Middlebury

 

Sections

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HIST0110A-S13

Cross-Listed As:
HIST0110B-S13

CRN: 22144

Modern South Asia

Modern South Asia
This course is an introduction to the history of South Asia. We will examine such events as the remarkable rise and fall of the Mughal empire (1526-1700s), the transformation of the once-humble English East India Company into a formidable colonial state (1700s-1858), the emergence of nationalist and anti-imperialist movements led by people such as Mahatma Gandhi and M.A. Jinnah (1858-1947), and the establishment and recent histories of the new nations of India, Pakistan, Bangladesh, and Sri Lanka. Readings will include primary sources, history textbooks, historical novels, and newspaper articles. We will also watch at least one historical film. Pre-1800. 3 hrs. lect./disc.

HIST0110B-S13

Cross-Listed As:
HIST0110A-S13

CRN: 22145

Modern South Asia

Modern South Asia
This course is an introduction to the history of South Asia. We will examine such events as the remarkable rise and fall of the Mughal empire (1526-1700s), the transformation of the once-humble English East India Company into a formidable colonial state (1700s-1858), the emergence of nationalist and anti-imperialist movements led by people such as Mahatma Gandhi and M.A. Jinnah (1858-1947), and the establishment and recent histories of the new nations of India, Pakistan, Bangladesh, and Sri Lanka. Readings will include primary sources, history textbooks, historical novels, and newspaper articles. We will also watch at least one historical film. Pre-1800. 3 hrs. lect./disc.

HIST0114A-S13

CRN: 22149

History of Modern Africa

History of Modern Africa
We begin looking at revolutions in the early 19th century and the transformations surrounding the slave trade. Next we examine the European colonization of the continent, exploring how diverse interventions into Africans' lives had complex effects on political authority, class and generational dynamics, gender relations, ethnic and cultural identities, and rural and urban livelihoods. After exploring Africans' struggles against colonial rule in day-to-day practices and mass political movements, the last few weeks cover Africa's transition to independence and the postcolonial era, including the experience of neo-colonialism, ethnic conflict, poverty, and demographic crisis. (formerly HIST 0226) 2 hrs. lect., 1 hr. disc.

HIST0114X-S13

CRN: 22150

History of Modern Africa
Discussion

History of Modern Africa
We begin looking at revolutions in the early 19th century and the transformations surrounding the slave trade. Next we examine the European colonization of the continent, exploring how diverse interventions into Africans' lives had complex effects on political authority, class and generational dynamics, gender relations, ethnic and cultural identities, and rural and urban livelihoods. After exploring Africans' struggles against colonial rule in day-to-day practices and mass political movements, the last few weeks cover Africa's transition to independence and the postcolonial era, including the experience of neo-colonialism, ethnic conflict, poverty, and demographic crisis. (formerly HIST 0226) 2 hrs. lect., 1 hr. disc.

HIST0114Y-S13

CRN: 22151

History of Modern Africa
Discussion

History of Modern Africa
We begin looking at revolutions in the early 19th century and the transformations surrounding the slave trade. Next we examine the European colonization of the continent, exploring how diverse interventions into Africans' lives had complex effects on political authority, class and generational dynamics, gender relations, ethnic and cultural identities, and rural and urban livelihoods. After exploring Africans' struggles against colonial rule in day-to-day practices and mass political movements, the last few weeks cover Africa's transition to independence and the postcolonial era, including the experience of neo-colonialism, ethnic conflict, poverty, and demographic crisis. (formerly HIST 0226) 2 hrs. lect., 1 hr. disc.

HIST0114Z-S13

CRN: 22152

History of Modern Africa
Discussion

History of Modern Africa
We begin looking at revolutions in the early 19th century and the transformations surrounding the slave trade. Next we examine the European colonization of the continent, exploring how diverse interventions into Africans' lives had complex effects on political authority, class and generational dynamics, gender relations, ethnic and cultural identities, and rural and urban livelihoods. After exploring Africans' struggles against colonial rule in day-to-day practices and mass political movements, the last few weeks cover Africa's transition to independence and the postcolonial era, including the experience of neo-colonialism, ethnic conflict, poverty, and demographic crisis. (formerly HIST 0226) 2 hrs. lect., 1 hr. disc.

