Middlebury

 

Robert S. Schine

Silberman Professor of Jewish Studies

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Phone: work802.443.5151
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Professor Schine teaches courses in Classical Hebrew and in the history of Jewish thought, especially in the modern period from the Enlightenment on, and on the ideas and history of Zionism.

His scholarship is in the area of German-Jewish thought and culture.  He is the author of Jewish Thought Adrift: Max Wiener 1882-1950 (1992) and of Hermann Cohen on Spinoza, an annotated translation, with introduction, of Cohen’s 1915 monograph, “Spinoza on State and Religion, Judaism and Christianity” (in press, Shalem Press, Jerusalem).  He is also co-editor, with Samuel Moyn, of an anthology of translations, Hermann Cohen: Judaism and Neo-Kantian Philosophy (forthcoming, Brandeis/University Press of New England). In addition, he has written on the early history of Jewish life in Vermont: " 'Members of this Book': The Pinkas of Vermont's First Jewish Congregation," in The American Jewish Archives Journal (2008).

 

Courses

Courses offered in the past four years.
indicates offered in the current term
indicates offered in the upcoming term[s]

CLAS 0500 - Independent Study      

Independent Study
(Approval required)

Fall 2010, Winter 2011, Spring 2011, Fall 2013, Spring 2014, Fall 2014, Spring 2015

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CLAS 0505 - Ind Senior Project      

(Approval Required)

Fall 2010, Winter 2011, Spring 2011, Fall 2013, Spring 2014, Fall 2014, Spring 2015

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CLAS 0700 - Sr Essay Classics/Cy      

Senior Essay for Classics/Classical Studies Majors
(Approval required)

Fall 2010, Winter 2011, Spring 2011, Fall 2013, Spring 2014, Fall 2014, Spring 2015

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FYSE 1384 - Reading the Book of Job      

Reading the Book of Job
Why do the innocent suffer? Why do we want to believe that the world is “fair” and “ordered”? The Book of Job asked these questions millennia ago. Framed by a prose tale about the “patience of Job,” with a happy ending, the core of the book is a debate in poetry, between an impatient Job and his “friends”, with no satisfactory ending at all. We will study the book itself and its retellings and interpretations through novels, poetry, drama, philosophy and art, including works by Kafka, Camus, William Blake, Shakespeare, Voltaire, Kant, and Robert Frost. 3 hrs. sem.

CW PHL

Fall 2012, Fall 2013

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HEBR 0101 - Beginning Classical Hebrew I      

Beginning Classical Hebrew I
The goal of the Hebrew sequence is to develop students' ability to read the Jewish Bible (Old Testament) and later Hebrew literature. An introduction to classical Hebrew, this course presupposes nothing, begins with mastery of the Hebrew alphabet, and leads students through the noun and the basic structure of the Hebrew verbal system. By the end of the course, students will be reading and translating brief biblical narratives with the use of a lexicon.

LNG

Winter 2013, Fall 2014

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HEBR 0102 - Beginning Classical Hebrew II      

Beginning Classical Hebrew II
This course continues the introductory sequence (HEBR 0101) offered in Winter Term and will conclude by reading a single biblical text such as Jonah or Ruth in its entirety. Selections of biblical poetry and narrative will be read throughout the semester. 3 hrs. lect.

LNG

Spring 2013

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HEBR 0500 - Independent Study      

Independent Study
Approval required.

Fall 2013, Fall 2014

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RELI 0160 - The Jewish Tradition      

The Jewish Tradition WT
An introductory course on central themes and problems in Judaism and the life of "the People of the Book," with the goal of understanding contemporary ideas, institutions, and problems of Jewish life and thought in historical perspective. Topics will include: the formative ideas in Jewish thought monotheism, commandment, Torah; liturgy, ritual, and rhythm of Jewish life; theory and practice of the commandments; the tension between textual tradition and innovation; the origins and contemporary denominations of Judaism (Reform, Conservative, Reconstructionist, and Orthodox); Zionism and the meaning of Israel. 2 hrs. lect., 1 hr. disc.

