Offerings by Semester

Note that screening times and labs are required of most FMMC courses. In cases of conflict between competing screenings or course meetings, faculty will sometimes grant waivers, allowing students to register for two simultaneous screenings, with the understanding that they will make up the viewing in the library on their own time. Contact faculty prior to Banner registration.
« Summer Study 2017 Fall 2017 Winter 2018 »

FMMC0101A-F17

CRN: 90949

Aesthetics of the Moving Image
Aesthetics of the Moving Image
How do films convey meaning, generate emotions, and work as an art form? What aspects of film are shared by television and videogames? This course is designed to improve your ability to watch, reflect on, and write about moving images. The course will be grounded in the analysis of cinema (feature films, documentaries, avant-garde, and animation) with special focus on film style and storytelling techniques. Study will extend to new audio-visual media as well, and will be considered from formal, cultural, and theoretical perspectives. 3 hrs. lect./3 hrs. screen

FMMC0102A-F17

CRN: 90950

Film History
Film History
This course will survey the development of the cinema from 1895 to present. Our study will emphasize film as an evolving art, while bearing in mind the influence of technology, economic institutions, and the political and social contexts in which the films were produced and received. Screenings will include celebrated works from Hollywood and international cinema. 3 hrs. lect./3 hrs. screen

FMMC0105A-F17

CRN: 91449

Sight and Sound I
Sight and Sound I
In this course students will gain a theoretical understanding of the ways moving images and sounds communicate, as well as practical experience creating time-based work. We will study examples of moving images as we use cameras, sound recorders, and non-linear editing software to produce our own series of short works. Emphasis will be placed on understanding the possibilities of the medium through experimentation, analysis, and detailed feedback while exploring different facets of cinematic communication. (FMMC 0101, or FMMC 0102, or approval of instructor) 3 hrs. lect./3 hrs. lab

FMMC0106A-F17

Cross-Listed As:
CRWR0106A-F17

CRN: 90952

Writing for the Screen I
Writing for the Screen I
In this course we will examine the fundamental elements of dramatic narrative as they relate to visual storytelling. We will emphasize the process of generating original story material and learning the craft of screenwriting, including topics such as story, outline, scene structure, subtext, character objectives, formatting standards, and narrative strategies. Weekly writing assignments will emphasize visual storytelling techniques, tone and atmosphere, character relationships, and dialogue. Students will be required to complete two short screenplays. Required readings will inform and accompany close study of selected screenplays and films. (FMMC 0101 OR CRWR 0170 or approval of instructor) (Formerly FMMC/ENAM 0106) 3 hrs. sem.

FMMC0106B-F17

Cross-Listed As:
CRWR0106B-F17

CRN: 91265

Writing for the Screen I
Writing for the Screen I
In this course we will examine the fundamental elements of dramatic narrative as they relate to visual storytelling. We will emphasize the process of generating original story material and learning the craft of screenwriting, including topics such as story, outline, scene structure, subtext, character objectives, formatting standards, and narrative strategies. Weekly writing assignments will emphasize visual storytelling techniques, tone and atmosphere, character relationships, and dialogue. Students will be required to complete two short screenplays. Required readings will inform and accompany close study of selected screenplays and films. (FMMC 0101 OR CRWR 0170 or approval of instructor) (Formerly FMMC/ENAM 0106) 3 hrs. sem.

FMMC0175A-F17

Cross-Listed As:
JAPN0175A-F17

CRN: 92471

Anime Masterworks
Please register via JAPN 0175A
Anime: Masterworks of Japanese Animation
How did anime emerge as a distinctive national genre in global popular culture at the turn of the 21st century? What social conditions in Japan promoted adaptations of manga (graphic novels) into feature-length films for adult audiences? In this course students will address these questions by analyzing the forms and contexts of ten masterworks by the most prominent directors of Japanese animation. We will study the relation of anime to classic Disney films, live-action Hollywood cinema, and Japanese aesthetic traditions. Students will probe the political and ethical questions anime raises about the atomic bombings of World War II, individual identity, consciousness and the body, and the human impact on the natural environment. We will study several directors and give special attention to Miyazaki as an anime auteur. Films include Grave of the Fireflies, Akira, Ghost in the Shell, Perfect Blue, My Neighbor Totoro, Spirited Away, and The Wind Rises. 3 hrs. lect.

