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PHIL0151A-F16

CRN: 92244

Intro Phil: Mortal Question
Introduction to Philosophy: Mortal Questions
This course is an issue-based introduction to core philosophical questions such as the following: What is the nature of reality, and can we ever know it? What is the relation between mind and body, and could computers ever think? What is the nature of the self? Do humans have free will? Is there such a thing as an objective right and wrong? Can we say God exists in the face of all the evil in the world? Readings will be drawn from both traditional philosophers (e.g., Descartes, Hume, Locke, Russell) and contemporary reflections on the issues (e.g., Nagel, Searle, Williams). Cannot be taken by students with credit for PHIL 0150. 3 hrs. lect./1 hr. disc.

PHIL0151X-F16

CRN: 92245

Intro Phil: Mortal Question
Discussion
Introduction to Philosophy: Mortal Questions
This course is an issue-based introduction to core philosophical questions such as the following: What is the nature of reality, and can we ever know it? What is the relation between mind and body, and could computers ever think? What is the nature of the self? Do humans have free will? Is there such a thing as an objective right and wrong? Can we say God exists in the face of all the evil in the world? Readings will be drawn from both traditional philosophers (e.g., Descartes, Hume, Locke, Russell) and contemporary reflections on the issues (e.g., Nagel, Searle, Williams). Cannot be taken by students with credit for PHIL 0150. 3 hrs. lect./1 hr. disc.

PHIL0151Y-F16

CRN: 92246

Intro Phil: Mortal Question
Discussion
Introduction to Philosophy: Mortal Questions
This course is an issue-based introduction to core philosophical questions such as the following: What is the nature of reality, and can we ever know it? What is the relation between mind and body, and could computers ever think? What is the nature of the self? Do humans have free will? Is there such a thing as an objective right and wrong? Can we say God exists in the face of all the evil in the world? Readings will be drawn from both traditional philosophers (e.g., Descartes, Hume, Locke, Russell) and contemporary reflections on the issues (e.g., Nagel, Searle, Williams). Cannot be taken by students with credit for PHIL 0150. 3 hrs. lect./1 hr. disc.

PHIL0151Z-F16

CRN: 92247

Intro Phil: Mortal Question
Discussion
Introduction to Philosophy: Mortal Questions
This course is an issue-based introduction to core philosophical questions such as the following: What is the nature of reality, and can we ever know it? What is the relation between mind and body, and could computers ever think? What is the nature of the self? Do humans have free will? Is there such a thing as an objective right and wrong? Can we say God exists in the face of all the evil in the world? Readings will be drawn from both traditional philosophers (e.g., Descartes, Hume, Locke, Russell) and contemporary reflections on the issues (e.g., Nagel, Searle, Williams). Cannot be taken by students with credit for PHIL 0150. 3 hrs. lect./1 hr. disc.

PHIL0156A-F16

CRN: 92396

Contemporary Moral Issues
Contemporary Moral Issues
We will examine a selection of pressing moral problems of our day, seeking to understand the substance of the issues and learning how moral arguments work. We will focus on developing our analytical skills, which we can then use to present and criticize arguments on difficult moral issues. Selected topics may include world poverty, animal rights, abortion, euthanasia, human rights, just and unjust wars, capital punishment, and racial and gender issues. You will be encouraged to question your own beliefs on these issues, and in the process to explore the limit and extent to which ethical theory can play a role in everyday ethical decision making. 2 hrs.lect./1 hr. disc.

PHIL0156X-F16

CRN: 92443

Contemporary Moral Issues
Discussion
Contemporary Moral Issues
We will examine a selection of pressing moral problems of our day, seeking to understand the substance of the issues and learning how moral arguments work. We will focus on developing our analytical skills, which we can then use to present and criticize arguments on difficult moral issues. Selected topics may include world poverty, animal rights, abortion, euthanasia, human rights, just and unjust wars, capital punishment, and racial and gender issues. You will be encouraged to question your own beliefs on these issues, and in the process to explore the limit and extent to which ethical theory can play a role in everyday ethical decision making. 2 hrs.lect./1 hr. disc.

