Middlebury

Offerings by Semester

Note that screening times and labs are required of most FMMC courses. In cases of conflict between competing screenings or course meetings, faculty will sometimes grant waivers, allowing students to register for two simultaneous screenings, with the understanding that they will make up the viewing in the library on their own time. Contact faculty prior to Banner registration.
« Winter 2015 Spring 2015 Fall 2015 »

FMMC0101A-S15

CRN: 21109

Aesthetics of the Moving Image
Aesthetics of the Moving Image
How do films convey meaning, generate emotions, and work as an art form? What aspects of film are shared by television and videogames? This course is designed to improve your ability to watch, reflect on, and write about moving images. The course will be grounded in the analysis of cinema (feature films, documentaries, avant-garde, and animation) with special focus on film style and storytelling techniques. Study will extend to new audio-visual media as well, and will be considered from formal, cultural, and theoretical perspectives. 3 hrs. lect./3 hrs. screen

FMMC0104A-S15

Cross-Listed As:
AMST0104A-S15

CRN: 21623

Television & American Culture
Television and American Culture
This course explores American life in the last six decades through an analysis of our central medium: television. Spanning a history of television from its origins in radio to its future in digital convergence, we will consider television's role in both reflecting and constituting American society through a variety of approaches. Our topical exploration will consider the economics of the television industry, television's role within American democracy, the formal attributes of a variety of television genres, television as a site of gender and racial identity formation, television's role in everyday life, and the medium's technological and social impacts. 2 hrs. lect./3 hrs. screen

FMMC0105A-S15

CRN: 21110

Sight and Sound I
Sight and Sound I
In this course students will gain a theoretical understanding of the ways moving images and sounds communicate, as well as practical experience creating time-based work. We will study examples of moving images as we use cameras, sound recorders, and non-linear editing software to produce our own series of short works. Emphasis will be placed on understanding the possibilities of the medium through experimentation, analysis, and detailed feedback while exploring different facets of cinematic communication. (FMMC 0101, or FMMC 0102, or approval of instructor) 3 hrs. lect./3 hrs. lab

FMMC0212A-S15

Cross-Listed As:
JAPN0212A-S15

CRN: 22575

Japanese Pop Culture
Please register via JAPN 0212A
The Age of Young Media: Japanese Popular Culture from Anime to JDrama (in English)
In this course we will examine how Japanese popular culture has historically co-opted young performers and audiences to present itself as “young media.” We will draw upon examples from anime, television dramas, and elsewhere to reflect upon what it means to live in an age of young media— an age in which media culture presents itself as eternally young and without history. In order to explore this and other issues within their local and global context, we will read essays on media theory and Japanese popular culture, including those of Azuma Hiroki, Marc Steinberg, and Ian Condry. 3 hrs. lect.

FMMC0225A-S15

Cross-Listed As:
AMST0225A-S15

CRN: 22419

Gothic and Horror
Please register via AMST 0225A
Gothic and Horror
This course examines the forms and meanings of the Gothic and horror over the last 250 years in the West. How have effects of fright, terror, or awe been achieved over this span and why do audiences find such effects attractive? Our purpose will be to understand the generic structures of horror and their evolution in tandem with broader cultural changes. Course materials will inlcude fiction, film, readings in the theory of horror, architecture, visual arts, and electronic media. 3 hrs. lect./disc. 3 hrs lect.

FMMC0238A-S15

Cross-Listed As:
AMST0238A-S15

CRN: 22067

Film Noir
Film Noir
A series of urban crime films and melodramas made in Hollywood between 1940-1960, but concentrated in the decade immediately after World War II, have been understood by critics to constitute the movement of film noir. This course will study prominent films from this group as well as contemporary films influenced by them, and the critical literature they have elicited in order to understand the cultural sources, the stylistic attributes, the social significance, and the long-term influence attributed to film noir. 3 hrs. lect./3 hrs. screen.

