Daniel Suarez

Assistant Professor of Environmental Studies

 
 work(802) 443-5365
 Spring 2018, Mondays 10:00-11:00, Fridays 1:00-3:00, and by appointment
 Franklin Environmental Ctr Hillcrest Hil

PhD, University of California, Berkeley

MA, University of Toronto

BSc, University of British Columbia

I am an Assistant Professor of Environmental Studies trained in human geography, cultural anthropology, and environmental science with prior experience working in international conservation and development.

I work on questions of power, knowledge, environmental justice, and social change, and how they intersect in contemporary environmental politics. In my research, I bring together scholarship from political ecology, science studies, and critical institutionalism and apply an ethnographic approach to the study of environmental policy, focusing on the day-to-day practices and lived experiences of the practitioners who dynamically constitute environmental governance processes.

My doctoral research analyzed the politics and institutionalization of “ecosystem services” concepts in global environmental governance. Why has nature's dollar sign gained such widespread currency among conservation practitioners? What is at stake in re-envisioning biodiversity in this manner? And what can the contemporary embrace of ecosystem services tell us about the changing politics of conservation? I used mixed ethnographic methods to pursue the spread and uptake of this idea through transnational policy networks and across diverse sites, scales, and institutional contexts of governance. You can find more information about my research here: https://danielsuarez.ca

In the classroom, my teaching emphasizes vigorous dialogue as a means of advancing student learning: dialogue with me, with each other, and with the wider social worlds in which my students are implicated, locally and globally, personally and professionally.

I grew up in Vancouver and am into running, cycling, hiking, and many other -ings related to being outdoors.

 

Courses

Course List: 

Courses offered in the past four years.
indicates offered in the current term
indicates offered in the upcoming term[s]

ENVS 0208 - Anthropocene Environ. Justice      

Environmental Justice in the Anthropocene
We live in a moment defined by environmental change. Yet the causes and consequences of these transformations are profoundly uneven. Across race, class, gender, and other forms of difference, “environmental problems” manifest in radically unequal ways, disproportionately burdening some while benefiting others. In this class we will dwell on this central tension in thinking about present socio-environmental crises and what to do about them, from toxic landscapes and biodiversity loss to global hunger and a warming climate. Certainly, these problems pose urgent, even existential problems that demand intervention. Yet common refrains about ‘how to save the environment’ always come with baggage. They have deep histories and hidden assumptions about causes and solutions, justice and inequality, politics and social change, which we will wrestle with together in this course. 3 hrs. lect. CMP SOC

Fall 2018

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ENVS 0385 - Global Political Ecology      

Global Political Ecology
In this course we will draw on theories of social and political change to understand the systematic causes of inequality and environmental degradation around the world. Using a political ecology lens, we will look at both proximate as well as ultimate drivers of environmental conflict focusing on the relations between production and consumption, representation and regulation, rights and responsibilities, and information and norms. We will compare the disproportionate distribution of environmental benefits and burdens across communities and nations. We will also study prospective solutions, focusing on the role of individuals and organizations in achieving these solutions. (ENVS 0211 or PSCI 0214) 3 hrs. sem. CMP SOC

Spring 2018

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ENVS 0401 - Community Engaged Practicum      

Community-Engaged Environmental Studies Practicum
In this course students work in small groups with one of a variety of partners and organizations to complete a semester-long, community-engaged project. Project themes vary by term and typically focus on local and regional environmental issues that have broader application. Projects rely on students’ creativity, interdisciplinary perspectives, skills, and knowledge developed through their previous work. The project is guided by a faculty member and carried out with a high degree of independence by the students. Students will prepare for and direct their project work through readings and discussion, independent research, collaboration with project partners, and consultation with external experts. The course may also include workshops focused on developing key skills (e.g., interviewing, public speaking, video editing). The project culminates in a public presentation of students’ final products, which may various forms such as written reports, policy white papers, podcasts, or outreach materials. (Open to Juniors and Seniors) (ENVS 0112, ENVS 0211, ENVS 0215, GEOG 0120 or GEOG 0150) 3 hrs. sem./3 hrs. lab

Fall 2018

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ENVS 0500 - Independent Study      

Independent Study
In this course, students (non-seniors) carry out an independent research or creative project on a topic pertinent to the relationship between humans and the environment. The project, carried out under the supervision of a faculty member with related expertise who is appointed in or affiliated with the Environmental Studies Program, must involve a significant amount of independent research and analysis. The expectations and any associated final products will be defined in consultation with the faculty advisor. Students may enroll in ENVS 0500 no more than twice for a given project. (Approval only)

Fall 2018, Spring 2019

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ENVS 0700 - Senior Independent Study      

Senior Independent Study
In this course, seniors complete an independent research or creative project on a topic pertinent to the relationship between humans and the environment. During the term prior to enrolling in ENVS 0700, a student must discuss and agree upon a project topic with a faculty advisor who is appointed in or affiliated with the Environmental Studies Program and submit a brief project proposal to the Director of Environmental Studies for Approval. The expectations and any associated final products will be defined in consultation with the faculty advisor. Students may enroll in ENVS 0700 as a one-term independent study OR up to twice as part of a multi-term project, including as a lead-up to ENVS 0701 (ES Senior Thesis). (Senior standing; Approval only)

Fall 2018, Spring 2019

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ENVS 0701 - Senior Thesis      

Senior Thesis
This course is the culminating term of a multi-term independent project, resulting in a senior thesis on a topic pertinent to the relationship between humans and the environment. Approval to enroll is contingent on successful completion of at least one term (and up to two) of ENVS 0700 and the approval of the student’s thesis committee. The project, carried out under the supervision of a faculty advisor who is appointed in or affiliated with the Environmental Studies Program, will result in a substantial piece of scholarly work that will be presented to other ENVS faculty and students in a public forum and defended before the thesis committee. (Senior standing; ENVS major; ENVS 0112, ENVS 0211, ENVS 0215, GEOG 0120, and ENVS 0700; Approval only)

Fall 2018, Spring 2019

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Program in Environmental Studies

Franklin Environmental Center at Hillcrest
531 College Street
Middlebury College
Middlebury, VT 05753