PHIL0156Y-F16

CRN: 92444

Contemporary Moral Issues
Discussion
Contemporary Moral Issues
We will examine a selection of pressing moral problems of our day, seeking to understand the substance of the issues and learning how moral arguments work. We will focus on developing our analytical skills, which we can then use to present and criticize arguments on difficult moral issues. Selected topics may include world poverty, animal rights, abortion, euthanasia, human rights, just and unjust wars, capital punishment, and racial and gender issues. You will be encouraged to question your own beliefs on these issues, and in the process to explore the limit and extent to which ethical theory can play a role in everyday ethical decision making. 2 hrs.lect./1 hr. disc.

PHIL0156Z-F16

CRN: 92445

Contemporary Moral Issues
Discussion
Contemporary Moral Issues
We will examine a selection of pressing moral problems of our day, seeking to understand the substance of the issues and learning how moral arguments work. We will focus on developing our analytical skills, which we can then use to present and criticize arguments on difficult moral issues. Selected topics may include world poverty, animal rights, abortion, euthanasia, human rights, just and unjust wars, capital punishment, and racial and gender issues. You will be encouraged to question your own beliefs on these issues, and in the process to explore the limit and extent to which ethical theory can play a role in everyday ethical decision making. 2 hrs.lect./1 hr. disc.

PHIL0180A-F16

CRN: 91149

Introduction to Modern Logic
Introduction to Modern Logic
Logic is concerned with good reasoning; as such, it stands at the core of the liberal arts. In this course we will develop our reasoning skills by identifying and analyzing arguments found in philosophical, legal, and other texts, and also by formulating our own arguments. We will use the formal techniques of modern propositional and predicate logic to codify and test various reasoning strategies and specific arguments. No prior knowledge of logic, formal mathematics, or computer science is presupposed in this course, which does not count towards the PHL distribution requirement but instead towards the deductive reasoning requirement. PHIL 0180 is not open to students who have already taken PHIL 0280/LNGT0280. 3 hrs. lect./1 hr. disc.

PHIL0180B-F16

CRN: 92249

Introduction to Modern Logic
Introduction to Modern Logic
Logic is concerned with good reasoning; as such, it stands at the core of the liberal arts. In this course we will develop our reasoning skills by identifying and analyzing arguments found in philosophical, legal, and other texts, and also by formulating our own arguments. We will use the formal techniques of modern propositional and predicate logic to codify and test various reasoning strategies and specific arguments. No prior knowledge of logic, formal mathematics, or computer science is presupposed in this course, which does not count towards the PHL distribution requirement but instead towards the deductive reasoning requirement. PHIL 0180 is not open to students who have already taken PHIL 0280/LNGT0280. 3 hrs. lect./1 hr. disc.

PHIL0180W-F16

CRN: 92447

Introduction to Modern Logic
Discussion
Introduction to Modern Logic
Logic is concerned with good reasoning; as such, it stands at the core of the liberal arts. In this course we will develop our reasoning skills by identifying and analyzing arguments found in philosophical, legal, and other texts, and also by formulating our own arguments. We will use the formal techniques of modern propositional and predicate logic to codify and test various reasoning strategies and specific arguments. No prior knowledge of logic, formal mathematics, or computer science is presupposed in this course, which does not count towards the PHL distribution requirement but instead towards the deductive reasoning requirement. PHIL 0180 is not open to students who have already taken PHIL 0280/LNGT0280. 3 hrs. lect./1 hr. disc.