FMMC0239A-S15

Cross-Listed As:
ENAM0239A-S15

CRN: 22323

Cinema of Alfred Hitchcock
Please register via ENAM 0239A
The Cinema of Alfred Hitchcock
The cinematic artistry of Alfred Hitchcock in a dozen of his major films (mainly from the 1950s, including North by Northwest, Psycho, Rear Window, The Trouble with Harry, Vertigo) with attention to Hitchcock's style and technique, his obsessive images (such as dangling over the abyss), and his characteristic themes (the transfer of guilt, the double, etc.) and with a focus on the figure of the artist in Hitchcock's work. Issues such as the relationship of film to narrative fiction and to dramatic literature will also be explored. 3 hrs. lect./disc./screening

FMMC0239Y-S15

Cross-Listed As:
ENAM0239Y-S15

CRN: 22324

Cinema of Alfred Hitchcock
Please register via ENAM 0239Y
The Cinema of Alfred Hitchcock
The cinematic artistry of Alfred Hitchcock in a dozen of his major films (mainly from the 1950s, including North by Northwest, Psycho, Rear Window, The Trouble with Harry, Vertigo) with attention to Hitchcock's style and technique, his obsessive images (such as dangling over the abyss), and his characteristic themes (the transfer of guilt, the double, etc.) and with a focus on the figure of the artist in Hitchcock's work. Issues such as the relationship of film to narrative fiction and to dramatic literature will also be explored. 3 hrs. lect./disc./screening

FMMC0239Z-S15

Cross-Listed As:
ENAM0239Z-S15

CRN: 22325

Cinema of Alfred Hitchcock
Please register via ENAM 0239Z
The Cinema of Alfred Hitchcock
The cinematic artistry of Alfred Hitchcock in a dozen of his major films (mainly from the 1950s, including North by Northwest, Psycho, Rear Window, The Trouble with Harry, Vertigo) with attention to Hitchcock's style and technique, his obsessive images (such as dangling over the abyss), and his characteristic themes (the transfer of guilt, the double, etc.) and with a focus on the figure of the artist in Hitchcock's work. Issues such as the relationship of film to narrative fiction and to dramatic literature will also be explored. 3 hrs. lect./disc./screening

FMMC0250A-S15

Cross-Listed As:
CHNS0250A-S15

CRN: 22244

Chinese Cinema
Please register via CHNS 0250A
Chinese Cinema
This course, taught in English, surveys the history of movies in China since the 1930s and also offers an in-depth look at the work of: China's fifth-generation directors of the 1980s and their successors up to the present; Taiwan's new wave; and Hong Kong popular cinema, including martial arts film. Our focus is the screening and discussion of films such as The Goddess (a 1934 silent classic), Stage Sisters (1965; directed by the influential Xie Jin), the controversial Yellow Earth (1984), In the Heat of the Sun (a 1994 break with the conventional representation of the Cultural Revolution), Yang Dechang's masterpiece A One and a Two (2000), and Still Life (Jia Zhangke's 2006 meditation on displacement near the Three Gorges Dam). The course is designed to help students understand the place of cinema in Chinese culture and develop the analytical tools necessary for the informed viewing and study of Chinese film. We will look at everything from art film, to underground film, to recent box office hits. (No prerequisites) One evening film screening per week. 3 hrs. lect./disc.

FMMC0252A-S15

CRN: 22068

Authorship and Cinema
Auteur Cinema/New Century
Authorship and Cinema: Auteur Cinema in the New Century
In the digital era, the future of cinema seems uncertain , and yet the last fifteen years have seen the rise of strong new artistic voices throughout world cinema. In this course we will look at the auteur approach in contemporary cinema and examine its various modes of expression, comparing American independent filmmakers and European auteurs. We will focus on authorship as influenced and determined not only by the filmmaker’s agency, but also by its financial, social, and historical contexts. We will also conduct a detailed case study of contemporary Romanian cinema and its most important auteurs: Cristian Mungiu (4 Months 3 Weeks and 2 Days), Cristi Puiu (The Death of Mr. Lazarescu), Corneliu Porumboiu (Police, Adjective), and Radu Muntean (Tuesday After Christmas). (FMMC 0101 or FMMC 0102)

