Middlebury

 

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PHIL0150A-S13

CRN: 20047

Intro Phil Tradition

Introduction to the Philosophical Tradition
This course will introduce students to fundamental philosophical issues concerning the nature of reality (metaphysics), the possibility of knowledge (epistemology), and the nature of value (ethical theory) through a reading of a number of important primary texts of thinkers such as Plato, Aristotle, Descartes, Hume, Kant, Kierkegaard, Mill, Nietzsche, and Freud. Cannot be taken by students with credit for PHIL 0151. 3 hrs. lect., 1 hr. disc.

PHIL0150X-S13

CRN: 21905

Intro Phil Tradition
Discussion

Introduction to the Philosophical Tradition
This course will introduce students to fundamental philosophical issues concerning the nature of reality (metaphysics), the possibility of knowledge (epistemology), and the nature of value (ethical theory) through a reading of a number of important primary texts of thinkers such as Plato, Aristotle, Descartes, Hume, Kant, Kierkegaard, Mill, Nietzsche, and Freud. Cannot be taken by students with credit for PHIL 0151. 3 hrs. lect., 1 hr. disc.

PHIL0150Y-S13

CRN: 21904

Intro Phil Tradition
Discussion

Introduction to the Philosophical Tradition
This course will introduce students to fundamental philosophical issues concerning the nature of reality (metaphysics), the possibility of knowledge (epistemology), and the nature of value (ethical theory) through a reading of a number of important primary texts of thinkers such as Plato, Aristotle, Descartes, Hume, Kant, Kierkegaard, Mill, Nietzsche, and Freud. Cannot be taken by students with credit for PHIL 0151. 3 hrs. lect., 1 hr. disc.

PHIL0150Z-S13

CRN: 21903

Intro Phil Tradition
Discussion

Introduction to the Philosophical Tradition
This course will introduce students to fundamental philosophical issues concerning the nature of reality (metaphysics), the possibility of knowledge (epistemology), and the nature of value (ethical theory) through a reading of a number of important primary texts of thinkers such as Plato, Aristotle, Descartes, Hume, Kant, Kierkegaard, Mill, Nietzsche, and Freud. Cannot be taken by students with credit for PHIL 0151. 3 hrs. lect., 1 hr. disc.

PHIL0180A-S13

CRN: 20805

Introduction to Modern Logic

Introduction to Modern Logic
Logic is concerned with good reasoning; as such, it stands at the core of the liberal arts. In this course, we will develop our reasoning skills by identifying, analyzing, and criticizing arguments found in philosophical, legal, and other texts, and also by formulating our own arguments. We will then use the formal techniques of modern propositional and predicate logic to codify and regiment various reasoning strategies. No prior knowledge of logic, formal mathematics, or computer science is presupposed in this course, which does not count towards the PHL distribution requirement but instead towards the deductive reasoning requirement. 3 hrs. lect., 1 hr. disc.

PHIL0180X-S13

CRN: 21521

Introduction to Modern Logic
Discussion

Introduction to Modern Logic
Logic is concerned with good reasoning; as such, it stands at the core of the liberal arts. In this course, we will develop our reasoning skills by identifying, analyzing, and criticizing arguments found in philosophical, legal, and other texts, and also by formulating our own arguments. We will then use the formal techniques of modern propositional and predicate logic to codify and regiment various reasoning strategies. No prior knowledge of logic, formal mathematics, or computer science is presupposed in this course, which does not count towards the PHL distribution requirement but instead towards the deductive reasoning requirement. 3 hrs. lect., 1 hr. disc.

PHIL0180Y-S13

CRN: 21193

Introduction to Modern Logic
Discussion

Introduction to Modern Logic
Logic is concerned with good reasoning; as such, it stands at the core of the liberal arts. In this course, we will develop our reasoning skills by identifying, analyzing, and criticizing arguments found in philosophical, legal, and other texts, and also by formulating our own arguments. We will then use the formal techniques of modern propositional and predicate logic to codify and regiment various reasoning strategies. No prior knowledge of logic, formal mathematics, or computer science is presupposed in this course, which does not count towards the PHL distribution requirement but instead towards the deductive reasoning requirement. 3 hrs. lect., 1 hr. disc.

