Middlebury

Offerings By Semester

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CRWR0170A-S15

CRN: 21421

Writing: Poetry, Fiction, NonF
Writing: Poetry, Fiction, NonFiction
An introduction to the writing of poetry, short fiction, and nonfiction through analysis of writings by modern and contemporary poets and prose writers and regular discussion of student writing. Different instructors may choose to emphasize one literary form or another in a given semester. Workshops will focus on composition and revision, with particular attention to the basics of form and craft. This course is a prerequisite to CRWR 0380, CRWR 0385, CRWR 0370, and CRWR 0375. (This course is not a college writing course.) (Formerly ENAM 0170) 3 hrs. sem.

CRWR0170B-S15

CRN: 21422

Writing: Poetry, Fiction, NonF
Writing: Poetry, Fiction, NonFiction
An introduction to the writing of poetry, short fiction, and nonfiction through analysis of writings by modern and contemporary poets and prose writers and regular discussion of student writing. Different instructors may choose to emphasize one literary form or another in a given semester. Workshops will focus on composition and revision, with particular attention to the basics of form and craft. This course is a prerequisite to CRWR 0380, CRWR 0385, CRWR 0370, and CRWR 0375. (This course is not a college writing course.) (Formerly ENAM 0170) 3 hrs. sem.

CRWR0170C-S15

CRN: 21423

Writing: Poetry, Fiction, NonF
Writing: Poetry, Fiction, NonFiction
An introduction to the writing of poetry, short fiction, and nonfiction through analysis of writings by modern and contemporary poets and prose writers and regular discussion of student writing. Different instructors may choose to emphasize one literary form or another in a given semester. Workshops will focus on composition and revision, with particular attention to the basics of form and craft. This course is a prerequisite to CRWR 0380, CRWR 0385, CRWR 0370, and CRWR 0375. (This course is not a college writing course.) (Formerly ENAM 0170) 3 hrs. sem.

CRWR0175A-S15

CRN: 22304

Structure of Poetry
The Structure of Poetry
This course is an introduction to the reading and writing of poetry with a focus on its structural aspects. We will look closely at a range of exemplary poems in English to explore how a poem is built through form, image, figurative language, and other poetic tools. Among the poets we shall read are Seamus Heaney and Elizabeth Bishop. Students will write their own poems and give oral presentations on contemporary poets. (Formerly ENAM 0175)

CRWR0225A-S15

Cross-Listed As:
GSFS0225A-S15

CRN: 22187

Feminist Blogging
Please register via GSFS 0225A
Feminist Blogging
Blogging is a genre that lends itself to both feminist theory and practice because it involves writing from a particular place and a particular embodiment, about how power operates in our social worlds. Feminist theory demands intersectionality: an ability to weave race, class, gender, sexuality and other forms of power into a single theoretical approach. Feminist blogging transforms intersectionality into a single narrative arc. In this course we will think about blogging as a genre and how feminist theory can infuse that genre into a more vibrant, complex, and even transformative site. Throughout the course we will read feminist theory, analyze feminist blogs, and produce our own feminist blogs. 3 hrs. lect.

CRWR0318A-S15

Cross-Listed As:
THEA0318A-S15

CRN: 22437

Playwriting II: Advanced
Please register via THEA 0318A
Playwriting II: Advanced
For students with experience writing short scripts or stories, this workshop will provide a support structure in which to write a full-length stage play. We will begin with extended free and guided writing exercises intended to help students write spontaneously and with commitment. Class discussions will explore scene construction, story structure, and the development of character arc. (ENAM 0170 or THEA 0218 or ENAM/THEA 0240; by approval) (Formerly THEA/ENAM 0318) 2 1/2 hrs. lect./individual labs

CRWR0341A-S15

Cross-Listed As:
FMMC0341A-S15

CRN: 21424

Writing for the Screen II
Please register via FMMC 0341A
Writing for the Screen II
Building on the skills acquired in Writing for the Screen I, students will complete the first drafts of their feature-length screenplay. Class discussion will focus on feature screenplay structure and theme development using feature films and screenplays. Each participant in the class will practice pitching, writing coverage, and outlining, culminating in a draft of a feature length script. (Approval required, obtain application on the FMMC website and submit prior to spring registration) 3 hrs. sem/3 hrs. screen.

CRWR0370A-S15

CRN: 21425

Advanced Fiction Workshop
Workshop: Fiction
Study and practice in techniques of fiction writing through workshops and readings in short fiction and novels. Class discussions will be based on student manuscripts and published model works. Emphasis will be placed on composition and revision. (ENAM/CRWR 0170, ENAM/CRWR 0175, or ENAM/CRWR 0185) (Approval required; please apply online at http://www.middlebury.edu/academics/enam/resources/forms or at the Department office) (Formerly ENAM 0370) (This course is not a college writing course) 3 hrs. sem.

CRWR0375A-S15

CRN: 21426

Advanced Poetry Workshop
Workshop: Poetry
This course will involve the reading and writing of contemporary poetry. It is designed for students who already possess some familiarity with poetry and its traditions and who want to concentrate especially on contemporary work as an adjunct to their own development as poets. Students will read a good deal of poetry, including such writers as Elizabeth Bishop, Seamus Heaney, and Charles Simic. Assignments will include the keeping of a daily notebook, writing poems on a regular basis, and giving oral reports. Close attention will be paid to poetic form and the conventions of poetry. A final portfolio will include revisions of poems and critical writing. (ENAM/CRWR 0170, ENAM/CRWR 0175, or ENAM/CRWR 0185) (Approval required; please apply online at http://www.middlebury.edu/academics/enam/resources/forms or at the Department office.) (Formerly ENAM 0375) (This course is not a college writing course.) 3 hrs. sem.