FMMC0260A-S15

Cross-Listed As:
JAPN0260A-S15

CRN: 22370

Kurosawa
Please register via JAPN 0260A
Kurosawa (in English)
Akira Kurosawa is internationally recognized as one of the great auteurs of cinema. His visually stunning samurai films made him famous worldwide, but some of his most compelling works deal with crime and corruption in modern society. Whether set in the past or the present, each of his films tells a story about an unlikely hero who finds himself grappling with an enduring human question: What personal sacrifices must we make for the good of others? What is bravery and where does it come from? How do we achieve our own identity? Is goodness possible in an evil world? Students will explore and debate these issues as we analyze Kurosawa’s storytelling style and cinematic techniques in a dozen films spanning his fifty-year career, including Drunken Angel, Seven Samurai, Ikiru and Kagemusha. 3 hrs. lect./ 3 hrs. screen.

FMMC0267A-S15

Cross-Listed As:
GSFS0267A-S15

CRN: 22069

Gender, Sexuality and Media
Gender and Sexuality in Media
In this course, we will explore the intersecting roles played by gender and sexuality in our media, focusing specifically on film, television, and digital culture. We will examine the multiple ways in which popular media texts construct and communicate gender and sexuality, and we will analyze the role of gender and sexuality in the processes of spectatorship and meaning-making. We will study a wide range of theories of gender and sexuality in media including feminist film theory, queer media theory, and literature on gender and sexuality in video game history and culture. 3 hrs. lect./3 hrs. screen.

FMMC0285A-S15

CRN: 21831

Producing Environmental Media
Sustainable Television
Sustainable Television: Producing Environmental Media
In this project-based course, we will collaborate to produce a nonfiction television program that addresses sustainability and environmental issues with the goal of showing the final program on local cable, online, and possibly on the PBS series Planet Forward. Students will collectively serve all roles in the project, from research and writing, to shooting and editing, creating a team-based environment, with screening and readings focused on the rhetoric of environmental media. Students will be selected by application to create a team with a range of experience and expertise. Prior video production or environmental studies experience is preferred but not required. (FMMC 0105 or ENVS 0211 or ENVS 0215 or approval of instructor; Not open to students who have taken FMMC 1019) 3 hrs. lect./lab

FMMC0341A-S15

Cross-Listed As:
CRWR0341A-S15

CRN: 20596

Writing for the Screen II
Writing for the Screen II
Building on the skills acquired in Writing for the Screen I, students will complete the first drafts of their feature-length screenplay. Class discussion will focus on feature screenplay structure and theme development using feature films and screenplays. Each participant in the class will practice pitching, writing coverage, and outlining, culminating in a draft of a feature length script. (Approval required, obtain application on the FMMC website and submit prior to spring registration) 3 hrs. sem/3 hrs. screen.

FMMC0346A-S15

CRN: 22070

Special Topics MediaProduction
Sound Aesthetics & Production
Special Topics in Media Production: Sound Aesthetics and Production
Ever since the invention of recording, sound has increasingly been incorporated into all forms of contemporary art. In this course we will investigate the aesthetic power of sound as an expressive medium, while reviewing the rich history of sound art and its influence in a wide range of audiovisual practices. Through creative projects, lectures, auditions, and readings, we will develop students’ sensibilities and imagination concerning the use of sound, while improving their critical thinking and listening skills. We will cover basic concepts of acoustics, sound technology, audiovisual analysis, and sound production for film/video. (FMMC 0105 or by approval) 3 hrs. lect., 3 hrs. lab.

FMMC0355A-S15

Cross-Listed As:
AMST0355A-S15

CRN: 22071

Theories of Popular Culture
Theories of Popular Culture
This course introduces a range of theoretical approaches to study popular culture, exploring the intersection between everyday life, mass media, and broader political and historical contexts within the United States. We will consider key theoretical readings and approaches to studying culture, including ideology and hegemony theory, political economy, audience studies, subcultural analysis, the politics of taste, and cultural representations of identity. Using these theoretical tools, we will examine a range of popular media and sites of cultural expression, from television to toys, technology to music, to understand popular culture as a site of ongoing political and social struggle. (Formerly AMST/FMMC 0275) (FMMC 0102 or FMMC 0104 or FMMC 0236 or AMST 0211) 3 hrs. lect./disc./3 hrs. screen.

