Sections

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PSCI0103A-S17

CRN: 20012

Intro to Comparative Politics
Introduction to Comparative Politics
This course offers an introduction to the comparative study of political systems and to the logic of comparative inquiry. How are different political systems created and organized? How and why do they change? Why are some democratic and others authoritarian? Why are some rich and others poor? Other topics covered in this course include nationalism and political ideologies, forms of representation, the relationship between state institutions and civil society, and globalization. The goal in this course is to use comparative methods to analyze questions of state institutions -- how they arise, change, and generate different economic, social, and political outcome. 3 hrs. lect./disc. (Comparative Politics)

PSCI0103B-S17

CRN: 22462

Intro to Comparative Politics
Introduction to Comparative Politics
This course offers an introduction to the comparative study of political systems and to the logic of comparative inquiry. How are different political systems created and organized? How and why do they change? Why are some democratic and others authoritarian? Why are some rich and others poor? Other topics covered in this course include nationalism and political ideologies, forms of representation, the relationship between state institutions and civil society, and globalization. The goal in this course is to use comparative methods to analyze questions of state institutions -- how they arise, change, and generate different economic, social, and political outcome. 3 hrs. lect./disc. (Comparative Politics)

PSCI0103V-S17

CRN: 22463

Intro to Comparative Politics
Discussion - PSCI 0103 A
Introduction to Comparative Politics
This course offers an introduction to the comparative study of political systems and to the logic of comparative inquiry. How are different political systems created and organized? How and why do they change? Why are some democratic and others authoritarian? Why are some rich and others poor? Other topics covered in this course include nationalism and political ideologies, forms of representation, the relationship between state institutions and civil society, and globalization. The goal in this course is to use comparative methods to analyze questions of state institutions -- how they arise, change, and generate different economic, social, and political outcome. 3 hrs. lect./disc. (Comparative Politics)

PSCI0103W-S17

CRN: 22464

Intro to Comparative Politics
Discussion - PSCI 0103 A
Introduction to Comparative Politics
This course offers an introduction to the comparative study of political systems and to the logic of comparative inquiry. How are different political systems created and organized? How and why do they change? Why are some democratic and others authoritarian? Why are some rich and others poor? Other topics covered in this course include nationalism and political ideologies, forms of representation, the relationship between state institutions and civil society, and globalization. The goal in this course is to use comparative methods to analyze questions of state institutions -- how they arise, change, and generate different economic, social, and political outcome. 3 hrs. lect./disc. (Comparative Politics)

PSCI0103X-S17

CRN: 20576

Intro to Comparative Politics
Discussion - PSCI 0103 B
Introduction to Comparative Politics
This course offers an introduction to the comparative study of political systems and to the logic of comparative inquiry. How are different political systems created and organized? How and why do they change? Why are some democratic and others authoritarian? Why are some rich and others poor? Other topics covered in this course include nationalism and political ideologies, forms of representation, the relationship between state institutions and civil society, and globalization. The goal in this course is to use comparative methods to analyze questions of state institutions -- how they arise, change, and generate different economic, social, and political outcome. 3 hrs. lect./disc. (Comparative Politics)

PSCI0103Y-S17

CRN: 20577

Intro to Comparative Politics
Discussion - PSCI 0103 B
Introduction to Comparative Politics
This course offers an introduction to the comparative study of political systems and to the logic of comparative inquiry. How are different political systems created and organized? How and why do they change? Why are some democratic and others authoritarian? Why are some rich and others poor? Other topics covered in this course include nationalism and political ideologies, forms of representation, the relationship between state institutions and civil society, and globalization. The goal in this course is to use comparative methods to analyze questions of state institutions -- how they arise, change, and generate different economic, social, and political outcome. 3 hrs. lect./disc. (Comparative Politics)

PSCI0103Z-S17

CRN: 20578

Intro to Comparative Politics
Discussion - PSCI 0103 B
Introduction to Comparative Politics
This course offers an introduction to the comparative study of political systems and to the logic of comparative inquiry. How are different political systems created and organized? How and why do they change? Why are some democratic and others authoritarian? Why are some rich and others poor? Other topics covered in this course include nationalism and political ideologies, forms of representation, the relationship between state institutions and civil society, and globalization. The goal in this course is to use comparative methods to analyze questions of state institutions -- how they arise, change, and generate different economic, social, and political outcome. 3 hrs. lect./disc. (Comparative Politics)

PSCI0104A-S17

CRN: 22155

Intro to American Politics
Introduction to American Politics
This course introduces the institutions and practices of American government and politics. The aim is to give students a firm understanding of the workings of and the balance of power among the American Congress, President, bureaucracy, and court system. We begin with the Constitution, which provides the set of founding principles upon which the American government is based. We then look at how American citizens make decisions about politics. Finally, we examine how political institutions, interest groups, parties, elections, and legislative bodies and rules aggregate diverse, often conflicting preferences and how they resolve or exacerbate problems. 3 hrs. lect./disc. (American Politics)/

