Offerings By Semester

« Summer Study 2017 Fall 2017 Spring 2018 »

CRWR0106A-F17

Cross-Listed As:
FMMC0106A-F17

CRN: 91185

Writing for the Screen I
Please register via FMMC 0106A
Writing for the Screen I
In this course we will examine the fundamental elements of dramatic narrative as they relate to visual storytelling. We will emphasize the process of generating original story material and learning the craft of screenwriting, including topics such as story, outline, scene structure, subtext, character objectives, formatting standards, and narrative strategies. Weekly writing assignments will emphasize visual storytelling techniques, tone and atmosphere, character relationships, and dialogue. Students will be required to complete two short screenplays. Required readings will inform and accompany close study of selected screenplays and films. (FMMC 0101 OR CRWR 0170 or approval of instructor) (Formerly FMMC/ENAM 0106) 3 hrs. sem.

CRWR0106B-F17

Cross-Listed As:
FMMC0106B-F17

CRN: 91266

Writing for the Screen I
Please register for FMMC 0106B
Writing for the Screen I
In this course we will examine the fundamental elements of dramatic narrative as they relate to visual storytelling. We will emphasize the process of generating original story material and learning the craft of screenwriting, including topics such as story, outline, scene structure, subtext, character objectives, formatting standards, and narrative strategies. Weekly writing assignments will emphasize visual storytelling techniques, tone and atmosphere, character relationships, and dialogue. Students will be required to complete two short screenplays. Required readings will inform and accompany close study of selected screenplays and films. (FMMC 0101 OR CRWR 0170 or approval of instructor) (Formerly FMMC/ENAM 0106) 3 hrs. sem.

CRWR0170A-F17

CRN: 91186

Writing: Poetry, Fiction, NonF
Writing: Poetry, Fiction, NonFiction
An introduction to the writing of poetry, short fiction, and nonfiction through analysis of writings by modern and contemporary poets and prose writers and regular discussion of student writing. Different instructors may choose to emphasize one literary form or another in a given semester. Workshops will focus on composition and revision, with particular attention to the basics of form and craft. This course is a prerequisite to CRWR 0380, CRWR 0385, CRWR 0370, and CRWR 0375. (This course is not a college writing course.) (Formerly ENAM 0170) 3 hrs. sem.

CRWR0170B-F17

CRN: 91187

Writing: Poetry, Fiction, NonF
Writing: Poetry, Fiction, NonFiction
An introduction to the writing of poetry, short fiction, and nonfiction through analysis of writings by modern and contemporary poets and prose writers and regular discussion of student writing. Different instructors may choose to emphasize one literary form or another in a given semester. Workshops will focus on composition and revision, with particular attention to the basics of form and craft. This course is a prerequisite to CRWR 0380, CRWR 0385, CRWR 0370, and CRWR 0375. (This course is not a college writing course.) (Formerly ENAM 0170) 3 hrs. sem.

CRWR0173A-F17

CRN: 91595

Environmental Lit Workshop
Environmental Literature: Reading & Writing Workshop
This course is an introduction to the reading and writing of environmental literature. We will analyze classic and contemporary model works in prose and poetry, in nonfiction and fiction, all directed at human interaction with the natural world. Our writing assignments will explore this theme in personal essays, poems, literary reportage, poetry, and fiction. Workshops will focus on inspiration, form, craft, and thematic issues associated with the environment. This course is a prerequisite to CRWR 0370, CRWR 0375, CRWR 0380, and CRWR 0385.

CRWR0175A-F17

CRN: 91188

Structure of Poetry
The Structure of Poetry
This course is a workshop for beginning students in the field of creative writing. Students will read a selection of poems each week and write their own poems, producing a portfolio of their work at the end of the term. There will be an emphasis on revision. Students will be introduced to a range of forms as well, including prose poems, epistles, the tanka, the long poem, and the sonnet.

CRWR0218A-F17

Cross-Listed As:
THEA0218A-F17

CRN: 92459

Playwriting I: Beginning
Please register via THEA 0218A
Playwriting I: Beginning
The purpose of the course is to gain a theoretical and practical understanding of writing for the stage. Students will read, watch, and analyze published plays, as well as work by their peers, but the focus throughout will remain on the writing and development of original work. (Formerly THEA/ENAM 0218)

CRWR0334A-F17

Cross-Listed As:
WRPR0334A-F17

CRN: 92178

Writing and Experience
Please Register Via WRPR 0334
Writing and Experience: Exploring Self in Society
The reading and online writing for this course will focus on what it means to construct a sense of self in relation to the larger social world of family and friends, education, media, work, and community. Readings will include nonfiction and fiction works by authors such as Maya Angelou, James Baldwin, Andre Dubus, Tim O'Brien, Flannery O'Connor, Amy Tan, Tobias Wolff, and Alice Walker. Students will explore the craft of storytelling and the multiple ways in which one can employ the tools of fiction in crafting creative nonfiction and fiction narratives for a new online magazine on American popular culture. This magazine will have been created by students in Writing on Contemporary Issues. Narratives about self and society will therefore lean towards aspects of American popular culture. 3 hrs sem.

CRWR0370A-F17

CRN: 91189

Advanced Fiction Workshop
Workshop: Fiction
Study and practice in techniques of fiction writing through workshops and readings in short fiction and novels. Class discussions will be based on student manuscripts and published model works. Emphasis will be placed on composition and revision. (ENAM/CRWR 0170, ENAM/CRWR 0175, or ENAM/CRWR 0185) (Approval required; please apply online at http://www.middlebury.edu/academics/enam/resources/forms or at the Department office) (Formerly ENAM 0370) (This course is not a college writing course) 3 hrs. sem.

CRWR0560A-F17

CRN: 91191

Special Project: Writing
Special Project: Creative Writing
Approval Required.

CRWR0560B-F17

CRN: 91192

Special Project: Writing
Special Project: Creative Writing
Approval Required.

