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PHIL0151A-F14

CRN: 91036

Intro Phil: Mortal Question

Introduction to Philosophy: Mortal Questions
This course is an issue-based introduction to core philosophical questions such as the following: What is the nature of reality, and can we ever know it? What is the relation between mind and body, and could computers ever think? What is the nature of the self? Do humans have free will? Is there such a thing as an objective right and wrong? Can we say God exists in the face of all the evil in the world? Readings will be drawn from both traditional philosophers (e.g., Descartes, Hume, Locke, Russell) and contemporary reflections on the issues (e.g., Nagel, Searle, Williams). Cannot be taken by students with credit for PHIL 0150. 3 hrs. lect./1 hr. disc.

PHIL0151Y-F14

CRN: 91617

Intro Phil: Mortal Question
Discussion

Introduction to Philosophy: Mortal Questions
This course is an issue-based introduction to core philosophical questions such as the following: What is the nature of reality, and can we ever know it? What is the relation between mind and body, and could computers ever think? What is the nature of the self? Do humans have free will? Is there such a thing as an objective right and wrong? Can we say God exists in the face of all the evil in the world? Readings will be drawn from both traditional philosophers (e.g., Descartes, Hume, Locke, Russell) and contemporary reflections on the issues (e.g., Nagel, Searle, Williams). Cannot be taken by students with credit for PHIL 0150. 3 hrs. lect./1 hr. disc.

PHIL0151Z-F14

CRN: 91618

Intro Phil: Mortal Question
Discussion

Introduction to Philosophy: Mortal Questions
This course is an issue-based introduction to core philosophical questions such as the following: What is the nature of reality, and can we ever know it? What is the relation between mind and body, and could computers ever think? What is the nature of the self? Do humans have free will? Is there such a thing as an objective right and wrong? Can we say God exists in the face of all the evil in the world? Readings will be drawn from both traditional philosophers (e.g., Descartes, Hume, Locke, Russell) and contemporary reflections on the issues (e.g., Nagel, Searle, Williams). Cannot be taken by students with credit for PHIL 0150. 3 hrs. lect./1 hr. disc.

PHIL0180A-F14

CRN: 91327

Introduction to Modern Logic

Introduction to Modern Logic
Logic is concerned with good reasoning; as such, it stands at the core of the liberal arts. In this course we will develop our reasoning skills by identifying and analyzing arguments found in philosophical, legal, and other texts, and also by formulating our own arguments. We will use the formal techniques of modern propositional and predicate logic to codify and test various reasoning strategies and specific arguments. No prior knowledge of logic, formal mathematics, or computer science is presupposed in this course, which does not count towards the PHL distribution requirement but instead towards the deductive reasoning requirement. PHIL 0180 is not open to students who have already taken PHIL 0280/LNGT0280. 3 hrs. lect./1 hr. disc.

PHIL0180X-F14

Cross-Listed As:
PHIL0280X-F14 LNGT0280X-F14

CRN: 91328

Introduction to Modern Logic
Discussion

Introduction to Modern Logic
Logic is concerned with good reasoning; as such, it stands at the core of the liberal arts. In this course we will develop our reasoning skills by identifying and analyzing arguments found in philosophical, legal, and other texts, and also by formulating our own arguments. We will use the formal techniques of modern propositional and predicate logic to codify and test various reasoning strategies and specific arguments. No prior knowledge of logic, formal mathematics, or computer science is presupposed in this course, which does not count towards the PHL distribution requirement but instead towards the deductive reasoning requirement. PHIL 0180 is not open to students who have already taken PHIL 0280/LNGT0280. 3 hrs. lect./1 hr. disc.