PSCI0104X-S17

CRN: 22156

Intro to American Politics
Discussion
Introduction to American Politics
This course introduces the institutions and practices of American government and politics. The aim is to give students a firm understanding of the workings of and the balance of power among the American Congress, President, bureaucracy, and court system. We begin with the Constitution, which provides the set of founding principles upon which the American government is based. We then look at how American citizens make decisions about politics. Finally, we examine how political institutions, interest groups, parties, elections, and legislative bodies and rules aggregate diverse, often conflicting preferences and how they resolve or exacerbate problems. 3 hrs. lect./disc. (American Politics)/

PSCI0104Y-S17

CRN: 22157

Intro to American Politics
Discussion
Introduction to American Politics
This course introduces the institutions and practices of American government and politics. The aim is to give students a firm understanding of the workings of and the balance of power among the American Congress, President, bureaucracy, and court system. We begin with the Constitution, which provides the set of founding principles upon which the American government is based. We then look at how American citizens make decisions about politics. Finally, we examine how political institutions, interest groups, parties, elections, and legislative bodies and rules aggregate diverse, often conflicting preferences and how they resolve or exacerbate problems. 3 hrs. lect./disc. (American Politics)/

PSCI0104Z-S17

CRN: 22158

Intro to American Politics
Discussion
Introduction to American Politics
This course introduces the institutions and practices of American government and politics. The aim is to give students a firm understanding of the workings of and the balance of power among the American Congress, President, bureaucracy, and court system. We begin with the Constitution, which provides the set of founding principles upon which the American government is based. We then look at how American citizens make decisions about politics. Finally, we examine how political institutions, interest groups, parties, elections, and legislative bodies and rules aggregate diverse, often conflicting preferences and how they resolve or exacerbate problems. 3 hrs. lect./disc. (American Politics)/

PSCI0109A-S17

CRN: 20933

International Politics
International Politics
What causes conflict or cooperation among states? What can states and other international entities do to preserve global peace? These are among the issues addressed by the study of international politics. This course examines the forces that shape relations among states, and between states and international regimes. Key concepts include: the international system, power and the balance of power, international institutions, foreign policy, diplomacy, deterrence, war, and global economic issues. Both the fall and spring sections of this course emphasize rigorous analysis and set theoretical concepts against historical and contemporary case studies. 3 hrs. lect./disc. (International Relations and Foreign Policy)/

PSCI0109B-S17

CRN: 22465

International Politics
International Politics
What causes conflict or cooperation among states? What can states and other international entities do to preserve global peace? These are among the issues addressed by the study of international politics. This course examines the forces that shape relations among states, and between states and international regimes. Key concepts include: the international system, power and the balance of power, international institutions, foreign policy, diplomacy, deterrence, war, and global economic issues. Both the fall and spring sections of this course emphasize rigorous analysis and set theoretical concepts against historical and contemporary case studies. 3 hrs. lect./disc. (International Relations and Foreign Policy)/

PSCI0109T-S17

CRN: 22466

International Politics
Discussion - PSCI 0109 A
International Politics
What causes conflict or cooperation among states? What can states and other international entities do to preserve global peace? These are among the issues addressed by the study of international politics. This course examines the forces that shape relations among states, and between states and international regimes. Key concepts include: the international system, power and the balance of power, international institutions, foreign policy, diplomacy, deterrence, war, and global economic issues. Both the fall and spring sections of this course emphasize rigorous analysis and set theoretical concepts against historical and contemporary case studies. 3 hrs. lect./disc. (International Relations and Foreign Policy)/

PSCI0109U-S17

CRN: 22467

International Politics
Discussion - PSCI 0109 A
International Politics
What causes conflict or cooperation among states? What can states and other international entities do to preserve global peace? These are among the issues addressed by the study of international politics. This course examines the forces that shape relations among states, and between states and international regimes. Key concepts include: the international system, power and the balance of power, international institutions, foreign policy, diplomacy, deterrence, war, and global economic issues. Both the fall and spring sections of this course emphasize rigorous analysis and set theoretical concepts against historical and contemporary case studies. 3 hrs. lect./disc. (International Relations and Foreign Policy)/

PSCI0109V-S17

CRN: 22468

International Politics
Discussion - PSCI 0109 A
International Politics
What causes conflict or cooperation among states? What can states and other international entities do to preserve global peace? These are among the issues addressed by the study of international politics. This course examines the forces that shape relations among states, and between states and international regimes. Key concepts include: the international system, power and the balance of power, international institutions, foreign policy, diplomacy, deterrence, war, and global economic issues. Both the fall and spring sections of this course emphasize rigorous analysis and set theoretical concepts against historical and contemporary case studies. 3 hrs. lect./disc. (International Relations and Foreign Policy)/

PSCI0109W-S17

CRN: 21809

International Politics
Discussion - PSCI 0109 A
International Politics
What causes conflict or cooperation among states? What can states and other international entities do to preserve global peace? These are among the issues addressed by the study of international politics. This course examines the forces that shape relations among states, and between states and international regimes. Key concepts include: the international system, power and the balance of power, international institutions, foreign policy, diplomacy, deterrence, war, and global economic issues. Both the fall and spring sections of this course emphasize rigorous analysis and set theoretical concepts against historical and contemporary case studies. 3 hrs. lect./disc. (International Relations and Foreign Policy)/

