experiences of captivity entail. Beginning with classic Puritan narratives (Mary Rowlandson) and moving forward through the 19th and 20th centuries, we will consider the ways that novels (The Last of the Mohicans), autobiographies (Patty Hearst, Iraqi captivity of Pvt. Jessica Lynch) and films (The Searchers, Little Big Man, Dances with Wolves) do cultural work in shaping and challenging images of American national identity. 3 hrs. lect.

ENAM0252A-F16

Cross-Listed As:
AMST0252A-F16

CRN: 92314

African American Literature
Please register via AMST 0252A
African American Literature (AL)
This course surveys developments in African American fiction, drama, poetry, and essays during the 20th century. Reading texts in their social, historical, and cultural contexts—and often in conjunction with other African American art forms like music and visual art—we will explore the evolution and deployment of various visions of black being and black artistry, from the Harlem Renaissance through social realism and the Black Arts Movement, to the contemporary post-soul aesthetic. Authors may include Langston Hughes, Zora Neale Hurston, Gwendolyn Brooks, Ralph Ellison, Lorraine Hansberry, Amiri Baraka, Ishmael Reed, Toni Morrison, Charles Johnson, and Octavia Butler. 3 hrs lect./disc.

ENAM0259A-F16

Cross-Listed As:
LITS0259A-F16

CRN: 91816

Cultural Crossings
Please register via LITS 0259A
Cultural Crossings: Studies in Literary Influence
Centered on a range of provocative narratives conceived at different historical moments and in different cultural situations, this course will explore some of the persistent imaginative preoccupations and far-reaching literary ambitions that serve to link authors working in a wide variety of genres and traditions. Authors to be considered this semester will include Petronius, F. Scott Fitzgerald, Thomas Carlyle, Herman Melville, Gustave Flaubert, Willa Cather, Ivan Turgenev, Vladimir Nabokov, Franz Kafka, and Thomas Pynchon. In addition to reading works by these authors in relation to one another, students will be encouraged to undertake independent comparisons between works on our reading list and works by authors who are not represented. 3 hr. lect.

ENAM0260A-F16

CRN: 92338

Modern British Drama
Style and Ideas in Modern British Drama (II)
During the 19th century the craft of Shakespeare devolved into mere popular entertainment, but in the1890s Oscar Wilde and Bernard Shaw re-established drama as literature, to be taken as seriously as the best poetry and fiction. In Ireland, Lady Gregory, Synge, and O’Casey critiqued the moral condition of their nation. And in the 1930s T.S. Eliot used his poetic power to revive verse drama, while Noel Coward and Terence Rattigan created comedies and dramas that used the style/form of dialogue in newly expressive ways. We will explore the superb art and craft of playwriting by these masters of dramatic form.

ENAM0304A-F16

Cross-Listed As:
AMST0304A-F16

CRN: 92316

The Graphic Novel
Please register via AMST 0304A
The Graphic Novel
In this course we will study some of the most widely respected graphic novels produced in the last thirty years. Our purpose will be to understand how the form works and is structured by its dual, but sometimes competing, interests in the verbal and the visual, and to think about distinct styles of illustration. We will also think about how landmark examples have shaped the form. Working with software designed for the purpose, students will use photographs to produce short comics of their own. Possible texts include: Alan Moore, Watchmen; Art Spiegelman, Maus; Chris Ware, Jimmy Corrigan; Alison Bechdel, Fun Home. 3 hrs. lect.

ENAM0308A-F16

CRN: 92339

Lit of the First World War
The Literature of the First World War
In this course we will study literature generated by observers of the Great War (1914-18) and its aftermath. We will examine the writing of War poets such as Rupert Brooke, Siegfried Sassoon, Wilfred Owen, Isaac Rosenberg, and Robert Graves, and novelists such as Ernest Hemingway (A Farewell to Arms), Erich Maria Remarque (All Quiet on the Western Front), Kazuo Ishiguro (The Remains of the Day), and Pat Barker (Regeneration). Personal accounts and visual art that take as their subject the Great War will also be discussed. We will also consider protest, trauma, grief, and memory, as well as the technical and stylistic innovations that emerged during this period. 3 hrs. Lect/Disc.