PHIL0180Y-F14

Cross-Listed As:
PHIL0280Y-F14 LNGT0280Y-F14

CRN: 91329

Introduction to Modern Logic
Discussion

Introduction to Modern Logic
Logic is concerned with good reasoning; as such, it stands at the core of the liberal arts. In this course we will develop our reasoning skills by identifying and analyzing arguments found in philosophical, legal, and other texts, and also by formulating our own arguments. We will use the formal techniques of modern propositional and predicate logic to codify and test various reasoning strategies and specific arguments. No prior knowledge of logic, formal mathematics, or computer science is presupposed in this course, which does not count towards the PHL distribution requirement but instead towards the deductive reasoning requirement. PHIL 0180 is not open to students who have already taken PHIL 0280/LNGT0280. 3 hrs. lect./1 hr. disc.

PHIL0180Z-F14

Cross-Listed As:
PHIL0280Z-F14 LNGT0280Z-F14

CRN: 91330

Introduction to Modern Logic
Discussion

Introduction to Modern Logic
Logic is concerned with good reasoning; as such, it stands at the core of the liberal arts. In this course we will develop our reasoning skills by identifying and analyzing arguments found in philosophical, legal, and other texts, and also by formulating our own arguments. We will use the formal techniques of modern propositional and predicate logic to codify and test various reasoning strategies and specific arguments. No prior knowledge of logic, formal mathematics, or computer science is presupposed in this course, which does not count towards the PHL distribution requirement but instead towards the deductive reasoning requirement. PHIL 0180 is not open to students who have already taken PHIL 0280/LNGT0280. 3 hrs. lect./1 hr. disc.

PHIL0201A-F14

CRN: 92243

Ancient Greek Philosophy

Ancient Greek Philosophy
This class introduces students to the range and power of Greek thought, which initiated the Western philosophical tradition. We will begin by exploring the origins of philosophy as found in myth (primarily Hesiod) and in the highly original speculation of the Pre-Socratic thinkers (such as Heraclitus and Parmenides). We will then focus on Socrates, Plato, and Aristotle, examining their transformations of these earlier traditions and their own divergent approaches to ethics and education. We will also consider the influences of Greek philosophy on later thought. 3 hrs. lect.

PHIL0206A-F14

CRN: 90040

Contemporary Moral Issues

Contemporary Moral Issues
We will examine a selection of pressing moral problems of our day, seeking to understand the substance of the issues and learning how moral arguments work. We will focus on developing our analytical skills, which we can then use to present and criticize arguments on difficult moral issues. Selected topics may include world poverty, animal rights, abortion, euthanasia, human rights, just and unjust wars, capital punishment, and racial and gender issues. You will be encouraged to question your own beliefs on these issues, and in the process to explore the limit and extent to which ethical theory can play a role in everyday ethical decision making. 2 hrs.lect./1 hr. disc.

PHIL0206X-F14

CRN: 90591

Contemporary Moral Issues
Discussion

Contemporary Moral Issues
We will examine a selection of pressing moral problems of our day, seeking to understand the substance of the issues and learning how moral arguments work. We will focus on developing our analytical skills, which we can then use to present and criticize arguments on difficult moral issues. Selected topics may include world poverty, animal rights, abortion, euthanasia, human rights, just and unjust wars, capital punishment, and racial and gender issues. You will be encouraged to question your own beliefs on these issues, and in the process to explore the limit and extent to which ethical theory can play a role in everyday ethical decision making. 2 hrs.lect./1 hr. disc.

PHIL0206Y-F14

CRN: 90592

Contemporary Moral Issues
Discussion

Contemporary Moral Issues
We will examine a selection of pressing moral problems of our day, seeking to understand the substance of the issues and learning how moral arguments work. We will focus on developing our analytical skills, which we can then use to present and criticize arguments on difficult moral issues. Selected topics may include world poverty, animal rights, abortion, euthanasia, human rights, just and unjust wars, capital punishment, and racial and gender issues. You will be encouraged to question your own beliefs on these issues, and in the process to explore the limit and extent to which ethical theory can play a role in everyday ethical decision making. 2 hrs.lect./1 hr. disc.