EUR PHL

Spring 2011, Fall 2012

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RELI 0161 - Making of Modern Jewish Life      

The Making of Modern Jewish Life
Jewish life in the 21st century is radically transformed from a century ago. We will explore these transformations through the thinkers, movements, and events that have shaped Jewish life in our day: the emergence of religious denominations in Europe and North America (Reform, Conservative, Orthodox, Reconstructionist), the revival of Kabbalah in our times, the Holocaust as a crisis in religious thought, the eruption of Zionism and founding of the State of Israel, the transformations brought about by the changing role of women, and finally, post-denominationalism and "the un-Jewish Jew." 3 hrs. lect.

PHL

Fall 2013

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RELI 0165 - Cultures of the Jews      

Cultures of the Jews
Judaism is more than a religion, but how? We will seek to answer this question by studying Jewish life as a global phenomenon encompassing varieties in custom, gender roles, family and communal structure, language, music, literature, and art. We will range across the major divisions of Jewish culture in Europe (Ashkenazic and Sephardic), to Jewish life in the Middle East, and follow the diffusion of these cultures as far as China and India. Readings include translations from a variety of languages (Hebrew, Yiddish, and Ladino), and genres including memoir, ethnography, poetry, philosophy, and scripture. 3 hrs. lect/disc.

CMP PHL

Fall 2014

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RELI 0280 - Hebrew Bible /Old Testament      

Studies in Hebrew Bible/Old Testament WT
Studies in the Hebrew Bible/Old Testament is an introductory course that focuses on a major religious text in the Western tradition. We will closely read diverse selections from the Pentateuch, the Prophets, and the Writings in English translation; no familiarity with the Bible or background is presumed. Special attention will be paid to matters of genre and methods of modern biblical scholarship, as well as Jewish and Christian traditions of interpretation. 2 hrs. lect., 1 hr. disc.

Note: Students with sufficient knowledge of Hebrew who would like to study selections from relevant texts in the original should register for RELI 0280B. (HEBR 0102, HEBM 0103, or waiver)/

HIS PHL

Fall 2010

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RELI 0362 - Zionism: Ideas and Realities      

Zionism: Ideas and Realities WT
In this course, we study the emergence of Zionism as a Jewish national movement in the 19th century, and follow its proponents and critics into the present debate on the nature of the modern State of Israel. Topics will include: Zionism as a secular rebellion against tradition; Zionism as a messianic movement; the vision of a "bi-national state"; the Palestinian critique of Zionism; "Postzionism" and the controversy over the "New Historians." Materials include readings from the major voices in the history of Zionism and their critics, as well as modern scholarship, and Israeli and Palestinian literature. (Approval Required) 3 hrs. sem.

AAL HIS PHL

Spring 2013

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RELI 0500 - Independent Research      

Independent Research
(Approval Required)

Fall 2010, Winter 2011, Spring 2011, Winter 2013, Spring 2013, Fall 2013, Winter 2014, Spring 2014, Fall 2014, Spring 2015

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RELI 0601 - Senior Project in Religion      

Senior Project
(Approval Required)

Fall 2010, Winter 2011, Spring 2011

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RELI 0700 - Senior Project in Religion      

Senior Project
(Approval Required)

Fall 2010, Winter 2011, Spring 2011, Winter 2013, Spring 2013, Winter 2014, Spring 2014, Fall 2014, Spring 2015

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RELI 0701 - Senior Thesis in Religion      

Senior Research for Honors Candidates
Approval required

Winter 2013, Spring 2013, Fall 2013, Winter 2014, Spring 2014, Fall 2014, Spring 2015

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RELI 1024 / PHIL 1024 - Jewish Thinkers/Big Questions      

Jewish Thinkers on Big Questions
What is atonement? How do we human beings confront our own flaws and mistakes? How do we respond to suffering? What is compassion for the “Other”? If there is revelation, can we know what it is? What is divine law? What is commandment? How do Jewish answers to these questions differ from Christian ones? These are perennial, looming questions in Jewish thought, and we will probe them with the help of texts from Martin Buber, Franz Rosenzweig, Hermann Cohen, and Emmanuel Levinas, as well as the great medieval thinker Maimonides.

PHL WTR

Winter 2011

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