CRWR0560C-F17

CRN: 91193

Special Project: Writing
Special Project: Creative Writing
Approval Required.

CRWR0560D-F17

CRN: 91194

Special Project: Writing
Special Project: Creative Writing
Approval Required.

CRWR0560E-F17

CRN: 91195

Special Project: Writing
Special Project: Creative Writing
Approval Required.

CRWR0560F-F17

CRN: 91196

Special Project: Writing
Special Project: Creative Writing
Approval Required.

CRWR0560G-F17

CRN: 91197

Special Project: Writing
Special Project: Creative Writing
Approval Required.

CRWR0560H-F17

CRN: 91198

Special Project: Writing
Special Project: Creative Writing
Approval Required.

CRWR0560I-F17

CRN: 91199

Special Project: Writing
Special Project: Creative Writing
Approval Required.

CRWR0560J-F17

CRN: 91200

Special Project: Writing
Special Project: Creative Writing
Approval Required.

CRWR0560K-F17

CRN: 91201

Special Project: Writing
Special Project: Creative Writing
Approval Required.

CRWR0560L-F17

CRN: 91202

Special Project: Writing
Special Project: Creative Writing
Approval Required.

CRWR0560M-F17

CRN: 91203

Special Project: Writing
Special Project: Creative Writing
Approval Required.

CRWR0560N-F17

CRN: 91204

Special Project: Writing
Special Project: Creative Writing
Approval Required.

CRWR0560O-F17

CRN: 91205

Special Project: Writing
Special Project: Creative Writing
Approval Required.

CRWR0560P-F17

CRN: 91206

Special Project: Writing
Special Project: Creative Writing
Approval Required.

CRWR0560Q-F17

CRN: 91207

Special Project: Writing
Special Project: Creative Writing
Approval Required.

CRWR0560R-F17

CRN: 91208

Special Project: Writing
Special Project: Creative Writing
Approval Required.

CRWR0560S-F17

CRN: 91209

Special Project: Writing
Special Project: Creative Writing
Approval Required.

CRWR0560U-F17

CRN: 91211

Special Project: Writing
Special Project: Creative Writing
Approval Required.

CRWR0560V-F17

CRN: 91212

Special Project: Writing
Special Project: Creative Writing
Approval Required.

CRWR0560W-F17

CRN: 91214

Special Project: Writing
Special Project: Creative Writing
Approval Required.

CRWR0560X-F17

CRN: 91213

Special Project: Writing
Special Project: Creative Writing
Approval Required.

CRWR0560Y-F17

CRN: 91215

Special Project: Writing
Special Project: Creative Writing
Approval Required.

CRWR0560Z-F17

CRN: 91216

Special Project: Writing
Special Project: Creative Writing
Approval Required.

CRWR0701A-F17

CRN: 91217

Senior Thesis:Creative Writing
Senior Thesis: Creative Writing
Discussions, workshops, tutorials for those undertaking one-term projects in the writing of fiction, poetry, or creative nonfiction.

CRWR0701B-F17

CRN: 91218

Senior Thesis:Creative Writing
Senior Thesis: Creative Writing
Discussions, workshops, tutorials for those undertaking one-term projects in the writing of fiction, poetry, or creative nonfiction.

CRWR0701C-F17

CRN: 91219

Senior Thesis:Creative Writing
Senior Thesis: Creative Writing
Discussions, workshops, tutorials for those undertaking one-term projects in the writing of fiction, poetry, or creative nonfiction.

CRWR0701D-F17

CRN: 91220

Senior Thesis:Creative Writing
Senior Thesis: Creative Writing
Discussions, workshops, tutorials for those undertaking one-term projects in the writing of fiction, poetry, or creative nonfiction.

CRWR0701E-F17

CRN: 91221

Senior Thesis:Creative Writing
Senior Thesis: Creative Writing
Discussions, workshops, tutorials for those undertaking one-term projects in the writing of fiction, poetry, or creative nonfiction.

CRWR0701F-F17

CRN: 91222

Senior Thesis:Creative Writing
Senior Thesis: Creative Writing
Discussions, workshops, tutorials for those undertaking one-term projects in the writing of fiction, poetry, or creative nonfiction.

CRWR0701G-F17

CRN: 91223

Senior Thesis:Creative Writing
Senior Thesis: Creative Writing
Discussions, workshops, tutorials for those undertaking one-term projects in the writing of fiction, poetry, or creative nonfiction.

CRWR0701H-F17

CRN: 91224

Senior Thesis:Creative Writing
Senior Thesis: Creative Writing
Discussions, workshops, tutorials for those undertaking one-term projects in the writing of fiction, poetry, or creative nonfiction.

CRWR0701I-F17

CRN: 91225

Senior Thesis:Creative Writing
Senior Thesis: Creative Writing
Discussions, workshops, tutorials for those undertaking one-term projects in the writing of fiction, poetry, or creative nonfiction.

CRWR0701K-F17

CRN: 91227

Senior Thesis:Creative Writing
Senior Thesis: Creative Writing
Discussions, workshops, tutorials for those undertaking one-term projects in the writing of fiction, poetry, or creative nonfiction.

CRWR0701L-F17

CRN: 91228

Senior Thesis:Creative Writing
Senior Thesis: Creative Writing
Discussions, workshops, tutorials for those undertaking one-term projects in the writing of fiction, poetry, or creative nonfiction.

CRWR0701M-F17

CRN: 91229

Senior Thesis:Creative Writing
Senior Thesis: Creative Writing
Discussions, workshops, tutorials for those undertaking one-term projects in the writing of fiction, poetry, or creative nonfiction.

CRWR0701N-F17

CRN: 91230

Senior Thesis:Creative Writing
Senior Thesis: Creative Writing
Discussions, workshops, tutorials for those undertaking one-term projects in the writing of fiction, poetry, or creative nonfiction.