PSCI0109X-S17

CRN: 20934

International Politics
Discussion - PSCI 0109 B
International Politics
What causes conflict or cooperation among states? What can states and other international entities do to preserve global peace? These are among the issues addressed by the study of international politics. This course examines the forces that shape relations among states, and between states and international regimes. Key concepts include: the international system, power and the balance of power, international institutions, foreign policy, diplomacy, deterrence, war, and global economic issues. Both the fall and spring sections of this course emphasize rigorous analysis and set theoretical concepts against historical and contemporary case studies. 3 hrs. lect./disc. (International Relations and Foreign Policy)/

PSCI0109Y-S17

CRN: 20935

International Politics
Discussion - PSCI 0109 B
International Politics
What causes conflict or cooperation among states? What can states and other international entities do to preserve global peace? These are among the issues addressed by the study of international politics. This course examines the forces that shape relations among states, and between states and international regimes. Key concepts include: the international system, power and the balance of power, international institutions, foreign policy, diplomacy, deterrence, war, and global economic issues. Both the fall and spring sections of this course emphasize rigorous analysis and set theoretical concepts against historical and contemporary case studies. 3 hrs. lect./disc. (International Relations and Foreign Policy)/

PSCI0109Z-S17

CRN: 20936

International Politics
Discussion - PSCI 0109 B
International Politics
What causes conflict or cooperation among states? What can states and other international entities do to preserve global peace? These are among the issues addressed by the study of international politics. This course examines the forces that shape relations among states, and between states and international regimes. Key concepts include: the international system, power and the balance of power, international institutions, foreign policy, diplomacy, deterrence, war, and global economic issues. Both the fall and spring sections of this course emphasize rigorous analysis and set theoretical concepts against historical and contemporary case studies. 3 hrs. lect./disc. (International Relations and Foreign Policy)/

PSCI0204A-S17

CRN: 22451

Left, Right, and Center
Left, Right, and Center
In this course, we shall examine liberalism, conservatism, socialism and their competing conceptions of freedom, equality, the individual, and community. We shall consider the origins of these ideologies in early modern political theory and shall afford special attention to the connection between thought and politics. Authors may include John Locke, Adam Smith, Edmund Burke, Alexis de Tocqueville, Karl Marx, Friedrich Nietzsche, John Rawls, Michel Foucault, Michael Oakeshott, and Friedrich Hayek. 3 hrs. lect. (Political Theory)

PSCI0206A-S17

CRN: 22159

American Presidency
The American Presidency
This course examines the development and modern practice of presidential leadership. Focus is on presidential decision-making, changes in the structure of the presidency as an institution, differences among individual presidents, and the interaction of the president with other major actors, including national governing institutions (executive branch, Congress, courts), interest groups, media, and the public. The course includes an historical overview of the evolution of the presidency, and examines changes in the electoral process. (PSCI 0102 or PSCI 0104 or waiver) 3 hrs. lect./disc. (American Politics)/

PSCI0217A-S17

CRN: 21660

Politics of M. East & N.Africa
Politics of the Middle East and North Africa
This course is an introduction to important themes, concepts, and cases in the study of Middle Eastern and North African politics. We will examine key political issues in the region, focusing primarily on developments since World War II and issues of relevance to the region today. For the purposes of this course, the region is defined as the countries of the Arab world, Israel, Turkey, and Iran. The first half of the course introduces major themes in Middle Eastern politics. These include state development, nationalism, revolution, authoritarian rule, the petro-state, the Arab-Israeli conflict, conflicts in the Persian Gulf, civil conflict, the rise of Islamism, and attempts at liberal reform. The second half of the course examines how these themes have affected political development in a number of key cases. Primary cases include Egypt, Israel, Iran, Morocco, Turkey, Saudi Arabia, and Iraq. Students will have the opportunity to individually assess other countries of personal interest in the region. 3 hrs. lect./disc. (Comparative Politics)/

PSCI0226A-S17

CRN: 22160

European Union
The European Union
The European integration project was launched in the aftermath of World War II as a means of making war between European states impossible. By the 1970s, this romantic aspiration for an ever closer union of Europeans gave way to a project focused on enhancing the global competitiveness of Europe's economies. In this course we will investigate the tension between these two visions of an integrated Europe by focusing on the historical evolution of the European Union and its institutions, practical and conceptual problems encountered in the integration process, and recent challenges posed by sharing a single currency and having open borders. 3 hrs. lect./disc. (International Relations and Foreign Policy)/

PSCI0227A-S17

CRN: 21416

Soviet & Russian Politics
Soviet and Russian Politics
This course seeks to introduce the student to a major phenomenon of 20th century politics, the rise and decline of the Soviet Union and the emergence of Russia as its successor state. The first part of the course provides an overview of key factors that influenced Russian and Soviet politics under communism, including history, economy, ideology, institutions of the communist party, and the role of political leadership from Lenin to Gorbachev. The second part surveys radical political and social transformations in the 1990s and analyzes Russia's struggle with the twin challenges of democratic and market reform under Yeltsin and Putin. 3 hrs. lect./disc. (Comparative Politics)/