FMMC0361A-S15

Cross-Listed As:
DANC0361A-S15

CRN: 21873

Movement and Media
Please register via DANC 0361A
Movement and Media
In this course we will take an interdisciplinary look at the dynamic relationship between the body and digital media. Students will develop skills in basic film editing, real-time software manipulation, open-source media research, project design, and collaboration. We will address design history and theories of modern media through readings and multimedia sources. Process and research papers and work-in-progress showings will document ongoing collaborations that will culminate in an informal showing at the end of the semester. This course is open to students of all artistic backgrounds who are interested in significantly expanding their creative vocabularies and boundaries to include dance. (Approval required; DANC 0261 required for dance students) 3 hrs. lect./3 hrs. lab.

FMMC0361Z-S15

Cross-Listed As:
DANC0361Z-S15

CRN: 21874

Movement and Media
Please register via DANC 0361Z
Movement and Media
In this course we will take an interdisciplinary look at the dynamic relationship between the body and digital media. Students will develop skills in basic film editing, real-time software manipulation, open-source media research, project design, and collaboration. We will address design history and theories of modern media through readings and multimedia sources. Process and research papers and work-in-progress showings will document ongoing collaborations that will culminate in an informal showing at the end of the semester. This course is open to students of all artistic backgrounds who are interested in significantly expanding their creative vocabularies and boundaries to include dance. (Approval required; DANC 0261 required for dance students) 3 hrs. lect./3 hrs. lab.

FMMC0507A-S15

CRN: 20194

Independent Project
Advanced Independent work in Film and Media Culture
Guidelines for submitting proposals are available on the Film & Media Culture web site along with a list of prerequisites.

FMMC0507B-S15

CRN: 20300

Independent Project
Advanced Independent work in Film and Media Culture
Guidelines for submitting proposals are available on the Film & Media Culture web site along with a list of prerequisites.

FMMC0507C-S15

CRN: 20868

Independent Project
Advanced Independent work in Film and Media Culture
Guidelines for submitting proposals are available on the Film & Media Culture web site along with a list of prerequisites.

FMMC0507E-S15

CRN: 20302

Independent Project
Advanced Independent work in Film and Media Culture
Guidelines for submitting proposals are available on the Film & Media Culture web site along with a list of prerequisites.

FMMC0507F-S15

CRN: 20303

Independent Project
Advanced Independent work in Film and Media Culture
Guidelines for submitting proposals are available on the Film & Media Culture web site along with a list of prerequisites.

FMMC0507G-S15

CRN: 20869

Independent Project
Advanced Independent work in Film and Media Culture
Guidelines for submitting proposals are available on the Film & Media Culture web site along with a list of prerequisites.

FMMC0700A-S15

CRN: 21327

Senior Tutorial
Film and Media Senior Tutorial
All FMMC majors must complete this course, in which they undertake a critical essay, a screenplay, or a video. The following prerequisite courses are required: for a video project: FMMC 0105, FMMC 0335, FMMC/CRWR 0106; for a screenwriting project: FMMC 0105, FMMC/CRWR 0106, FMMC/CRWR 0341; for a research essay: demonstrated knowledge in the topic of the essay, as determined in consultation with the project advisor, and coursework relevant to the topic as available.

FMMC0700B-S15

CRN: 21428

Senior Tutorial
Film and Media Senior Tutorial
All FMMC majors must complete this course, in which they undertake a critical essay, a screenplay, or a video. The following prerequisite courses are required: for a video project: FMMC 0105, FMMC 0335, FMMC/CRWR 0106; for a screenwriting project: FMMC 0105, FMMC/CRWR 0106, FMMC/CRWR 0341; for a research essay: demonstrated knowledge in the topic of the essay, as determined in consultation with the project advisor, and coursework relevant to the topic as available.

Department of Film and Media Culture

Axinn Center at Starr Library
15 Old Chapel Road
Middlebury College
Middlebury, VT 05753
Fax: 802.443.2805