PHIL0206Z-F14

CRN: 90593

Contemporary Moral Issues
Discussion

Contemporary Moral Issues
We will examine a selection of pressing moral problems of our day, seeking to understand the substance of the issues and learning how moral arguments work. We will focus on developing our analytical skills, which we can then use to present and criticize arguments on difficult moral issues. Selected topics may include world poverty, animal rights, abortion, euthanasia, human rights, just and unjust wars, capital punishment, and racial and gender issues. You will be encouraged to question your own beliefs on these issues, and in the process to explore the limit and extent to which ethical theory can play a role in everyday ethical decision making. 2 hrs.lect./1 hr. disc.

PHIL0208A-F14

CRN: 92244

Morality & War

Morality & War
Are there any Just Wars? What would make a war a Just War? In the first part of this course we will investigate the historical origins of Just War Theory. In the second part, we will analyze contemporary moral perspectives on whether war can be morally justified and if so, what actions in war are morally justified or prohibited. In the final part, we will read articles concerning war and humanitarian intervention and on what actions, e.g. punishment, are morally permissible or demanded after war. Authors will include Augustine, Grotius, Nagel, Walzer, Luban. 3 hrs. lect.

PHIL0209A-F14

CRN: 91804

Philosophy of Law

Philosophy of Law
In this course, we shall consider a number of questions concerning law and its institution in human society. What is the origin and authority of law? What is legal obligation? What is the connection between law and coercion, between law and morality, and law and rights? Are laws merely conventions or is there a law of nature? What is the role of law in judicial decisions and the effect of these on the law? We shall also consider and evaluate various theories of law: natural law theories, utilitarian theories, analytical philosophy of law, critical legal studies, feminist theories. 3 hrs. lect.

PHIL0237A-F14

Cross-Listed As:
HIST0237A-F14

CRN: 91345

Chinese Philosophy
Please register via HIST 0237A

Chinese Philosophy
A survey of the dominant philosophies of China, beginning with the establishment of the earliest intellectual orientations, moving to the emergence of the competing schools of the fifth century B.C., and concluding with the modern adoption and adaptation of Marxist thought. Early native alternatives to Confucian philosophy (such as Mohism, Daoism, and Legalism) and later foreign ones (such as Buddhism and Marxism) will be stressed. We will scrutinize individual thinkers with reference to their philosophical contributions and assess the implications of their ideas with reference to their historical contexts and comparative significance. Pre-1800. 3 hrs. lect./disc.

PHIL0255A-F14

CRN: 92442

Kierkegaard/Marx/Nietzsche

Kierkegaard, Marx, and Nietzsche
This course will investigate the works of three of the central philosophical and cultural critics of the nineteenth century. All of these thinkers revolted against the apotheosis of Reason that had occurred in the Enlightenment and that reached its culmination in the works of Hegel. We shall read Kierkegaard's Either/Or, Philosophical Fragments, and Concluding Unscientific Postscript; Marx's early essays criticizing Hegel, the Economic and Philosophic Manuscripts of 1844, and other selections concentrating on Marx's philosophical views, not his economic analysis; and Nietzsche's The Birth of Tragedy, The Use and Abuse of History, Thus Spoke Zarathustra (selections), and The Genealogy of Morals.

PHIL0280A-F14

Cross-Listed As:
LNGT0280A-F14

CRN: 92600

Formal Semantics

Logic and Formal Semantics
Using logical and mathematical tools, formal semantics answers the following questions: Why do sentences mean what they mean? How is reasoning possible? How does language structure our understanding of time, change, knowledge, morality, identity, and possibility? This course is well suited for students interested in computer science, linguistics, logic, mathematics, or philosophy. (PHIL 0180; pending instructor’s approval, PHIL 0180 may be taken contemporaneously with PHIL/LNGT 0280. Students who take these two courses simultaneously will meet for 6 total contact hours.) 2 hrs. lect./1 hr. disc

