COVID-19: Essential Information

Clinton Cave

Assistant Professor of Neuroscience

 
 work(802) 443-5450
 Fall 2021: Thursday & Friday 11am-12:30pm and by appointment
 McCardell Bicen Hall 351

Clinton Cave is an Assistant Professor of Neuroscience at Middlebury College. He arrived at Middlebury in 2018 after completing his Ph.D. in Neuroscience and post-doctoral fellowship at Johns Hopkins University. Clinton conducted post-baccalaureate research at the University of Colorado and holds a B.A. in Psychology (with a concentration in Behavioral Neuroscience) from Yale University.

Research in the Cave lab focuses on defining the molecular mechanisms regulating progenitor patterning, neurogenesis, gliogenesis, and cell fate decisions. During embryonic development, the nervous system must balance the rapid proliferation and maintenance of progenitors while sequentially populating a diverse array of neurons and glia. Following neural tube closure, dividing progenitors are patterned by opposing gradients of morphogens secreted along the dorsal-ventral (DV) axis. This leads to the patterning of progenitors into discrete domains across the DV axis, each adopting specific transcriptional profiles. These progenitors subsequently produce distinct post-mitotic neuronal subtypes followed by astrocytes and oligodendrocytes. Experimentally, we investigate these processes with a combination of genetic, biochemical, and histological approaches using in-vivo and in-vitro models of neurodevelopment.

Clinton Cave, PhD-Scientist on the Subway-Biography

 

Courses

Course List: 

Courses offered in the past four years.
indicates offered in the current term
indicates offered in the upcoming term[s]

NSCI 0200 - Pioneers of the Brain      

Pioneers of the Brain
The field of neuroscience emerged from the collective efforts of anatomists, physiologists, chemists, and psychologists all striving to understand the immense complexity of the nervous system. In this course we will investigate a selection of pioneering researchers in the history of neuroscience, focusing especially from the mid-19th century to the present day. Utilizing a historical framework, we will examine their hypotheses, methodologies, conclusions, and how their work was received (or derided) by contemporaries. Topics will range from molecular mechanisms of neuronal function to animal behavior. (BIOL 0145 or PSYC 0105 or CHEM 0103, or equivalent; open to non-seniors only, others by approval) 3 hrs. lect. SCI

Fall 2019, Spring 2020

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NSCI 0251 - Cellular/MolecularNeuroscience      

Fundamentals of Cellular and Molecular Neuroscience
Neurons are the building blocks of complex circuits that underlie perception and behavior. In this course we will examine the molecular and cellular basis of neuron structure and function. The topics include the molecular and cellular basis of action potential propagation, the molecular biology of synaptic transmission, the molecular mechanisms of synaptic plasticity, and the molecular mechanisms of sensory transduction. Laboratory exercises will train students in commonly used neurobiology techniques and engage students in novel investigations. (BIOL 0145 (Note: AP credit in biology cannot be used to satisfy this requirement) Open to neuroscience majors, nonmajors by waiver; Not open to seniors). 3 hrs. lect./3 hrs. lab. SCI

Spring 2020

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NSCI 0252 - Behavioral Neuroscience      

Fundamentals of Behavioral Neuroscience
Behavioral neuroscience is an interdisciplinary field that combines approaches and knowledge from psychology, biology, and chemistry to further our understanding of human and non-human animal behavior. In this course, you will study the interrelationships among elements of the nervous systems, co-functioning bodily systems, and behavioral output such as emotions, sex, memory, consciousness, sleep, and language. You will be given an opportunity to apply your knowledge from NSCI 0251 of the nervous system at the micro and macro levels and will revisit the basic concepts of behavioral genetics and psychopharmacology. This cumulative knowledge base will serve as your foundation for advanced study of neural systems and their relative roles in progressively more complex behaviors such as basic reflexes, motivation, rational thought, neural disorders, and therapeutic efficacy. (PSYC 0105 and NSCI 0251; open to NSCI majors only, others by approval) 3 hrs. lect./3 hrs. lab. SCI

Fall 2018, Spring 2019, Fall 2020, Fall 2021

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NSCI 0345 - Neurodevelopment      

Neurodevelopment
The generation of the nervous system is an intricate, stepwise process involving the coordinated action of progenitor cells, organizing centers, and signaling pathways. Drawing examples from vertebrate and invertebrate neurodevelopment, we will examine the cellular and molecular mechanisms involved in generating a healthy, functioning nervous system. Topics will range from early embryonic events (neural induction, patterning) through mid-gestation (neurogenesis, gliogenesis) and later stage processes (axon guidance, synaptogenesis). Students will also gain an appreciation for the emerging role of activity-dependent plasticity in neurodevelopment and how developmental processes become compromised in disease. (NSCI 251; open to NSCI majors only, others by approval) 3 hrs. lect. SCI

Spring 2019, Fall 2019, Fall 2020, Fall 2021

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NSCI 0500 - Independent Research      

Independent Research
Students enrolled in NSCI 0500 complete individual research projects involving laboratory or extensive library study on a topic chosen by the student and approved in advance by a NSCI faculty advisor. This course is not open to seniors; seniors should enroll in NSCI 0700. (Approval required)

Fall 2018, Winter 2019, Spring 2019, Fall 2019, Winter 2020, Spring 2020, Fall 2020, Winter 2021, Spring 2021, Fall 2021, Winter 2022, Spring 2022

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NSCI 0700 - Senior Research      

Senior Research
This course is for senior NSCI majors who plan to conduct one or more semesters of independent research, or who plan to complete preparatory work toward a senior thesis, such as researching and writing a thesis proposal as well as, if appropriate, collecting data that will form the basis for a senior thesis. Senior NSCI majors who plan to complete a senior thesis should register initially for NSCI 0700. Additional requirements may include participation in weekly meetings with advisors and/or lab groups and attending neuroscience seminars. (Approval required, open to seniors only)

Fall 2018, Winter 2019, Spring 2019, Fall 2019, Winter 2020, Spring 2020, Fall 2020, Winter 2021, Spring 2021, Fall 2021, Winter 2022, Spring 2022

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NSCI 0701 - Senior Thesis      

Senior Thesis
Senior NSCI majors who have completed one or more terms of NSCI 0700, who have a GPA of 3.3 in their major courses, and who plan to complete a senior thesis should register for NSCI 0701 for the final semester of the senior thesis process. Students enrolled in NSCI 0701 write a thesis, give a public presentation of their research, and present an oral defense of the thesis before a committee of at least two Neuroscience faculty members. Faculty may recommend High honors in Neuroscience after considering the quality of these components of a student’s thesis and the student’s GPA in major courses. Additional requirements may include participation in weekly meetings with advisors and/or lab groups and attending neuroscience seminars. (NSCI 0700, Approval required)

Fall 2018, Winter 2019, Spring 2019, Fall 2019, Winter 2020, Spring 2020, Fall 2020, Winter 2021, Spring 2021, Fall 2021, Winter 2022, Spring 2022

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Program in Neuroscience

McCardell Bicentennial Hall
276 Bicentennial Way
Middlebury College
Middlebury, VT 05753