Sections

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PHIL0150A-S17

CRN: 21537

Intro Phil Tradition
Introduction to the Philosophical Tradition
This course will introduce students to fundamental philosophical issues concerning the nature of reality (metaphysics), the possibility of knowledge (epistemology), and the nature of value (ethical theory) through a reading of a number of important primary texts of thinkers such as Plato, Aristotle, Descartes, Hume, Kant, Kierkegaard, Mill, Nietzsche, and Freud. Cannot be taken by students with credit for PHIL 0151. 3 hrs. lect., 1 hr. disc.

PHIL0150X-S17

CRN: 22185

Intro Phil Tradition
Discussion
Introduction to the Philosophical Tradition
This course will introduce students to fundamental philosophical issues concerning the nature of reality (metaphysics), the possibility of knowledge (epistemology), and the nature of value (ethical theory) through a reading of a number of important primary texts of thinkers such as Plato, Aristotle, Descartes, Hume, Kant, Kierkegaard, Mill, Nietzsche, and Freud. Cannot be taken by students with credit for PHIL 0151. 3 hrs. lect., 1 hr. disc.

PHIL0150Y-S17

CRN: 21538

Intro Phil Tradition
Discussion
Introduction to the Philosophical Tradition
This course will introduce students to fundamental philosophical issues concerning the nature of reality (metaphysics), the possibility of knowledge (epistemology), and the nature of value (ethical theory) through a reading of a number of important primary texts of thinkers such as Plato, Aristotle, Descartes, Hume, Kant, Kierkegaard, Mill, Nietzsche, and Freud. Cannot be taken by students with credit for PHIL 0151. 3 hrs. lect., 1 hr. disc.

PHIL0150Z-S17

CRN: 21539

Intro Phil Tradition
Discussion
Introduction to the Philosophical Tradition
This course will introduce students to fundamental philosophical issues concerning the nature of reality (metaphysics), the possibility of knowledge (epistemology), and the nature of value (ethical theory) through a reading of a number of important primary texts of thinkers such as Plato, Aristotle, Descartes, Hume, Kant, Kierkegaard, Mill, Nietzsche, and Freud. Cannot be taken by students with credit for PHIL 0151. 3 hrs. lect., 1 hr. disc.

PHIL0156A-S17

CRN: 22381

Contemporary Moral Issues
Contemporary Moral Issues
We will examine a selection of pressing moral problems of our day, seeking to understand the substance of the issues and learning how moral arguments work. We will focus on developing our analytical skills, which we can then use to present and criticize arguments on difficult moral issues. Selected topics may include world poverty, animal rights, abortion, euthanasia, human rights, just and unjust wars, capital punishment, and racial and gender issues. You will be encouraged to question your own beliefs on these issues, and in the process to explore the limit and extent to which ethical theory can play a role in everyday ethical decision making. 2 hrs.lect./1 hr. disc.

PHIL0156X-S17

CRN: 22479

Contemporary Moral Issues
Discussion
Contemporary Moral Issues
We will examine a selection of pressing moral problems of our day, seeking to understand the substance of the issues and learning how moral arguments work. We will focus on developing our analytical skills, which we can then use to present and criticize arguments on difficult moral issues. Selected topics may include world poverty, animal rights, abortion, euthanasia, human rights, just and unjust wars, capital punishment, and racial and gender issues. You will be encouraged to question your own beliefs on these issues, and in the process to explore the limit and extent to which ethical theory can play a role in everyday ethical decision making. 2 hrs.lect./1 hr. disc.

PHIL0156Y-S17

CRN: 22480

Contemporary Moral Issues
Discussion
Contemporary Moral Issues
We will examine a selection of pressing moral problems of our day, seeking to understand the substance of the issues and learning how moral arguments work. We will focus on developing our analytical skills, which we can then use to present and criticize arguments on difficult moral issues. Selected topics may include world poverty, animal rights, abortion, euthanasia, human rights, just and unjust wars, capital punishment, and racial and gender issues. You will be encouraged to question your own beliefs on these issues, and in the process to explore the limit and extent to which ethical theory can play a role in everyday ethical decision making. 2 hrs.lect./1 hr. disc.

PHIL0156Z-S17

CRN: 22481

Contemporary Moral Issues
Discussion
Contemporary Moral Issues
We will examine a selection of pressing moral problems of our day, seeking to understand the substance of the issues and learning how moral arguments work. We will focus on developing our analytical skills, which we can then use to present and criticize arguments on difficult moral issues. Selected topics may include world poverty, animal rights, abortion, euthanasia, human rights, just and unjust wars, capital punishment, and racial and gender issues. You will be encouraged to question your own beliefs on these issues, and in the process to explore the limit and extent to which ethical theory can play a role in everyday ethical decision making. 2 hrs.lect./1 hr. disc.