FMMC0215A-F17

Cross-Listed As:
INTD0215A-F17

CRN: 91791

3D Computer Animation
Please register via INTD 0215A
3D Computer Animation
3D computer animation has revolutionized animation, graphics, and special effects. In this course students will explore basic 3D modeling techniques, virtual material and texture creation, digital lighting, rendering, and animation. Every workshop will be hands on and fully immersed in this rapidly evolving technology. Students will leave with a strong conceptual understanding of the 3D graphics pipeline, a fundamental 3D skill set, options for further study, and an independent final animation project. 3 hrs. workshop

FMMC0221A-F17

CRN: 92430

Sherlock Holmes Across Media
Sherlock Holmes Across Media
Sir Arthur Conan Doyle created Sherlock Holmes in 1886. Since then, the consulting detective has continued to solve mysteries in literature, radio, film, television, and digital media. Indeed, Sherlock Holmes inspired what many think of as the earliest media fandom. Why has Sherlock Holmes remained such a fascinating figure for almost a century and a half? How have Holmes and his sidekick Watson (or Sherlock and John) transformed in their different iterations across media, culture, history, and nation? And what does it mean for contemporary television series Elementary and Sherlock to reimagine Sherlock Holmes for the digital age? (Not open to students who have taken FYSE 1457)

FMMC0232A-F17

CRN: 92303

The Documentary Film
Documentary: Art of the Nonfiction Film
Documentary film combines nonfiction with an aesthetic aspiration. This course will explore the achievement in the documentary, raising issues about the influence of documentary upon political persuasion, historical memory, the status of film as evidence, and its utility as a means of investigation. Questions will be posed, such as: Can documentary achieve a distinctive understanding of a phenomenon? How does nonfiction address/guide the relationship between sound, image, and subject? The course will offer a historical perspective, as well as study contemporary works, with the aim of preparing students to both understand and produce documentary films. 3 hrs. lect./3 hrs. screen.

FMMC0239A-F17

Cross-Listed As:
ENAM0239A-F17

CRN: 92199

Cinema of Alfred Hitchcock
Please Register Via ENAM 0239
The Cinema of Alfred Hitchcock
We will watch about 20 of Hitchcock’s films with an eye toward understanding why contemporary film directors consider his films exemplary of the greatest cinematic artistry: Hitchcock always finds new ways of telling a story visually by the way he uses his camera, especially the subjective camera. We will learn his rules for cinema, such as “the bigger the emotion the bigger the close-up.” We will also define his recurring themes, images, and motifs, such as obsessive love, the wrong man, dangling over the abyss, and a man and a woman saving one another by clasping hands. Among the films we will analyze are his masterpieces, Rear Window, Vertigo, North by Northwest, and Psycho. 3 hrs. lect./disc./screening

FMMC0239Y-F17

Cross-Listed As:
ENAM0239Y-F17

CRN: 92200

Cinema of Alfred Hitchcock
Please Register Via ENAM 0239
The Cinema of Alfred Hitchcock
We will watch about 20 of Hitchcock’s films with an eye toward understanding why contemporary film directors consider his films exemplary of the greatest cinematic artistry: Hitchcock always finds new ways of telling a story visually by the way he uses his camera, especially the subjective camera. We will learn his rules for cinema, such as “the bigger the emotion the bigger the close-up.” We will also define his recurring themes, images, and motifs, such as obsessive love, the wrong man, dangling over the abyss, and a man and a woman saving one another by clasping hands. Among the films we will analyze are his masterpieces, Rear Window, Vertigo, North by Northwest, and Psycho. 3 hrs. lect./disc./screening

FMMC0239Z-F17

Cross-Listed As:
ENAM0239Z-F17

CRN: 92201

Cinema of Alfred Hitchcock
Please Register Via ENAM 0239
The Cinema of Alfred Hitchcock
We will watch about 20 of Hitchcock’s films with an eye toward understanding why contemporary film directors consider his films exemplary of the greatest cinematic artistry: Hitchcock always finds new ways of telling a story visually by the way he uses his camera, especially the subjective camera. We will learn his rules for cinema, such as “the bigger the emotion the bigger the close-up.” We will also define his recurring themes, images, and motifs, such as obsessive love, the wrong man, dangling over the abyss, and a man and a woman saving one another by clasping hands. Among the films we will analyze are his masterpieces, Rear Window, Vertigo, North by Northwest, and Psycho. 3 hrs. lect./disc./screening

