COVID-19: Essential Information

Offerings by Semester

Note that screening times and labs are required of most FMMC courses. In cases of conflict between competing screenings or course meetings, faculty will sometimes grant waivers, allowing students to register for two simultaneous screenings, with the understanding that they will make up the viewing in the library on their own time. Contact faculty prior to Banner registration.
« Winter 2021 Spring 2021 Fall 2021 »

FMMC0101A-S21

CRN: 20915

Aesthetics of the Moving Image
Aesthetics of the Moving Image
How do films convey meaning, generate emotions, and work as an art form? What aspects of film are shared by television and videogames? This course is designed to improve your ability to watch, reflect on, and write about moving images. The course will be grounded in the analysis of cinema (feature films, documentaries, avant-garde, and animation) with special focus on film style and storytelling techniques. Study will extend to new audio-visual media as well, and will be considered from formal, cultural, and theoretical perspectives. Note to students: this course involves substantial streaming of films and television for assigned viewing. 3 hrs. lect./3 hrs. screen

FMMC0101W-S21

CRN: 22677

Aesthetics of the Moving Image
Discussion
Aesthetics of the Moving Image
How do films convey meaning, generate emotions, and work as an art form? What aspects of film are shared by television and videogames? This course is designed to improve your ability to watch, reflect on, and write about moving images. The course will be grounded in the analysis of cinema (feature films, documentaries, avant-garde, and animation) with special focus on film style and storytelling techniques. Study will extend to new audio-visual media as well, and will be considered from formal, cultural, and theoretical perspectives. Note to students: this course involves substantial streaming of films and television for assigned viewing. 3 hrs. lect./3 hrs. screen

FMMC0101X-S21

CRN: 22678

Aesthetics of the Moving Image
Discussion
Aesthetics of the Moving Image
How do films convey meaning, generate emotions, and work as an art form? What aspects of film are shared by television and videogames? This course is designed to improve your ability to watch, reflect on, and write about moving images. The course will be grounded in the analysis of cinema (feature films, documentaries, avant-garde, and animation) with special focus on film style and storytelling techniques. Study will extend to new audio-visual media as well, and will be considered from formal, cultural, and theoretical perspectives. Note to students: this course involves substantial streaming of films and television for assigned viewing. 3 hrs. lect./3 hrs. screen

FMMC0101Y-S21

CRN: 22679

Aesthetics of the Moving Image
Discussion
Aesthetics of the Moving Image
How do films convey meaning, generate emotions, and work as an art form? What aspects of film are shared by television and videogames? This course is designed to improve your ability to watch, reflect on, and write about moving images. The course will be grounded in the analysis of cinema (feature films, documentaries, avant-garde, and animation) with special focus on film style and storytelling techniques. Study will extend to new audio-visual media as well, and will be considered from formal, cultural, and theoretical perspectives. Note to students: this course involves substantial streaming of films and television for assigned viewing. 3 hrs. lect./3 hrs. screen

FMMC0101Z-S21

CRN: 22680

Aesthetics of the Moving Image
Screening
Aesthetics of the Moving Image
How do films convey meaning, generate emotions, and work as an art form? What aspects of film are shared by television and videogames? This course is designed to improve your ability to watch, reflect on, and write about moving images. The course will be grounded in the analysis of cinema (feature films, documentaries, avant-garde, and animation) with special focus on film style and storytelling techniques. Study will extend to new audio-visual media as well, and will be considered from formal, cultural, and theoretical perspectives. Note to students: this course involves substantial streaming of films and television for assigned viewing. 3 hrs. lect./3 hrs. screen

FMMC0102A-S21

CRN: 22236

Film History
Film History
This course will survey the development of the cinema from 1895 to present. Our study will emphasize film as an evolving art, while bearing in mind the influence of technology, economic institutions, and the political and social contexts in which the films were produced and received. Screenings will include celebrated works from Hollywood and international cinema. 3 hrs. lect./3 hrs. screen

FMMC0102Z-S21

CRN: 22682

Film History
Screening
Film History
This course will survey the development of the cinema from 1895 to present. Our study will emphasize film as an evolving art, while bearing in mind the influence of technology, economic institutions, and the political and social contexts in which the films were produced and received. Screenings will include celebrated works from Hollywood and international cinema. 3 hrs. lect./3 hrs. screen