PHIL0180Z-S13

CRN: 20806

Introduction to Modern Logic
Discussion

Introduction to Modern Logic
Logic is concerned with good reasoning; as such, it stands at the core of the liberal arts. In this course, we will develop our reasoning skills by identifying, analyzing, and criticizing arguments found in philosophical, legal, and other texts, and also by formulating our own arguments. We will then use the formal techniques of modern propositional and predicate logic to codify and regiment various reasoning strategies. No prior knowledge of logic, formal mathematics, or computer science is presupposed in this course, which does not count towards the PHL distribution requirement but instead towards the deductive reasoning requirement. 3 hrs. lect., 1 hr. disc.

PHIL0208A-S13

CRN: 21997

Morality & War

Morality & War
Are there any Just Wars? What would make a war a Just War? In the first part of this course we will investigate the historical origins of Just War Theory. In the second part, we will analyze contemporary moral perspectives on whether war can be morally justified and if so, what actions in war are morally justified or prohibited. In the final part, we will read articles concerning war and humanitarian intervention and on what actions, e.g. punishment, are morally permissible or demanded after war. Authors will include Augustine, Grotius, Nagel, Walzer, Luban. 3 hrs. lect.

PHIL0213A-S13

CRN: 21998

Theories of Scientific Method

Theories of Scientific Method
The scientific method is one of humankind's best attempts at rationally uncovering the objective structure of the world. But what exactly is this method and in what sense is it rational? Studying both contemporary science and prominent episodes from the history of science, we will explore questions about (a) the defining characteristics of the scientific method; (b) the soundness of various forms of scientific reasoning (Mill's Methods, Bayesianism, hypothetico-deductive reasoning, and inference to the best explanation); and (c) the objectivity of science. We will also formulate, test, and revise hypotheses in light of the methods that we study. (Students who took PHIL 0212 may not take this course.) 4 hrs. lect.

PHIL0233A-S13

CRN: 21999

Aesthetics

Aesthetics
In this course we will investigate the nature of art and aesthetic experience through readings from historical and contemporary philosophers and artists. Is art essentially rational or non-rational, and can it offer a deeper insight into reality than discursive knowledge can? What is beauty, and is it essential to art? What is the relation between art and the ethical, the social, and the political? We will consider both influential traditional theories of art such as those of Plato, Aristotle, Kant, and Nietzsche, and more recent modern and postmodern critiques of traditional views. Readings will also include works by artists such as Van Gogh and Kandinsky.

PHIL0250A-S13

CRN: 21194

Early Modern Philosophy

Early Modern Philosophy
This course offers an introduction to some of the most influential European philosophers of the 17th and 18th centuries: Descartes, Spinoza, Locke, Berkeley, Hume, and Kant. We will consider and critically examine the responses these thinkers gave to various questions in metaphysics and epistemology, including the following: What is the relationship between reality and our perception of reality? What is the nature of the mind and how is it related to the body? What is the nature of physical reality? Which of our beliefs, if any, do we have good reason to maintain in the face of radical skepticism? 3 hrs lect.

PHIL0275A-S13

Cross-Listed As:
CLAS0275A-S13 CLAS0275B-S13 PHIL0275B-S13

CRN: 22362

Greek Philosophy
Please register via CLAS 0275A

Greek Philosophy: The Problem of Socrates
Why did Socrates “call philosophy down from the heavens, set her in the cities of men and also their homes, and compel her to ask questions about life and morals and things good and evil”? Why was philosophy indifferent to man, then considered dangerous to men when it did pay attention? How was philosophy ultimately transformed by Plato and Aristotle as a consequence of the examination of human knowledge that Socrates made intrinsic to philosophy? In this course we will consider the central questions of ancient Greek philosophy from the pre-Socratics through Plato and Aristotle by focusing on what Nietzsche called "the Problem of Socrates": why Socrates abandoned "pre-Socratic" natural science in order to examine the opinions of his fellow Athenians, and why they put him to death for corruption and impiety. Texts will include selected fragments of the pre-Socratics and sophists, works of Aristophanes, Xenophon, Plato, Aristotle , and Nietzsche. 3 hrs. lect disc.