PHIL0180X-F16

CRN: 92250

Introduction to Modern Logic
Discussion
Introduction to Modern Logic
Logic is concerned with good reasoning; as such, it stands at the core of the liberal arts. In this course we will develop our reasoning skills by identifying and analyzing arguments found in philosophical, legal, and other texts, and also by formulating our own arguments. We will use the formal techniques of modern propositional and predicate logic to codify and test various reasoning strategies and specific arguments. No prior knowledge of logic, formal mathematics, or computer science is presupposed in this course, which does not count towards the PHL distribution requirement but instead towards the deductive reasoning requirement. PHIL 0180 is not open to students who have already taken PHIL 0280/LNGT0280. 3 hrs. lect./1 hr. disc.

PHIL0180Z-F16

CRN: 91151

Introduction to Modern Logic
Discussion
Introduction to Modern Logic
Logic is concerned with good reasoning; as such, it stands at the core of the liberal arts. In this course we will develop our reasoning skills by identifying and analyzing arguments found in philosophical, legal, and other texts, and also by formulating our own arguments. We will use the formal techniques of modern propositional and predicate logic to codify and test various reasoning strategies and specific arguments. No prior knowledge of logic, formal mathematics, or computer science is presupposed in this course, which does not count towards the PHL distribution requirement but instead towards the deductive reasoning requirement. PHIL 0180 is not open to students who have already taken PHIL 0280/LNGT0280. 3 hrs. lect./1 hr. disc.

PHIL0201A-F16

CRN: 91624

Ancient Greek Philosophy
Ancient Greek Philosophy
This class introduces students to the range and power of Greek thought, which initiated the Western philosophical tradition. We will begin by exploring the origins of philosophy as found in myth (primarily Hesiod) and in the highly original speculation of the Pre-Socratic thinkers (such as Heraclitus and Parmenides). We will then focus on Socrates, Plato, and Aristotle, examining their transformations of these earlier traditions and their own divergent approaches to ethics and education. We will also consider the influences of Greek philosophy on later thought. 3 hrs. lect.

PHIL0207A-F16

CRN: 92251

Philosophy of Human Rights
The Philosophy of Human Rights
What is a human right? If there are human rights, what moral obligations, if any, follow from them, and who bears those obligations? In this course, we will investigate the philosophical origins and development of the concept of human rights. We will critically analyze both historical and contemporary moral perspectives concerning the existence and nature of human rights. What does it mean to say one possesses a human right? We will also take a close look at the issue of human rights as they relate to world poverty and humanitarian intervention. Authors will include Hobbes, Bentham, Rorty, Nickel, and Pogge. (Not open to students who have taken FYSE 1317).

PHIL0209A-F16

CRN: 92252

Philosophy of Law
Philosophy of Law
In this course, we shall consider a number of questions concerning law and its institution in human society. What is the origin and authority of law? What is legal obligation? What is the connection between law and coercion, between law and morality, and law and rights? Are laws merely conventions or is there a law of nature? What is the role of law in judicial decisions and the effect of these on the law? We shall also consider and evaluate various theories of law: natural law theories, utilitarian theories, analytical philosophy of law, critical legal studies, feminist theories. 3 hrs. lect.

PHIL0214A-F16

CRN: 91876

Science and Society
Science and Society
Scientific theories are not developed in a vacuum. Social circumstances influence the practice of science, and science, in turn, influences how we organize ourselves as a society. This course will investigate both directions of the relationship between science and society. We will ask such questions as: how do the values of society drive scientific research? What do we mean when we claim that science is 'objective' and what do we expect of an objective science? Can there be 'good' politically-motivated science, or does this conflict with the norms of 'good' science? How important is science as a way of bettering society? Do scientists bear an extra burden of responsibility when they generate scientific results of particular social significance (such as the development of the atomic bomb, or the development of techniques of cloning)? We will examine particular cases of socially significant scientific research, and we will consider larger philosophical questions concerning the status of science, given its interconnections with society. 3 hrs. lect.