HIST0202A-S13

Cross-Listed As:
AMST0202A-S13

CRN: 22153

The American Mind

The American Mind
We will consider the history of influential American ideas, and ideas about America, from the Revolution to the present, with particular regard to changing cultural contexts. A continuing question will be whether such a consensus concept as “the American Mind” has the validity long claimed for it. Among many writers we will read are Thomas Jefferson, Alexis de Tocqueville, William James, Martin Luther King, Betty Friedan, Neil Postman, and Bill McKibben. (Previously taught as HIST/AMST 0426)

HIST0204A-S13

CRN: 22154

US History 1861-2011

United States History, 1861–2011
In this course we will explore the last 150 years of American history, examining the major issues that Americans faced economically, socially, politically, and culturally. Though course content will focus primarily on the nation's domestic developments, we will also consider the role the United States played in significant world events during the last century. We will make a special effort to employ a multicultural approach through readings and films. This survey course is a continuation of HIST 0203, but it is an independent course; there are no prerequisites. Students with AP credit in American history may not take HIST 0204 for credit. 2 hrs. lect., 1 hr. disc.

HIST0204X-S13

CRN: 22155

US History 1861-2011
Discussion

United States History, 1861–2011
In this course we will explore the last 150 years of American history, examining the major issues that Americans faced economically, socially, politically, and culturally. Though course content will focus primarily on the nation's domestic developments, we will also consider the role the United States played in significant world events during the last century. We will make a special effort to employ a multicultural approach through readings and films. This survey course is a continuation of HIST 0203, but it is an independent course; there are no prerequisites. Students with AP credit in American history may not take HIST 0204 for credit. 2 hrs. lect., 1 hr. disc.

HIST0204Y-S13

CRN: 22156

US History 1861-2011
Discussion

United States History, 1861–2011
In this course we will explore the last 150 years of American history, examining the major issues that Americans faced economically, socially, politically, and culturally. Though course content will focus primarily on the nation's domestic developments, we will also consider the role the United States played in significant world events during the last century. We will make a special effort to employ a multicultural approach through readings and films. This survey course is a continuation of HIST 0203, but it is an independent course; there are no prerequisites. Students with AP credit in American history may not take HIST 0204 for credit. 2 hrs. lect., 1 hr. disc.

HIST0204Z-S13

CRN: 22157

US History 1861-2011
Discussion

United States History, 1861–2011
In this course we will explore the last 150 years of American history, examining the major issues that Americans faced economically, socially, politically, and culturally. Though course content will focus primarily on the nation's domestic developments, we will also consider the role the United States played in significant world events during the last century. We will make a special effort to employ a multicultural approach through readings and films. This survey course is a continuation of HIST 0203, but it is an independent course; there are no prerequisites. Students with AP credit in American history may not take HIST 0204 for credit. 2 hrs. lect., 1 hr. disc.

HIST0216A-S13

Cross-Listed As:
AMST0216A-S13

CRN: 21631

Hist of American West

History of the American West
This is a survey of the history of the trans-Mississippi West from colonial contact through the 1980s. It explores how that region became known and understood as the West, and its role and meaning in United States history as a whole. The central themes of this course are conquest and its legacy, especially with regard to the role of the U.S. federal government in the West; human interactions with and perceptions of landscape and environment; social contests among different groups for a right to western resources and over the meanings of western identity; and the role of the West in American popular culture. (formerly HIST/AMST 0374) 2 hrs. lect., 1 hr. disc.

HIST0216X-S13

Cross-Listed As:
AMST0216X-S13

CRN: 22494

Hist of American West
Discussion

History of the American West
This is a survey of the history of the trans-Mississippi West from colonial contact through the 1980s. It explores how that region became known and understood as the West, and its role and meaning in United States history as a whole. The central themes of this course are conquest and its legacy, especially with regard to the role of the U.S. federal government in the West; human interactions with and perceptions of landscape and environment; social contests among different groups for a right to western resources and over the meanings of western identity; and the role of the West in American popular culture. (formerly HIST/AMST 0374) 2 hrs. lect., 1 hr. disc.

HIST0216Y-S13

Cross-Listed As:
AMST0216Y-S13

CRN: 22496

Hist of American West
Discussion

History of the American West
This is a survey of the history of the trans-Mississippi West from colonial contact through the 1980s. It explores how that region became known and understood as the West, and its role and meaning in United States history as a whole. The central themes of this course are conquest and its legacy, especially with regard to the role of the U.S. federal government in the West; human interactions with and perceptions of landscape and environment; social contests among different groups for a right to western resources and over the meanings of western identity; and the role of the West in American popular culture. (formerly HIST/AMST 0374) 2 hrs. lect., 1 hr. disc.