PHIL0280X-F14

Cross-Listed As:
PHIL0180X-F14 LNGT0280X-F14

CRN: 92608

Formal Semantics
Discussion

Logic and Formal Semantics
Using logical and mathematical tools, formal semantics answers the following questions: Why do sentences mean what they mean? How is reasoning possible? How does language structure our understanding of time, change, knowledge, morality, identity, and possibility? This course is well suited for students interested in computer science, linguistics, logic, mathematics, or philosophy. (PHIL 0180; pending instructor’s approval, PHIL 0180 may be taken contemporaneously with PHIL/LNGT 0280. Students who take these two courses simultaneously will meet for 6 total contact hours.) 2 hrs. lect./1 hr. disc

PHIL0280Y-F14

Cross-Listed As:
PHIL0180Y-F14 LNGT0280Y-F14

CRN: 92609

Formal Semantics
Discussion

Logic and Formal Semantics
Using logical and mathematical tools, formal semantics answers the following questions: Why do sentences mean what they mean? How is reasoning possible? How does language structure our understanding of time, change, knowledge, morality, identity, and possibility? This course is well suited for students interested in computer science, linguistics, logic, mathematics, or philosophy. (PHIL 0180; pending instructor’s approval, PHIL 0180 may be taken contemporaneously with PHIL/LNGT 0280. Students who take these two courses simultaneously will meet for 6 total contact hours.) 2 hrs. lect./1 hr. disc

PHIL0280Z-F14

Cross-Listed As:
PHIL0180Z-F14 LNGT0280Z-F14

CRN: 92610

Formal Semantics
Discussion

Logic and Formal Semantics
Using logical and mathematical tools, formal semantics answers the following questions: Why do sentences mean what they mean? How is reasoning possible? How does language structure our understanding of time, change, knowledge, morality, identity, and possibility? This course is well suited for students interested in computer science, linguistics, logic, mathematics, or philosophy. (PHIL 0180; pending instructor’s approval, PHIL 0180 may be taken contemporaneously with PHIL/LNGT 0280. Students who take these two courses simultaneously will meet for 6 total contact hours.) 2 hrs. lect./1 hr. disc

PHIL0326A-F14

CRN: 92245

Biomedical Ethics

Biomedical Ethics
The field of biomedical ethics explores ethical issues pertaining to both the practice of medicine and the pursuit of biomedical research. In this course we will explore topics central to biomedical ethics at an advanced level. We will consider topics fundamental to the study of life and death, such as reproductive technologies, physician-assisted suicide, and euthanasia, as well as the micro- and macro- issues specific to medicine and biomedical research, such as consent, confidentiality, and paternalism, experimentation with human subjects, and resource allocation. (Previous philosophy course or waiver) 3 hrs. sem.

PHIL0360A-F14

CRN: 92246

Consciousness

Consciousness
In this course we will focus on recent philosophical issues in the study of consciousness: What is the nature of our conscious subjective experience? What is the function of conscious states? Can we find neural correlates of consciousness, and if so, can consciousness simply be reduced to them? If not, how does consciousness relate to the physical? Is there something irreducible about the qualitative features of consciousness (qualia)? Could computers ever be conscious? Are animals conscious? We will consider such questions through the writings of contemporary philosophers and neuroscientists such as Dennett, Chalmers, Churchland, Nagel, Damasio, and Searle. (PHIL 0352 is strongly recommended but not required). 3 hrs. lect.

PHIL0389A-F14

Cross-Listed As:
FREN0389A-F14

CRN: 92681

World of Senses Early Mod FR
Please register via FREN 0389A

Passion and Pain, Love and Lust: The World of the Senses in Early Modern France
In this course we will examine early modern theories of emotion —“passion,” “affect,” and “sentiment”—as they are discussed in philosophy and represented in fiction. Seventeenth and 18th-century philosophers and other thinkers confronted questions that continue to haunt contemporary thinking: What is “feeling”? Does language promote or frustrate the expression of emotion? How do the senses relate to other experiences like cognition, memory, and imagination? We will look at texts that transformed how we talk, think, and feel about “feeling.” Readings include short works by Gournay, Lafayette, Descartes, Élisabeth of Bohemia, Du Plaisir, Bernard, Leibniz, Condillac, Rousseau, Condorcet, and Diderot. (FREN 0221 or equivalent) 3 hrs. sem.