CRWR0386A-S15

CRN: 21427

Writing the Journey
Writing the Journey
In this course we will write personal journey narratives that fuse objective observation and exposition with strong narrative and subjective experience. Readings will include works of literary travel writing including The Song Lines and The Snow Leopard, as well as the picaresque novel On the Road. We will also practice the travel article. For the final project students must write about a journey they plan and take during the semester, preferably during Spring Break. (ENAM/CRWR 0170) (or approval from instructor required; please apply online at http://www.middlebury.edu/academics/enam/resources/forms or at the Department office) (Formerly ENAM 0386) 3 hrs. sem.

CRWR0560A-S15

CRN: 21343

Special Project: Writing
Special Project: Creative Writing
Approval Required.

CRWR0560D-S15

CRN: 21346

Special Project: Writing
Special Project: Creative Writing
Approval Required.

CRWR0560H-S15

CRN: 21350

Special Project: Writing
Special Project: Creative Writing
Approval Required.

CRWR0560M-S15

CRN: 21355

Special Project: Writing
Special Project: Creative Writing
Approval Required.

CRWR0560Q-S15

CRN: 21359

Special Project: Writing
Special Project: Creative Writing
Approval Required.

CRWR0560S-S15

CRN: 21361

Special Project: Writing
Special Project: Creative Writing
Approval Required.

CRWR0560U-S15

CRN: 21363

Special Project: Writing
Special Project: Creative Writing
Approval Required.

CRWR0560X-S15

CRN: 21366

Special Project: Writing
Special Project: Creative Writing
Approval Required.

CRWR0560Z-S15

CRN: 21368

Special Project: Writing
Special Project: Creative Writing
Approval Required.

CRWR0701A-S15

CRN: 21369

Senior Thesis:Creative Writing
Senior Thesis: Creative Writing
Discussions, workshops, tutorials for those undertaking one-term projects in the writing of fiction, poetry, or creative nonfiction. (Formerly ENAM 0701)

CRWR0701D-S15

CRN: 21372

Senior Thesis:Creative Writing
Senior Thesis: Creative Writing
Discussions, workshops, tutorials for those undertaking one-term projects in the writing of fiction, poetry, or creative nonfiction. (Formerly ENAM 0701)

CRWR0701F-S15

CRN: 21374

Senior Thesis:Creative Writing
Senior Thesis: Creative Writing
Discussions, workshops, tutorials for those undertaking one-term projects in the writing of fiction, poetry, or creative nonfiction. (Formerly ENAM 0701)

CRWR0701M-S15

CRN: 21381

Senior Thesis:Creative Writing
Senior Thesis: Creative Writing
Discussions, workshops, tutorials for those undertaking one-term projects in the writing of fiction, poetry, or creative nonfiction. (Formerly ENAM 0701)

CRWR0701P-S15

CRN: 21384

Senior Thesis:Creative Writing
Senior Thesis: Creative Writing
Discussions, workshops, tutorials for those undertaking one-term projects in the writing of fiction, poetry, or creative nonfiction. (Formerly ENAM 0701)

CRWR0701Q-S15

CRN: 21385

Senior Thesis:Creative Writing
Senior Thesis: Creative Writing
Discussions, workshops, tutorials for those undertaking one-term projects in the writing of fiction, poetry, or creative nonfiction. (Formerly ENAM 0701)

CRWR0701S-S15

CRN: 21387

Senior Thesis:Creative Writing
Senior Thesis: Creative Writing
Discussions, workshops, tutorials for those undertaking one-term projects in the writing of fiction, poetry, or creative nonfiction. (Formerly ENAM 0701)

CRWR0701X-S15

CRN: 21392

Senior Thesis:Creative Writing
Senior Thesis: Creative Writing
Discussions, workshops, tutorials for those undertaking one-term projects in the writing of fiction, poetry, or creative nonfiction. (Formerly ENAM 0701)

CRWR0701Z-S15

CRN: 21394

Senior Thesis:Creative Writing
Senior Thesis: Creative Writing
Discussions, workshops, tutorials for those undertaking one-term projects in the writing of fiction, poetry, or creative nonfiction. (Formerly ENAM 0701)

ENAM0102A-S15

Cross-Listed As:
GSFS0102A-S15 ENAM0102B-S15 GSFS0102B-S15

CRN: 22307

Gender/Sexuality/Literature
Introduction to Gender, Sexuality and Literature
This course offers an introduction to the ways in which literature reflects, influences, creates, and reveals cultural beliefs about gender and sexuality. We will read a wide range of novels, poems, and plays from a diversity of eras and national traditions; we will also study seminal works in feminist theory, queer studies, and the history of sexuality, from early thinkers to today's cutting-edge theorists. Throughout the course, we will explore the ways in which gender intersects with other crucial cultural issues such as race, nationhood, globalization, and class. 3 hrs. lect./disc.

ENAM0102B-S15

Cross-Listed As:
ENAM0102A-S15 GSFS0102A-S15 GSFS0102B-S15

CRN: 22554

Gender/Sexuality/Literature
Introduction to Gender, Sexuality and Literature
This course offers an introduction to the ways in which literature reflects, influences, creates, and reveals cultural beliefs about gender and sexuality. We will read a wide range of novels, poems, and plays from a diversity of eras and national traditions; we will also study seminal works in feminist theory, queer studies, and the history of sexuality, from early thinkers to today's cutting-edge theorists. Throughout the course, we will explore the ways in which gender intersects with other crucial cultural issues such as race, nationhood, globalization, and class. 3 hrs. lect./disc.