CRWR0701O-F17

CRN: 91231

Senior Thesis:Creative Writing
Senior Thesis: Creative Writing
Discussions, workshops, tutorials for those undertaking one-term projects in the writing of fiction, poetry, or creative nonfiction.

CRWR0701P-F17

CRN: 91232

Senior Thesis:Creative Writing
Senior Thesis: Creative Writing
Discussions, workshops, tutorials for those undertaking one-term projects in the writing of fiction, poetry, or creative nonfiction.

CRWR0701Q-F17

CRN: 91233

Senior Thesis:Creative Writing
Senior Thesis: Creative Writing
Discussions, workshops, tutorials for those undertaking one-term projects in the writing of fiction, poetry, or creative nonfiction.

CRWR0701R-F17

CRN: 91234

Senior Thesis:Creative Writing
Senior Thesis: Creative Writing
Discussions, workshops, tutorials for those undertaking one-term projects in the writing of fiction, poetry, or creative nonfiction.

CRWR0701S-F17

CRN: 91235

Senior Thesis:Creative Writing
Senior Thesis: Creative Writing
Discussions, workshops, tutorials for those undertaking one-term projects in the writing of fiction, poetry, or creative nonfiction.

CRWR0701T-F17

CRN: 91236

Senior Thesis:Creative Writing
Senior Thesis: Creative Writing
Discussions, workshops, tutorials for those undertaking one-term projects in the writing of fiction, poetry, or creative nonfiction.

CRWR0701U-F17

CRN: 91237

Senior Thesis:Creative Writing
Senior Thesis: Creative Writing
Discussions, workshops, tutorials for those undertaking one-term projects in the writing of fiction, poetry, or creative nonfiction.

CRWR0701V-F17

CRN: 91238

Senior Thesis:Creative Writing
Senior Thesis: Creative Writing
Discussions, workshops, tutorials for those undertaking one-term projects in the writing of fiction, poetry, or creative nonfiction.

CRWR0701W-F17

CRN: 91239

Senior Thesis:Creative Writing
Senior Thesis: Creative Writing
Discussions, workshops, tutorials for those undertaking one-term projects in the writing of fiction, poetry, or creative nonfiction.

CRWR0701X-F17

CRN: 91240

Senior Thesis:Creative Writing
Senior Thesis: Creative Writing
Discussions, workshops, tutorials for those undertaking one-term projects in the writing of fiction, poetry, or creative nonfiction.

CRWR0701Y-F17

CRN: 91241

Senior Thesis:Creative Writing
Senior Thesis: Creative Writing
Discussions, workshops, tutorials for those undertaking one-term projects in the writing of fiction, poetry, or creative nonfiction.

CRWR0701Z-F17

CRN: 91242

Senior Thesis:Creative Writing
Senior Thesis: Creative Writing
Discussions, workshops, tutorials for those undertaking one-term projects in the writing of fiction, poetry, or creative nonfiction.

ENAM0103A-F17

CRN: 90627

Reading Literature
Reading Literature
This course is designed to develop techniques for reading and writing effectively and sensitively about literary works. We will read works across temporal, generic, and national boundaries, exploring the different critical methods of interpretation available to us. The course’s organizing theme is the representation of identity (transgressive, mysterious, transforming, etc.) in literary works, and readings will be structured to allow us simultaneously to develop—and interweave--both the thematic and critical axes of our reading practices. Both aspects of the course will culminate in a reading of Henry James's complex ghost story, The Turn of the Screw, in the context of several different--and sometimes contradictory--critical approaches. From this vantage point at the end of the course we will be able to survey the different historical, cultural, and linguistic methods of interpreting literature. Texts may also include: The Shorter Norton Anthology of Poetry, David Henry Hwang’s M. Butterfly, John Patrick Shanley’s Doubt, and Chimamanda Ngozi Adichie’s Purple Hibiscus. 3 hrs. lect./disc

ENAM0103B-F17

CRN: 90629

Reading Literature
A Reading Literature: Place, Space, and Time
Writers have always been concerned with the meaning of place and the passage of time, and our task will be to explore the diverse ways that literature in English expresses, grapples with, and comes to terms with these fundamental concepts. Of central concern will be the relationship between form and content in literary expression. Along the way, you will learn to more fluently read, write about, and talk about multiple literary genres—poetry, drama, short fiction, and novel—from Shakespeare to the 21st century. 3 hrs. lect./disc

ENAM0103C-F17

CRN: 90630

Reading Literature
Reading Literature: The Poetics of Memory
According to ancient myth, Mnemosyne, the goddess of memory, was mother of the muses. That indicates how important memory is to literature and the reading of literature. In what ways do different literary genres involve memory? How do texts remember each other? What is the relationship between memory and interpretation, and how does memory contribute to the building of interpretive communities? How does it shape poetic and narrative form, structure, syntax, and impersonation, and what part does it play in literary representations of gender, race, and class? 3 hrs. lect./disc.

ENAM0105A-F17

Cross-Listed As:
GSFS0105A-F17

CRN: 92294

Victoria's Secrets
Victoria's Secrets
Known as the great age of the realist novel and the epitome of staid decorum, the nineteenth century also had its guilty pleasures--mysteries, ghost stories, science fiction, adventure tales, and more--all exposing a wild underside to the Victorian imagination where seeming norms of gendered, racial, and ethnic identity were systematically called into question. In this course we will read both canonical realist novels and their non-traditional counterparts in an attempt to understand the productive interplay between these two seemingly disparate literary traditions. Authors may include: Austen, Dickens, Eliot, Hardy, the Brontës, Wilkie Collins, R.L. Stevenson, Arthur Conan Doyle, H.G. Wells, Bram Stoker, Mary Elizabeth Braddon, and others. 3 hrs.lect.