FMMC0104A-S21

Cross-Listed As:
AMST0104A-S21

CRN: 22684

Television & American Culture
Television and American Culture
This course explores American life in the last seven decades through an analysis of our central medium: television. Spanning a history of television from its origins in radio to today’s digital convergence via YouTube and Netflix, we will consider television's role in both representing and constituting American society through a variety of approaches, including: the economics of the television industry, television's role within American democracy, the formal attributes of various television genres, television as a site of gender and racial identity formation, television's role in everyday life, the medium's technological transformations, and television as a site of global cultural exchange. Note to students: this course involves substantial streaming of television for assigned viewing. 3 hrs. lect./disc. / 3 hrs. screen

FMMC0104W-S21

Cross-Listed As:
AMST0104W-S21

CRN: 22686

Television & American Culture
Discussion
Television and American Culture
This course explores American life in the last seven decades through an analysis of our central medium: television. Spanning a history of television from its origins in radio to today’s digital convergence via YouTube and Netflix, we will consider television's role in both representing and constituting American society through a variety of approaches, including: the economics of the television industry, television's role within American democracy, the formal attributes of various television genres, television as a site of gender and racial identity formation, television's role in everyday life, the medium's technological transformations, and television as a site of global cultural exchange. Note to students: this course involves substantial streaming of television for assigned viewing. 3 hrs. lect./disc. / 3 hrs. screen

FMMC0104X-S21

Cross-Listed As:
AMST0104X-S21

CRN: 22688

Television & American Culture
Discussion
Television and American Culture
This course explores American life in the last seven decades through an analysis of our central medium: television. Spanning a history of television from its origins in radio to today’s digital convergence via YouTube and Netflix, we will consider television's role in both representing and constituting American society through a variety of approaches, including: the economics of the television industry, television's role within American democracy, the formal attributes of various television genres, television as a site of gender and racial identity formation, television's role in everyday life, the medium's technological transformations, and television as a site of global cultural exchange. Note to students: this course involves substantial streaming of television for assigned viewing. 3 hrs. lect./disc. / 3 hrs. screen

FMMC0104Y-S21

Cross-Listed As:
AMST0104Y-S21

CRN: 22693

Television & American Culture
Discussion
Television and American Culture
This course explores American life in the last seven decades through an analysis of our central medium: television. Spanning a history of television from its origins in radio to today’s digital convergence via YouTube and Netflix, we will consider television's role in both representing and constituting American society through a variety of approaches, including: the economics of the television industry, television's role within American democracy, the formal attributes of various television genres, television as a site of gender and racial identity formation, television's role in everyday life, the medium's technological transformations, and television as a site of global cultural exchange. Note to students: this course involves substantial streaming of television for assigned viewing. 3 hrs. lect./disc. / 3 hrs. screen

FMMC0104Z-S21

Cross-Listed As:
AMST0104Z-S21

CRN: 22695

Television & American Culture
Discussion
Television and American Culture
This course explores American life in the last seven decades through an analysis of our central medium: television. Spanning a history of television from its origins in radio to today’s digital convergence via YouTube and Netflix, we will consider television's role in both representing and constituting American society through a variety of approaches, including: the economics of the television industry, television's role within American democracy, the formal attributes of various television genres, television as a site of gender and racial identity formation, television's role in everyday life, the medium's technological transformations, and television as a site of global cultural exchange. Note to students: this course involves substantial streaming of television for assigned viewing. 3 hrs. lect./disc. / 3 hrs. screen

FMMC0105A-S21

CRN: 20916

Sight and Sound I
Sight and Sound I
In this course students will gain a theoretical understanding of the ways moving images and sounds communicate, as well as practical experience creating time-based work. We will study examples of moving images as we use cameras, sound recorders, and non-linear editing software to produce our own series of short works. Emphasis will be placed on understanding the possibilities of the medium through experimentation, analysis, and detailed feedback while exploring different facets of cinematic communication. Open to FMMC majors only. (FMMC 0101, or FMMC 0102, or approval of instructor) 3 hrs. lect./3 hrs. lab