HIST0216Z-S13

Cross-Listed As:
AMST0216Z-S13

CRN: 22498

Hist of American West
Discussion

History of the American West
This is a survey of the history of the trans-Mississippi West from colonial contact through the 1980s. It explores how that region became known and understood as the West, and its role and meaning in United States history as a whole. The central themes of this course are conquest and its legacy, especially with regard to the role of the U.S. federal government in the West; human interactions with and perceptions of landscape and environment; social contests among different groups for a right to western resources and over the meanings of western identity; and the role of the West in American popular culture. (formerly HIST/AMST 0374) 2 hrs. lect., 1 hr. disc.

HIST0225A-S13

CRN: 22158

African American History

African American History
This course will explore the history of the African American people from the slave trade to the present. It will examine the process of enslavement, the nature of American slavery, the meaning of emancipation, the response to the rise of legalized segregation, and the modern struggle for equality. Special attention will be given to placing the African American story within the context of the developing American nation, its institutions, and its culture. (formerly HIST0371) 3 hrs. lect./disc.

HIST0235A-S13

Cross-Listed As:
JAPN0235A-S13

CRN: 22419

History of Pre-Modern Japan

History of Pre-Modern Japan
In this course we will explore the social, cultural, and institutional history of Japan from the eighth century up through the rise of the Tokugawa shogunate in the 17th century. The course is organized thematically to illuminate the different periods of Japanese history, including the imperial origin myth and Heian culture, the frontier and the rise of samurai government, localism and the warring states period, and finally the Tokugawa settlement and the paradoxes of centralized feudalism. Pre-1800. 3 hrs. lect/disc.

HIST0249A-S13

Cross-Listed As:
HIST0249B-S13

CRN: 21627

Germany in the 19th Century

Germany in the Long Nineteenth Century
This chronologically-organized course will examine Germany's development over the long nineteenth century. Pivotal moments in the formation of Germany will be explored, including but not limited to the following topics: the impact of French revolutionary ideas and the Napoleonic Wars on political organization, the revolutions of 1848-9, the industrial revolution, the wars of unification and 1871, the Kulturkampf, and the efforts at colonization in Africa. Beyond politics and economics, however, this course will also attempt to view the developments in high culture and daily life that were intimately tied up with the larger events. This will include themes like the "Catholic ghetto," urban culture, and Marxist philosophy. 3 hrs. lect./disc.

HIST0249B-S13

Cross-Listed As:
HIST0249A-S13

CRN: 22161

Germany in the 19th Century

Germany in the Long Nineteenth Century
This chronologically-organized course will examine Germany's development over the long nineteenth century. Pivotal moments in the formation of Germany will be explored, including but not limited to the following topics: the impact of French revolutionary ideas and the Napoleonic Wars on political organization, the revolutions of 1848-9, the industrial revolution, the wars of unification and 1871, the Kulturkampf, and the efforts at colonization in Africa. Beyond politics and economics, however, this course will also attempt to view the developments in high culture and daily life that were intimately tied up with the larger events. This will include themes like the "Catholic ghetto," urban culture, and Marxist philosophy. 3 hrs. lect./disc.

HIST0257A-S13

CRN: 21787

The Holocaust

The Holocaust
Why did the Holocaust happen? How could the Holocaust happen? In this course we will consider several aspects of the Holocaust, including the long-term conditions and events leading up to it, the measures employed in undertaking it, and the aftermath of the atrocities. Beyond a general survey, this course introduces students to the many varying interpretations and historical arguments scholars of the Holocaust have proposed and invites them to discuss and debate these issues in class. 3 hrs. lect./disc.

HIST0287A-S13

CRN: 22163

Modern Caribbean

Modern Caribbean
In this course we will study the modern history of the Greater Antilles (Cuba, the Dominican Republic, Puerto Rico, Haiti, and Jamaica) from 1789 to the present day. We will pay close attention to the independence movement, abolition, construction of national cultures, and the impact of Europeans and Africans on each nation, as well as to the connections among these major islands in the 19th and 20th century and to the other islands and mainland nations. We will discuss diverse revolutionary political and cultural movements, issues of poverty and development, and issues of migration.

HIST0305A-S13

Cross-Listed As:
PHIL0305A-S13

CRN: 21610

Confucius and Confucianism

Confucius and Confucianism
Perhaps no individual has left his mark more completely and enduringly upon an entire civilization than Confucius (551-479 B.C.) has upon that of China. Moreover, the influence of Confucius has spread well beyond China to become entrenched in the cultural traditions of neighboring Japan and Korea and elsewhere. This course examines who Confucius was, what he originally intended, and how the more important of his disciples have continued to reinterpret his original vision and direct it toward different ends. Pre-1800. (formerly HIST/PHIL 0273) 3 hrs. lect./disc.