PHIL0208A-S17

CRN: 22187

Morality & War
Morality & War
Are there any Just Wars? What would make a war a Just War? In the first part of this course we will investigate the historical origins of Just War Theory. In the second part, we will analyze contemporary moral perspectives on whether war can be morally justified and if so, what actions in war are morally justified or prohibited. In the final part, we will read articles concerning war and humanitarian intervention and on what actions, e.g. punishment, are morally permissible or demanded after war. Authors will include Augustine, Grotius, Nagel, Walzer, Luban. 3 hrs. lect.

PHIL0250A-S17

CRN: 20938

Early Modern Philosophy
Early Modern Philosophy
This course offers an introduction to some of the most influential European philosophers of the 17th and 18th centuries: Descartes, Spinoza, Locke, Berkeley, Hume, and Kant. We will consider and critically examine the responses these thinkers gave to various questions in metaphysics and epistemology, including the following: What is the relationship between reality and our perception of reality? What is the nature of the mind and how is it related to the body? What is the nature of physical reality? Which of our beliefs, if any, do we have good reason to maintain in the face of radical skepticism? 3 hrs lect.

PHIL0252A-S17

CRN: 22388

Philosophy of Mind
Philosophy of Mind
What is the nature of the mind, and how does it relate to the body and the physical world? Could computers ever think? Do animals have mental and emotional lives? This course will explore several of the major recent philosophical conceptions of the mind. A central focus will be on evaluating various attempts to explain the mind in purely physical terms, including the project of artificial intelligence (AI). Can these theories give us a complete understanding of the mind? Other key questions will include: What is the nature of thought, and how is it capable of representing the world? What is consciousness, and can it be explained physically? 3 hrs. lect./1 hr. disc.

PHIL0252Y-S17

CRN: 22482

Philosophy of Mind
Discussion
Philosophy of Mind
What is the nature of the mind, and how does it relate to the body and the physical world? Could computers ever think? Do animals have mental and emotional lives? This course will explore several of the major recent philosophical conceptions of the mind. A central focus will be on evaluating various attempts to explain the mind in purely physical terms, including the project of artificial intelligence (AI). Can these theories give us a complete understanding of the mind? Other key questions will include: What is the nature of thought, and how is it capable of representing the world? What is consciousness, and can it be explained physically? 3 hrs. lect./1 hr. disc.

PHIL0252Z-S17

CRN: 22483

Philosophy of Mind
Discussion
Philosophy of Mind
What is the nature of the mind, and how does it relate to the body and the physical world? Could computers ever think? Do animals have mental and emotional lives? This course will explore several of the major recent philosophical conceptions of the mind. A central focus will be on evaluating various attempts to explain the mind in purely physical terms, including the project of artificial intelligence (AI). Can these theories give us a complete understanding of the mind? Other key questions will include: What is the nature of thought, and how is it capable of representing the world? What is consciousness, and can it be explained physically? 3 hrs. lect./1 hr. disc.

PHIL0302A-S17

CRN: 22186

Philosophy of Plato
Philosophy of Plato
In this class, we will explore the significance, influence, and development of Plato's thought, paying special attention to the form of the dramatic dialogue and topics such as Platonic love, rhetoric and politics, learning and recollection, and the theory of forms. We will begin with the early period (dialogues such as the Meno and the Apology) focused on the historical figure of Socrates, continue to the middle period (Symposium, Republic), in which Plato develops his own distinctive views; and conclude with the later period (Philebus, Parmenides) in which Plato suggests a critique of Socrates and his own earlier positions. (Previous course in philosophy or waiver)

PHIL0305A-S17

Cross-Listed As:
HIST0305A-S17 HIST0305B-S17 PHIL0305B-S17

CRN: 22246

Confucius and Confucianism
Please register via HIST 0305A
Confucius and Confucianism
Perhaps no individual has left his mark more completely and enduringly upon an entire civilization than Confucius (551-479 B.C.) has upon that of China. Moreover, the influence of Confucius has spread well beyond China to become entrenched in the cultural traditions of neighboring Japan and Korea and elsewhere. This course examines who Confucius was, what he originally intended, and how the more important of his disciples have continued to reinterpret his original vision and direct it toward different ends. Pre-1800. (formerly HIST/PHIL 0273) 3 hrs. lect./disc.