ENAM0316A-F16

CRN: 92340

Poetry and Spiritual Tradition
Poetry and the Spiritual Tradition
In this course we will examine the long and intimate connection between poetry and spirituality, looking especially at the influence of Christian thinking on such English and American poets as John Donne, George Herbert, Gerard Manley Hopkins, and T.S. Eliot. The course will begin with a study of the King James Version of the Book of Psalms, which deeply affected later British and American poetry. We will also read early Taoist and Islamic poets, including Lao Tse and Rumi. The course will conclude with a look at the work of several contemporary poets: Charles Wright, Louis Glück, and Mary Oliver.

ENAM0317A-F16

Cross-Listed As:
CMLT0317A-F16

CRN: 92270

Lost & Found in Translation
Please register via CMLT 0317A
Lost & Found in Translation
In this course we will explore the fundamental philosophical, sociological, and linguistic questions raised by translingual communication through a survey of the greatest theoretical writings on translation together with a comparative study of multiple translations of coherent sections from major works such as the Bible, the Iliad, One Thousand and One Nights, and the Tao Te Ching, as well as other shorter texts. Questions to be considered include: How much does language determine how we think? How much of language is culture? What is unique to translating sacred texts, poetry, “exotic” languages, and dead languages? How do we define the “untranslatable”? Are translators traitors, drudges, or artists? Can machines translate? 3 hrs. lect./disc.

ENAM0330A-F16

CRN: 91838

Shakespeare's Career
Shakespeare’s Career (I) (Pre-1800)
In this course we will study the whole arc of William Shakespeare's literary career from the earliest histories, comedies, and non-dramatic poetry to the more mature tragedies and romances, with an eye to understanding Shakespeare’s development as a writer in his own time. How might the plays have resonated for his first audiences on stage, and how have subsequent readers drawn their own meanings from the published texts? Reading one play a week, we will pay close attention to such dramaturgical issues as Shakespeare’s construction of character and of plot, his adaptation of sources, and his modes of versification, as well as the ethical, political, and commercial implications of Shakespeare’s works during his lifetime, some of which stand in contrast with what we learn from them today. 3 hrs. lect./1 hr. disc./3 hrs. screen.

ENAM0409A-F16

CRN: 92341

Seminar: James Joyce
Seminar: James Joyce
In this seminar we will study two of Joyce’s major works of fiction: Dubliners, A Portrait of the Artist as a Young Man, and Ulysses. There will be some emphasis on background material to illustrate and clarify the rich array of specific details, settings, persons, and events which make up the turn-of-the-century world of Irish Catholic Dublin, the exclusive scene of all of Joyce’s fiction. We will also consider various critical approaches to Joyce’s monuments of modernism. 3 hrs. sem.

ENAM0423A-F16

CRN: 92421

Return of the Screw
Return of the Screw: Tangled Texts
In this course we will explore the ambiguous and incomplete in fiction, and where these qualities take readers. We will start out by reading Henry James's The Turn of the Screw, the most mind-blowing, sinister, and perplexing ghost story in literature. (Or maybe it's not a ghost story.) By looking at the ways in which several generations of readers and critics have grappled with the story's essential ambiguity, we will ask questions about the complicated issue of authorial intent in fiction, the relevance of biography, and the limits of interpretation. Besides criticism and biographical excerpts we will read other fictions that have reimagined the novella, such as A.N. Wilson's A Jealous Ghost. We will then look at other literary pairings (such as Bronte's Jane Eyre and Rhys's Wide Sargasso Sea) and self-contradictory texts by one author (such as Salinger's Seymour and A Perfect Day for Bananafish) to consider other ways in which texts have responded to each other. We will end by considering some contemporary works (online and off) that break down the boundaries between author and reader. In the course of the readings we will be investigating such concepts as originality and plagiarism, intertextuality, and authenticity.

ENAM0445A-F16

Cross-Listed As:
ENAM0445B-F16

CRN: 92342

Novels Environmental Justice
Recent Novels of Environmental Justice
In recent years environmental justice has emerged as a major topic in the humanities. This intersection of environmentalism and social justice is motivated by a concern for the differential access to natural resources (clean water, clean air, tillable land) afforded to different groups of people within particular social systems. Students will encounter these themes through the reading of many global Anglophone novels, including Waterland, by Graham Swift; The Hungry Tide, by Amitav Ghosh; Animal's People, by Indra Sinha; A Thousand Acres, by Jane Smiley; Ceremony, by Leslie Marmon Silko; and Disgrace, by J.M. Coetzee. 3 hrs. sem.