HIST0308A-S13

Cross-Listed As:
AMST0308A-S13

CRN: 22435

Race: Sci, Med. & Diversity
Please register via AMST 0308A

The Power of Race: Science, Medicine, and Human Diversity
In this course, we will explore the manner in which ideologies of race have shaped the histories of science and medicine, and how scientists and medical practitioners have shaped the history of race. Topics will include the role of scientific knowledge in debates about racial slavery in the U.S., eugenics policies in the U.S. and Puerto Rico, tropical medicine in the Philippines, and public health policies in Los Angeles and San Francisco. We will pay particular attention to recent debates regarding the uses of race and genetic ancestry in biomedical research and practice, as well as genetic genealogy. 3 hrs. sem.

HIST0331A-S13

Cross-Listed As:
CLAS0331A-S13

CRN: 22166

Sparta And Athens
Please register via CLAS 0331A

Sparta and Athens
For over 200 years, Athens and Sparta were recognized as the most powerful Greek city-states, and yet one was a democracy (Athens), the other an oligarchy (Sparta). One promoted the free and open exchange of ideas (Athens); one tried to remain closed to outside influence (Sparta). This course studies the two city-states from the myths of their origins through their respective periods of hegemony to their decline as imperial powers. The goal is to understand the interaction between political success and intellectual and cultural development in ancient Greece. 2 hrs. lect., 1 hr. disc.

HIST0331B-S13

Cross-Listed As:
CLAS0331B-S13

CRN: 22167

Sparta And Athens
Please register via CLAS 0331B

Sparta and Athens
For over 200 years, Athens and Sparta were recognized as the most powerful Greek city-states, and yet one was a democracy (Athens), the other an oligarchy (Sparta). One promoted the free and open exchange of ideas (Athens); one tried to remain closed to outside influence (Sparta). This course studies the two city-states from the myths of their origins through their respective periods of hegemony to their decline as imperial powers. The goal is to understand the interaction between political success and intellectual and cultural development in ancient Greece. 2 hrs. lect., 1 hr. disc.

HIST0331X-S13

Cross-Listed As:
CLAS0331X-S13

CRN: 22168

Sparta And Athens
Please register via CLAS 0331X

Sparta and Athens
For over 200 years, Athens and Sparta were recognized as the most powerful Greek city-states, and yet one was a democracy (Athens), the other an oligarchy (Sparta). One promoted the free and open exchange of ideas (Athens); one tried to remain closed to outside influence (Sparta). This course studies the two city-states from the myths of their origins through their respective periods of hegemony to their decline as imperial powers. The goal is to understand the interaction between political success and intellectual and cultural development in ancient Greece. 2 hrs. lect., 1 hr. disc.

HIST0331Y-S13

Cross-Listed As:
CLAS0331Y-S13

CRN: 22169

Sparta And Athens
Please register via CLAS 0331Y

Sparta and Athens
For over 200 years, Athens and Sparta were recognized as the most powerful Greek city-states, and yet one was a democracy (Athens), the other an oligarchy (Sparta). One promoted the free and open exchange of ideas (Athens); one tried to remain closed to outside influence (Sparta). This course studies the two city-states from the myths of their origins through their respective periods of hegemony to their decline as imperial powers. The goal is to understand the interaction between political success and intellectual and cultural development in ancient Greece. 2 hrs. lect., 1 hr. disc.

HIST0331Z-S13

Cross-Listed As:
CLAS0331Z-S13

CRN: 22170

Sparta And Athens
Please register via CLAS 0331Z

Sparta and Athens
For over 200 years, Athens and Sparta were recognized as the most powerful Greek city-states, and yet one was a democracy (Athens), the other an oligarchy (Sparta). One promoted the free and open exchange of ideas (Athens); one tried to remain closed to outside influence (Sparta). This course studies the two city-states from the myths of their origins through their respective periods of hegemony to their decline as imperial powers. The goal is to understand the interaction between political success and intellectual and cultural development in ancient Greece. 2 hrs. lect., 1 hr. disc.

HIST0352A-S13

CRN: 22249

Food History in Middle East

Food in the Middle East: History, Culture, and Identity
Who invented Baklava? Was it the Greeks, Turks, Armenians, or maybe the Lebanese? In this course, we will examine the rich culinary history of the Middle East from the time of major Islamic Empires, such as the Abbasids and Ottomans, until the modern period. Through a close study of primary and secondary sources, including cookbooks and memoirs, we will explore the social, religious, literary, and economic place of food in the region. We will also investigate how, in the modern period, Middle Eastern peoples from different ethnic, geographic, and religious backgrounds have used food to express their distinct cultural, national, and gendered identities. 3 hrs. lect./disc.