ENAM0117A-F17

CRN: 92295

The Short Story
The Short Story (AL)
This course approaches the short story as a distinct prose genre, beginning with work by Edgar Allen Poe and Guy de Maupassant and concluding with stories by contemporary authors. We will examine the particularly notable growth of the genre in America and survey various trends in the form, from "local color" sketches and realistic tales to experiments in modernism and postmodernism. Throughout, we will consider issues of structure, characterization, style, and voice. Other authors may include Anderson, Barthelme, Cheever, Chekhov, Hemingway, Joyce, Moore, O'Connor, Twain, and Welty. 3 hrs. lect./disc.

ENAM0180A-F17

Cross-Listed As:
RELI0180A-F17

CRN: 92441

Intro to Biblical Literature
Please register via RELI 0180A
An Introduction to Biblical Literature
This course is a general introduction to biblical history, literature, and interpretation. It aims to acquaint students with the major characters, narratives, and poetry of the Jewish and Christian scriptures, with special emphasis on the ways scripture has been used and interpreted in Western culture. Students interested in more detailed analysis of the material should enroll in RELI 0280 and RELI 0281. 3 hrs. lect./1 hr. disc.

ENAM0180X-F17

Cross-Listed As:
RELI0180X-F17

CRN: 92443

Intro to Biblical Literature
Please register via RELI 0180X
An Introduction to Biblical Literature
This course is a general introduction to biblical history, literature, and interpretation. It aims to acquaint students with the major characters, narratives, and poetry of the Jewish and Christian scriptures, with special emphasis on the ways scripture has been used and interpreted in Western culture. Students interested in more detailed analysis of the material should enroll in RELI 0280 and RELI 0281. 3 hrs. lect./1 hr. disc.

ENAM0180Y-F17

Cross-Listed As:
RELI0180Y-F17

CRN: 92444

Intro to Biblical Literature
Please register via RELI 0180Y
An Introduction to Biblical Literature
This course is a general introduction to biblical history, literature, and interpretation. It aims to acquaint students with the major characters, narratives, and poetry of the Jewish and Christian scriptures, with special emphasis on the ways scripture has been used and interpreted in Western culture. Students interested in more detailed analysis of the material should enroll in RELI 0280 and RELI 0281. 3 hrs. lect./1 hr. disc.

ENAM0180Z-F17

Cross-Listed As:
RELI0180Z-F17

CRN: 92445

Intro to Biblical Literature
Please register via RELI 0180Z
An Introduction to Biblical Literature
This course is a general introduction to biblical history, literature, and interpretation. It aims to acquaint students with the major characters, narratives, and poetry of the Jewish and Christian scriptures, with special emphasis on the ways scripture has been used and interpreted in Western culture. Students interested in more detailed analysis of the material should enroll in RELI 0280 and RELI 0281. 3 hrs. lect./1 hr. disc.

ENAM0201A-F17

CRN: 90948

British Lit. and Culture I
The Poetics of Entertainment
British Literature and Culture: The Poetics of Entertainment (I) (Pre-1800)
"Entertain" now means "amuse" or "divert," but long ago it could mean, more seriously, "hold together" in community. We will explore poetic "entertainment" as it evolved in the Middle Ages and Renaissance. Recurring themes will include hospitality, gift-exchange, love, marriage, festival, politics, and friendship, all involving gender, class, and nationality. Our topic will also entail exploring what has made works canonical and the contribution of the canon to our own sense of community. Texts may include Beowulf, Gawain and the Green Knight, mystery and morality plays, and works by Marie de France, Chretien, Chaucer, Wyatt, Spenser, Shakespeare, and Milton. 3 hrs. lect.

ENAM0205A-F17

Cross-Listed As:
CMLT0205A-F17

CRN: 90857

Intro:Contemporary Lit. Theory
Introduction to Contemporary Literary Theory
This course will introduce several major schools of contemporary literary theory. By reading theoretical texts in close conjunction with works of literature, we will illuminate the ways in which these theoretical stances can produce various interpretations of a given poem, novel, or play. The approaches covered will include New Criticism, Psychoanalysis, Marxism and Cultural Criticism, Feminism, and Post-Structuralism. These theories will be applied to works by Shakespeare, Wordsworth, The Brontës, Conrad, Joyce, and others. The goal will be to make students critically aware of the fundamental literary, cultural, political, and moral assumptions underlying every act of interpretation they perform. 3 hrs. lect/disc.

ENAM0206A-F17

Cross-Listed As:
AMST0206A-F17

CRN: 92192

19th Century American Lit.
Nineteenth-Century American Literature (II, AL) (Pre-1900 AL)
This course will examine major developments in the literary world of 19th century America. Specific topics to be addressed might include the transition from Romanticism to Regionalism and Realism, the origins and evolution of the novel in the United States, and the tensions arising from the emergence of a commercial marketplace for literature. Attention will also be paid to the rise of women as literary professionals in America and the persistent problematizing of race and slavery. Among others, authors may include J. F. Cooper, Emerson, Melville, Douglass, Chopin, Whitman, Dickinson, Twain, Hawthorne, Stowe, Alcott, Wharton, and James. . 3 hrs. lect./disc.

ENAM0209A-F17

Cross-Listed As:
AMST0209A-F17

CRN: 90856

Am. Lit. & Cult: origins-1830
Please register via AMST 0209A
American Literature and Culture: Origins-1830 (II, AL) (Pre-1900 AL)
A study of literary and other cultural forms in early America, including gravestones, architecture, furniture and visual art. We will consider how writing and these other forms gave life to ideas about religion, diversity, civic obligation and individual rights that dominated not only colonial life but that continue to influence notions of "Americanness" into the present day. 3 hrs. lect./disc.