PHIL0221A-F16

CRN: 92560

Existentialism
Between Freedom and Despair: An Introduction to Existentialism
We are the creatures for whom our own existence is at issue, the ones who can ask whether to be or not to be; who can choose, but who have to bear the burden of being able to choose, and of not being able not to choose. In this course we will pursue a deeper understanding of the kind of creatures that we are, and of the condition in which we find ourselves, through the rigorous study of existentialism as it is portrayed in the works of Kant, de Beauvoir, Sartre, Cornell West, and the Cohen Brothers. 3 hrs lect.

PHIL0237A-F16

Cross-Listed As:
HIST0237A-F16

CRN: 92299

Chinese Philosophy
Please register via HIST 0237A
Chinese Philosophy
A survey of the dominant philosophies of China, beginning with the establishment of the earliest intellectual orientations, moving to the emergence of the competing schools of the fifth century B.C., and concluding with the modern adoption and adaptation of Marxist thought. Early native alternatives to Confucian philosophy (such as Mohism, Daoism, and Legalism) and later foreign ones (such as Buddhism and Marxism) will be stressed. We will scrutinize individual thinkers with reference to their philosophical contributions and assess the implications of their ideas with reference to their historical contexts and comparative significance. Pre-1800. 3 hrs. lect./disc.

PHIL0276A-F16

Cross-Listed As:
CLAS0276A-F16

CRN: 92236

Roman Philosophy
Please register via CLAS 0276A
Roman Philosophy
In this course we will seek to answer the question of what is Roman philosophy - philosophia togata. Is it simply Greek philosophy in Roman dress? Or, while based in its Greek origins, does it grow to have a distinctive and rigorous character of its own, designed and developed to focus on uniquely "Roman" questions and problems, in particular, ethical, social, and political questions? We will investigate how some of the main schools of Hellenistic Greek thought came to be developed in Latin: Epicureanism (Lucretius), Academic Skepticism (Cicero), and Stoicism (Seneca). As we read we will investigate how each school offers different answers to crucial questions such as what is the goal of life? What is the highest good? Should one take part in politics or not? What is the nature of the soul? What is the nature of Nature itself? Is there an afterlife? Can we ever have a certain answer to any of these questions? 3hrs. lect.

PHIL0286A-F16

Cross-Listed As:
CMLT0286A-F16

CRN: 91998

Philosophy & Literature
Philosophy & Literature
In this course we will explore the border both separating and joining philosophy and literature. How does literature evoke philosophical problems, and how do philosophers interpret such works? How does fiction create meaning? Beginning with Greek tragedy, we investigate Plato’s “quarrel” with, and Aristotle’s defense of, poetry. Then we will turn to modern works, mostly European, on topics such as: tragedy and ethics; style and rhetoric; author and reader; time and temporality; mood and emotion; existence and mortality. Literary readings after Sophocles will be selected from Borges, Calvino, Camus, Kafka, Tolstoy, and Woolf. Philosophical readings after Plato and Aristotle will be selected from Bergson, Danto, Freud, Murdoch, Ricoeur, and Nussbaum. Not open to students who have taken PHIL/CMLT 1014.

PHIL0319A-F16

Cross-Listed As:
HIST0319A-F16 HIST0319B-F16 PHIL0319B-F16

CRN: 92297

Philosophy of History
Please register via HIST 0319A
Readings in the Philosophy of History
Even before the appearance of Georg W. F. Hegel's classic study The Philosophy of History, a heated debate was being waged concerning the nature and substance of history. Is history, like science, expressible in predictable patterns or subject to irrevocable laws? What factors distinguish true history from the mere random succession of events? What should we assume to be the fundamental nature of historical truth, and are we to determine it objectively or subjectively? Is it possible to be human and yet be somehow "outside of" history? These are among the questions we will examine as we read and deliberate on a variety of philosophies of history, while concentrating on the most influential versions developed by Hegel and Karl Marx. 3 hrs. sem.