PHIL0434A-F14

Cross-Listed As:
GSFS0434A-F14

CRN: 92247

Feminist Epistemologies

Feminist Epistemologies
In recent years, feminist epistemologies, such as feminist standpoint theories and feminist empiricisms, have been extremely influential in developing social theories of knowledge. They have also served as a crucial intellectual tool for feminist theorists trying to understand the connections between social relations of gender and the production of knowledge and ignorance. In this course we will investigate some of the major themes and challenges of feminist epistemologies and feminist philosophies of science: How is knowledge socially situated? What does it mean to look at knowledge through a gendered lens? How is objective knowledge possible according to feminist epistemologies? We will work to understand the influence of feminist epistemologies in contemporary philosophy. We will also consider how feminist epistemologies have guided research on gendered and raced relations. (Approval required; Open to philosophy and GSFS senior and junior majors. GSFS majors must have previously taken GSFS 0320, or permission.) 3 hrs. sem.

PHIL0500A-F14

CRN: 90160

Resrch In Philosophy

Research in Philosophy
Supervised independent research in philosophy. (Approval requiredl.

PHIL0500B-F14

CRN: 90162

Resrch In Philosophy

Research in Philosophy
Supervised independent research in philosophy. (Approval requiredl.

PHIL0500C-F14

CRN: 90163

Resrch In Philosophy

Research in Philosophy
Supervised independent research in philosophy. (Approval requiredl.

PHIL0500D-F14

CRN: 90876

Resrch In Philosophy

Research in Philosophy
Supervised independent research in philosophy. (Approval requiredl.

PHIL0500E-F14

CRN: 90164

Resrch In Philosophy

Research in Philosophy
Supervised independent research in philosophy. (Approval requiredl.

PHIL0500F-F14

CRN: 90530

Resrch In Philosophy

Research in Philosophy
Supervised independent research in philosophy. (Approval requiredl.

PHIL0500G-F14

CRN: 90535

Resrch In Philosophy

Research in Philosophy
Supervised independent research in philosophy. (Approval requiredl.

PHIL0500H-F14

CRN: 90688

Resrch In Philosophy

Research in Philosophy
Supervised independent research in philosophy. (Approval requiredl.

PHIL0500I-F14

CRN: 91179

Resrch In Philosophy

Research in Philosophy
Supervised independent research in philosophy. (Approval requiredl.

PHIL0700A-F14

CRN: 90167

Senior Thesis

Senior Thesis
(Approval Required)

PHIL0700B-F14

CRN: 90570

Senior Thesis

Senior Thesis
(Approval Required)

PHIL0700C-F14

CRN: 90594

Senior Thesis

Senior Thesis
(Approval Required)

PHIL0700D-F14

CRN: 90877

Senior Thesis

Senior Thesis
(Approval Required)

PHIL0700E-F14

CRN: 90595

Senior Thesis

Senior Thesis
(Approval Required)

PHIL0700F-F14

CRN: 90596

Senior Thesis

Senior Thesis
(Approval Required)

PHIL0700G-F14

CRN: 90689

Senior Thesis

Senior Thesis
(Approval Required)

PHIL0700H-F14

CRN: 90690

Senior Thesis

Senior Thesis
(Approval Required)

PHIL0700I-F14

CRN: 91180

Senior Thesis

Senior Thesis
(Approval Required)

PHIL0700J-F14

CRN: 91332

Senior Thesis

Senior Thesis
(Approval Required)