COVID-19: Essential Information

Offerings by Semester

Note that screening times and labs are required of most FMMC courses. In cases of conflict between competing screenings or course meetings, faculty will sometimes grant waivers, allowing students to register for two simultaneous screenings, with the understanding that they will make up the viewing in the library on their own time. Contact faculty prior to Banner registration.
« Summer Study 2020 Fall 2020 Winter 2021 »

FMMC0101A-F20

CRN: 90865

Aesthetics of the Moving Image
Aesthetics of the Moving Image
How do films convey meaning, generate emotions, and work as an art form? What aspects of film are shared by television and videogames? This course is designed to improve your ability to watch, reflect on, and write about moving images. The course will be grounded in the analysis of cinema (feature films, documentaries, avant-garde, and animation) with special focus on film style and storytelling techniques. Study will extend to new audio-visual media as well, and will be considered from formal, cultural, and theoretical perspectives. Note to students: this course involves substantial streaming of films and television for assigned viewing. 3 hrs. lect./3 hrs. screen

FMMC0101X-F20

CRN: 92651

Aesthetics of the Moving Image
Discussion
Aesthetics of the Moving Image
How do films convey meaning, generate emotions, and work as an art form? What aspects of film are shared by television and videogames? This course is designed to improve your ability to watch, reflect on, and write about moving images. The course will be grounded in the analysis of cinema (feature films, documentaries, avant-garde, and animation) with special focus on film style and storytelling techniques. Study will extend to new audio-visual media as well, and will be considered from formal, cultural, and theoretical perspectives. Note to students: this course involves substantial streaming of films and television for assigned viewing. 3 hrs. lect./3 hrs. screen

FMMC0101Y-F20

CRN: 92654

Aesthetics of the Moving Image
Discussion
Aesthetics of the Moving Image
How do films convey meaning, generate emotions, and work as an art form? What aspects of film are shared by television and videogames? This course is designed to improve your ability to watch, reflect on, and write about moving images. The course will be grounded in the analysis of cinema (feature films, documentaries, avant-garde, and animation) with special focus on film style and storytelling techniques. Study will extend to new audio-visual media as well, and will be considered from formal, cultural, and theoretical perspectives. Note to students: this course involves substantial streaming of films and television for assigned viewing. 3 hrs. lect./3 hrs. screen

FMMC0101Z-F20

CRN: 92655

Aesthetics of the Moving Image
Discussion
Aesthetics of the Moving Image
How do films convey meaning, generate emotions, and work as an art form? What aspects of film are shared by television and videogames? This course is designed to improve your ability to watch, reflect on, and write about moving images. The course will be grounded in the analysis of cinema (feature films, documentaries, avant-garde, and animation) with special focus on film style and storytelling techniques. Study will extend to new audio-visual media as well, and will be considered from formal, cultural, and theoretical perspectives. Note to students: this course involves substantial streaming of films and television for assigned viewing. 3 hrs. lect./3 hrs. screen

FMMC0104A-F20

Cross-Listed As:
AMST0104A-F20

CRN: 91857

Television & American Culture
Television and American Culture
This course explores American life in the last seven decades through an analysis of our central medium: television. Spanning a history of television from its origins in radio to today’s digital convergence via YouTube and Netflix, we will consider television's role in both representing and constituting American society through a variety of approaches, including: the economics of the television industry, television's role within American democracy, the formal attributes of various television genres, television as a site of gender and racial identity formation, television's role in everyday life, the medium's technological transformations, and television as a site of global cultural exchange. Note to students: this course involves substantial streaming of television for assigned viewing. 3 hrs. lect./disc. / 3 hrs. screen

FMMC0104W-F20

Cross-Listed As:
AMST0104W-F20

CRN: 92656

Television & American Culture
Discussion
Television and American Culture
This course explores American life in the last seven decades through an analysis of our central medium: television. Spanning a history of television from its origins in radio to today’s digital convergence via YouTube and Netflix, we will consider television's role in both representing and constituting American society through a variety of approaches, including: the economics of the television industry, television's role within American democracy, the formal attributes of various television genres, television as a site of gender and racial identity formation, television's role in everyday life, the medium's technological transformations, and television as a site of global cultural exchange. Note to students: this course involves substantial streaming of television for assigned viewing. 3 hrs. lect./disc. / 3 hrs. screen