ENAM0226A-F17

Cross-Listed As:
EDST0226A-F17

CRN: 92194

Boarding School Fiction & Fact
The Boarding School in Fiction and Fact
From Tom Brown's School Days to Prep, writers have commemorated the boarding school experience. Through studying novels, short stories, memoir excerpts, and films, we will identify recurring archetypes and consider how these have changed over time. We will examine the reciprocal relationship between these schools and society. Do these schools have an agenda beyond their professed ones? How do they contribute to the formation of social power structures? We will look at not only the traditional Anglo-American experience but also that of Native Americans, Chinese, Indian, and others. Readings will include works by John Knowles, P. G. Wodehouse, Curtis Sittenfeld, Anita Shreve, and Han Han. (This course is not open to students who have taken ENAM/EDST 1019)

ENAM0228A-F17

Cross-Listed As:
THEA0228A-F17

CRN: 92556

ContemporaryBritishPlaywrights
Please register via THEA 0228A
Contemporary British Playwrights
This course will explore Great Britain's controversial theatrical movement, beginning in the late sixties, which came to be known as "The Fringe." Plays by David Hare, Howard Brenton, Stephan Poliakoff, Howard Barker, David Edgar, Caryl Churchill, Snoo Wilson, Trevor Griffiths, and others will be discussed. Particular focus will be on the plays' dramaturgical and theatrical values, as well as their impact on the overall development of the Fringe theatre movement and its influence on the more traditional theatrical establishment. 3 hrs. lect.

ENAM0239A-F17

Cross-Listed As:
FMMC0239A-F17

CRN: 92196

The Cinema of Alfred Hitchcock
The Cinema of Alfred Hitchcock
We will watch about 20 of Hitchcock’s films with an eye toward understanding why contemporary film directors consider his films exemplary of the greatest cinematic artistry: Hitchcock always finds new ways of telling a story visually by the way he uses his camera especially the subjective camera. We will learn his rules for cinema, such as “the bigger the emotion the bigger the close-up.” We will also define his recurring themes, images, and motifs, such as obsessive love, the wrong man, dangling over the abyss, and a man and a woman saving one another by clasping hands. Among the films we will analyze are his masterpieces, Rear Window, Vertigo, North by Northwest, and Psycho. 3 hrs. lect./disc./screening

ENAM0239Y-F17

Cross-Listed As:
FMMC0239Y-F17

CRN: 92197

The Cinema of Alfred Hitchcock
Discussion
The Cinema of Alfred Hitchcock
We will watch about 20 of Hitchcock’s films with an eye toward understanding why contemporary film directors consider his films exemplary of the greatest cinematic artistry: Hitchcock always finds new ways of telling a story visually by the way he uses his camera especially the subjective camera. We will learn his rules for cinema, such as “the bigger the emotion the bigger the close-up.” We will also define his recurring themes, images, and motifs, such as obsessive love, the wrong man, dangling over the abyss, and a man and a woman saving one another by clasping hands. Among the films we will analyze are his masterpieces, Rear Window, Vertigo, North by Northwest, and Psycho. 3 hrs. lect./disc./screening

ENAM0239Z-F17

Cross-Listed As:
FMMC0239Z-F17

CRN: 92198

The Cinema of Alfred Hitchcock
Discussion
The Cinema of Alfred Hitchcock
We will watch about 20 of Hitchcock’s films with an eye toward understanding why contemporary film directors consider his films exemplary of the greatest cinematic artistry: Hitchcock always finds new ways of telling a story visually by the way he uses his camera especially the subjective camera. We will learn his rules for cinema, such as “the bigger the emotion the bigger the close-up.” We will also define his recurring themes, images, and motifs, such as obsessive love, the wrong man, dangling over the abyss, and a man and a woman saving one another by clasping hands. Among the films we will analyze are his masterpieces, Rear Window, Vertigo, North by Northwest, and Psycho. 3 hrs. lect./disc./screening

ENAM0243A-F17

Cross-Listed As:
ENVS0243A-F17

CRN: 92296

Maritime Literature & Culture
Maritime Literature and Culture (II)
Writers have long found the sea to be a cause of wonder and reflection. A mirror for some and a desert for others, the sea has influenced the imaginations of writers throughout history in vastly different ways. In this course we will read a variety of literary works, both fiction and non-fiction, in which the sea acts as the setting, a body of symbolism, an epistemological challenge, and a reason to reflect on the human relationship to nature. Readings will be drawn from the Bible, Homer's Odyssey, Old English Poetry, Shakespeare, Tennyson, Kipling, Conrad, Melville, Hemingway, Walcott, O'Brian, and others. 3 hrs. lect./disc.

ENAM0265A-F17

Cross-Listed As:
LITS0265A-F17

CRN: 92384

Varieties Literary Ambiguity
Please Register Via LITS 0265
Varieties of Literary Ambiguity
We will consider readings in a range of European, British, and American fictions purposefully designed to lead the reader to uncertain or contradictory judgments regarding the larger implications of the tale. Narratives of this kind, often deceptively straightforward but in fact intricately conceived, may be understood to provide an experience of insinuating irresolution, calling for repeated and progressively deeper assessments of the same story. Authors whose works may be considered include Heinrich von Kleist, Nathaniel Hawthorne, Herman Melville, Nikolai Gogol, Gustave Flaubert, Henry James, Joseph Conrad, and Franz Kafka. 3 hrs lect/disc.

ENAM0285A-F17

Cross-Listed As:
CMLT0285A-F17

CRN: 92297

Magical Realism(s)
Magical Realism(s)
Novels that juxtapose the marvelous with the everyday have shadowed (and mocked) mainstream realism for the better part of two centuries, and have proliferated in recent years to the point where they may constitute the predominant genre of our globalized culture. Why should such strange mélanges of the quotidian and the supernatural strike so many authors as the perfect vehicle to express 20th and 21st century anxieties and possibilities? We will explore examples of these boundary-defying fictions across several decades and various national literatures. Authors to be studied will include Woolf, Kafka, Calvino, Morrison, Pynchon, Rushdie, and Garcia-Marquez.