PSCI0227X-S17

CRN: 21417

Soviet & Russian Politics
Discussion
Soviet and Russian Politics
This course seeks to introduce the student to a major phenomenon of 20th century politics, the rise and decline of the Soviet Union and the emergence of Russia as its successor state. The first part of the course provides an overview of key factors that influenced Russian and Soviet politics under communism, including history, economy, ideology, institutions of the communist party, and the role of political leadership from Lenin to Gorbachev. The second part surveys radical political and social transformations in the 1990s and analyzes Russia's struggle with the twin challenges of democratic and market reform under Yeltsin and Putin. 3 hrs. lect./disc. (Comparative Politics)/

PSCI0227Y-S17

CRN: 21418

Soviet & Russian Politics
Discussion
Soviet and Russian Politics
This course seeks to introduce the student to a major phenomenon of 20th century politics, the rise and decline of the Soviet Union and the emergence of Russia as its successor state. The first part of the course provides an overview of key factors that influenced Russian and Soviet politics under communism, including history, economy, ideology, institutions of the communist party, and the role of political leadership from Lenin to Gorbachev. The second part surveys radical political and social transformations in the 1990s and analyzes Russia's struggle with the twin challenges of democratic and market reform under Yeltsin and Putin. 3 hrs. lect./disc. (Comparative Politics)/

PSCI0227Z-S17

CRN: 21419

Soviet & Russian Politics
Discussion
Soviet and Russian Politics
This course seeks to introduce the student to a major phenomenon of 20th century politics, the rise and decline of the Soviet Union and the emergence of Russia as its successor state. The first part of the course provides an overview of key factors that influenced Russian and Soviet politics under communism, including history, economy, ideology, institutions of the communist party, and the role of political leadership from Lenin to Gorbachev. The second part surveys radical political and social transformations in the 1990s and analyzes Russia's struggle with the twin challenges of democratic and market reform under Yeltsin and Putin. 3 hrs. lect./disc. (Comparative Politics)/

PSCI0239A-S17

CRN: 21813

Future Great Power Relations
The Future of Great Power Relations
Will America’s global preeminence endure in the 21st century? Will Russia, Japan, and the European Union decline while other powers grow more influential? In this course we will explore the future global balance of power and prospects for cooperation and conflict among the world’s great powers. Topics include the rise of Brazil, China, and India; the changing nature of American power; the causality of global power shifts and their implications for cooperation or competition on issues such as energy security, cyber security, nuclear nonproliferation, UN Security Council reform, intervention in the Middle East, and Sino-American relations. (PSCI 0109) 3 hrs. sem. (International Relations and Foreign Policy)/

PSCI0242A-S17

CRN: 21432

International Politics and WMD
International Politics and WMD
In this course we will examine the international ramifications of nuclear, biological, and chemical weapons use. What is a weapon of mass destruction (WMD)? How have WMD changed the way states behave toward international conflicts and within international crises? How has the development of these weapons influenced the policies states have adopted in response? Beyond these questions, major course themes include the threats of proliferation and the highs and lows of weapons reduction initiatives. 3 hrs. lect./disc. (International Relations and Foreign Policy)/

PSCI0242Y-S17

CRN: 21433

International Politics and WMD
Discussion
International Politics and WMD
In this course we will examine the international ramifications of nuclear, biological, and chemical weapons use. What is a weapon of mass destruction (WMD)? How have WMD changed the way states behave toward international conflicts and within international crises? How has the development of these weapons influenced the policies states have adopted in response? Beyond these questions, major course themes include the threats of proliferation and the highs and lows of weapons reduction initiatives. 3 hrs. lect./disc. (International Relations and Foreign Policy)/

PSCI0242Z-S17

CRN: 21814

International Politics and WMD
Discussion
International Politics and WMD
In this course we will examine the international ramifications of nuclear, biological, and chemical weapons use. What is a weapon of mass destruction (WMD)? How have WMD changed the way states behave toward international conflicts and within international crises? How has the development of these weapons influenced the policies states have adopted in response? Beyond these questions, major course themes include the threats of proliferation and the highs and lows of weapons reduction initiatives. 3 hrs. lect./disc. (International Relations and Foreign Policy)/

PSCI0251A-S17

CRN: 22426

Identity/Conflict South Asia
Identity and Conflict in South Asia
In this course we will examine political development and conflict in South Asia through the concept of identity. South Asians take on a variety of identities -- ethnic, religious, linguistic, caste, national, etc. These identities often form the basis of political mobilization and both inter- and intrastate conflict. We will study the general concept of identity, including how identities are constructed and used, and then specific manifestations in South Asia. We will also examine the question of whether these identities were constructed during colonial or post-colonial times, or have an earlier basis. (International Relations and Foreign Policy)/