FMMC0104X-F20

Cross-Listed As:
AMST0104X-F20

CRN: 92657

Television & American Culture
Discussion
Television and American Culture
This course explores American life in the last seven decades through an analysis of our central medium: television. Spanning a history of television from its origins in radio to today’s digital convergence via YouTube and Netflix, we will consider television's role in both representing and constituting American society through a variety of approaches, including: the economics of the television industry, television's role within American democracy, the formal attributes of various television genres, television as a site of gender and racial identity formation, television's role in everyday life, the medium's technological transformations, and television as a site of global cultural exchange. Note to students: this course involves substantial streaming of television for assigned viewing. 3 hrs. lect./disc. / 3 hrs. screen

FMMC0104Y-F20

Cross-Listed As:
AMST0104Y-F20

CRN: 92658

Television & American Culture
Discussion
Television and American Culture
This course explores American life in the last seven decades through an analysis of our central medium: television. Spanning a history of television from its origins in radio to today’s digital convergence via YouTube and Netflix, we will consider television's role in both representing and constituting American society through a variety of approaches, including: the economics of the television industry, television's role within American democracy, the formal attributes of various television genres, television as a site of gender and racial identity formation, television's role in everyday life, the medium's technological transformations, and television as a site of global cultural exchange. Note to students: this course involves substantial streaming of television for assigned viewing. 3 hrs. lect./disc. / 3 hrs. screen

FMMC0104Z-F20

Cross-Listed As:
AMST0104Z-F20

CRN: 92659

Television & American Culture
Discussion
Television and American Culture
This course explores American life in the last seven decades through an analysis of our central medium: television. Spanning a history of television from its origins in radio to today’s digital convergence via YouTube and Netflix, we will consider television's role in both representing and constituting American society through a variety of approaches, including: the economics of the television industry, television's role within American democracy, the formal attributes of various television genres, television as a site of gender and racial identity formation, television's role in everyday life, the medium's technological transformations, and television as a site of global cultural exchange. Note to students: this course involves substantial streaming of television for assigned viewing. 3 hrs. lect./disc. / 3 hrs. screen

FMMC0105A-F20

CRN: 91299

Sight and Sound I
Sight and Sound I
In this course students will gain a theoretical understanding of the ways moving images and sounds communicate, as well as practical experience creating time-based work. We will study examples of moving images as we use cameras, sound recorders, and non-linear editing software to produce our own series of short works. Emphasis will be placed on understanding the possibilities of the medium through experimentation, analysis, and detailed feedback while exploring different facets of cinematic communication. Open to FMMC majors only. (FMMC 0101, or FMMC 0102, or approval of instructor) 3 hrs. lect./3 hrs. lab

FMMC0106A-F20

Cross-Listed As:
CRWR0106A-F20

CRN: 90868

Writing for the Screen I
Writing for the Screen I
In this course we will examine the fundamental elements of dramatic narrative as they relate to visual storytelling. We will emphasize the process of generating original story material and learning the craft of screenwriting, including topics such as story, outline, scene structure, subtext, character objectives, formatting standards, and narrative strategies. Weekly writing assignments will emphasize visual storytelling techniques, tone and atmosphere, character relationships, and dialogue. Students will be required to complete one short screenplay. Required readings will inform and accompany close study of selected screenplays and short films. This class will require some streaming of video material. (FMMC 0101 OR CRWR 0170 or approval of instructor) (Formerly FMMC/ENAM 0106) 3 hrs. sem.

FMMC0215A-F20

Cross-Listed As:
INTD0215A-F20

CRN: 92603

3D Computer Animation
Please register via INTD 0215A
3D Computer Animation
3D computer animation has revolutionized animation, graphics, and special effects. In this course students will explore basic 3D modeling techniques, virtual material and texture creation, digital lighting, rendering, and animation. Every workshop will be hands on and fully immersed in this rapidly evolving technology. Students will leave with a strong conceptual understanding of the 3D graphics pipeline, a fundamental 3D skill set, options for further study, and an independent final animation project. 3 hrs. workshop

FMMC0224A-F20

Cross-Listed As:
BLST0224A-F20

CRN: 91859

African Cinema
African Cinema
In this course we will examine how films written and directed by African filmmakers address the evolving identities of post-colonial Africans. Students will explore the development of various national cinemas and the film movements that helped define African cinema as a tool for cultural expression and social change. We will pair film studies, post-colonial studies, and African studies readings with a diverse selection of films from across sub-Saharan Africa, from Senegal’s 1967 Black Girl (Ousmane Sembene) to the 2018 Netflix-produced Nigerian “Nollywood” film, Lionheart (Genevieve Nnaji). Note to students: this course involves substantial streaming of films for assigned viewing. 3 hours lect./3 hours screen.