ENAM0302A-F17

Cross-Listed As:
GSFS0302A-F17

CRN: 92298

Unquiet Minds:Gender & Madness
Unquiet Minds: Gender and Madness in Literature and Medicine (I) (Pre-1800)
In this course we will explore the fascinating intersection of gender, literature, and medicine from the Greeks to the present day, focusing in particular on the early modern period. We will consider why and how such diseases as melancholy and hysteria became flashpoints for anxieties about gender and sexuality in this period, turning to both literary and medical narratives to illuminate the troubled interface between mind and body in the social construction of melancholic illness. Alongside literary texts that dramatize mental illness (such as Chrétien's Yvain and Shakespeare's Hamlet) we will read sections from Robert Burton's Anatomy of Melancholy as well as the recently published account by a 17th century woman of her own private struggles with madness. We will conclude with a consideration of contemporary texts that explore the experience of madness, including Kay Redfield Jamison's memoir An Unquiet Mind and Sarah Ruhl's Melancholy Play. In this final section we will also explore the work being done in the exciting emerging field of "narrative medicine," which brings together literature and medicine in quite explicit and strategic ways.

ENAM0330A-F17

CRN: 91689

Shakespeare's Career
Shakespeare’s Career (I) (Pre-1800)
In this course we will study the whole arc of William Shakespeare's literary career from the earliest histories, comedies, and non-dramatic poetry to the more mature tragedies and romances, with an eye to understanding Shakespeare’s development as a writer in his own time. How might the plays have resonated for his first audiences on stage, and how have subsequent readers drawn their own meanings from the published texts? Reading one play a week, we will pay close attention to such dramaturgical issues as Shakespeare’s construction of character and of plot, his adaptation of sources, and his modes of versification, as well as the ethical, political, and commercial implications of Shakespeare’s works during his lifetime, some of which stand in contrast with what we learn from them today. 3 hrs. lect./1 hr. disc./3 hrs. screen.

ENAM0342A-F17

Cross-Listed As:
AMST0342A-F17

CRN: 92299

Literature of American South
Literature of the American South (AL)
In William Faulkner's Absolom, Absolom! Canadian Shreve McCannon commands his roommate, Mississippian Quentin Compson, "Tell about the South. What's it like there. What do they do there. Why do they live there. Why do they live at all?" Our course will take on writers who want to "tell about the South" in the post-Civil War era and beyond, as they seek to help re-define and revitalize their region. We will focus our regional exploration on the "Southern Renascence," when writers and theorists like the Agrarians re-examined Southern history and reconsidered their role in relation to their regional community. Authors including William Faulkner, Zora Neale Hurston, Robert Penn Warren, Eudora Welty, and Tennessee Williams developed a new awareness of the restrictions of racial and gender roles, an interest in literary experimentation, and an increasingly realistic presentation of social conditions in the south. We will consider the legacy of these writers in later 20th century texts by authors such as Flannery O'Connor, Walker Percy, Alice Walker, Cormac McCarthy, Ernest Gaines, Randall Kenan and even relative newcomers such as Jackson Tippett McCrea. (Not open to students who have taken FYSE 1336) 3 hrs. lect./disc.

ENAM0358A-F17

Cross-Listed As:
AMST0358A-F17

CRN: 92386

Reading Slavery and Abolition
Please register via AMST 0358A
Reading, Slavery, and Abolition (II, AL) (Pre-1900 AL)
In this course we will study both black and white writers' psychological responses to, and their verbal onslaughts on, the "peculiar institution" of chattel slavery. We will work chronologically and across genres to understand how and by whom the written word was deployed in pursuit of physical and mental freedom and racial and socioeconomic justice. As the course progresses, we will deepen our study of historical context drawing on the substantial resources of Middlebury's special collections, students will have the opportunity to engage in archival work if they wish. Authors will include Emerson, Douglass, Jacobs, Thoreau, Stowe, Walker, and Garrison. 3 hrs. sem. (Diversity)/

ENAM0406A-F17

CRN: 92301

Shaw, Rattigan, Stoppard
Shaw, Rattigan, Stoppard: the Play of Ideas vs. the Play of Character and Situation
In the early 20th Century George Bernard Shaw, following Ibsen’s model, sought to introduce the Play of Ideas into British Drama, i.e., plays that dramatized current philosophical and social issues. We will study his Man and Superman as representative of such drama. At the mid-century Terence Rattigan argued against Shaw that plays should be about people and tell stories, not about ideas. We shall read plays of his, such as The Winslow Boy and The Browning Version to understand his art of implication and understatement. Shaw and Rattigan’s argument has played itself out in the dazzling late 20th century plays of Tom Stoppard who starts as a playwright of ideas. We shall try to understand where he and the debate come out in a play such as his Arcadia. 3 hrs. lect.

ENAM0460A-F17

CRN: 92302

Affect, Emotion, Feeling
Affect, Emotion, and Structures of Feeling
What is the role of emotion in the shaping of identities, communities, and political cultures? How have narratives of shame, love, melancholy, anger, and “muddle” allowed writers to address experiences of injury and stigmatization? In this seminar we will explore the growing body of interdisciplinary scholarship on affect. Readings will include theoretical approaches (Deleuze, Berlant, Ngai, Hardt/Negri, Williams, Love) and literary works drawn mostly from queer and postcolonial archives. Topics considered will include affective citizenship; embodiment and touch; antisocial behavior; empathy, hospitality, and conviviality; care-giving and affective labor; and the recent embrace of tragedy in postcolonial studies. 3 hrs. sem.

ENAM0500A-F17

CRN: 90174

Special Project: Lit
Special Project: Literature
Approval Required.

ENAM0500B-F17

CRN: 90178

Special Project: Lit
Special Project: Literature
Approval Required.

ENAM0500C-F17

CRN: 90180

Special Project: Lit
Special Project: Literature
Approval Required.

ENAM0500D-F17

CRN: 90182

Special Project: Lit
Special Project: Literature
Approval Required.