PHIL0319B-F16

Cross-Listed As:
HIST0319A-F16 HIST0319B-F16 PHIL0319A-F16

CRN: 92298

Philosophy of History
Please register via HIST 0319B
Readings in the Philosophy of History
Even before the appearance of Georg W. F. Hegel's classic study The Philosophy of History, a heated debate was being waged concerning the nature and substance of history. Is history, like science, expressible in predictable patterns or subject to irrevocable laws? What factors distinguish true history from the mere random succession of events? What should we assume to be the fundamental nature of historical truth, and are we to determine it objectively or subjectively? Is it possible to be human and yet be somehow "outside of" history? These are among the questions we will examine as we read and deliberate on a variety of philosophies of history, while concentrating on the most influential versions developed by Hegel and Karl Marx. 3 hrs. sem.

PHIL0358A-F16

CRN: 92554

Rationality and Cognition
Rationality and Cognition
Philosophers (and others) study how we ought to reason. By contrast, psychologists (and others) study how we actually do reason. Often, their findings conflict. How should these conflicts be reconciled? Potential topics include different kinds of reasoning (deductive, probabilistic, explanatory, analogical, practical), naturalized epistemology, theories of justification, and heuristics and biases. (PHIL 0180 or PSYC 0105) 3 hrs. lect.

PHIL0410A-F16

CRN: 92401

The Good Life
The Good Life
What is the good life? In this course we will explore the philosophy of happiness and well-being in an effort to better understand the nature of the good life. Specific topics will include the nature of human flourishing and the role that virtue and interpersonal relationships play in the development of the good life. Readings will be primarily by contemporary authors and will be drawn from both philosophical and psychological perspectives. (Junior or Senior Philosophy Majors, or by waiver) 3 hrs. sem.

PHIL0500A-F16

CRN: 90142

Resrch In Philosophy
Research in Philosophy
Supervised independent research in philosophy. (Approval required).

PHIL0500B-F16

CRN: 90144

Resrch In Philosophy
Research in Philosophy
Supervised independent research in philosophy. (Approval required).

PHIL0500C-F16

CRN: 90145

Resrch In Philosophy
Research in Philosophy
Supervised independent research in philosophy. (Approval required).

PHIL0500D-F16

CRN: 90776

Resrch In Philosophy
Research in Philosophy
Supervised independent research in philosophy. (Approval required).

PHIL0500E-F16

CRN: 90146

Resrch In Philosophy
Research in Philosophy
Supervised independent research in philosophy. (Approval required).

PHIL0500F-F16

CRN: 90456

Resrch In Philosophy
Research in Philosophy
Supervised independent research in philosophy. (Approval required).

PHIL0500H-F16

CRN: 90603

Resrch In Philosophy
Research in Philosophy
Supervised independent research in philosophy. (Approval required).

PHIL0500I-F16

CRN: 91022

Resrch In Philosophy
Research in Philosophy
Supervised independent research in philosophy. (Approval required).

PHIL0700A-F16

CRN: 90148

Senior Thesis
Senior Thesis
(Approval Required)

PHIL0700B-F16

CRN: 90493

Senior Thesis
Senior Thesis
(Approval Required)

PHIL0700C-F16

CRN: 90516

Senior Thesis
Senior Thesis
(Approval Required)

PHIL0700D-F16

CRN: 90777

Senior Thesis
Senior Thesis
(Approval Required)

PHIL0700E-F16

CRN: 90517

Senior Thesis
Senior Thesis
(Approval Required)

PHIL0700F-F16

CRN: 90518

Senior Thesis
Senior Thesis
(Approval Required)

PHIL0700H-F16

CRN: 90605

Senior Thesis
Senior Thesis
(Approval Required)

PHIL0700I-F16

CRN: 91023

Senior Thesis
Senior Thesis
(Approval Required)

Department of Philosophy

Twilight Hall
50 Franklin Street
Middlebury College
Middlebury, VT 05753

802.443.2077 fax