HIST0352Z-S13

CRN: 22502

Food History in Middle East
Screening

Food in the Middle East: History, Culture, and Identity
Who invented Baklava? Was it the Greeks, Turks, Armenians, or maybe the Lebanese? In this course, we will examine the rich culinary history of the Middle East from the time of major Islamic Empires, such as the Abbasids and Ottomans, until the modern period. Through a close study of primary and secondary sources, including cookbooks and memoirs, we will explore the social, religious, literary, and economic place of food in the region. We will also investigate how, in the modern period, Middle Eastern peoples from different ethnic, geographic, and religious backgrounds have used food to express their distinct cultural, national, and gendered identities. 3 hrs. lect./disc.

HIST0359A-S13

Cross-Listed As:
HIST0359B-S13

CRN: 22171

Experience of Total War

The Experience of Total War
In this course we will explore how the two greatest conflicts of the 20th century--the First and Second World Wars--shaped the everyday lives of ordinary men and women. We will address such themes and problems as: the motivations to fight, war's role in individual development, the sources of obedience and mutiny, the phenomena of atrocity and genocide, experiences on the home front, and the reflection of war in culture and memory. Students will think critically across genres and national boundaries and will analyze fiction, personal narrative, and poetry from a historical perspective.

HIST0359B-S13

Cross-Listed As:
HIST0359A-S13

CRN: 22172

Experience of Total War

The Experience of Total War
In this course we will explore how the two greatest conflicts of the 20th century--the First and Second World Wars--shaped the everyday lives of ordinary men and women. We will address such themes and problems as: the motivations to fight, war's role in individual development, the sources of obedience and mutiny, the phenomena of atrocity and genocide, experiences on the home front, and the reflection of war in culture and memory. Students will think critically across genres and national boundaries and will analyze fiction, personal narrative, and poetry from a historical perspective.

HIST0359Y-S13

CRN: 22173

Experience of Total War
Discussion

The Experience of Total War
In this course we will explore how the two greatest conflicts of the 20th century--the First and Second World Wars--shaped the everyday lives of ordinary men and women. We will address such themes and problems as: the motivations to fight, war's role in individual development, the sources of obedience and mutiny, the phenomena of atrocity and genocide, experiences on the home front, and the reflection of war in culture and memory. Students will think critically across genres and national boundaries and will analyze fiction, personal narrative, and poetry from a historical perspective.

HIST0359Z-S13

CRN: 22174

Experience of Total War
Discussion

The Experience of Total War
In this course we will explore how the two greatest conflicts of the 20th century--the First and Second World Wars--shaped the everyday lives of ordinary men and women. We will address such themes and problems as: the motivations to fight, war's role in individual development, the sources of obedience and mutiny, the phenomena of atrocity and genocide, experiences on the home front, and the reflection of war in culture and memory. Students will think critically across genres and national boundaries and will analyze fiction, personal narrative, and poetry from a historical perspective.

HIST0393A-S13

Cross-Listed As:
WAGS0393A-S13

CRN: 22175

Gender in Early America

A History of Gender in Early America
Exploration, conquest, settlement, revolution, and nation-building: no course in early American history should ignore such traditional topics. In this course, though, we will examine the various ways that gender shaped these historical processes. How, for example, did colonials’ assumptions about manhood and womanhood affect the development of slavery in America? Or how did the Founding Fathers’ identities as men inform their attitudes about democracy and citizenship? We will scrutinize historical documents, of both a private and public nature, and discuss several recent scholarly works on gender from 1600-1850 to consider these kinds of questions. Pre-1800. 3 hrs. lect./disc.

HIST0403A-S13

CRN: 22279

Readings in European History

Readings in Modern European History: Scottish and Irish Identities
This seminar studies the development of Scottish and Irish national identities, from 1603 to 1922. Scotland and Ireland have had complicated and often tempestuous relationships with each other and with England, the long-dominant power in the British Isles. We will examine the social, political and cultural consequences, from the union of crowns under James I, to creation of the Irish Free State after World War I. Particular attention will be paid to rebellions, civil wars, religious changes, population shifts, literary movements and mass political organizations that have helped to shape national identities on both sides of the Irish Sea. 3 hrs. sem.