ENAM0445B-F16

Cross-Listed As:
ENAM0445A-F16

CRN: 92422

Novels Environmental Justice
Recent Novels of Environmental Justice
In recent years environmental justice has emerged as a major topic in the humanities. This intersection of environmentalism and social justice is motivated by a concern for the differential access to natural resources (clean water, clean air, tillable land) afforded to different groups of people within particular social systems. Students will encounter these themes through the reading of many global Anglophone novels, including Waterland, by Graham Swift; The Hungry Tide, by Amitav Ghosh; Animal's People, by Indra Sinha; A Thousand Acres, by Jane Smiley; Ceremony, by Leslie Marmon Silko; and Disgrace, by J.M. Coetzee. 3 hrs. sem.

ENAM0500A-F16

CRN: 90181

Special Project: Lit
Special Project: Literature
Approval Required.

ENAM0500B-F16

CRN: 90185

Special Project: Lit
Special Project: Literature
Approval Required.

ENAM0500C-F16

CRN: 90187

Special Project: Lit
Special Project: Literature
Approval Required.

ENAM0500D-F16

CRN: 90189

Special Project: Lit
Special Project: Literature
Approval Required.

ENAM0500E-F16

CRN: 90192

Special Project: Lit
Special Project: Literature
Approval Required.

ENAM0500F-F16

CRN: 90193

Special Project: Lit
Special Project: Literature
Approval Required.

ENAM0500G-F16

CRN: 90195

Special Project: Lit
Special Project: Literature
Approval Required.

ENAM0500H-F16

CRN: 90196

Special Project: Lit
Special Project: Literature
Approval Required.

ENAM0500J-F16

CRN: 90199

Special Project: Lit
Special Project: Literature
Approval Required.

ENAM0500K-F16

CRN: 90689

Special Project: Lit
Special Project: Literature
Approval Required.

ENAM0500L-F16

CRN: 90690

Special Project: Lit
Special Project: Literature
Approval Required.

ENAM0500M-F16

CRN: 90691

Special Project: Lit
Special Project: Literature
Approval Required.

ENAM0500P-F16

CRN: 90694

Special Project: Lit
Special Project: Literature
Approval Required.

ENAM0500Q-F16

CRN: 90695

Special Project: Lit
Special Project: Literature
Approval Required.

ENAM0500S-F16

CRN: 90697

Special Project: Lit
Special Project: Literature
Approval Required.

ENAM0500T-F16

CRN: 90698

Special Project: Lit
Special Project: Literature
Approval Required.

ENAM0500W-F16

CRN: 90701

Special Project: Lit
Special Project: Literature
Approval Required.

ENAM0500X-F16

CRN: 90796

Special Project: Lit
Special Project: Literature
Approval Required.

ENAM0500Y-F16

CRN: 90797

Special Project: Lit
Special Project: Literature
Approval Required.

ENAM0500Z-F16

CRN: 90904

Special Project: Lit
Special Project: Literature
Approval Required.

ENAM0700A-F16

CRN: 90206

Senior Thesis:Critical Writing
Senior Thesis: Critical Writing
Individual guidance and seminar (discussions, workshops, tutorials) for those undertaking one-term projects in literary criticism or analysis. All critical thesis writers also take the Senior Thesis Workshop (ENAM 700Z) in either Fall or Spring Term.

ENAM0700B-F16

CRN: 90207

Senior Thesis:Critical Writing
Senior Thesis: Critical Writing
Individual guidance and seminar (discussions, workshops, tutorials) for those undertaking one-term projects in literary criticism or analysis. All critical thesis writers also take the Senior Thesis Workshop (ENAM 700Z) in either Fall or Spring Term.

ENAM0700C-F16

CRN: 90210

Senior Thesis:Critical Writing
Senior Thesis: Critical Writing
Individual guidance and seminar (discussions, workshops, tutorials) for those undertaking one-term projects in literary criticism or analysis. All critical thesis writers also take the Senior Thesis Workshop (ENAM 700Z) in either Fall or Spring Term.