PSCI0258A-S17

CRN: 21579

Pols Intl Humanitarian Action
The Politics of International Humanitarian Action
Humanitarian intervention has emerged as a new moral imperative that challenges traditional concepts and practices in international relations. In this course we will consider how a range of actors--international organizations, states, NGOs--understand the concept of humanitarian intervention and engage (or not) in humanitarian actions. We will examine a variety of policy choices, including aid and military intervention, through case studies, including Somalia, Kosovo, and Rwanda. The goal of the course is to enable students to assess critically the benefits and challenges of a humanitarian approach to global politics. 3 hrs. lect./disc. (International Relations and Foreign Policy)/

PSCI0260A-S17

CRN: 21142

Pol Economy Drug Trafficking
The Political Economy of Drug Trafficking
This course examines the political economy of drug trafficking in the Western Hemisphere. How have transnational drug markets evolved, and why? What effects has narco-trafficking had on the political, economic, legal, financial, and social systems of producer, consumer, and transshipment countries? What policy responses are available to combat it? How should we weigh alternative policy options? Examination of these issues centers on source countries in Latin America's Andean region, the chief transshipment country (Mexico), and the principal consumer country (the US). Attention also is devoted to the drug trade's effects on American society and criminal justice system. 3 hrs. lect./disc.
(International Relations and Foreign Policy)/

PSCI0282A-S17

CRN: 22161

Power and Violence in America
Power and Violence in America: An Historical Approach to Politics
In this course we will explore the complex relationship between industrialization, the labor movement, race relations, and the organization of violence in America. Students will learn about major events in American history, from the founding of the United States through the end of World War II. The topics covered include labor strikes, riots, and ethnic and racial tensions, as well as the related formation of police forces, private security guards, and vigilante groups. In learning about such conflicts, we will examine the indelible mark that these events left on American political development in the twentieth and twenty-first centuries. Throughout the semester, students will encounter fundamental questions concerning the distribution of income and the use of force in American society. This course is being taught simultaneously at Amherst College and will include a virtual classroom component as well as opportunities for inter-collegiate collaboration. 3 hrs. sem. (American Politics)

PSCI0282Z-S17

CRN: 22163

Power and Violence in America
Discussion
Power and Violence in America: An Historical Approach to Politics
In this course we will explore the complex relationship between industrialization, the labor movement, race relations, and the organization of violence in America. Students will learn about major events in American history, from the founding of the United States through the end of World War II. The topics covered include labor strikes, riots, and ethnic and racial tensions, as well as the related formation of police forces, private security guards, and vigilante groups. In learning about such conflicts, we will examine the indelible mark that these events left on American political development in the twentieth and twenty-first centuries. Throughout the semester, students will encounter fundamental questions concerning the distribution of income and the use of force in American society. This course is being taught simultaneously at Amherst College and will include a virtual classroom component as well as opportunities for inter-collegiate collaboration. 3 hrs. sem. (American Politics)

PSCI0304A-S17

CRN: 20569

Internatl Political Economy
International Political Economy
This course examines the politics of global economic relations, focusing principally on the advanced industrial states. How do governments and firms deal with the forces of globalization and interdependence? And what are the causes and consequences of their actions for the international system in turn? The course exposes students to both classic and contemporary thinking on free trade and protectionism, exchange rates and monetary systems, foreign direct investment and capital movements, regional integration, and the role of international institutions like the WTO. Readings will be drawn mainly from political science, as well as law and economics. (PSCI 0109) 3 hrs. lect./disc.
(International Relations and Foreign Policy)/

PSCI0304Y-S17

CRN: 22164

Internatl Political Economy
Discussion
International Political Economy
This course examines the politics of global economic relations, focusing principally on the advanced industrial states. How do governments and firms deal with the forces of globalization and interdependence? And what are the causes and consequences of their actions for the international system in turn? The course exposes students to both classic and contemporary thinking on free trade and protectionism, exchange rates and monetary systems, foreign direct investment and capital movements, regional integration, and the role of international institutions like the WTO. Readings will be drawn mainly from political science, as well as law and economics. (PSCI 0109) 3 hrs. lect./disc.
(International Relations and Foreign Policy)/

PSCI0304Z-S17

CRN: 22165

Internatl Political Economy
Discussion
International Political Economy
This course examines the politics of global economic relations, focusing principally on the advanced industrial states. How do governments and firms deal with the forces of globalization and interdependence? And what are the causes and consequences of their actions for the international system in turn? The course exposes students to both classic and contemporary thinking on free trade and protectionism, exchange rates and monetary systems, foreign direct investment and capital movements, regional integration, and the role of international institutions like the WTO. Readings will be drawn mainly from political science, as well as law and economics. (PSCI 0109) 3 hrs. lect./disc.
(International Relations and Foreign Policy)/