HIST0411A-S13

CRN: 22176

Rdgs Amer HI: Environmental HI

Readings in American History: American Environmental History
Although the U.S. has long been thought "nature's nation," scholars have only begun to include the study of human interactions with nature in their study of the American past. This course will examine the history of interactions between human beings and their physical environments in North America, through readings that bring plants, animals, climates, and landscapes as well as human culture, politics, labor, race, and gender into histories of settlement, capitalism, urbanization, region, science, and policy. Readings will also trace the emergence of this new field, and the problems inherent in creating a more inclusive account of the past. 3 hrs sem. (formerly HIST 0406)

HIST0412A-S13

CRN: 22177

Rdgs Amer Hi: Cultures-Contact
Rdgs Amer HI: Cultures-Contact

Readings in American History: Cultures in Contact
In this course we will examine the dimensions of cultural contact among Native Americans, Europeans, African Americans, and Euro Americans in the eastern half of the United States, from early encounters at Roanoke, to Cherokee removal to Oklahoma. Themes of investigation include: encounter vs. invasion; Indian depopulation by men, microbes, and munitions; religious conversion; cultural persistence, change, and revitalization; slavery by and of Indians; and the changeable image of the Indian. (formerly HIST 0407) 3 hrs. sem.

HIST0428A-S13

CRN: 22306

Blame it On Bossa Nova

Blame It On Bossa Nova: The History of a Transnational Phenomenon
What is bossa nova and what impact did it have on the world? In this course we will examine the history of this complex international phenomenon and its connection to social and political trends of the 1950s and 1960s. We will study the national and transnational impact of bossa nova and the post-World War II development of the bossa nova aesthetic and ethos in Latin America, Europe (particularly France), and the United States. Our study of bossa nova will also help us discuss broader philosophical questions such as how we define who owns a cultural product, why we consume cultural products from abroad, and whether we can truly understand other cultures in translation?

HIST0429A-S13

CRN: 22178

Gandhi

Gandhi
This course will focus on the works and actions of Mahatma Gandhi. At one level, the readings will provide an introduction to the philosophy and life of one of the most significant, influential, and well-known figures of the 20th century. At another level, the course will discuss in detail the major themes and occurrences in modern Indian history, tracing the rise and ultimate victory of the Indian nationalist movement. The class will read a variety of texts, including books written by Gandhi, tracts published by his political and religious opponents, social commentaries, contemporary novels, and engaging histories. (formerly HIST 0414)3 hrs. sem

HIST0430A-S13

Cross-Listed As:
JAPN0430A-S13

CRN: 22257

East Asia/Japan's Long Postwar

Readings in Modern East Asian History: Post-colonial East Asia and Japan's "Long Postwar"
With the end of the Cold War and the death of Emperor Hirohito in 1989, long simmering debates reignited over the meaning of Japan's prewar empire in East Asia, Japanese wartime atrocities, and the reconfiguration of East Asia within the Cold War. In this course, students will investigate how events from over 60 years ago have continued to reproduce national identities and geopolitical relations in postwar East Asia. Through a variety of novels, films, and historical analyses, we will investigate the limits of, and tensions between, individual experience, memory, national history, and geopolitics. 3 hrs. sem.

HIST0431A-S13

CRN: 22179

China's Historical Minorities

Readings in Chinese History: China's Historical Minorities
We tend reflexively to visualize China as an ethnically homogeneous nation-state. However, this conception fails to account for the minority populations that have for centuries resided in China and contributed greatly to its socio-cultural identity. Throughout the imperial age, the four groups called Manchu, Mongol, Hui, and Tibetan surpassed all other non-Chinese ethnicities in influencing the direction of Chinese history and shaping the contours of China's developmental experience. In this reading seminar we will examine the imprint of the collective legacy of these particular minorities as well as those of certain related groups, such as the ancestors of the Uyghurs of modern Xinjiang. 3 hrs. sem.

HIST0439A-S13

CRN: 22180

Ottomans in MidEast & Balkans

Readings on Ottoman History in the Middle East and the Balkans
The Ottoman Empire arose from the rubble of waning Islamic and Byzantine empires and became the longest lasting Islamic empire in history. In this seminar we will explore the rise of the empire, from its nascence as an unknown tribe in thirteenth-century western Anatolia to its formidable dominance of the Mediterranean and European worlds in the fifteenth and sixteenth centuries, and on to its responses to European ascendancy on the eve of modernity. Selected readings will help us explore its origins, its political, social, and cultural structures, as well as its multi-ethnic and multi-cultural identity, with particular attention to its influence on the Balkans and the Arab Middle East during the early modern period. 3 hrs. sem.