ENAM0103A-S15

CRN: 20682

Reading Literature
Reading Literature
This course seeks to develop skills for the close reading of literature through discussion of and writing about selected poems, plays, and short stories. A basic vocabulary of literary terms and an introductory palette of critical methods will also be covered, and the course's ultimate goal will be to enable students to attain the literary-critical sensibility vital to further course work in the major. At the instructor's discretion, the texts employed in this class may share a particular thematic concern or historical kinship. 3 hrs. lect./disc.

ENAM0103B-S15

CRN: 20683

Reading Literature
Reading Literature
This course seeks to develop skills for the close reading of literature through discussion of and writing about selected poems, plays, and short stories. A basic vocabulary of literary terms and an introductory palette of critical methods will also be covered, and the course's ultimate goal will be to enable students to attain the literary-critical sensibility vital to further course work in the major. At the instructor's discretion, the texts employed in this class may share a particular thematic concern or historical kinship. 3 hrs. lect./disc.

ENAM0103C-S15

CRN: 20684

Reading Literature
Reading Literature
This course seeks to develop skills for the close reading of literature through discussion of and writing about selected poems, plays, and short stories. A basic vocabulary of literary terms and an introductory palette of critical methods will also be covered, and the course's ultimate goal will be to enable students to attain the literary-critical sensibility vital to further course work in the major. At the instructor's discretion, the texts employed in this class may share a particular thematic concern or historical kinship. 3 hrs. lect./disc.

ENAM0103D-S15

CRN: 21267

Reading Literature
Reading Literature
This course seeks to develop skills for the close reading of literature through discussion of and writing about selected poems, plays, and short stories. A basic vocabulary of literary terms and an introductory palette of critical methods will also be covered, and the course's ultimate goal will be to enable students to attain the literary-critical sensibility vital to further course work in the major. At the instructor's discretion, the texts employed in this class may share a particular thematic concern or historical kinship. 3 hrs. lect./disc.

ENAM0180A-S15

Cross-Listed As:
RELI0180A-S15

CRN: 21273

Intro to Biblical Literature
Please register via RELI 0180A
An Introduction to Biblical Literature (I)
This course is a general introduction to biblical history, literature, and interpretation. It aims to acquaint students with the major characters, narratives, and poetry of the Jewish and Christian scriptures, with special emphasis on the ways scripture has been used and interpreted in Western culture. Students interested in more detailed analysis of the material should enroll in RELI 0280 and RELI 0281. 3 hrs. lect./1 hr. disc.

ENAM0180Y-S15

Cross-Listed As:
RELI0180Y-S15

CRN: 21290

Intro to Biblical Literature
Please register via RELI 0180Y
An Introduction to Biblical Literature (I)
This course is a general introduction to biblical history, literature, and interpretation. It aims to acquaint students with the major characters, narratives, and poetry of the Jewish and Christian scriptures, with special emphasis on the ways scripture has been used and interpreted in Western culture. Students interested in more detailed analysis of the material should enroll in RELI 0280 and RELI 0281. 3 hrs. lect./1 hr. disc.

ENAM0180Z-S15

Cross-Listed As:
RELI0180Z-S15

CRN: 21291

Intro to Biblical Literature
Please register via RELI 0180Z
An Introduction to Biblical Literature (I)
This course is a general introduction to biblical history, literature, and interpretation. It aims to acquaint students with the major characters, narratives, and poetry of the Jewish and Christian scriptures, with special emphasis on the ways scripture has been used and interpreted in Western culture. Students interested in more detailed analysis of the material should enroll in RELI 0280 and RELI 0281. 3 hrs. lect./1 hr. disc.

ENAM0203A-S15

Cross-Listed As:
EDST0203A-S15

CRN: 22165

Taboos and Trends
Please register via EDST 0203A
Taboos and Trends in Literature for Children and Young Adults
In this course we will examine groundbreaking works of literature for children and young adults. From Mark Twain to contemporary authors such as Lowry, Myers, and Farmer, writers for young people have pressed hard on societal notions about what is acceptable for young readers. We will look at taboos that have existed and been broken, as well as current trends in the field. We will pay particular attention to developmental issues in youth and sociocultural mores, including censorship.

ENAM0204A-S15

CRN: 20019

Foundations of English Lit.
Foundations of English Literature (I)
Students will study Chaucer's Canterbury Tales and Milton's Paradise Lost, as well as other foundational works of English literature that may include Shakespeare, non-Shakespearean Elizabethan drama, the poetry of Donne, and other 16th and 17th century poetry. 3 hrs. lect./dsc.

ENAM0204B-S15

CRN: 21112

Foundations of English Lit.
Foundations of English Literature (I)
Students will study Chaucer's Canterbury Tales and Milton's Paradise Lost, as well as other foundational works of English literature that may include Shakespeare, non-Shakespearean Elizabethan drama, the poetry of Donne, and other 16th and 17th century poetry. 3 hrs. lect./dsc.

ENAM0205A-S15

Cross-Listed As:
CMLT0205A-S15

CRN: 20364

Intro:Contemporary Lit. Theory
Introduction to Contemporary Literary Theory
This course will introduce several major schools of contemporary literary theory. By reading theoretical texts in close conjunction with works of literature, we will illuminate the ways in which these theoretical stances can produce various interpretations of a given poem, novel, or play. The approaches covered will include New Criticism, Psychoanalysis, Marxism and Cultural Criticism, Feminism, and Post-Structuralism. These theories will be applied to works by Shakespeare, Wordsworth, The Brontës, Conrad, Joyce, and others. The goal will be to make students critically aware of the fundamental literary, cultural, political, and moral assumptions underlying every act of interpretation they perform. 3 hrs. lect/disc.