ENAM0500E-F17

CRN: 90185

Special Project: Lit
Special Project: Literature
Approval Required.

ENAM0500F-F17

CRN: 90186

Special Project: Lit
Special Project: Literature
Approval Required.

ENAM0500G-F17

CRN: 90188

Special Project: Lit
Special Project: Literature
Approval Required.

ENAM0500H-F17

CRN: 90189

Special Project: Lit
Special Project: Literature
Approval Required.

ENAM0500I-F17

CRN: 90190

Special Project: Lit
Special Project: Literature
Approval Required.

ENAM0500J-F17

CRN: 90192

Special Project: Lit
Special Project: Literature
Approval Required.

ENAM0500K-F17

CRN: 90668

Special Project: Lit
Special Project: Literature
Approval Required.

ENAM0500L-F17

CRN: 90669

Special Project: Lit
Special Project: Literature
Approval Required.

ENAM0500M-F17

CRN: 90670

Special Project: Lit
Special Project: Literature
Approval Required.

ENAM0500N-F17

CRN: 90671

Special Project: Lit
Special Project: Literature
Approval Required.

ENAM0500O-F17

CRN: 90672

Special Project: Lit
Special Project: Literature
Approval Required.

ENAM0500P-F17

CRN: 90673

Special Project: Lit
Special Project: Literature
Approval Required.

ENAM0500Q-F17

CRN: 90674

Special Project: Lit
Special Project: Literature
Approval Required.

ENAM0500R-F17

CRN: 90675

Special Project: Lit
Special Project: Literature
Approval Required.

ENAM0500S-F17

CRN: 90676

Special Project: Lit
Special Project: Literature
Approval Required.

ENAM0500T-F17

CRN: 90677

Special Project: Lit
Special Project: Literature
Approval Required.

ENAM0500U-F17

CRN: 90678

Special Project: Lit
Special Project: Literature
Approval Required.

ENAM0500W-F17

CRN: 90680

Special Project: Lit
Special Project: Literature
Approval Required.

ENAM0500X-F17

CRN: 90774

Special Project: Lit
Special Project: Literature
Approval Required.

ENAM0500Y-F17

CRN: 90775

Special Project: Lit
Special Project: Literature
Approval Required.

ENAM0500Z-F17

CRN: 90880

Special Project: Lit
Special Project: Literature
Approval Required.

ENAM0700A-F17

CRN: 90199

Senior Thesis:Critical Writing
Senior Thesis: Critical Writing
Individual guidance and seminar (discussions, workshops, tutorials) for those undertaking one-term projects in literary criticism or analysis. All critical thesis writers also take the Senior Thesis Workshop (ENAM 700Z) in either Fall or Spring Term.

ENAM0700B-F17

CRN: 90200

Senior Thesis:Critical Writing
Senior Thesis: Critical Writing
Individual guidance and seminar (discussions, workshops, tutorials) for those undertaking one-term projects in literary criticism or analysis. All critical thesis writers also take the Senior Thesis Workshop (ENAM 700Z) in either Fall or Spring Term.

ENAM0700C-F17

CRN: 90203

Senior Thesis:Critical Writing
Senior Thesis: Critical Writing
Individual guidance and seminar (discussions, workshops, tutorials) for those undertaking one-term projects in literary criticism or analysis. All critical thesis writers also take the Senior Thesis Workshop (ENAM 700Z) in either Fall or Spring Term.

ENAM0700D-F17

CRN: 90205

Senior Thesis:Critical Writing
Senior Thesis: Critical Writing
Individual guidance and seminar (discussions, workshops, tutorials) for those undertaking one-term projects in literary criticism or analysis. All critical thesis writers also take the Senior Thesis Workshop (ENAM 700Z) in either Fall or Spring Term.

ENAM0700E-F17

CRN: 90206

Senior Thesis:Critical Writing
Senior Thesis: Critical Writing
Individual guidance and seminar (discussions, workshops, tutorials) for those undertaking one-term projects in literary criticism or analysis. All critical thesis writers also take the Senior Thesis Workshop (ENAM 700Z) in either Fall or Spring Term.

ENAM0700F-F17

CRN: 90208

Senior Thesis:Critical Writing
Senior Thesis: Critical Writing
Individual guidance and seminar (discussions, workshops, tutorials) for those undertaking one-term projects in literary criticism or analysis. All critical thesis writers also take the Senior Thesis Workshop (ENAM 700Z) in either Fall or Spring Term.

ENAM0700G-F17

CRN: 90209

Senior Thesis:Critical Writing
Senior Thesis: Critical Writing
Individual guidance and seminar (discussions, workshops, tutorials) for those undertaking one-term projects in literary criticism or analysis. All critical thesis writers also take the Senior Thesis Workshop (ENAM 700Z) in either Fall or Spring Term.

ENAM0700H-F17

CRN: 90212

Senior Thesis:Critical Writing
Senior Thesis: Critical Writing
Individual guidance and seminar (discussions, workshops, tutorials) for those undertaking one-term projects in literary criticism or analysis. All critical thesis writers also take the Senior Thesis Workshop (ENAM 700Z) in either Fall or Spring Term.

ENAM0700K-F17

CRN: 90217

Senior Thesis:Critical Writing
Senior Thesis: Critical Writing
Individual guidance and seminar (discussions, workshops, tutorials) for those undertaking one-term projects in literary criticism or analysis. All critical thesis writers also take the Senior Thesis Workshop (ENAM 700Z) in either Fall or Spring Term.

ENAM0700L-F17

CRN: 90269

Senior Thesis:Critical Writing
Senior Thesis: Critical Writing
Individual guidance and seminar (discussions, workshops, tutorials) for those undertaking one-term projects in literary criticism or analysis. All critical thesis writers also take the Senior Thesis Workshop (ENAM 700Z) in either Fall or Spring Term.