PSCI0306A-S17

Cross-Listed As:
INTD0306A-S17

CRN: 22469

American Constitutional Law
Please Register Via INTD 0306
American Constitutional Law: The First Amendment
This course focuses on the Supreme Court’s interpretation of the first amendment freedoms of speech, press, and religion. After starting with the philosophic foundations of these first amendment freedoms (Mill, Locke), students will read the major Supreme Court decisions concerning these rights. Class assignments in the form of oral arguments and briefs and/or options will enable students to take the part of lawyers and judges. (Sophomores, juniors and seniors with PSCI 0102 or 0104 or 0205 or 0206 or 0305 or waiver) 3 hrs. lect./disc. (American Politics)/

PSCI0321A-S17

Cross-Listed As:
PSCI0321B-S17

CRN: 22166

Anglo vs. Franco Africa
Anglophone vs. Francophone Africa
Multiple European powers fought to colonize Africa, but only a few prevailed. In this course we will focus on two major post-colonial blocs: English- and French-speaking Africa. We will examine whether, to what extent, and why the current political systems of Anglophone Africa differ from those of Francophone Africa. To do so, we will explore variations in modes of colonial rule, processes of decolonization, and post-colonial political developments in Algeria, Belgian Congo, Madagascar, Senegal, Cameroon, Kenya, Nigeria, South Africa, and Uganda. 3 hrs. lect./disc. (Comparative Politics)/

PSCI0321B-S17

Cross-Listed As:
PSCI0321A-S17

CRN: 22470

Anglo vs. Franco Africa
Anglophone vs. Francophone Africa
Multiple European powers fought to colonize Africa, but only a few prevailed. In this course we will focus on two major post-colonial blocs: English- and French-speaking Africa. We will examine whether, to what extent, and why the current political systems of Anglophone Africa differ from those of Francophone Africa. To do so, we will explore variations in modes of colonial rule, processes of decolonization, and post-colonial political developments in Algeria, Belgian Congo, Madagascar, Senegal, Cameroon, Kenya, Nigeria, South Africa, and Uganda. 3 hrs. lect./disc. (Comparative Politics)/

PSCI0322A-S17

CRN: 21582

War and Peace
War and Peace
What causes conflicts between states and within countries? What factors facilitate or impede their resolution? In this course we will examine interstate and intrastate conflicts and the challenges faced in resolving them, from both practical and theoretical perspectives. Employing some of the most prominent theories on war, and more recent theories of bargaining, negotiation, and conflict, we will draw upon a range of case studies to illustrate and evaluate the theoretical dynamics of conflict and conflict resolution. (PSCI 0109 or PSCI 0201 or by waiver) 3 hrs. lect./disc. (International Relations and Foreign Policy)/

PSCI0324A-S17

CRN: 21420

Pol Development Western Europe
The Political Development of Western Europe
In what ways are the political systems and politics of France, Germany, Italy, and Britain similar? In what ways do they differ? How might we explain these patterns? This course attempts to answer these questions through comparative investigation of the processes and consequences of economic and political modernization in these nations from the feudal period to the 21st century. 3 hrs. lect./disc. (Comparative Politics)/

PSCI0349A-S17

CRN: 21618

Intl Politics of Middle East
International Politics of the Middle East
In this course we will study the evolution of the inter-state system in the Middle East. Using contemporary International Relations (IR) theories we will examine the influence of great powers, regional states, transnational movements, and regional organizations on state interests, ideology, religion, and the region's political economy. Questions to be addressed will include: which levels of analyses are most helpful in understanding the complexity of Middle East politics? Which of the IR theories--realist, liberal, or constructivist-- best explain inter-state relations in the region? What other approaches may be useful in this endeavor? 3 hrs. sem. (International Relations and Foreign Policy)/

PSCI0368A-S17

CRN: 22167

Frontiers in Political Science
Frontiers in Political Science Research
Nothing is more controversial among political scientists than the topic of how to study politics. In this course, we consider a variety of advanced techniques for studying political phenomena, including statistical methods, game theory, institutional analysis, case study techniques, experiments, and agent-based modeling. We will work with concrete examples (drawn from major political science journals) of how scholars have used these techniques, and consider the ongoing philosophical controversies associated with each approach. Students will have the opportunity to conduct original research using a method and subject of their choosing. (Two political science courses) 3 hrs. lect.disc. (Political Theory)/

PSCI0392A-S17

CRN: 21675

Insurgency and Security Policy
Insurgency and Security Policy
In the post-Cold War era insurgency is the predominant form of conflict and now tops the list of major security concerns. Understanding the origins and tactics of insurgency in cases around the world in comparative perspective allows students to develop nuanced analyses of how security strategy should be improved to combat emergent non-state threats. How have insurgent tactics evolved in response to changing military, political, technological, and geographical conditions? What are the implications for international intervention and homeland security policy? This course brings Middlebury and Monterey students together in pursuit of this broad policy objective. Note: To align the Middlebury and MIIS schedules, Middlebury students will need to begin their coursework prior to the end of Winter Term, and will need to be available to meet during the course’s non-standard time. 4 hrs. lect./disc. (International Relations and Foreign Policy)/