ENAM0206A-S15

Cross-Listed As:
AMST0206A-S15

CRN: 22306

19th Century American Lit.
Nineteenth-Century American Literature (II, AL)
This course will examine major developments in the literary world of 19th century America. Specific topics to be addressed might include the transition from Romanticism to Regionalism and Realism, the origins and evolution of the novel in the United States, and the tensions arising from the emergence of a commercial marketplace for literature. Attention will also be paid to the rise of women as literary professionals in America and the persistent problematizing of race and slavery. Among others, authors may include J. F. Cooper, Emerson, Melville, Douglass, Chopin, Whitman, Dickinson, Twain, Hawthorne, Stowe, Alcott, Wharton, and James. . 3 hrs. lect./disc.

ENAM0215A-S15

Cross-Listed As:
ENVS0215A-S15

CRN: 22085

Nature's Meanings
Please register via ENVS 0215A
Nature's Meanings: The American Experience (AL)
What we think of as "nature" today is the result of a complex and fascinating history. The many meanings of nature emerge from Americans' experiences of the physical world and their understandings of, and contests over, their place in that world. This course will investigate how American meanings of nature have changed from European-Native contact to the present. How have changing meanings reshaped American culture and the natural environment? These questions will be addressed from historical, literary, religious, and philosophical perspectives. Readings may include: Emerson, Thoreau, Marsh, Muir, Leopold, and Carson, as well as other Euro-American and Native American writers. 3 hrs. lect.

ENAM0220A-S15

CRN: 22308

The Early English Novel
Castaways, Courtesans, and Criminals: The Early English Novel (II)
The novel was a young and scandalous literary genre in the 18th century. The reading public found the novel to be confusing, unpredictable, racy, morally dangerous--and of course very exciting. In this course we will examine the rise of the novel as a controversial literary genre, tracing its development from Defoe’s Robinson Crusoe and Moll Flanders in the early part of the century, through Richardson’s didactic Pamela and Clarissa and Fielding’s lively Tom Jones in mid-century, to Sterne’s wildly experimental Tristram Shandy and the more familiar world of Jane Austen at the century’s end. We will also consider the ways in which this history has shaped the fiction of today by reading a 21st century novel, to be determined by the course participants.

ENAM0239A-S15

Cross-Listed As:
FMMC0239A-S15

CRN: 22309

The Cinema of Alfred Hitchcock
The Cinema of Alfred Hitchcock
The cinematic artistry of Alfred Hitchcock in a dozen of his major films (mainly from the 1950s, including North by Northwest, Psycho, Rear Window, The Trouble with Harry, Vertigo) with attention to Hitchcock's style and technique, his obsessive images (such as dangling over the abyss), and his characteristic themes (the transfer of guilt, the double, etc.) and with a focus on the figure of the artist in Hitchcock's work. Issues such as the relationship of film to narrative fiction and to dramatic literature will also be explored. 3 hrs. lect./disc./screening

ENAM0239Y-S15

Cross-Listed As:
FMMC0239Y-S15

CRN: 22310

The Cinema of Alfred Hitchcock
Discussion
The Cinema of Alfred Hitchcock
The cinematic artistry of Alfred Hitchcock in a dozen of his major films (mainly from the 1950s, including North by Northwest, Psycho, Rear Window, The Trouble with Harry, Vertigo) with attention to Hitchcock's style and technique, his obsessive images (such as dangling over the abyss), and his characteristic themes (the transfer of guilt, the double, etc.) and with a focus on the figure of the artist in Hitchcock's work. Issues such as the relationship of film to narrative fiction and to dramatic literature will also be explored. 3 hrs. lect./disc./screening

ENAM0239Z-S15

Cross-Listed As:
FMMC0239Z-S15

CRN: 22311

The Cinema of Alfred Hitchcock
Discussion
The Cinema of Alfred Hitchcock
The cinematic artistry of Alfred Hitchcock in a dozen of his major films (mainly from the 1950s, including North by Northwest, Psycho, Rear Window, The Trouble with Harry, Vertigo) with attention to Hitchcock's style and technique, his obsessive images (such as dangling over the abyss), and his characteristic themes (the transfer of guilt, the double, etc.) and with a focus on the figure of the artist in Hitchcock's work. Issues such as the relationship of film to narrative fiction and to dramatic literature will also be explored. 3 hrs. lect./disc./screening

ENAM0240A-S15

Cross-Listed As:
AMST0240A-S15

CRN: 22016

Captivity Narratives
Please register via AMST 0240A
Captivity Narratives
Captivity narratives—first-person accounts of people's experiences of being forcibly taken and held against their will by an "other"—were immensely popular and important in early America; the captivity motif has been perpetuated and transformed throughout later American literature and film. In this course we will explore what these types of tales reveal about how Americans have handled the issues of race and racism, religion, gender, violence and sexuality that experiences of captivity entail. Beginning with classic Puritan narratives (Mary Rowlandson) and moving forward through the 19th and 20th centuries, we will consider the ways that novels (The Last of the Mohicans), autobiographies (Patty Hearst, Iraqi captivity of Pvt. Jessica Lynch) and films (The Searchers, Little Big Man, Dances with Wolves) do cultural work in shaping and challenging images of American national identity. 3 hrs. lect.