ENAM0700M-F17

CRN: 90582

Senior Thesis:Critical Writing
Senior Thesis: Critical Writing
Individual guidance and seminar (discussions, workshops, tutorials) for those undertaking one-term projects in literary criticism or analysis. All critical thesis writers also take the Senior Thesis Workshop (ENAM 700Z) in either Fall or Spring Term.

ENAM0700N-F17

CRN: 90583

Senior Thesis:Critical Writing
Senior Thesis: Critical Writing
Individual guidance and seminar (discussions, workshops, tutorials) for those undertaking one-term projects in literary criticism or analysis. All critical thesis writers also take the Senior Thesis Workshop (ENAM 700Z) in either Fall or Spring Term.

ENAM0700O-F17

CRN: 90607

Senior Thesis:Critical Writing
Senior Thesis: Critical Writing
Individual guidance and seminar (discussions, workshops, tutorials) for those undertaking one-term projects in literary criticism or analysis. All critical thesis writers also take the Senior Thesis Workshop (ENAM 700Z) in either Fall or Spring Term.

ENAM0700P-F17

CRN: 90681

Senior Thesis:Critical Writing
Senior Thesis: Critical Writing
Individual guidance and seminar (discussions, workshops, tutorials) for those undertaking one-term projects in literary criticism or analysis. All critical thesis writers also take the Senior Thesis Workshop (ENAM 700Z) in either Fall or Spring Term.

ENAM0700Q-F17

CRN: 90682

Senior Thesis:Critical Writing
Senior Thesis: Critical Writing
Individual guidance and seminar (discussions, workshops, tutorials) for those undertaking one-term projects in literary criticism or analysis. All critical thesis writers also take the Senior Thesis Workshop (ENAM 700Z) in either Fall or Spring Term.

ENAM0700R-F17

CRN: 90722

Senior Thesis:Critical Writing
Senior Thesis: Critical Writing
Individual guidance and seminar (discussions, workshops, tutorials) for those undertaking one-term projects in literary criticism or analysis. All critical thesis writers also take the Senior Thesis Workshop (ENAM 700Z) in either Fall or Spring Term.

ENAM0700T-F17

CRN: 90776

Senior Thesis:Critical Writing
Senior Thesis: Critical Writing
Individual guidance and seminar (discussions, workshops, tutorials) for those undertaking one-term projects in literary criticism or analysis. All critical thesis writers also take the Senior Thesis Workshop (ENAM 700Z) in either Fall or Spring Term.

ENAM0700U-F17

CRN: 90777

Senior Thesis:Critical Writing
Senior Thesis: Critical Writing
Individual guidance and seminar (discussions, workshops, tutorials) for those undertaking one-term projects in literary criticism or analysis. All critical thesis writers also take the Senior Thesis Workshop (ENAM 700Z) in either Fall or Spring Term.

ENAM0700V-F17

CRN: 90778

Senior Thesis:Critical Writing
Senior Thesis: Critical Writing
Individual guidance and seminar (discussions, workshops, tutorials) for those undertaking one-term projects in literary criticism or analysis. All critical thesis writers also take the Senior Thesis Workshop (ENAM 700Z) in either Fall or Spring Term.

ENAM0700W-F17

CRN: 90779

Senior Thesis:Critical Writing
Senior Thesis: Critical Writing
Individual guidance and seminar (discussions, workshops, tutorials) for those undertaking one-term projects in literary criticism or analysis. All critical thesis writers also take the Senior Thesis Workshop (ENAM 700Z) in either Fall or Spring Term.

ENAM0700X-F17

CRN: 90780

Senior Thesis:Critical Writing
Senior Thesis: Critical Writing
Individual guidance and seminar (discussions, workshops, tutorials) for those undertaking one-term projects in literary criticism or analysis. All critical thesis writers also take the Senior Thesis Workshop (ENAM 700Z) in either Fall or Spring Term.

ENAM0700Y-F17

CRN: 90781

Senior Thesis:Critical Writing
Senior Thesis: Critical Writing
Individual guidance and seminar (discussions, workshops, tutorials) for those undertaking one-term projects in literary criticism or analysis. All critical thesis writers also take the Senior Thesis Workshop (ENAM 700Z) in either Fall or Spring Term.

ENAM0700Z-F17

CRN: 90449

Senior Thesis:Critical Writing
Senior Thesis: Workshop
Senior Thesis: Critical Writing
Individual guidance and seminar (discussions, workshops, tutorials) for those undertaking one-term projects in literary criticism or analysis. All critical thesis writers also take the Senior Thesis Workshop (ENAM 700Z) in either Fall or Spring Term.

ENAM0705A-F17

Cross-Listed As:
LITS0705A-F17

CRN: 90236

Senior Colloquium
Please register via LITS 0705A
Senior Colloquium in Literary Studies
Although it is required of all Literary Studies senior majors, this course is intended for students working in any discipline who seek a close encounter with some of the greatest achievements of the literary imagination. In addition to being understood as distinctive artistic and philosophical accomplishments, the six major works which constitute the reading list will also be seen as engaged in a vital, overarching cultural conversation across temporal and geographical boundaries that might otherwise seem insurmountable. The texts for this semester are: Homer, The Odyssey; Tolstoy, War and Peace; Dostoevsky, The Brothers Karamazov; Mann, The Magic Mountain; Proust, Swann’s Way; Joyce, Ulysses. (Open to non-majors with the approval of the instructor.) 3 hrs., seminar.

ENAM0708A-F17

CRN: 91658

Joint Senior Work: ENAM-THEA
Senior Work: Joint Majors in English & American Literatures and Theatre
Approval required.

ENAM0708B-F17

CRN: 92174

Joint Senior Work: ENAM-THEA
Senior Work: Joint Majors in English & American Literatures and Theatre
Approval required.

Department of English & American Literatures

Axinn Center at Starr Library
15 Old Chapel Road
Middlebury College
Middlebury, VT 05753