Middlebury

 

Susan Burch

Associate Professor of American Studies

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Phone: work802.443.5866
Office Hours: Fall 2014: Tuesday 11:00-12:00 and 3:00-4:00, Wednesday 1:30-3:30, Thursday 11:00-12:00 or by appointment
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Susan Burch is an associate professor of American Studies. Before joining the Middlebury faculty in 2009, she taught at Gallaudet University, King’s College (University of Aberdeen, Scotland), and the Ohio State University. Professor Burch also has worked as a research associate at the Smithsonian National Museum of American History.

Professor Burch earned her BA degree in history and Soviet Studies from Colorado College and her MA and PhD in American and Soviet history from Georgetown University.

Research and teaching subjects “at the margins” draws Burch’s attention, and particularly the historical impact of race, ethnicity, disability, gender, and material culture on lived experiences in America, Russia, and beyond. For more details about her work see her cv and a sample of her publications.

 

 

Courses


indicates offered in the current term
indicates offered in the upcoming term[s]

AMST 0260 - American Disability Studies      

American Disability Studies: History, Meanings, and Cultures
In this course we will examine the history, meanings, and realities of disability in the United States. We will analyze the social, political, economic, environmental, and material factors that shape the meanings of "disability," examining changes and continuities over time. Students will draw critical attention to the connections between disability, race, ethnicity, gender, sexuality, socioeconomic status, and age in American and transnational contexts. Diverse sources, including films and television shows, music, advertising, fiction, memoirs, and material objects, encourage inter and multi-disciplinary approaches to disability. Central themes we consider include language, privilege, community, citizenship, education, medicine and technology, and representation.

HIS NOR SOC

Fall 2012, Fall 2014

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AMST 0301 - Madness in America      

Madness in America
It's a mad, mad course. In this course we will focus on representations of madness from colonial to late 20th century America, emphasizing the links between popular and material culture, science, medicine, and institutions. We will consider how ideas about madness (and normalcy) reflect broader (and shifting) notions of identity. Thus, issues of race, ethnicity, gender and sexual orientation, community, class, and region will play significant roles in our discussions and critiques. To complement foundational readings, this course will draw on American literature, documentary and entertainment films, music, and materials from the college's special collections.

NOR SOC

Spring 2011, Spring 2015

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AMST 0302 - Love, Sex, Race & Disability      

Love, Sex, Race, and Disability
In this course we will explore the connections between gender and sexuality, race, and disability. Culture and representation, understandings of diversity and difference, and contexts (political, social, and historical) will provide central areas of study. Comparing and integrating topics and perspectives, we will critically analyze the constructions and politics of identity (and multiple identities) and historical perspectives on gender and sexuality, race, and disability. We also will consider the impact of education and activism, as well as the meanings of intimate relationships across and between genders and sexualities, races, and disabilities. Our work will foster a fundamental reexamination of American life and history through its study of bodies and minds, identities, languages, cultures, citizenship and rights, power and authority, what is a "natural" and "unnatural." This course will draw on diverse sources, including documentary and Hollywood films, poetry and short fiction, academic texts, such as Freakery, Gendering Disability and Disability and the Teaching of Writing, and memoirs, such as Eli Clare's Exile and Pride.

NOR SOC

Fall 2011

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AMST 0500 - Independent Study      

Independent Study
Select project advisor prior to registration.

Winter 2011, Spring 2011, Fall 2011, Winter 2012, Spring 2012, Fall 2012, Winter 2013, Spring 2013, Winter 2014, Fall 2014, Winter 2015, Spring 2015

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AMST 0700 - Senior Essay      

Senior Essay
For students who have completed AMST 0400 and are not pursuing an honors thesis. Under the guidance of one or more faculty members, each student will complete research leading toward a one-term, one-credit interdisciplinary senior essay on some aspect of American culture. The essay is to be submitted no later than the last Thursday of the fall semester. (Select project advisor prior to registration)

Fall 2011

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AMST 0710 - Honors Thesis      

Honors Thesis
For students who have completed AMST 0705, and qualify to write two-credit interdisciplinary honors thesis. on some aspect of American culture. The thesis may be completed on a fall/winter schedule or a fall/spring schedule. (Select a thesis advisor prior to registration)

Winter 2011, Spring 2011, Fall 2011, Winter 2012, Spring 2012, Winter 2013, Spring 2013, Winter 2014, Winter 2015, Spring 2015

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ENAM 0700 - Senior Essay: Critical Writing      

Senior Thesis: Critical Writing
Individual guidance and seminar (discussions, workshops, tutorials) for those undertaking one-term projects in literary criticism or analysis. All critical thesis writers also take the essay workshop (ENAM 700Z) in either Fall or Spring Term.

Fall 2011

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FYSE 1356 - Disability/Difference/Society      

Disability, Difference, and Society
In this seminar we explore the varied and evolving meanings of disability—as condition, lived experience, and analytical framework—and the contexts that shape these meanings. Dominant issues, including representation, education, employment, bioethics, institutions, community, and policies and rights, will serve as our touchstones for research, analysis, and learning. We will pay rigorous attention to the links between disability and other significant social categories, such as race, ethnicity, socioeconomic class, gender, sexual orientation and identification, and age. While the United States is highlighted in this class, transnational and global components will figure significantly as well. Course materials and assignments offer different disciplinary approaches and writing styles, fostering both individual and collective work. Films, on line exhibits, music, advertising, popular media, and the material world reflect the wide range of sources on which this course draws.

CW NOR SOC

Spring 2012, Fall 2014

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IGST 0450 / HIST 0450 - U.S./Soviet Popular Culture      

Twentieth-Century U.S. and Soviet Popular Culture
In this comparative history seminar we will examine the United States and Russia from the Bolshevik Revolution in 1917 through the Cold War. Popular culture provides rich material and suggests analytical frameworks for examining American and Soviet perceptions of each other. It also invites critical analysis of each society's "way of being": their cultural values, political priorities, assumptions, and their personal and national identities. Students will examine the ways popular culture informed social movements and international relations, paying close attention to changes and continuities across the 20th century. Of particular interest is the way that popular culture, which initially was used to drive a wedge between American and Soviet peoples, eventually became an unexpected force of rapprochement in the 1970s and 1980s. Throughout the seminar students will consider how race, class, and gender shape cultural understandings of identity. This course is equivalent to HIST 0450. 3 hrs. sem.

CMP HIS SOC

Spring 2013

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IGST 0476 - Disability in a Global Context      

Disability in a Global Context
Approximately 650 million people currently live with a disability, making this population the largest minority in the world. In this seminar we will explore the meaning of disability (as a condition) as well as the lived experience of people with disabilities in global, continental, and national contexts. Using an integrated perspective that applies knowledge about disability from diverse disciplines and methodologies, we will assess core models of disability: social, medical, linguistic, historical, political, institutional, educational, technological, attitudinal, and economic. Using the term disability within an analytical framework, we will examine the meaning of such fundamental concepts as identity, community, citizenship, and "normalcy." (Approval required) 3 hrs. sem.

CMP

Spring 2015

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Published Work

Signs of Resistance: American Deaf Cultural History, 1900–World War II http://www.nyupress.org

Women and Deafness: Double Visions (co-edited with Brenda Jo Brueggemann) http://gupress.gallaudet.edu

Unspeakable: The Story of Junius Wilson (co-authored with Hannah Joyner) http://uncpress.unc.edu

Editor-in-chief of The Encyclopedia of American Disability History http://factsonfile.infobasepublishing.com

Co-edited the anthology At the Intersections: Deaf and Disability Studies: Interdisciplinary Perspectives (with Alison Kafer)