FMMC0201A-S21

CRN: 22579

Autobiographical Film
Autobiographical Film
In this course we will study a range of autobiographical practices in audiovisual media to examine how filmmakers have used the self as a starting point to explore universal issues like the search for identity, the representation of trauma, the essence of family bonds, or finding love. The study of film and video journals, experimental self-inscription, domestic ethnographies, vlogging and film essays will inform our own creative processes as we engage critically with these films’ social and political relevance. Through close readings, critical papers, and our own self-inscriptive explorations, we will attempt to better understand the world through the lens of autobiographical film. (Not open to students who have taken FYSE 1542) (FMMC 0101, or by instructor approval) Note to students: this course involves substantial streaming of films for assigned viewing. 3 hrs sem./screening

FMMC0201Z-S21

CRN: 22580

Autobiographical Film
Screening
Autobiographical Film
In this course we will study a range of autobiographical practices in audiovisual media to examine how filmmakers have used the self as a starting point to explore universal issues like the search for identity, the representation of trauma, the essence of family bonds, or finding love. The study of film and video journals, experimental self-inscription, domestic ethnographies, vlogging and film essays will inform our own creative processes as we engage critically with these films’ social and political relevance. Through close readings, critical papers, and our own self-inscriptive explorations, we will attempt to better understand the world through the lens of autobiographical film. (Not open to students who have taken FYSE 1542) (FMMC 0101, or by instructor approval) Note to students: this course involves substantial streaming of films for assigned viewing. 3 hrs sem./screening

FMMC0208A-S21

CRN: 22459

Contemporary East Asian Cinema
Contemporary East Asian Cinema
In this course we will study the contemporary cinema cultures of East Asia, focusing predominantly on the production of China, Japan, and South Korea in the 21st century. We will examine production, distribution, and (global) consumption in order to understand how these industries fit into or transcend national, regional, and global cinema paradigms. We will consider issues of superstardom and authorship, especially the ways in which prominent auteurs adapt, develop, and (re)invent genres and aesthetic techniques. We will also examine some of the more complex cinematic representations of tradition and modernity, nationalism, race and ethnicity, and gender and sexuality. The broader goal of the course is to think how the region’s film production can be conceptualized in terms of national/regional/global cinema, so we will use a comparative approach by analyzing similarities and unique differences within the main national industries studied. 3 hrs. lect./disc.; 3 hrs. screening

FMMC0208Y-S21

CRN: 22697

Contemporary East Asian Cinema
Discussion
Contemporary East Asian Cinema
In this course we will study the contemporary cinema cultures of East Asia, focusing predominantly on the production of China, Japan, and South Korea in the 21st century. We will examine production, distribution, and (global) consumption in order to understand how these industries fit into or transcend national, regional, and global cinema paradigms. We will consider issues of superstardom and authorship, especially the ways in which prominent auteurs adapt, develop, and (re)invent genres and aesthetic techniques. We will also examine some of the more complex cinematic representations of tradition and modernity, nationalism, race and ethnicity, and gender and sexuality. The broader goal of the course is to think how the region’s film production can be conceptualized in terms of national/regional/global cinema, so we will use a comparative approach by analyzing similarities and unique differences within the main national industries studied. 3 hrs. lect./disc.; 3 hrs. screening

FMMC0208Z-S21

CRN: 22698

Contemporary East Asian Cinema
Discussion
Contemporary East Asian Cinema
In this course we will study the contemporary cinema cultures of East Asia, focusing predominantly on the production of China, Japan, and South Korea in the 21st century. We will examine production, distribution, and (global) consumption in order to understand how these industries fit into or transcend national, regional, and global cinema paradigms. We will consider issues of superstardom and authorship, especially the ways in which prominent auteurs adapt, develop, and (re)invent genres and aesthetic techniques. We will also examine some of the more complex cinematic representations of tradition and modernity, nationalism, race and ethnicity, and gender and sexuality. The broader goal of the course is to think how the region’s film production can be conceptualized in terms of national/regional/global cinema, so we will use a comparative approach by analyzing similarities and unique differences within the main national industries studied. 3 hrs. lect./disc.; 3 hrs. screening

FMMC0215A-S21

Cross-Listed As:
INTD0215A-S21

CRN: 22076

3D Computer Animation
Please register via INTD 0215A
3D Computer Animation
3D computer animation has revolutionized animation, graphics, and special effects. In this course students will explore basic 3D modeling techniques, virtual material and texture creation, digital lighting, rendering, and animation. Every workshop will be hands on and fully immersed in this rapidly evolving technology. Students will leave with a strong conceptual understanding of the 3D graphics pipeline, a fundamental 3D skill set, options for further study, and an independent final animation project. 3 hrs. workshop