ENAM0700D-F16

CRN: 90212

Senior Thesis:Critical Writing
Senior Thesis: Critical Writing
Individual guidance and seminar (discussions, workshops, tutorials) for those undertaking one-term projects in literary criticism or analysis. All critical thesis writers also take the Senior Thesis Workshop (ENAM 700Z) in either Fall or Spring Term.

ENAM0700E-F16

CRN: 90213

Senior Thesis:Critical Writing
Senior Thesis: Critical Writing
Individual guidance and seminar (discussions, workshops, tutorials) for those undertaking one-term projects in literary criticism or analysis. All critical thesis writers also take the Senior Thesis Workshop (ENAM 700Z) in either Fall or Spring Term.

ENAM0700F-F16

CRN: 90215

Senior Thesis:Critical Writing
Senior Thesis: Critical Writing
Individual guidance and seminar (discussions, workshops, tutorials) for those undertaking one-term projects in literary criticism or analysis. All critical thesis writers also take the Senior Thesis Workshop (ENAM 700Z) in either Fall or Spring Term.

ENAM0700G-F16

CRN: 90216

Senior Thesis:Critical Writing
Senior Thesis: Critical Writing
Individual guidance and seminar (discussions, workshops, tutorials) for those undertaking one-term projects in literary criticism or analysis. All critical thesis writers also take the Senior Thesis Workshop (ENAM 700Z) in either Fall or Spring Term.

ENAM0700H-F16

CRN: 90219

Senior Thesis:Critical Writing
Senior Thesis: Critical Writing
Individual guidance and seminar (discussions, workshops, tutorials) for those undertaking one-term projects in literary criticism or analysis. All critical thesis writers also take the Senior Thesis Workshop (ENAM 700Z) in either Fall or Spring Term.

ENAM0700K-F16

CRN: 90224

Senior Thesis:Critical Writing
Senior Thesis: Critical Writing
Individual guidance and seminar (discussions, workshops, tutorials) for those undertaking one-term projects in literary criticism or analysis. All critical thesis writers also take the Senior Thesis Workshop (ENAM 700Z) in either Fall or Spring Term.

ENAM0700L-F16

CRN: 90280

Senior Thesis:Critical Writing
Senior Thesis: Critical Writing
Individual guidance and seminar (discussions, workshops, tutorials) for those undertaking one-term projects in literary criticism or analysis. All critical thesis writers also take the Senior Thesis Workshop (ENAM 700Z) in either Fall or Spring Term.

ENAM0700M-F16

CRN: 90600

Senior Thesis:Critical Writing
Senior Thesis: Critical Writing
Individual guidance and seminar (discussions, workshops, tutorials) for those undertaking one-term projects in literary criticism or analysis. All critical thesis writers also take the Senior Thesis Workshop (ENAM 700Z) in either Fall or Spring Term.

ENAM0700N-F16

CRN: 90601

Senior Thesis:Critical Writing
Senior Thesis: Critical Writing
Individual guidance and seminar (discussions, workshops, tutorials) for those undertaking one-term projects in literary criticism or analysis. All critical thesis writers also take the Senior Thesis Workshop (ENAM 700Z) in either Fall or Spring Term.

ENAM0700O-F16

CRN: 90626

Senior Thesis:Critical Writing
Senior Thesis: Critical Writing
Individual guidance and seminar (discussions, workshops, tutorials) for those undertaking one-term projects in literary criticism or analysis. All critical thesis writers also take the Senior Thesis Workshop (ENAM 700Z) in either Fall or Spring Term.

ENAM0700P-F16

CRN: 90702

Senior Thesis:Critical Writing
Senior Thesis: Critical Writing
Individual guidance and seminar (discussions, workshops, tutorials) for those undertaking one-term projects in literary criticism or analysis. All critical thesis writers also take the Senior Thesis Workshop (ENAM 700Z) in either Fall or Spring Term.