ENAM0241A-S15

CRN: 22312

19th Century Literature
From Austen to Dracula: The Transformation of 19th Century English Literature (II)
In this course we will trace the development of 19th century literature from the polite and decorous world of Austen in the early decades to the blood-thirsty depravity of Dracula and his kin in the fin de siecle. Far from merely reflecting the society that created it, 19th century literature played an active part in constructing its readers' ideas of gender and sexuality, imperialism and colonialism, class, religion, and technology. We will read novels by Austen, the Brontës, Dickens, George Eliot, Thomas Hardy, and Stoker; poetry by Wordsworth, Tennyson, Browning, Arnold, and Christina Rossetti; and works by Oscar Wilde and others that defy classification. We will pay special attention to authors' efforts to make literature relevant and revelatory in a time of swift and sometimes frightening social and intellectual innovation. 3 hrs lect./disc.

ENAM0249A-S15

Cross-Listed As:
AMST0249A-S15

CRN: 22484

Literature and Race
Literary Form and the Experience of Race (AL)
What does it mean to be a person of color in America? In this course we will look at how African American, Asian American, Chicana, Latina, and Native American writers have dealt with this question in fiction, autobiography, poetry, and film. We will analyze the differences and similarities between the literatures of these cultural groups. We will also look at how these writers have used the distinctly literary nature of their texts in grappling with race in America. Authors may include Julia Alvarez, Octavia Butler, Lorraine Hansberry, Maxine Hong Kingston, Malcolm X, Richard Rodriguez, Leslie Silko, and Amy Tan. 3 hrs. lect./disc.

ENAM0252A-S15

Cross-Listed As:
AMST0252A-S15

CRN: 22422

African American Literature
Please register via AMST 0252A
African American Literature (AL)
This course surveys developments in African American fiction, drama, poetry, and essays during the 20th century. Reading texts in their social, historical, and cultural contexts—and often in conjunction with other African American art forms like music and visual art—we will explore the evolution and deployment of various visions of black being and black artistry, from the Harlem Renaissance through social realism and the Black Arts Movement, to the contemporary post-soul aesthetic. Authors may include Langston Hughes, Zora Neale Hurston, Gwendolyn Brooks, Ralph Ellison, Lorraine Hansberry, Amiri Baraka, Ishmael Reed, Toni Morrison, Charles Johnson, and Octavia Butler. 3 hrs lect./disc.

ENAM0275A-S15

CRN: 22313

Multi-Ethnic British Lit
Multi-Ethnic British Literatures
"My name is Karim Amir," announces the protagonist of a Hanif Kureishi novel, "and I am an Englishman born and bred, almost." In this course we will investigate the complex subject of ethnic and national identity in the writing of British authors of Asian, African, and Caribbean descent. We will trace the shifting meanings of "black" and "British" as we move from 1950s migrant fictions to more recent reckonings with British multiculturalism. Topics to be considered will include diaspora and the work of memory; race and religion after 9/11; the representation of urban space; and the experience of asylum-seekers and refugees. 3 hrs. lect./disc.

ENAM0305A-S15

Cross-Listed As:
CMLT0305A-S15

CRN: 22314

Love Stories
Love Stories: Desire & Gender in Medieval and Early Modern Europe (I)
Our modern conceptions of desire, self, body and gender are informed in complex and often invisible ways by earlier narratives of love. We will investigate the conflicting accounts of love written during the medieval and early modern periods, considering in particular the relationship between the idealized notion of "courtly love" and the darker, medical picture of love as a form of madness or melancholia. Reading a variety of works including lyric, drama, romance and medical texts, we will look at the construction of gender and sexuality, the relationship between desire and subjectivity, and the gendering of certain "diseases" of love (such as hysteria) during this period. Authors to be studied will include: Chaucer, Boccaccio, Petrarch, Dante, Shakespeare, and a selection of male and female lyric poets. 3 hrs. lect./disc.

ENAM0309A-S15

Cross-Listed As:
CMLT0309A-S15

CRN: 22315

Contemporary Literature
Contemporary Literature
In this course we will explore seminal works of the post-World War II literature written in English. In the course of our readings we will move through the cultural and social transformations beginning with the paranoia and alienation of the Cold War, and continuing with the Civil Rights era, the national crisis of Vietnam, the rise of multiculturalism and the culture wars in the 1980s, the wide ranging effects of the information revolution, the profits and perils of globalization, and the profound anxiety of the war on terror. Writers studied will include Thomas Pynchon, Vladimir Nabokov, Don DeLillo, Donald Barthelme, William S. Burroughs, Toni Morrison, Ishmael Reed, Ana Castillo, and Art Spiegelman. 3 hrs. lect.

ENAM0316A-S15

CRN: 22316

Poetry and Spiritual Tradition
Poetry and the Spiritual Tradition
In this course we will examine the long and intimate connection between poetry and spirituality, looking especially at the influence of Christian thinking on such English and American poets as John Donne, George Herbert, Gerard Manley Hopkins, and T.S. Eliot. The course will begin with a study of the King James Version of the Book of Psalms, which deeply affected later British and American poetry. We will also read early Taoist and Islamic poets, including Lao Tse and Rumi. The course will conclude with a look at the work of several contemporary poets: Charles Wright, Louis Glück, and Mary Oliver.

ENAM0317A-S15

Cross-Listed As:
CMLT0317A-S15

CRN: 22442

Lost & Found in Translation
Please register via CMLT 0317A
Lost & Found in Translation
In this course we will explore the fundamental philosophical, sociological, and linguistic questions raised by translingual communication through a survey of the greatest theoretical writings on translation together with a comparative study of multiple translations of coherent sections from major works such as the Bible, the Iliad, One Thousand and One Nights, and the Tao Te Ching, as well as other shorter texts. Questions to be considered include: How much does language determine how we think? How much of language is culture? What is unique to translating sacred texts, poetry, “exotic” languages, and dead languages? How do we define the “untranslatable”? Are translators traitors, drudges, or artists? Can machines translate? 3 hrs. lect./disc.