FMMC0227A-S21

Cross-Listed As:
BLST0227A-S21

CRN: 21962

African American Cinema
African American Cinema
In this course we will examine various representations of Blackness in American Cinema, from Oscar Micheaux’s early silent films to Ryan Coogler’s Black Panther. While we will primarily focus on films written and/or directed by African-Americans, we will also study the social, cultural, and political impact of Hollywood ideas and images of Black people and how they changed over time. Through a framework of both film theory and critical race theory, students will analyze how Black creative expression has manifested itself through film, influencing both form and content. 3 hours lect./3 hours screen

FMMC0227Z-S21

Cross-Listed As:
BLST0227Z-S21

CRN: 22700

African American Cinema
Screening
African American Cinema
In this course we will examine various representations of Blackness in American Cinema, from Oscar Micheaux’s early silent films to Ryan Coogler’s Black Panther. While we will primarily focus on films written and/or directed by African-Americans, we will also study the social, cultural, and political impact of Hollywood ideas and images of Black people and how they changed over time. Through a framework of both film theory and critical race theory, students will analyze how Black creative expression has manifested itself through film, influencing both form and content. 3 hours lect./3 hours screen

FMMC0255A-S21

CRN: 22238

French New Wave
French New Wave
Beginning in 1959 and continuing through the 1960s, dozens of young French cinephiles, thrilled by Hollywood genre movies and European art films, but disgusted with their own national cinema’s stodgy productions, took up cameras and began making films. This movement, known as La Nouvelle Vague, remains one of the most exciting, inventive periods in cinema history. This course focuses on the major films and directors (Jean-Luc Godard, Francois Truffaut, Alain Resnais) of the period and also gives consideration to the cultural, technological, and economic factors that shaped this movement. (Formerly FMMC 0345)

FMMC0255Z-S21

CRN: 22702

French New Wave
Screening
French New Wave
Beginning in 1959 and continuing through the 1960s, dozens of young French cinephiles, thrilled by Hollywood genre movies and European art films, but disgusted with their own national cinema’s stodgy productions, took up cameras and began making films. This movement, known as La Nouvelle Vague, remains one of the most exciting, inventive periods in cinema history. This course focuses on the major films and directors (Jean-Luc Godard, Francois Truffaut, Alain Resnais) of the period and also gives consideration to the cultural, technological, and economic factors that shaped this movement. (Formerly FMMC 0345)

FMMC0301A-S21

CRN: 22581

Editing the Moving Image
Aesthetics, Theories and Practice of Film Editing*
The editing of film and television content is often compared to screenwriting – and referred to as a “third writing”. In this class we will examine the history, aesthetic and theory of film editing, discuss editing techniques and apply them in several take-home exercises. The class focuses on editing’s importance in storytelling and on the strategies that editors use to create tension, relationships, emotion and meaning. We will also explore filmmaking techniques that conceptually relate to editing such as long takes, staging, lighting design, camera movement. Some of the films we will study: The Conversation, Do the right thing, Stories we tell, The Nile Hilton incident. While the class is only marginally touching on technology, access to a computer with certain technical capabilities and to editing software is necessary; if you are on campus, they are provided to you by the department (software also provided remotely). For class screenings, you also need access to an internet connection with video streaming capability. Familiarity with Adobe Premiere editing software recommended. (FMMC 0101 or FMMC 0105 or instructor approval)

FMMC0334A-S21

CRN: 21814

Videographic Film Studies
Videographic Film and Media Studies
Digital video technologies—such as DVDs, digital editing software, and online streaming—now enable film and media scholars to “write” with the same materials that constitute their object of study: moving images and sounds. But such a change means rethinking the rhetorical modes traditionally used in scholarly writing, and incorporating more aesthetic and poetic elements alongside explanation and analysis. In this hands-on course, we will both study and produce new videographic forms of criticism often known as “video essays,” exploring how such work can both produce knowledge and create an aesthetic impact. (FMMC 0101 or FMMC 0105 or by approval) 3 hrs. sem

FMMC0341A-S21

Cross-Listed As:
CRWR0341A-S21

CRN: 20494

Writing for the Screen II
Writing for the Screen II
Building on the skills acquired in Writing for the Screen I, students will complete the first drafts of their feature-length screenplay, or TV pilot and Bible. Class discussion will focus on feature screenplay structure and theme development using feature films and screenplays. Each participant in the class will practice pitching, writing coverage, and outlining, culminating in a draft of a feature length script or TV pilot and Bible. (FMMC 0106) 3 hrs. sem/3 hrs. screen.