HIST0442A-S13

CRN: 22181

Popular Culture/History/Africa

Popular Culture and History in Africa
In recent years scholars of the African past have increasingly turned their attention to the multiple arenas of "popular culture" that have helped shape and express Africans' histories. In this course, we will explore the diverse thematic range of such approaches and the new conceptual lenses they bring to interpreting African colonial and post-colonial history. Readings and seminar discussions will touch on such varied historical topics as Africans as producers and consumers of popular photography, film/video, and music; the politics of fashion; and local dynamics of sports and leisure. (Formerly HIST 0420) 3 hrs. sem.

HIST0450A-S13

Cross-Listed As:
IGST0450A-S13

CRN: 22321

U.S./Soviet Popular Culture
Please register via IGST 0450A

Twentieth-Century U.S. and Soviet Popular Culture
In this comparative history seminar we will examine the United States and Russia from the Bolshevik Revolution in 1917 through the Cold War. Popular culture provides rich material and suggests analytical frameworks for examining American and Soviet perceptions of each other. It also invites critical analysis of each society's "way of being": their cultural values, political priorities, assumptions, and their personal and national identities. Students will examine the ways popular culture informed social movements and international relations, paying close attention to changes and continuities across the 20th century. Of particular interest is the way that popular culture, which initially was used to drive a wedge between American and Soviet peoples, eventually became an unexpected force of rapprochement in the 1970s and 1980s. Throughout the seminar students will consider how race, class, and gender shape cultural understandings of identity. This course is equivalent to IGST 0450.

HIST0500A-S13

CRN: 20344

Special Research Projects

Special research projects during the junior year may be used to fulfill the research seminar requirements in some cases. Approval of department chair and project advisor is required.

HIST0500B-S13

CRN: 20747

Special Research Projects

Special research projects during the junior year may be used to fulfill the research seminar requirements in some cases. Approval of department chair and project advisor is required.

HIST0500C-S13

CRN: 20760

Special Research Projects

Special research projects during the junior year may be used to fulfill the research seminar requirements in some cases. Approval of department chair and project advisor is required.

HIST0500D-S13

CRN: 20761

Special Research Projects

Special research projects during the junior year may be used to fulfill the research seminar requirements in some cases. Approval of department chair and project advisor is required.

HIST0500E-S13

CRN: 20762

Special Research Projects

Special research projects during the junior year may be used to fulfill the research seminar requirements in some cases. Approval of department chair and project advisor is required.

HIST0500F-S13

CRN: 20764

Special Research Projects

Special research projects during the junior year may be used to fulfill the research seminar requirements in some cases. Approval of department chair and project advisor is required.

HIST0500H-S13

CRN: 20893

Special Research Projects

Special research projects during the junior year may be used to fulfill the research seminar requirements in some cases. Approval of department chair and project advisor is required.

HIST0500K-S13

CRN: 20992

Special Research Projects

Special research projects during the junior year may be used to fulfill the research seminar requirements in some cases. Approval of department chair and project advisor is required.

HIST0500P-S13

CRN: 20995

Special Research Projects

Special research projects during the junior year may be used to fulfill the research seminar requirements in some cases. Approval of department chair and project advisor is required.

HIST0500R-S13

CRN: 20997

Special Research Projects

Special research projects during the junior year may be used to fulfill the research seminar requirements in some cases. Approval of department chair and project advisor is required.

HIST0500S-S13

CRN: 20998

Special Research Projects

Special research projects during the junior year may be used to fulfill the research seminar requirements in some cases. Approval of department chair and project advisor is required.

HIST0500T-S13

CRN: 20999

Special Research Projects

Special research projects during the junior year may be used to fulfill the research seminar requirements in some cases. Approval of department chair and project advisor is required.

HIST0500U-S13

CRN: 21000

Special Research Projects

Special research projects during the junior year may be used to fulfill the research seminar requirements in some cases. Approval of department chair and project advisor is required.

HIST0700A-S13

CRN: 20345

Senior Independent Study

The History Senior Thesis is required of all majors. It is written over two terms, with the final grade applying to both terms. The project is generally begun in the fall and completed during winter or spring. Approval is required to begin the thesis in winter or spring, and such students must still attend the Thesis Writer's Workshops that take place in fall and winter.

HIST0700B-S13

CRN: 20584

Senior Independent Study

The History Senior Thesis is required of all majors. It is written over two terms, with the final grade applying to both terms. The project is generally begun in the fall and completed during winter or spring. Approval is required to begin the thesis in winter or spring, and such students must still attend the Thesis Writer's Workshops that take place in fall and winter.