ENAM0330A-S15

CRN: 22317

Shakespeare and Contexts
Shakespeare and Contexts (I)
This course is designed to sample the breadth of Shakespeare's dramatic art, from Titus Andronicus to The Tempest, with an eye to understanding both how the plays may have resonated for his first audiences on stage and how subsequent readers have drawn their own meanings from the published texts. We will therefore pay particular attention to such dramaturgical issues as the construction of character and of plot, the reworking of sources, spectacle, meta-theatricality, and versification, as well as consider what political and commercial implications these plays might have had during Shakespeare's life and what meaning they hold for us today. 3 hrs. lect./3 hr. disc./3 hrs. screen.

ENAM0330Y-S15

CRN: 22319

Shakespeare and Contexts
Discussion
Shakespeare and Contexts (I)
This course is designed to sample the breadth of Shakespeare's dramatic art, from Titus Andronicus to The Tempest, with an eye to understanding both how the plays may have resonated for his first audiences on stage and how subsequent readers have drawn their own meanings from the published texts. We will therefore pay particular attention to such dramaturgical issues as the construction of character and of plot, the reworking of sources, spectacle, meta-theatricality, and versification, as well as consider what political and commercial implications these plays might have had during Shakespeare's life and what meaning they hold for us today. 3 hrs. lect./3 hr. disc./3 hrs. screen.

ENAM0330Z-S15

CRN: 22320

Shakespeare and Contexts
Discussion
Shakespeare and Contexts (I)
This course is designed to sample the breadth of Shakespeare's dramatic art, from Titus Andronicus to The Tempest, with an eye to understanding both how the plays may have resonated for his first audiences on stage and how subsequent readers have drawn their own meanings from the published texts. We will therefore pay particular attention to such dramaturgical issues as the construction of character and of plot, the reworking of sources, spectacle, meta-theatricality, and versification, as well as consider what political and commercial implications these plays might have had during Shakespeare's life and what meaning they hold for us today. 3 hrs. lect./3 hr. disc./3 hrs. screen.

ENAM0342A-S15

Cross-Listed As:
AMST0342A-S15

CRN: 22321

Literature of American South
Literature of the American South (AL)
In William Faulkner's Absolom, Absolom! Canadian Shreve McCannon commands his roommate, Mississippian Quentin Compson, "Tell about the South. What's it like there. What do they do there. Why do they live there. Why do they live at all?" Our course will take on writers who want to "tell about the South" in the post-Civil War era and beyond, as they seek to help re-define and revitalize their region. We will focus our regional exploration on the "Southern Renascence," when writers and theorists like the Agrarians re-examined Southern history and reconsidered their role in relation to their regional community. Authors including William Faulkner, Zora Neale Hurston, Robert Penn Warren, Eudora Welty, and Tennessee Williams developed a new awareness of the restrictions of racial and gender roles, an interest in literary experimentation, and an increasingly realistic presentation of social conditions in the south. We will consider the legacy of these writers in later 20th century texts by authors such as Flannery O'Connor, Walker Percy, Alice Walker, Cormac McCarthy, Ernest Gaines, Randall Kenan and even relative newcomers such as Jackson Tippett McCrea. (Not open to students who have taken FYSE 1336) 3 hrs. lect./disc.

ENAM0359A-S15

Cross-Listed As:
RUSS0359A-S15

CRN: 22435

The Art Of Nabokov
Please register via RUSS 0359A
The Art of Vladimir Nabokov (in English)
A study of the "perverse" aesthetics of this Russian-American writer. We will expose the hidden plots under the surface of his fiction, follow and arbitrate the ongoing contest between the author and his fictional heroes, and search for the roots of Nabokov's poetics in Western and Russian literary traditions. An attempt will be made to show the continuity between the Russian and English works of this bilingual and bicultural writer. 3 hrs. lect.

ENAM0408A-S15

CRN: 22436

D.H. Lawrence
D.H. Lawrence
We will explore the ways in which Lawrence’s dynamic literary style dramatizes his vision of how the destructive forces of the will, linked with consciousness, industrialization, and the collective mass, are in mortal conflict with the redemptive and salvific forces of sexual passion, linked to the unconscious, nature and natural processes, and the absolute integrity and otherness of the individual. We will also consider how Lawrence’s literary representation has diminished in recent years in America (though much less so in England and elsewhere), and why he is now so infrequently taught in American colleges and universities. Works to be studied include the collected short stories, Sons and Lovers, The Rainbow, Women in Love, St. Mawr, Lady Chatterley’s Lover, selected essays, and poems 3 hrs. lect. (D. Price)

ENAM0447A-S15

Cross-Listed As:
CMLT0447A-S15

CRN: 22601

The Novel and the City
The Novel and the City
In this course we will take a global and transnational approach as we examine a number of 20th and 21st century British and Anglophone novels about life in the city. We will explore formations of urban life alongside transformations in the novel as a genre. We will put these novels of city life in dialogue with critical theory-that is, theories of culture and society that have as their aim human emancipation (for example, Marxism, feminism, critical race studies, and postcolonial studies). The novels we read will reflect important literary movements such as realism, modernism, and postmodernism. (Not open to students who have taken ENAM/CMLT 0373) 3 hrs. sem.

ENAM0458A-S15

CRN: 22443

Merchants of Venice
Merchants of Venice
In this course we will read Shakespeare's The Merchant of Venice from different perspectives, including those of race, religion, gender, staging, and form. We will engage the play at the level of rhetorical analysis, textual history, character analysis, source analysis, and stage history. We will also study contemporary dramas resembling The Merchant of Venice (e.g., Three Ladies of London, Jew of Malta, Othello), and examine its legacy in film adaptations and in works by such authors as Charles Dickens, Philip Roth, Wladislaw Szpilman, and Christopher Moore. At every point, we will consider critical reception and theoretical implications. 3 hrs. sem.