PHIL0275B-S13

Cross-Listed As:
CLAS0275A-S13 PHIL0275A-S13 CLAS0275B-S13

CRN: 22585

Greek Philosophy
Please register via CLAS 0275B

Greek Philosophy: The Problem of Socrates
Why did Socrates “call philosophy down from the heavens, set her in the cities of men and also their homes, and compel her to ask questions about life and morals and things good and evil”? Why was philosophy indifferent to man, then considered dangerous to men when it did pay attention? How was philosophy ultimately transformed by Plato and Aristotle as a consequence of the examination of human knowledge that Socrates made intrinsic to philosophy? In this course we will consider the central questions of ancient Greek philosophy from the pre-Socratics through Plato and Aristotle by focusing on what Nietzsche called "the Problem of Socrates": why Socrates abandoned "pre-Socratic" natural science in order to examine the opinions of his fellow Athenians, and why they put him to death for corruption and impiety. Texts will include selected fragments of the pre-Socratics and sophists, works of Aristophanes, Xenophon, Plato, Aristotle , and Nietzsche. 3 hrs. lect disc.

PHIL0303A-S13

CRN: 22002

Aristotle

Philosophy of Aristotle
In this class we will explore both the original breadth and the contemporary relevance of Aristotle's thought. We will read a diverse selection of his writings, beginning with ethical and political works, continuing to works on art and poetry, the soul, and nature, and concluding with logical and ontological works. We will ask why Aristotelian virtue ethics in particular has enjoyed a recent renaissance and generated special interest in Aristotle's ideas about the ethical role of friendship, the perceptive power of the emotions, and the different kinds of intelligence. (Previous course in philosophy or waiver.) 3 hrs. sem.

PHIL0305A-S13

Cross-Listed As:
HIST0305A-S13

CRN: 21611

Confucius and Confucianism
Please register via HIST 0305A

Confucius and Confucianism
Perhaps no individual has left his mark more completely and enduringly upon an entire civilization than Confucius (551-479 B.C.) has upon that of China. Moreover, the influence of Confucius has spread well beyond China to become entrenched in the cultural traditions of neighboring Japan and Korea and elsewhere. This course examines who Confucius was, what he originally intended, and how the more important of his disciples have continued to reinterpret his original vision and direct it toward different ends. Pre-1800. (formerly HIST/PHIL 0273) 3 hrs. lect./disc.

PHIL0326A-S13

CRN: 22000

Biomedical Ethics

Biomedical Ethics
The field of biomedical ethics explores ethical issues pertaining to both the practice of medicine and the pursuit of biomedical research. In this course we will explore topics central to biomedical ethics at an advanced level. We will consider topics fundamental to the study of life and death, such as reproductive technologies, physician-assisted suicide, and euthanasia, as well as the micro- and macro- issues specific to medicine and biomedical research, such as consent, confidentiality, and paternalism, experimentation with human subjects, and resource allocation. (Previous philosophy course or waiver) 3 hrs. sem.

PHIL0352A-S13

CRN: 21569

Philosophy Of Mind

Philosophy of Mind
What is the nature of the mind, and how does it relate to the body and the physical world? Could computers ever think? Do animals have mental and emotional lives? This course will explore several of the major recent philosophical conceptions of the mind. A central focus will be on evaluating various attempts to explain the mind in purely physical terms, including the project of artificial intelligence (AI). Can these theories give us a complete understanding of the mind? Other key questions will include: What is the nature of thought, and how is it capable of representing the world? What is consciousness, and can it be explained physically? 3 hrs. lect., 1 hr. disc.

PHIL0352X-S13

CRN: 21906

Philosophy Of Mind
Discussion

Philosophy of Mind
What is the nature of the mind, and how does it relate to the body and the physical world? Could computers ever think? Do animals have mental and emotional lives? This course will explore several of the major recent philosophical conceptions of the mind. A central focus will be on evaluating various attempts to explain the mind in purely physical terms, including the project of artificial intelligence (AI). Can these theories give us a complete understanding of the mind? Other key questions will include: What is the nature of thought, and how is it capable of representing the world? What is consciousness, and can it be explained physically? 3 hrs. lect., 1 hr. disc.