FMMC0341Z-S21

Cross-Listed As:
CRWR0341Z-S21

CRN: 22703

Writing for the Screen II
Screening
Writing for the Screen II
Building on the skills acquired in Writing for the Screen I, students will complete the first drafts of their feature-length screenplay, or TV pilot and Bible. Class discussion will focus on feature screenplay structure and theme development using feature films and screenplays. Each participant in the class will practice pitching, writing coverage, and outlining, culminating in a draft of a feature length script or TV pilot and Bible. (FMMC 0106) 3 hrs. sem/3 hrs. screen.

FMMC0358A-S21

Cross-Listed As:
GSFS0358A-S21

CRN: 22705

Theories of Spectatorship
Theories of Spectatorship, Audience, and Fandom
In this course we will explore the dynamics of spectatorship, audience engagement, and fan communities, from Hitchcock to anime, from The Beatles to BLACKPINK, from Star Trek to The Untamed. How do we engage with media texts? Is our experience of media today radically different from the early years of cinema? What does it mean to be a fan? Have our notions of fandom changed over time? How do race, gender, class, and cultural context inform media engagement? We will consider key theoretical approaches and interrogate our own position as spectators, consumers, and fans in media culture. (FMMC 0101 or FMMC 0102 or FMMC 0104 or FMMC 0276) 3 hrs. lect./disc./3 hrs. screen.

FMMC0358Z-S21

Cross-Listed As:
GSFS0358Z-S21

CRN: 22707

Theories of Spectatorship
Screening
Theories of Spectatorship, Audience, and Fandom
In this course we will explore the dynamics of spectatorship, audience engagement, and fan communities, from Hitchcock to anime, from The Beatles to BLACKPINK, from Star Trek to The Untamed. How do we engage with media texts? Is our experience of media today radically different from the early years of cinema? What does it mean to be a fan? Have our notions of fandom changed over time? How do race, gender, class, and cultural context inform media engagement? We will consider key theoretical approaches and interrogate our own position as spectators, consumers, and fans in media culture. (FMMC 0101 or FMMC 0102 or FMMC 0104 or FMMC 0276) 3 hrs. lect./disc./3 hrs. screen.

FMMC0507A-S21

CRN: 20157

Independent Project
Advanced Independent work in Film and Media Culture
Consult with a Film and Media Culture faculty member for guidelines.

FMMC0507B-S21

CRN: 20252

Independent Project
Advanced Independent work in Film and Media Culture
Consult with a Film and Media Culture faculty member for guidelines.

FMMC0507C-S21

CRN: 20724

Independent Project
Advanced Independent work in Film and Media Culture
Consult with a Film and Media Culture faculty member for guidelines.

FMMC0507D-S21

CRN: 20253

Independent Project
Advanced Independent work in Film and Media Culture
Consult with a Film and Media Culture faculty member for guidelines.

FMMC0507E-S21

CRN: 20254

Independent Project
Advanced Independent work in Film and Media Culture
Consult with a Film and Media Culture faculty member for guidelines.

FMMC0507F-S21

CRN: 20255

Independent Project
Advanced Independent work in Film and Media Culture
Consult with a Film and Media Culture faculty member for guidelines.

FMMC0507H-S21

CRN: 20866

Independent Project
Advanced Independent work in Film and Media Culture
Consult with a Film and Media Culture faculty member for guidelines.

FMMC0701B-S21

CRN: 22917

Senior Project
Senior Projects
Students may enroll in this project-based independent credit to complete the thesis work started in the fall. Requires faculty approval based on satisfactory progress in the Senior Tutorial. Projects will include a public presentation at the end of Winter or beginning of Spring term.

FMMC0701C-S21

CRN: 22939

Senior Project
Senior Projects
Students may enroll in this project-based independent credit to complete the thesis work started in the fall. Requires faculty approval based on satisfactory progress in the Senior Tutorial. Projects will include a public presentation at the end of Winter or beginning of Spring term.

Department of Film and Media Culture

Axinn Center at Starr Library
15 Old Chapel Road
Middlebury College
Middlebury, VT 05753
Fax: 802.443.2805