FMMC0252A-F20

CRN: 92312

Authorship and Cinema
Authorship and Cinema
In this course we will focus on two of the most important international directors of the past 50 years, Terence Davies (Great Britain) and Abbas Kiarostami (Iran). Though their cinematic styles are in many ways markedly different, there is also a striking similarity: each has as its cornerstone an aesthetic of realism, but this is balanced and even challenged by other features: in Davies, by a modernist stylization, and in Kiarostami, by a postmodernist reflexivity. We will trace the course of each director’s career, exploring the features that designate each as a cinematic author, and we will use each as a point of comparison for the other. Films by Davies will include Distant Voices, Still Lives; The Long Day Closes, The House of Mirth, and A Quiet Passion. Films by Kiarostami will include Close-Up, And Life Goes On, The Wind Will Carry Us, and Certified Copy. Note to students: this course involves substantial streaming of films for assigned viewing. (FMMC 0101, FMMC 0102, or instructor approval)

FMMC0276A-F20

CRN: 92313

Remix Culture
Remix Culture
With the spread of digital technologies, remix has come to the forefront as a major form of artistic work and cultural and political commentary. In this course we will explore the history, cultural and legal impact, and creative logics of remix traditions. We will examine how digital technologies shape transformative creativity. Drawing on the work of theorists such as DJ Spooky and Lawrence Lessig, we will consider the creative and legal ramifications of remix logics. We will explore a range of remix works across media with a focus on video. Students will also produce remixes through individual and group work. 3 hrs. lecture/3 hrs. screening

FMMC0358A-F20

Cross-Listed As:
GSFS0358A-F20

CRN: 92314

Theories of Spectatorship
Theories of Spectatorship, Audience, and Fandom
With the spread of digital technologies, remix has come to the forefront as a major form of artistic work and cultural and political commentary. In this course we will explore the history, cultural and legal impact, and creative logics of remix traditions. We will examine how digital technologies shape transformative creativity. Drawing on the work of theorists such as DJ Spooky and Lawrence Lessig, we will consider the creative and legal ramifications of remix logics. We will explore a range of remix works across media with a focus on video. Students will also produce remixes through individual and group work. Note to students: this course involves substantial streaming of films and television for assigned viewing. (FMMC 0101 or FMMC 0102 or FMMC 0104 or FMMC 0254) 3 hrs. lect./disc./3 hrs. screen.

FMMC0507A-F20

CRN: 90256

Independent Project
Advanced Independent work in Film and Media Culture
Consult with a Film and Media Culture faculty member for guidelines.

FMMC0507B-F20

CRN: 90378

Independent Project
Advanced Independent work in Film and Media Culture
Consult with a Film and Media Culture faculty member for guidelines.

FMMC0507C-F20

CRN: 90379

Independent Project
Advanced Independent work in Film and Media Culture
Consult with a Film and Media Culture faculty member for guidelines.

FMMC0507D-F20

CRN: 90380

Independent Project
Advanced Independent work in Film and Media Culture
Consult with a Film and Media Culture faculty member for guidelines.

FMMC0507E-F20

CRN: 90381

Independent Project
Advanced Independent work in Film and Media Culture
Consult with a Film and Media Culture faculty member for guidelines.

FMMC0507F-F20

CRN: 90382

Independent Project
Advanced Independent work in Film and Media Culture
Consult with a Film and Media Culture faculty member for guidelines.

FMMC0507G-F20

CRN: 90383

Independent Project
Advanced Independent work in Film and Media Culture
Consult with a Film and Media Culture faculty member for guidelines.

FMMC0507I-F20

CRN: 91589

Independent Project
Advanced Independent work in Film and Media Culture
Consult with a Film and Media Culture faculty member for guidelines.

FMMC0507J-F20

CRN: 92236

Independent Project
Advanced Independent work in Film and Media Culture
Consult with a Film and Media Culture faculty member for guidelines.

FMMC0700A-F20

CRN: 92531

Senior Tutorial
Senior Tutorial
All FMMC majors must complete this course in their senior year, during which they undertake the process of devising, researching, and developing the early drafts and materials for an independent project in Film and Media in their choice of medium and format. Students will be poised to produce and complete these projects during Winter Term, via an optional but recommended independent study. Prerequisites for projects in specific formats are outlined on the departmental website.

FMMC0700B-F20

CRN: 92532

Senior Tutorial
Senior Tutorial
All FMMC majors must complete this course in their senior year, during which they undertake the process of devising, researching, and developing the early drafts and materials for an independent project in Film and Media in their choice of medium and format. Students will be poised to produce and complete these projects during Winter Term, via an optional but recommended independent study. Prerequisites for projects in specific formats are outlined on the departmental website.

Department of Film and Media Culture

Axinn Center at Starr Library
15 Old Chapel Road
Middlebury College
Middlebury, VT 05753
Fax: 802.443.2805