PHIL0352Y-S13

CRN: 21907

Philosophy Of Mind
Discussion

Philosophy of Mind
What is the nature of the mind, and how does it relate to the body and the physical world? Could computers ever think? Do animals have mental and emotional lives? This course will explore several of the major recent philosophical conceptions of the mind. A central focus will be on evaluating various attempts to explain the mind in purely physical terms, including the project of artificial intelligence (AI). Can these theories give us a complete understanding of the mind? Other key questions will include: What is the nature of thought, and how is it capable of representing the world? What is consciousness, and can it be explained physically? 3 hrs. lect., 1 hr. disc.

PHIL0352Z-S13

CRN: 21908

Philosophy Of Mind
Discussion

Philosophy of Mind
What is the nature of the mind, and how does it relate to the body and the physical world? Could computers ever think? Do animals have mental and emotional lives? This course will explore several of the major recent philosophical conceptions of the mind. A central focus will be on evaluating various attempts to explain the mind in purely physical terms, including the project of artificial intelligence (AI). Can these theories give us a complete understanding of the mind? Other key questions will include: What is the nature of thought, and how is it capable of representing the world? What is consciousness, and can it be explained physically? 3 hrs. lect., 1 hr. disc.

PHIL0408A-S13

CRN: 22001

Global Justice

Global Justice
In this course, we will investigate questions of justice that arise in
global affairs. We will inquire into whether there are moral principles that
constrain the actions of states and how these principles support a
conception of global justice. Also, we will seek to understand what global
responsibilities are entailed by global justice. Specific topics that will
be considered include global distributive justice, world poverty, human
rights, humanitarian intervention, and the relationship between global
justice and nationalistic moral concerns. Authors will include Beitz,
Nussbaum, O'Neill, Pogge, Rawls, Singer, Miller, and Walzer. 3 hrs. sem.

PHIL0500A-S13

CRN: 20079

Resrch In Philosophy

Supervised independent research in philosophy. Admission by approval.

PHIL0500B-S13

CRN: 20933

Resrch In Philosophy

Supervised independent research in philosophy. Admission by approval.

PHIL0500C-S13

CRN: 20080

Resrch In Philosophy

Supervised independent research in philosophy. Admission by approval.

PHIL0500D-S13

CRN: 20679

Resrch In Philosophy

Supervised independent research in philosophy. Admission by approval.

PHIL0500F-S13

CRN: 20367

Resrch In Philosophy

Supervised independent research in philosophy. Admission by approval.

PHIL0500G-S13

CRN: 20683

Resrch In Philosophy

Supervised independent research in philosophy. Admission by approval.

PHIL0500H-S13

CRN: 20736

Resrch In Philosophy
Research In Philosophy

Supervised independent research in philosophy. Admission by approval.

PHIL0500I-S13

CRN: 21254

Resrch In Philosophy

Supervised independent research in philosophy. Admission by approval.

PHIL0700A-S13

CRN: 20083

Senior Thesis

Senior Thesis
(Approval Required)

PHIL0700B-S13

CRN: 20645

Senior Thesis

Senior Thesis
(Approval Required)

PHIL0700C-S13

CRN: 20646

Senior Thesis

Senior Thesis
(Approval Required)

PHIL0700D-S13

CRN: 20685

Senior Thesis

Senior Thesis
(Approval Required)

PHIL0700F-S13

CRN: 20687

Senior Thesis

Senior Thesis
(Approval Required)

PHIL0700G-S13

CRN: 20688

Senior Thesis

Senior Thesis
(Approval Required)

PHIL0700H-S13

CRN: 20737

Senior Thesis

Senior Thesis
(Approval Required)

PHIL0700I-S13

CRN: 21270

Senior Thesis

Senior Thesis
(Approval Required)

PHIL0700K-S13

CRN: 21356

Senior Thesis

Senior Thesis
(Approval Required)