PHIL0305B-S17

Cross-Listed As:
HIST0305A-S17 HIST0305B-S17 PHIL0305A-S17

CRN: 22247

Confucius and Confucianism
Please register via HIST 0305B
Confucius and Confucianism
Perhaps no individual has left his mark more completely and enduringly upon an entire civilization than Confucius (551-479 B.C.) has upon that of China. Moreover, the influence of Confucius has spread well beyond China to become entrenched in the cultural traditions of neighboring Japan and Korea and elsewhere. This course examines who Confucius was, what he originally intended, and how the more important of his disciples have continued to reinterpret his original vision and direct it toward different ends. Pre-1800. (formerly HIST/PHIL 0273) 3 hrs. lect./disc.

PHIL0310A-S17

CRN: 22188

Moral Psychology
Moral Psychology
Moral psychology is the study of human behavior in the context of morality. How do we think about morality? How do we make moral judgments? How do we behave in moral situations? Answering these questions forces us to think deeply about the nature of our actions and the way we do and should evaluate them. In this course we will explore these questions and more. Specific topics covered may include altruism and egoism, moral judgment, moral responsibility, practical deliberation, intentional action, virtue and vice, character, and moral development. Readings will be drawn from both philosophy and psychology. 3 hrs sem

PHIL0324A-S17

CRN: 22434

Discrimination and Resistance
Subjugation, Discrimination and Political Transformation
Our goal, in this course, is twofold. First, to identify different ways in which members of a community can be subjugated and marginalized. Second, to ask ourselves what kind of ethical and strategic considerations should inform our response to instances of subjugation and discrimination, if our primary concern is that our actions be at once faithful to the values that we stand for and politically efficacious. We will study works by Simone Weil, Michel Foucault, Martin Luther King Jr., Primo Levi, Simone de Beauvoir, Charles W. Mills, and Epictetus among others. We will also use films and press articles as material for case studies.(Previous Philosophy class or waiver) 3 hrs. sem.

PHIL0435A-S17

CRN: 22427

Concepts
Concepts: The Stuff of Thought
Concepts are often regarded as “the stuff of thought”: they allow us to categorize the world, learn about it, and navigate through it. But what are they, and how do they relate to reality? In this course we will examine prominent contemporary philosophical theories of concepts, drawing as well on readings from cognitive science and neuroscience. Possible topics include: Is it possible to define concepts? How are they mentally represented? Is reality relative to conceptual schemes? Do concepts give us knowledge of reality or hinder our awareness of it? Is perception nonconceptual? Do animals have concepts? (Junior and senior majors, or by waiver.) 3 hrs. sem.

PHIL0500A-S17

CRN: 20066

Resrch In Philosophy
Research in Philosophy
Supervised independent research in philosophy. (Approval required).

PHIL0500B-S17

CRN: 20761

Resrch In Philosophy
Research in Philosophy
Supervised independent research in philosophy. (Approval required).

PHIL0500C-S17

CRN: 20067

Resrch In Philosophy
Research in Philosophy
Supervised independent research in philosophy. (Approval required).

PHIL0500D-S17

CRN: 20545

Resrch In Philosophy
Research in Philosophy
Supervised independent research in philosophy. (Approval required).

PHIL0500F-S17

CRN: 20292

Resrch In Philosophy
Research in Philosophy
Supervised independent research in philosophy. (Approval required).

PHIL0500H-S17

CRN: 20590

Resrch In Philosophy
Research In Philosophy
Research in Philosophy
Supervised independent research in philosophy. (Approval required).

PHIL0500I-S17

CRN: 20983

Resrch In Philosophy
Research in Philosophy
Supervised independent research in philosophy. (Approval required).

PHIL0500J-S17

CRN: 20995

Resrch In Philosophy
Research in Philosophy
Supervised independent research in philosophy. (Approval required).

PHIL0700A-S17

CRN: 20070

Senior Thesis
Senior Thesis
(Approval Required)

PHIL0700B-S17

CRN: 20517

Senior Thesis
Senior Thesis
(Approval Required)

PHIL0700C-S17

CRN: 20518

Senior Thesis
Senior Thesis
(Approval Required)

PHIL0700D-S17

CRN: 20551

Senior Thesis
Senior Thesis
(Approval Required)

PHIL0700F-S17

CRN: 20553

Senior Thesis
Senior Thesis
(Approval Required)

PHIL0700H-S17

CRN: 20591

Senior Thesis
Senior Thesis
(Approval Required)

PHIL0700I-S17

CRN: 20996

Senior Thesis
Senior Thesis
(Approval Required)

PHIL0700J-S17

CRN: 20976

Senior Thesis
Senior Thesis
(Approval Required)

PHIL0700K-S17

CRN: 21064

Senior Thesis
Senior Thesis
(Approval Required)

Department of Philosophy

Twilight Hall
50 Franklin Street
Middlebury College
Middlebury, VT 05753

802.443.2077 fax