ENAM0500A-S15

CRN: 20096

Special Project: Lit
Special Project: Literature
Approval Required.

ENAM0500B-S15

CRN: 20097

Special Project: Lit
Special Project: Literature
Approval Required.

ENAM0500D-S15

CRN: 20101

Special Project: Lit
Special Project: Literature
Approval Required.

ENAM0500F-S15

CRN: 20103

Special Project: Lit
Special Project: Literature
Approval Required.

ENAM0500G-S15

CRN: 20104

Special Project: Lit
Special Project: Literature
Approval Required.

ENAM0500I-S15

CRN: 20106

Special Project: Lit
Special Project: Literature
Approval Required.

ENAM0500J-S15

CRN: 20108

Special Project: Lit
Special Project: Literature
Approval Required.

ENAM0500K-S15

CRN: 20645

Special Project: Lit
Special Project: Literature
Approval Required.

ENAM0500L-S15

CRN: 20647

Special Project: Lit
Special Project: Literature
Approval Required.

ENAM0500M-S15

CRN: 20648

Special Project: Lit
Special Project: Literature
Approval Required.

ENAM0500N-S15

CRN: 20731

Special Project: Lit
Special Project: Literature
Approval Required.

ENAM0500O-S15

CRN: 20732

Special Project: Lit
Special Project: Literature
Approval Required.

ENAM0500P-S15

CRN: 20733

Special Project: Lit
Special Project: Literature
Approval Required.

ENAM0500Q-S15

CRN: 20734

Special Project: Lit
Special Project: Literature
Approval Required.

ENAM0500R-S15

CRN: 20735

Special Project: Lit
Special Project: Literature
Approval Required.

ENAM0500S-S15

CRN: 20896

Special Project: Lit
Special Project: Literature
Approval Required.

ENAM0500V-S15

CRN: 20899

Special Project: Lit
Special Project: Literature
Approval Required.

ENAM0500W-S15

CRN: 20900

Special Project: Lit
Special Project: Literature
Approval Required.

ENAM0500X-S15

CRN: 20901

Special Project: Lit
Special Project: Literature
Approval Required.

ENAM0500Y-S15

CRN: 20902

Special Project: Lit
Special Project: Literature
Approval Required.

ENAM0500Z-S15

CRN: 20947

Special Project: Lit
Special Project: Literature
Approval Required.

ENAM0700A-S15

CRN: 20117

Senior Essay: Critical Writing
Senior Thesis: Critical Writing
Individual guidance and seminar (discussions, workshops, tutorials) for those undertaking one-term projects in literary criticism or analysis. All critical thesis writers also take the essay workshop (ENAM 700Z) in either Fall or Spring Term.

ENAM0700B-S15

CRN: 20118

Senior Essay: Critical Writing
Senior Thesis: Critical Writing
Individual guidance and seminar (discussions, workshops, tutorials) for those undertaking one-term projects in literary criticism or analysis. All critical thesis writers also take the essay workshop (ENAM 700Z) in either Fall or Spring Term.

ENAM0700C-S15

CRN: 20121

Senior Essay: Critical Writing
Senior Thesis: Critical Writing
Individual guidance and seminar (discussions, workshops, tutorials) for those undertaking one-term projects in literary criticism or analysis. All critical thesis writers also take the essay workshop (ENAM 700Z) in either Fall or Spring Term.

ENAM0700D-S15

CRN: 20123

Senior Essay: Critical Writing
Senior Thesis: Critical Writing
Individual guidance and seminar (discussions, workshops, tutorials) for those undertaking one-term projects in literary criticism or analysis. All critical thesis writers also take the essay workshop (ENAM 700Z) in either Fall or Spring Term.

ENAM0700E-S15

CRN: 20124

Senior Essay: Critical Writing
Senior Thesis: Critical Writing
Individual guidance and seminar (discussions, workshops, tutorials) for those undertaking one-term projects in literary criticism or analysis. All critical thesis writers also take the essay workshop (ENAM 700Z) in either Fall or Spring Term.

ENAM0700F-S15

CRN: 20126

Senior Essay: Critical Writing
Senior Thesis: Critical Writing
Individual guidance and seminar (discussions, workshops, tutorials) for those undertaking one-term projects in literary criticism or analysis. All critical thesis writers also take the essay workshop (ENAM 700Z) in either Fall or Spring Term.

ENAM0700G-S15

CRN: 20127

Senior Essay: Critical Writing
Senior Thesis: Critical Writing
Individual guidance and seminar (discussions, workshops, tutorials) for those undertaking one-term projects in literary criticism or analysis. All critical thesis writers also take the essay workshop (ENAM 700Z) in either Fall or Spring Term.

ENAM0700H-S15

CRN: 20130

Senior Essay: Critical Writing
Senior Thesis: Critical Writing
Individual guidance and seminar (discussions, workshops, tutorials) for those undertaking one-term projects in literary criticism or analysis. All critical thesis writers also take the essay workshop (ENAM 700Z) in either Fall or Spring Term.

ENAM0700I-S15

CRN: 20131

Senior Essay: Critical Writing
Senior Thesis: Critical Writing
Individual guidance and seminar (discussions, workshops, tutorials) for those undertaking one-term projects in literary criticism or analysis. All critical thesis writers also take the essay workshop (ENAM 700Z) in either Fall or Spring Term.

