Offerings by Semester

Note that screening times and labs are required of most FMMC courses. In cases of conflict between competing screenings or course meetings, faculty will sometimes grant waivers, allowing students to register for two simultaneous screenings, with the understanding that they will make up the viewing in the library on their own time. Contact faculty prior to Banner registration.
« Winter 2017 Spring 2017

FMMC0101A-S17

CRN: 21025

Aesthetics of the Moving Image
Aesthetics of the Moving Image
How do films convey meaning, generate emotions, and work as an art form? What aspects of film are shared by television and videogames? This course is designed to improve your ability to watch, reflect on, and write about moving images. The course will be grounded in the analysis of cinema (feature films, documentaries, avant-garde, and animation) with special focus on film style and storytelling techniques. Study will extend to new audio-visual media as well, and will be considered from formal, cultural, and theoretical perspectives. 3 hrs. lect./3 hrs. screen

FMMC0104A-S17

Cross-Listed As:
AMST0104A-S17

CRN: 21400

Television & American Culture
Television and American Culture
This course explores American life in the last six decades through an analysis of our central medium: television. Spanning a history of television from its origins in radio to its future in digital convergence, we will consider television's role in both reflecting and constituting American society through a variety of approaches. Our topical exploration will consider the economics of the television industry, television's role within American democracy, the formal attributes of a variety of television genres, television as a site of gender and racial identity formation, television's role in everyday life, and the medium's technological and social impacts. 2 hrs. lect./3 hrs. screen

FMMC0105A-S17

CRN: 21026

Sight and Sound I
Sight and Sound I
In this course students will gain a theoretical understanding of the ways moving images and sounds communicate, as well as practical experience creating time-based work. We will study examples of moving images as we use cameras, sound recorders, and non-linear editing software to produce our own series of short works. Emphasis will be placed on understanding the possibilities of the medium through experimentation, analysis, and detailed feedback while exploring different facets of cinematic communication. (FMMC 0101, or FMMC 0102, or approval of instructor) 3 hrs. lect./3 hrs. lab

FMMC0221A-S17

CRN: 22408

Sherlock Holmes Across Media
Sherlock Holmes Across Media
Sir Arthur Conan Doyle created Sherlock Holmes in 1886. Since then, the consulting detective has continued to solve mysteries in literature, radio, film, television, and digital media. Indeed, Sherlock Holmes inspired what many think of as the earliest media fandom. Why has Sherlock Holmes remained such a fascinating figure for almost a century and a half? How have Holmes and his sidekick Watson (or Sherlock and John) transformed in their different iterations across media, culture, history, and nation? And what does it mean for contemporary television series Elementary and Sherlock to reimagine Sherlock Holmes for the digital age? (Not open to students who have taken FYSE 1457)

FMMC0244A-S17

CRN: 22352

International Cinema:
Art of the Ellipsis
International Cinema: Art of Ellipsis
In 1936, film critic Roger Leenhardt declared, “cinema is the art of ellipsis.” But this claim seems to contradict our most basic understanding of film. After all, movies are about what we see, not about what we don’t. Or are they? In fact, Leenhardt was suggesting that the richest tradition in cinema explores the dynamic between the seen and the unseen, the shown and the unshown. In this course we will carefully study international films that effectively work this dynamic in terms of narrative, character, and most importantly, cinematic style. Films studied will include: Jean Renoir’s Rules of the Game (France, 1939); Christian Petzold’s Barbara (Germany, 2012). Abbas Kiarostami’s Like Someone in Love (France/Iran/Japan, 2012); Otto Preminger’s Anatomy of a Murder (US, 1959). 3 hrs. lect./3 hrs. screen

FMMC0341A-S17

Cross-Listed As:
CRWR0341A-S17

CRN: 20550

Writing for the Screen II
Writing for the Screen II
Building on the skills acquired in Writing for the Screen I, students will complete the first drafts of their feature-length screenplay. Class discussion will focus on feature screenplay structure and theme development using feature films and screenplays. Each participant in the class will practice pitching, writing coverage, and outlining, culminating in a draft of a feature length script. (Approval required, obtain application on the FMMC website and submit prior to spring registration) 3 hrs. sem/3 hrs. screen.

FMMC0361A-S17

Cross-Listed As:
DANC0361A-S17

CRN: 21441

Movement and Media
Please register via DANC 0361A
Movement and Media
In this course we will take an interdisciplinary look at the dynamic relationship between the body and digital media. Students will develop skills in basic film editing, real-time software manipulation, open-source media research, project design, and collaboration. We will address design history and theories of modern media through readings and multimedia sources. Process and research papers and work-in-progress showings will document ongoing collaborations that will culminate in an informal showing at the end of the semester. This course is open to students of all artistic backgrounds who are interested in significantly expanding their creative vocabularies and boundaries to include dance. (Approval required; DANC 0261 required for dance students) 3 hrs. lect./3 hrs. lab.

FMMC0507A-S17

CRN: 20177

Independent Project
Advanced Independent work in Film and Media Culture
Guidelines for submitting proposals are available on the Film & Media Culture web site along with a list of prerequisites.

FMMC0507B-S17

CRN: 20280

Independent Project
Advanced Independent work in Film and Media Culture
Guidelines for submitting proposals are available on the Film & Media Culture web site along with a list of prerequisites.

FMMC0507C-S17

CRN: 20810

Independent Project
Advanced Independent work in Film and Media Culture
Guidelines for submitting proposals are available on the Film & Media Culture web site along with a list of prerequisites.

FMMC0507D-S17

CRN: 20281

Independent Project
Advanced Independent work in Film and Media Culture
Guidelines for submitting proposals are available on the Film & Media Culture web site along with a list of prerequisites.

FMMC0507E-S17

CRN: 20282

Independent Project
Advanced Independent work in Film and Media Culture
Guidelines for submitting proposals are available on the Film & Media Culture web site along with a list of prerequisites.

FMMC0507F-S17

CRN: 20283

Independent Project
Advanced Independent work in Film and Media Culture
Guidelines for submitting proposals are available on the Film & Media Culture web site along with a list of prerequisites.

FMMC0507H-S17

CRN: 20970

Independent Project
Advanced Independent work in Film and Media Culture
Guidelines for submitting proposals are available on the Film & Media Culture web site along with a list of prerequisites.

FMMC0700A-S17

CRN: 21192

Senior Tutorial
Film and Media Senior Tutorial
All FMMC majors must complete this course, in which they undertake a critical essay, a screenplay, or a video. The following prerequisite courses are required: for a video project: FMMC 0105, FMMC 0335, FMMC/CRWR 0106; for a screenwriting project: FMMC 0105, FMMC/CRWR 0106, FMMC/CRWR 0341; for a research essay: demonstrated knowledge in the topic of the essay, as determined in consultation with the project advisor, and coursework relevant to the topic as available.

FMMC0700B-S17

CRN: 21260

Senior Tutorial
Film and Media Senior Tutorial
All FMMC majors must complete this course, in which they undertake a critical essay, a screenplay, or a video. The following prerequisite courses are required: for a video project: FMMC 0105, FMMC 0335, FMMC/CRWR 0106; for a screenwriting project: FMMC 0105, FMMC/CRWR 0106, FMMC/CRWR 0341; for a research essay: demonstrated knowledge in the topic of the essay, as determined in consultation with the project advisor, and coursework relevant to the topic as available.

Department of Film and Media Culture

Axinn Center at Starr Library
15 Old Chapel Road
Middlebury College
Middlebury, VT 05753
Fax: 802.443.2805