ENAM0700Q-F16

CRN: 90703

Senior Thesis:Critical Writing
Senior Thesis: Critical Writing
Individual guidance and seminar (discussions, workshops, tutorials) for those undertaking one-term projects in literary criticism or analysis. All critical thesis writers also take the Senior Thesis Workshop (ENAM 700Z) in either Fall or Spring Term.

ENAM0700R-F16

CRN: 90743

Senior Thesis:Critical Writing
Senior Thesis: Critical Writing
Individual guidance and seminar (discussions, workshops, tutorials) for those undertaking one-term projects in literary criticism or analysis. All critical thesis writers also take the Senior Thesis Workshop (ENAM 700Z) in either Fall or Spring Term.

ENAM0700T-F16

CRN: 90798

Senior Thesis:Critical Writing
Senior Thesis: Critical Writing
Individual guidance and seminar (discussions, workshops, tutorials) for those undertaking one-term projects in literary criticism or analysis. All critical thesis writers also take the Senior Thesis Workshop (ENAM 700Z) in either Fall or Spring Term.

ENAM0700U-F16

CRN: 90799

Senior Thesis:Critical Writing
Senior Thesis: Critical Writing
Individual guidance and seminar (discussions, workshops, tutorials) for those undertaking one-term projects in literary criticism or analysis. All critical thesis writers also take the Senior Thesis Workshop (ENAM 700Z) in either Fall or Spring Term.

ENAM0700V-F16

CRN: 90800

Senior Thesis:Critical Writing
Senior Thesis: Critical Writing
Individual guidance and seminar (discussions, workshops, tutorials) for those undertaking one-term projects in literary criticism or analysis. All critical thesis writers also take the Senior Thesis Workshop (ENAM 700Z) in either Fall or Spring Term.

ENAM0700W-F16

CRN: 90801

Senior Thesis:Critical Writing
Senior Thesis: Critical Writing
Individual guidance and seminar (discussions, workshops, tutorials) for those undertaking one-term projects in literary criticism or analysis. All critical thesis writers also take the Senior Thesis Workshop (ENAM 700Z) in either Fall or Spring Term.

ENAM0700X-F16

CRN: 90802

Senior Thesis:Critical Writing
Senior Thesis: Critical Writing
Individual guidance and seminar (discussions, workshops, tutorials) for those undertaking one-term projects in literary criticism or analysis. All critical thesis writers also take the Senior Thesis Workshop (ENAM 700Z) in either Fall or Spring Term.

ENAM0700Y-F16

CRN: 90803

Senior Thesis:Critical Writing
Senior Thesis: Critical Writing
Individual guidance and seminar (discussions, workshops, tutorials) for those undertaking one-term projects in literary criticism or analysis. All critical thesis writers also take the Senior Thesis Workshop (ENAM 700Z) in either Fall or Spring Term.

ENAM0700Z-F16

CRN: 90463

Senior Thesis:Critical Writing
Senior Thesis: Workshop
Senior Thesis: Critical Writing
Individual guidance and seminar (discussions, workshops, tutorials) for those undertaking one-term projects in literary criticism or analysis. All critical thesis writers also take the Senior Thesis Workshop (ENAM 700Z) in either Fall or Spring Term.

ENAM0705A-F16

Cross-Listed As:
LITS0705A-F16

CRN: 90244

Senior Colloquium
Please register via LITS 0705A
Senior Colloquium in Literary Studies
Although it is required of all Literary Studies senior majors, this course is intended for students working in any discipline who seek a close encounter with some of the greatest achievements of the literary imagination. In addition to being understood as distinctive artistic and philosophical accomplishments, the six major works which constitute the reading list will also be seen as engaged in a vital, overarching cultural conversation across temporal and geographical boundaries that might otherwise seem insurmountable. The texts for this semester are: Homer, The Odyssey; Tolstoy, War and Peace; Dostoevsky, The Brothers Karamazov; Mann, The Magic Mountain; Proust, Swann’s Way; Joyce, Ulysses. (Open to non-majors with the approval of the instructor.) 3 hrs., seminar.

ENAM0708A-F16

CRN: 91772

Joint Senior Work: ENAM-THEA
Senior Work: Joint Majors in English & American Literatures and Theatre
Approval required.

Department of English & American Literatures

Axinn Center at Starr Library
15 Old Chapel Road
Middlebury College
Middlebury, VT 05753