ENAM0700J-S15

CRN: 20133

Senior Essay: Critical Writing
Senior Thesis: Critical Writing
Individual guidance and seminar (discussions, workshops, tutorials) for those undertaking one-term projects in literary criticism or analysis. All critical thesis writers also take the essay workshop (ENAM 700Z) in either Fall or Spring Term.

ENAM0700K-S15

CRN: 20134

Senior Essay: Critical Writing
Senior Thesis: Critical Writing
Individual guidance and seminar (discussions, workshops, tutorials) for those undertaking one-term projects in literary criticism or analysis. All critical thesis writers also take the essay workshop (ENAM 700Z) in either Fall or Spring Term.

ENAM0700M-S15

CRN: 20556

Senior Essay: Critical Writing
Senior Thesis: Critical Writing
Individual guidance and seminar (discussions, workshops, tutorials) for those undertaking one-term projects in literary criticism or analysis. All critical thesis writers also take the essay workshop (ENAM 700Z) in either Fall or Spring Term.

ENAM0700N-S15

CRN: 20557

Senior Essay: Critical Writing
Senior Thesis: Critical Writing
Individual guidance and seminar (discussions, workshops, tutorials) for those undertaking one-term projects in literary criticism or analysis. All critical thesis writers also take the essay workshop (ENAM 700Z) in either Fall or Spring Term.

ENAM0700O-S15

CRN: 20562

Senior Essay: Critical Writing
Senior Thesis: Critical Writing
Individual guidance and seminar (discussions, workshops, tutorials) for those undertaking one-term projects in literary criticism or analysis. All critical thesis writers also take the essay workshop (ENAM 700Z) in either Fall or Spring Term.

ENAM0700P-S15

CRN: 20641

Senior Essay: Critical Writing
Senior Thesis: Critical Writing
Individual guidance and seminar (discussions, workshops, tutorials) for those undertaking one-term projects in literary criticism or analysis. All critical thesis writers also take the essay workshop (ENAM 700Z) in either Fall or Spring Term.

ENAM0700Q-S15

CRN: 20792

Senior Essay: Critical Writing
Senior Thesis: Critical Writing
Individual guidance and seminar (discussions, workshops, tutorials) for those undertaking one-term projects in literary criticism or analysis. All critical thesis writers also take the essay workshop (ENAM 700Z) in either Fall or Spring Term.

ENAM0700R-S15

CRN: 20643

Senior Essay: Critical Writing
Senior Thesis: Critical Writing
Individual guidance and seminar (discussions, workshops, tutorials) for those undertaking one-term projects in literary criticism or analysis. All critical thesis writers also take the essay workshop (ENAM 700Z) in either Fall or Spring Term.

ENAM0700S-S15

CRN: 20644

Senior Essay: Critical Writing
Senior Thesis: Critical Writing
Individual guidance and seminar (discussions, workshops, tutorials) for those undertaking one-term projects in literary criticism or analysis. All critical thesis writers also take the essay workshop (ENAM 700Z) in either Fall or Spring Term.

ENAM0700T-S15

CRN: 20783

Senior Essay: Critical Writing
Senior Thesis: Critical Writing
Individual guidance and seminar (discussions, workshops, tutorials) for those undertaking one-term projects in literary criticism or analysis. All critical thesis writers also take the essay workshop (ENAM 700Z) in either Fall or Spring Term.

ENAM0700U-S15

CRN: 20784

Senior Essay: Critical Writing
Senior Thesis: Critical Writing
Individual guidance and seminar (discussions, workshops, tutorials) for those undertaking one-term projects in literary criticism or analysis. All critical thesis writers also take the essay workshop (ENAM 700Z) in either Fall or Spring Term.

ENAM0700V-S15

CRN: 20785

Senior Essay: Critical Writing
Senior Thesis: Critical Writing
Individual guidance and seminar (discussions, workshops, tutorials) for those undertaking one-term projects in literary criticism or analysis. All critical thesis writers also take the essay workshop (ENAM 700Z) in either Fall or Spring Term.

ENAM0700W-S15

CRN: 20903

Senior Essay: Critical Writing
Senior Thesis: Critical Writing
Individual guidance and seminar (discussions, workshops, tutorials) for those undertaking one-term projects in literary criticism or analysis. All critical thesis writers also take the essay workshop (ENAM 700Z) in either Fall or Spring Term.

ENAM0700X-S15

CRN: 20904

Senior Essay: Critical Writing
Senior Thesis: Critical Writing
Individual guidance and seminar (discussions, workshops, tutorials) for those undertaking one-term projects in literary criticism or analysis. All critical thesis writers also take the essay workshop (ENAM 700Z) in either Fall or Spring Term.

ENAM0700Y-S15

CRN: 20905

Senior Essay: Critical Writing
Senior Thesis: Critical Writing
Individual guidance and seminar (discussions, workshops, tutorials) for those undertaking one-term projects in literary criticism or analysis. All critical thesis writers also take the essay workshop (ENAM 700Z) in either Fall or Spring Term.

ENAM0700Z-S15

CRN: 20923

Senior Essay: Critical Writing
Senior Essay: Discussion
Senior Thesis: Critical Writing
Individual guidance and seminar (discussions, workshops, tutorials) for those undertaking one-term projects in literary criticism or analysis. All critical thesis writers also take the essay workshop (ENAM 700Z) in either Fall or Spring Term.

ENAM0708A-S15

CRN: 22450

Joint Senior Work: ENAM-THEA
Senior Work: Joint Majors in English & American Literatures and Theatre
Approval required.

Department of English & American Literatures

Axinn Center at Starr Library
15 Old Chapel Road
Middlebury College
Middlebury, VT 05753