PSCI0421A-S17

CRN: 21144

American Environ Politics
American Environmental Politics
In this seminar we will examine various aspects of environmental politics in the United States. Topics to be covered include how society seeks to influence environmental policy (through public opinion, voting and interest groups,) and how policy is made through Congress, the executive branch, the courts, collaboration, and through the states. Policy case studies will vary from year to year. Students will write a major research paper on an aspect of U.S. environmental politics. (PSCI/ENVS 0211; open to PSCI/ESEP majors, others by approval) 3 hrs. sem. (American Politics)

PSCI0425A-S17

CRN: 22168

American Presidency
The American Presidency
In-depth examination of the exercise of presidential leadership from a normative and empirical perspective. What are the sources of presidential power, the constraints on its use, and the implications for the American political system? The focus is on the leadership strategies of the modern presidents (FDR through Obama). (PSCI 0102 or PSCI 0104 or PSCI 0206 or waiver) 3 hrs. sem. (American Politics)/

PSCI0435A-S17

CRN: 22413

Contemporary Political Theory
PSCI 0435 Contemporary Political Theory (Spring 2017)In this seminar, we will study problems and debates in American and European political theory from 1945 to the present. Students will explore a broad range of topics, including the revival of political philosophy, positivism, relativism, rationalism, totalitarianism, contemporary liberal theory, communitarianism, conservatism, multiculturalism, and postmodernism. We will study major works by some of the 20th century’s most influential political thinkers. Authors may include Hannah Arendt, Michael Oakeshott, Leo Strauss, Isaiah Berlin, Eric Voegelin, John Rawls, Michael Sandel, Iris Marion Young, Michael Walzer, Will Kymlicka, Richard Rorty, and Michel Foucault. (One course in Political Theory or one course in Philosophy) (Not open to students who have taken PSCI 1035) 3 hrs. sem. (Political Theory)/

PSCI0449A-S17

CRN: 21817

Chinese Foreign Policy
China's grand strategy is "peaceful rise," meaning that soft power is used to accomplish policy goals. In this course we will examine China's foreign policy at three levels. At the neighbor-state level, we will focus on territorial conflicts like Taiwan and Tibet, nuclear proliferation in North Korea, and security alliances between Japan and the US. At the regional level, we will analyze economic and environmental issues involving Association of Southeast Asian Nations (ASEAN) states. At the international level, we will focus on oil diplomacy and China’s role in the UN. In addition to international factors, we will examine domestic explanations of policy such as legitimacy, culture, and ideology. 3 hrs. sem. (International Relations and Foreign Policy)/

PSCI0452A-S17

CRN: 22169

Global Environmental Justice
Ecocriticism and Global Environmental Justice
Many global environmental problems—climate change, biodiversity, deforestation, clean water, and transboundary waste movement—are ineffectively managed. In this course we will take a critical look at these failures and ask: do existing norms and attitudes make effective, sustainable environmental management more difficult? In doing so, we will examine institutions and phenomena such as the sovereign nation-state, free market capitalism, and the authority of scientific knowledge. We will ask whether sustainable management is compatible with these institutions and phenomena, or whether they contribute to environmental injustice, racism, political marginalization, and gender and class inequity by studying contemporary and historic examples. 3 hrs. sem. (International Relations and Foreign Policy)/

PSCI0454A-S17

CRN: 21421

Leadership Pol & Personality
Leadership: Politics and Personality
What difference do leaders make? Are leaders born or made? What accounts for effective leadership? Do answers to these questions change when the social, cultural, and political context varies? This course will approach the subject of leadership from a multidisciplinary perspective, focusing on (1) the individual personalities and values of leaders; (2) the relationship of leaders to the institutions they serve; (3) the role of the state and cultural context in which the leadership is exercised; and (4) the process of leading. (One course in comparative politics) 3 hrs. sem. (Comparative Politics)/

PSCI0458A-S17

Cross-Listed As:
GSFS0458A-S17

CRN: 22414

Race, Gender, & Class Politics
The U.S. Politics of Race, Gender, and Class
Race, gender, and class have long shaped American politics. They have formed the basis for social movements, have structured institutions, and have affected the way political actors–from voters to activists to elected officials–have made their day-to-day decisions. What do political scientists know about the roles that race, gender, and class play in politics, separately and together, and what do we yet have to learn? (PSCI 0102 or PSCI 0104) 3 hrs. sem. (American Politics)/

PSCI0470A-S17

CRN: 22170

Race and Ethnic Politics
Race and Ethnic Politics
This seminar is designed to build upon students' own interests, as each participant will write a 30-35 page research paper on a topic in race and ethnic politics that they have selected, drawing on any time period, country, or region of the world. We will discuss how to craft a research paper and will collectively workshop student papers-in-progress. This course will be of particular interest to seniors wishing to engage in a capstone project, or to juniors exploring a potential senior thesis topic. 3 hrs. sem. (Comparative Politics)/

PSCI0500A-S17

CRN: 20123

Independent Project
Independent Projects
A program of independent work designed to meet the individual needs of advanced students. (Approval required)

PSCI0500C-S17

CRN: 20833

Independent Project
Independent Projects
A program of independent work designed to meet the individual needs of advanced students. (Approval required)

