Middlebury

 

Kimery Levering

Visiting Assistant Professor of Psychology

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Phone: work802.443.5210
Office Hours: Tuesdays, 9:30-10:30; Wednesdays, 2:45-3:45
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Kimery Levering is a Visiting Assistant Professor at Middlebury College. She received her BA (2005) from The College of New Jersey and her MS (2009) and PhD (2012) from Binghamton University. Her research interests are focused better understanding how people learn concepts. In particular, she is interested in the role that contrast plays in the development of category representations. For example, to what extent does a learner develop a different representation of dog if the concept is learned alongside examples of cats versus examples of giraffes? A substantial portion of her work involves interpreting behavioral phenomena in terms of specific predictions made by category learning models.

 

Courses

Courses offered in the past four years.
indicates offered in the current term
indicates offered in the upcoming term[s]

PSYC 0105 - Introduction To Psychology      

Introduction to Psychology
This course will provide a general introduction to the discipline field of psychology. The most central and important theories, concepts, findings, controversies, and applications in the following areas will be considered: biological bases of behavior, learning, perception, thinking, development, personality, abnormality disorders, and social behavior. (Open to Juniors and Seniors by waiver only) 3 hrs lect./1 hr. disc.

SOC

Fall 2012, Fall 2013, Spring 2014

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PSYC 0201 - Psychological Statistics      

Psychological Statistics
This course will examine statistical methods used in the behavioral and biological sciences. Students will learn the logic underlying statistical analysis, focusing primarily on inferential techniques. They also will become familiar with the application and interpretation of statistics in psychological empirical research, including the use of computer software for conducting and interpreting statistical tests analysis. (PSYC 0105; Fall: open to psychology and neuroscience majors and undeclared majors, others by waiver; Spring: open to psychology and neuroscience majors; others by waiver. Not open to students who have taken MATH 0116 or ECON 0210) 3 hrs. lect./1.5 hr. lab

DED

Fall 2012, Fall 2013

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PSYC 0305 / NSCI 0305 - Cognitive Psychology      

Cognitive Psychology
Questions about the nature of the mind, thinking, and knowledge have a long and rich history in the field of psychology. This course will examine the theoretical perspectives and empirically documented phenomena that inform our current understanding of cognition. Lectures, discussions, demonstrations, and experiments will form the basis for our explorations of cognition in this class. Topics to be considered include attention, perception, memory, knowledge, problem solving, and decision making. (PSYC 0105; PSYC 0201 or MATH 0116 or ECON 0210 previously or concurrently; PSYC 0202 recommended; not open to first-year students; open to psychology and neuroscience majors; others by waiver) 3 hrs. lect./1.5 hrs. lab.

SCI

Spring 2013

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PSYC 0350 - Directed Research      

Directed Research in Psychology
Directed research provides opportunities for advanced students to become familiar with and participate in ongoing research projects under the direction of a faculty member. The student will first read background literature on the content area to be investigated and experimental methodologies to be used. Procedures involved in conducting psychological research will then be learned through firsthand experience. Potential activities include the design of research and the defining of conceptual variables and the gathering, analyzing, and interpretation of data. Finally, students will learn how to write technical articles in psychology by preparing a paper describing the project, using APA style. (Approval required; not open to first-year students) 3 hrs. lect.

Winter 2013, Spring 2013, Winter 2014, Spring 2014, Spring 2015

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PSYC 0419 / NSCI 0419 - Concepts: The Stuff of Thought      

Concepts: The Stuff of Thought
Concepts allow us to think--they organize and provide meaning to our perceptions, memories, knowledge, and social interactions. In this seminar we will employ a multidisciplinary approach to explore how concepts are represented psychologically and biologically, how they develop over time, and how they allow us to understand and interact with the physical and social world around us. While the majority of course material will come from cognitive psychology, topics will be taken from philosophy, neuroscience, computer science, developmental psychology, and social psychology. (PSYC 0105; open to junior and senior psychology and neuroscience majors only) 3 hrs. sem.

Spring 2013

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PSYC 0500 - Advanced Research      

Advanced Research
A program of research arranged to meet the needs of advanced students majoring in psychology. (Approval required)

Winter 2013, Spring 2013, Winter 2014, Spring 2014, Spring 2015

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PSYC 0700 - Senior Research      

Senior Research
A program of research arranged to meet the needs of advanced senior majors in psychology. (PSYC 0201 and PSYC 0202; Approval required)

Spring 2013, Spring 2014, Spring 2015

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PSYC 0701 - Senior Thesis Proposal      

Senior Thesis Proposal
Students hoping to be considered as candidates for departmental honors must enroll in PSYC 0701 under the sponsorship of a department faculty member and submit a formal, written research proposal to the department by 5 p.m. on the Wednesday during the final week of fall classes in their senior year. If the proposal is approved, the student will enroll in PSYC 0702 during the winter term and PSYC 0703 during the spring term of their senior year. (Feb graduates should consult with their advisors about the appropriate semester in which to begin a thesis.) (PSYC 0201 and PSYC 0202; Approval required)

Winter 2013, Spring 2013, Winter 2014, Spring 2014, Spring 2015

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PSYC 0702 - Senior Thesis Second Semester      

Senior Thesis Second Semester
Students whose honors thesis proposal (PSYC 0701) has been approved will collect, analyze, and interpret their data. This is the second semester of the 3-semester senior thesis. (PSYC 0201, PSYC 0202, and PSYC 0701; Approval required)

Winter 2013, Spring 2013, Winter 2014, Spring 2014, Spring 2015

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PSYC 0703 - Senior Thesis      

Senior Thesis*
This is the third and final semester of the senior thesis. Students will finish analyzing, and interpreting their data. This process culminates in a written thesis to be submitted by 5 p.m. on the Monday BEFORE the final week of spring classes, a presentation, and an oral defense. The decision about awarding departmental honors will be made after the student submits the thesis. (PSYC 0201, PSYC 0202, and PSYC 0702; Approval required)

Winter 2013, Spring 2013, Winter 2014, Spring 2014, Spring 2015

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Publications

Levering, K.R. & Kurtz, K.J. (under review). Contrast-based ideals: The internal structure of a category depends on the contrast categories during learning.

Kurtz, K. J., Levering, K.R., Romero, J., Stanton, R. D., & Morris, S. N. (2012). Human Learning of Elemental Category Structures: Revising the Classic Result of Shepard, Hovland, and Jenkins (1961). Journal of Experimental Psychology: Learning, Memory, & Cognition. Published Online First: 16 July 2012. doi:10.1037/a0029178.

Levering, K. R. & Kurtz, K. J. (2009). Generalization in higher-order cognition: Categorization and analogy as bridges to stored knowledge. In MT Banich & DC Cavendish (Eds.), Generalization of Knowledge: Multidisciplinary perspectives. (pp. 175-196). Los Angeles, CA.

Papers in Preparation

Levering, K.R. & Kurtz, K.J. (in preparation). Observational versus classification in supervised category learning (it’s better not to guess).

Levering, K.R. & Kurtz, K.J. (in preparation). Toward a new benchmark for models of category learning.

Levering, K.R. & Kurtz, K. J. (in preparation). The six types problem: Beyond binary feature dimensions.

Kurtz, K. J. & Levering, K. R. (in preparation). Inference learning without a label.

Kurtz, K. J. & Levering, K. R. (in preparation). Mode shifts during category learning.

Kurtz, K.J., Blazej, L.J., Levering, K.R., & Benjamin, J. (in preparation). Substituting for similarity: The case for a taxonomic advantage.