FMMC0240A-F17

Cross-Listed As:
JAPN0240A-F17

CRN: 92229

Gun and Sword: Japan&US Films
Please register via JAPN 0240A
Guns and Swords: Violence and Masculinity in Japanese and American Films
Cowboys, samurai, gangsters, and yakuza are fabled figures embodying national myths of honor and resistance in American and Japanese films. Swordfight and gunfight genres grapple with the issue of lethal weapons in the hands of individuals when the power of the state is absent, corrupt, or ineffectual. Familiar motifs, archetypal characters, and straightforward plots uphold traditional aspirations threatened by the forces of modernity. Japanese and American directors have exploited these conventions to create cinematic masterpieces about questions of violence, righteousness, and masculinity. In this course we will explore cross-cultural influences between swordfight and gunfight genres as we compare their heroes, antiheroes, conflicts, and codes. Films for study include Seven Samurai, Yojimbo, The Tale of Zatoichi, The Searchers, High Noon, Unforgiven, Pale Flower, Tokyo Drifter, Branded to Kill, White Heat, The Godfather, and Goodfellas. 3hrs. lect/disc.

FMMC0334A-F17

CRN: 92304

Videographic Film Studies
Videographic Film and Media Studies
Digital video technologies—such as DVDs, digital editing software, and online streaming—now enable film and media scholars to “write” with the same materials that constitute their object of study: moving images and sounds. But such a change means rethinking the rhetorical modes traditionally used in scholarly writing, and incorporating more aesthetic and poetic elements alongside explanation and analysis. In this hands-on course, we will both study and produce new videographic forms of criticism often known as “video essays,” exploring how such work can both produce knowledge and create an aesthetic impact. (FMMC 0101 or FMMC 0105 or by approval) 3 hrs. sem

FMMC0335A-F17

CRN: 90953

Sight and Sound II
Sight and Sound II
In this course students will work in teams to produce several short films, having the opportunity to take turns at fulfilling all the essential crew positions: director, producer, cinematographer, production sound mixer, editor, and sound designer. We will emphasize thorough pre-production planning, scene design, cinematography, working with actors, and post production —including color correction and sound mixing. The critical dialogue established in FMMC 0105 Sight and Sound I will be extended and augmented with readings and screenings of outstanding independently produced work. Obtain application on FMMC website online and submit prior to the start of registration.(Approval-required; FMMC 0105). Obtain application from the FMMC website and submit prior to the start of registration. Priority given to FMMC majors. 3 hrs. lect./3 hrs. lab.

FMMC0346A-F17

CRN: 92305

Special Topics MediaProduction
Sound Aesthetics & Production
Special Topics in Media Production: Sound Aesthetics and Production
Ever since the invention of recording, sound has increasingly been incorporated into all forms of contemporary art. In this course we will investigate the aesthetic power of sound as an expressive medium, while reviewing the rich history of sound art and its influence in a wide range of audiovisual practices. Through creative projects, lectures, auditions, and readings, we will develop students’ sensibilities and imagination concerning the use of sound, while improving their critical thinking and listening skills. We will cover basic concepts of acoustics, sound technology, audiovisual analysis, and sound production for film/video. (FMMC 0105 or by approval) 3 hrs. lect., 3 hrs. lab.

FMMC0507A-F17

CRN: 90279

Independent Project
Advanced Independent work in Film and Media Culture
Guidelines for submitting proposals are available on the Film & Media Culture web site along with a list of prerequisites.

FMMC0507B-F17

CRN: 90419

Independent Project
Advanced Independent work in Film and Media Culture
Guidelines for submitting proposals are available on the Film & Media Culture web site along with a list of prerequisites.

FMMC0507C-F17

CRN: 90420

Independent Project
Advanced Independent work in Film and Media Culture
Guidelines for submitting proposals are available on the Film & Media Culture web site along with a list of prerequisites.

FMMC0507D-F17

CRN: 90421

Independent Project
Advanced Independent work in Film and Media Culture
Guidelines for submitting proposals are available on the Film & Media Culture web site along with a list of prerequisites.

FMMC0507E-F17

CRN: 90422

Independent Project
Advanced Independent work in Film and Media Culture
Guidelines for submitting proposals are available on the Film & Media Culture web site along with a list of prerequisites.

FMMC0507G-F17

CRN: 90424

Independent Project
Advanced Independent work in Film and Media Culture
Guidelines for submitting proposals are available on the Film & Media Culture web site along with a list of prerequisites.

FMMC0507I-F17

CRN: 92170

Independent Project
Advanced Independent work in Film and Media Culture
Guidelines for submitting proposals are available on the Film & Media Culture web site along with a list of prerequisites.

Department of Film and Media Culture

Axinn Center at Starr Library
15 Old Chapel Road
Middlebury College
Middlebury, VT 05753
Fax: 802.443.2805