PSCI0500D-S17

CRN: 20136

Independent Project
Independent Projects
A program of independent work designed to meet the individual needs of advanced students. (Approval required)

PSCI0500E-S17

CRN: 20138

Independent Project
Independent Projects
A program of independent work designed to meet the individual needs of advanced students. (Approval required)

PSCI0500F-S17

CRN: 20140

Independent Project
Independent Projects
A program of independent work designed to meet the individual needs of advanced students. (Approval required)

PSCI0500G-S17

CRN: 20141

Independent Project
Independent Projects
A program of independent work designed to meet the individual needs of advanced students. (Approval required)

PSCI0500H-S17

CRN: 20142

Independent Project
Independent Projects
A program of independent work designed to meet the individual needs of advanced students. (Approval required)

PSCI0500I-S17

CRN: 20143

Independent Project
Independent Projects
A program of independent work designed to meet the individual needs of advanced students. (Approval required)

PSCI0500J-S17

CRN: 20144

Independent Project
Independent Projects
A program of independent work designed to meet the individual needs of advanced students. (Approval required)

PSCI0500K-S17

CRN: 20834

Independent Project
Independent Projects
A program of independent work designed to meet the individual needs of advanced students. (Approval required)

PSCI0500L-S17

CRN: 20146

Independent Project
Independent Projects
A program of independent work designed to meet the individual needs of advanced students. (Approval required)

PSCI0500M-S17

CRN: 20519

Independent Project
Independent Projects
A program of independent work designed to meet the individual needs of advanced students. (Approval required)

PSCI0500N-S17

CRN: 20561

Independent Project
Independent Projects
A program of independent work designed to meet the individual needs of advanced students. (Approval required)

PSCI0500O-S17

CRN: 21334

Independent Project
Independent Projects
A program of independent work designed to meet the individual needs of advanced students. (Approval required)

PSCI0500P-S17

CRN: 20654

Independent Project
Independent Projects
A program of independent work designed to meet the individual needs of advanced students. (Approval required)

PSCI0500Q-S17

CRN: 20655

Independent Project
Independent Projects
A program of independent work designed to meet the individual needs of advanced students. (Approval required)

PSCI0500S-S17

CRN: 20657

Independent Project
Independent Projects
A program of independent work designed to meet the individual needs of advanced students. (Approval required)

PSCI0500U-S17

CRN: 21091

Independent Project
Independent Projects
A program of independent work designed to meet the individual needs of advanced students. (Approval required)

PSCI0500V-S17

CRN: 21092

Independent Project
Independent Projects
A program of independent work designed to meet the individual needs of advanced students. (Approval required)

PSCI0500W-S17

CRN: 21145

Independent Project
Independent Projects
A program of independent work designed to meet the individual needs of advanced students. (Approval required)

PSCI0500X-S17

CRN: 21594

Independent Project
Independent Projects
A program of independent work designed to meet the individual needs of advanced students. (Approval required)

PSCI0700A-S17

CRN: 20147

Honors Thesis
Honors Thesis
(Approval required)

PSCI0700C-S17

CRN: 20835

Honors Thesis
Honors Thesis
(Approval required)

PSCI0700D-S17

CRN: 20150

Honors Thesis
Honors Thesis
(Approval required)

PSCI0700E-S17

CRN: 20151

Honors Thesis
Honors Thesis
(Approval required)

PSCI0700F-S17

CRN: 20152

Honors Thesis
Honors Thesis
(Approval required)

PSCI0700G-S17

CRN: 20836

Honors Thesis
Honors Thesis
(Approval required)

PSCI0700H-S17

CRN: 20154

Honors Thesis
Honors Thesis
(Approval required)

PSCI0700I-S17

CRN: 20155

Honors Thesis
Honors Thesis
(Approval required)

PSCI0700J-S17

CRN: 20158

Honors Thesis
Honors Thesis
(Approval required)

PSCI0700K-S17

CRN: 20160

Honors Thesis
Honors Thesis
(Approval required)

PSCI0700L-S17

CRN: 20161

Honors Thesis
Honors Thesis
(Approval required)

PSCI0700M-S17

CRN: 20658

Honors Thesis
Honors Thesis
(Approval required)

PSCI0700N-S17

CRN: 20562

Honors Thesis
Honors Thesis
(Approval required)

PSCI0700O-S17

CRN: 21165

Honors Thesis
Honors Thesis
(Approval required)

PSCI0700P-S17

CRN: 20659

Honors Thesis
Honors Thesis
(Approval required)

PSCI0700Q-S17

CRN: 20660

Honors Thesis
Honors Thesis
(Approval required)

PSCI0700S-S17

CRN: 20662

Honors Thesis
Honors Thesis
(Approval required)

PSCI0700U-S17

CRN: 21093

Honors Thesis
Honors Thesis
(Approval required)

PSCI0700V-S17

CRN: 21094

Honors Thesis
Honors Thesis
(Approval required)

PSCI0700W-S17

CRN: 21146

Honors Thesis
Honors Thesis
(Approval required)

PSCI0700X-S17

CRN: 21635

Honors Thesis
Honors Thesis
(Approval required)