HIST0700C-S13

CRN: 20585

Senior Independent Study

The History Senior Thesis is required of all majors. It is written over two terms, with the final grade applying to both terms. The project is generally begun in the fall and completed during winter or spring. Approval is required to begin the thesis in winter or spring, and such students must still attend the Thesis Writer's Workshops that take place in fall and winter.

HIST0700D-S13

CRN: 20586

Senior Independent Study

The History Senior Thesis is required of all majors. It is written over two terms, with the final grade applying to both terms. The project is generally begun in the fall and completed during winter or spring. Approval is required to begin the thesis in winter or spring, and such students must still attend the Thesis Writer's Workshops that take place in fall and winter.

HIST0700E-S13

CRN: 20587

Senior Independent Study

The History Senior Thesis is required of all majors. It is written over two terms, with the final grade applying to both terms. The project is generally begun in the fall and completed during winter or spring. Approval is required to begin the thesis in winter or spring, and such students must still attend the Thesis Writer's Workshops that take place in fall and winter.

HIST0700F-S13

CRN: 20588

Senior Independent Study

The History Senior Thesis is required of all majors. It is written over two terms, with the final grade applying to both terms. The project is generally begun in the fall and completed during winter or spring. Approval is required to begin the thesis in winter or spring, and such students must still attend the Thesis Writer's Workshops that take place in fall and winter.

HIST0700G-S13

CRN: 20589

Senior Independent Study

The History Senior Thesis is required of all majors. It is written over two terms, with the final grade applying to both terms. The project is generally begun in the fall and completed during winter or spring. Approval is required to begin the thesis in winter or spring, and such students must still attend the Thesis Writer's Workshops that take place in fall and winter.

HIST0700H-S13

CRN: 20590

Senior Independent Study

The History Senior Thesis is required of all majors. It is written over two terms, with the final grade applying to both terms. The project is generally begun in the fall and completed during winter or spring. Approval is required to begin the thesis in winter or spring, and such students must still attend the Thesis Writer's Workshops that take place in fall and winter.

HIST0700K-S13

CRN: 20593

Senior Independent Study

The History Senior Thesis is required of all majors. It is written over two terms, with the final grade applying to both terms. The project is generally begun in the fall and completed during winter or spring. Approval is required to begin the thesis in winter or spring, and such students must still attend the Thesis Writer's Workshops that take place in fall and winter.

HIST0700N-S13

CRN: 20596

Senior Independent Study

The History Senior Thesis is required of all majors. It is written over two terms, with the final grade applying to both terms. The project is generally begun in the fall and completed during winter or spring. Approval is required to begin the thesis in winter or spring, and such students must still attend the Thesis Writer's Workshops that take place in fall and winter.

HIST0700P-S13

CRN: 20859

Senior Independent Study

The History Senior Thesis is required of all majors. It is written over two terms, with the final grade applying to both terms. The project is generally begun in the fall and completed during winter or spring. Approval is required to begin the thesis in winter or spring, and such students must still attend the Thesis Writer's Workshops that take place in fall and winter.

HIST0700Q-S13

CRN: 20860

Senior Independent Study

The History Senior Thesis is required of all majors. It is written over two terms, with the final grade applying to both terms. The project is generally begun in the fall and completed during winter or spring. Approval is required to begin the thesis in winter or spring, and such students must still attend the Thesis Writer's Workshops that take place in fall and winter.

HIST0700R-S13

CRN: 20894

Senior Independent Study

The History Senior Thesis is required of all majors. It is written over two terms, with the final grade applying to both terms. The project is generally begun in the fall and completed during winter or spring. Approval is required to begin the thesis in winter or spring, and such students must still attend the Thesis Writer's Workshops that take place in fall and winter.

HIST0700S-S13

CRN: 20895

Senior Independent Study

The History Senior Thesis is required of all majors. It is written over two terms, with the final grade applying to both terms. The project is generally begun in the fall and completed during winter or spring. Approval is required to begin the thesis in winter or spring, and such students must still attend the Thesis Writer's Workshops that take place in fall and winter.

HIST0700U-S13

CRN: 21005

Senior Independent Study

The History Senior Thesis is required of all majors. It is written over two terms, with the final grade applying to both terms. The project is generally begun in the fall and completed during winter or spring. Approval is required to begin the thesis in winter or spring, and such students must still attend the Thesis Writer's Workshops that take place in fall and winter.