Middlebury

 

Orion Lewis

Visiting Assistant Professor of Political Science

Email: 
Phone: work802.443.5479
Office Hours: Monday 9:00 - 12:00 and by appointment
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Courses

Courses offered in the past four years.
indicates offered in the current term
indicates offered in the upcoming term[s]

IGST 0483 / PSCI 0483 - Rise of Asia and U.S. Policy      

The Rise of Asia and US Policy
In this course we will study what is arguably the most important strategic development of the 21st century: how the rise of Asia presents security challenges to the region and the United States. Drawing from international relations scholarship, the course will focus on foreign policy challenges and potential responses. These challenges include both traditional security and nontraditional areas such as water and the environment. We will integrate the analysis of these issues in South, East, and Southeast Asia with study of the policy process, in part through simulations and role-playing exercises. This course is equivalent to PSCI 0483. 3 hrs. sem.

AAL CMP SOC

Fall 2013, Fall 2014

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IGST 0702 - EUS Senior Thesis      

European Studies Senior Thesis
(Approval Required)

Winter 2014, Spring 2014, Spring 2015

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IGST 0704 - EAS Senior Thesis      

Latin American Studies Senior Thesis
(Approval Required)

Winter 2014, Spring 2014, Spring 2015

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IPEC 0500 - Independent Project      

Independent Project
(Approval Required)

Fall 2012, Fall 2013, Winter 2014, Spring 2014, Fall 2014, Spring 2015

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IPEC 0700 - Intl.Pol.&Economics SR. Thesis      

Senior Thesis
(Approval Required)

Winter 2012, Spring 2012, Winter 2013, Spring 2013, Fall 2013, Winter 2014, Spring 2014, Fall 2014, Spring 2015

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PSCI 0103 - Intro to Comparative Politics      

Introduction to Comparative Politics
This course offers an introduction to the comparative study of political systems and to the logic of comparative inquiry. How are different political systems created and organized? How and why do they change? Why are some democratic and others authoritarian? Why are some rich and others poor? Other topics covered in this course include nationalism and political ideologies, forms of representation, the relationship between state institutions and civil society, and globalization. The goal in this course is to use comparative methods to analyze questions of state institutions -- how they arise, change, and generate different economic, social, and political outcome. 3 hrs. lect./disc. (Comparative Politics)

CMP SOC

Fall 2013

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PSCI 0278 - Politics of Insurgency      

The Politics of Insurgency
In this course we will survey the full range of insurgencies, from violent civil wars and classic insurgencies to strategically nonviolent movements. Drawing from the international relations and comparative politics literatures, this class will work to analyze an array of research questions on why insurgencies begin, endure, and terminate. We will also consider the efficacy of different resistance methods, the role of the international community, and the impact of insurgency on post-conflict outcomes. Students will synthesize course content in a professional research analysis that provides policy prescriptions for ongoing conflicts throughout the world. (PSCI 0103 or 0109) 3 hrs. lect. (Comparative Politics)/

CMP SOC

Spring 2012, Spring 2013, Spring 2014

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PSCI 0290 - Social Unrest in Asia      

Social Unrest in Asia
In this course we will compare protest, social mobilization, and contentious politics across Asia. While some have argued that "Asian values" cause harmonious and stable political systems, we will start from the premise that contentious politics in the region reflect the same dynamics seen elsewhere throughout history. However, as with all countries, the specific institutional and cultural context often shapes particular forms of contention. Empirically, we will focus on key regions including East and Southeast Asia as well as the domestic and international dimensions of activism. (PSCI 0103 or PSCI 0109) 3 hrs. lect. (Comparative Politics)

AAL CMP SOC

Spring 2013

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PSCI 0292 - Political Communication      

Political Communication
How are media and communications technology re-shaping politics? From a global comparative perspective—ranging from the United States to the Middle East and to Asia—this course will survey the historical development of communications, the role of media in shaping public opinion and behavior, the impact of new media, and the rise of transnational satellite TV. Conceptually, the course will assess the importance of communications for understanding authoritarianism, democracy, and foreign policy. We will develop general comparative frameworks for understanding the growing importance of communications in the information age, while clarifying the limitations of media for shaping polities. (This course is not open to students who have taken PSCI 0413) 3 hrs. lect. (Comparative Politics)/

AAL CMP SOC

Fall 2014

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PSCI 0380 - Int'l Relations of East Asia      

International Relations of East Asia
Although the power of East Asian states makes the region central to US foreign policy and the study of international politics in general, most international relations theorists rely heavily upon European history and case studies. In this course, we will explore IR theory and East Asian politics in an attempt to enrich both. We will review major events in East Asia, explore advanced theoretical readings and their applications to the region, and finally, use these theories to understand issues like energy security, territorial disputes, and prospects for democratic development. (PSCI 0109) (PSCI 0109 or PSCI 0201) 3 hrs. lect/disc. (International Relations and Foreign Policy)/

AAL SOC

Fall 2012

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PSCI 0413 - Mass Media&Democratization      

Media and Democratization
The news media can either support or undermine non-democratic regimes. This tension between media liberalization and political control is well-captured in Yuezhi Zhao’s book Communication in China: Political Economy, Power and Conflict, which will serve as a thematic anchor for this course. We will examine the impact of print, television, and new media on democratization in Eastern Europe, East Asia, and Africa, while drawing from the literature on democratic transitions and the communications literature on media effects. The goal of the course is to understand the causes of press freedom, its role in the erosion of state control, and its implications for the survival of authoritarian regimes. 3 hrs. sem. (Comparative Politics)/

CMP SOC

Fall 2012, Spring 2014

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PSCI 0500 - Independent Project      

Independent Projects
A program of independent work designed to meet the individual needs of advanced students. (Approval required)

Fall 2011, Fall 2012, Spring 2013, Fall 2013, Spring 2014, Fall 2014, Spring 2015

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PSCI 0700 - Honors Thesis      

Honors Thesis
(Approval required)

Fall 2011, Winter 2012, Spring 2012, Fall 2012, Winter 2013, Spring 2013, Fall 2013, Winter 2014, Spring 2014, Fall 2014, Spring 2015

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