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PSCI0101A-F14

CRN: 92690

Intro to Political Philosophy

Introduction to Political Philosophy
What is politics? What is the purpose of politics? Is there a best regime? Is it attainable? What is justice? What is the good life? How is each related to political life? Is there a science of politics? In this course, we will raise these and other fundamental questions through a study of major ancient and modern works of political philosophy. Authors may include Plato, Aristotle, Augustine, Machiavelli, Hobbes, Locke, Montesquieu, Rousseau, Constant, Tocqueville, Mill, Marx, and Nietzsche. 3 hrs. lect./disc. (Political Theory)

PSCI0101X-F14

CRN: 92693

Intro to Political Philosophy
Discussion

Introduction to Political Philosophy
What is politics? What is the purpose of politics? Is there a best regime? Is it attainable? What is justice? What is the good life? How is each related to political life? Is there a science of politics? In this course, we will raise these and other fundamental questions through a study of major ancient and modern works of political philosophy. Authors may include Plato, Aristotle, Augustine, Machiavelli, Hobbes, Locke, Montesquieu, Rousseau, Constant, Tocqueville, Mill, Marx, and Nietzsche. 3 hrs. lect./disc. (Political Theory)

PSCI0101Y-F14

CRN: 92691

Intro to Political Philosophy
Discussion

Introduction to Political Philosophy
What is politics? What is the purpose of politics? Is there a best regime? Is it attainable? What is justice? What is the good life? How is each related to political life? Is there a science of politics? In this course, we will raise these and other fundamental questions through a study of major ancient and modern works of political philosophy. Authors may include Plato, Aristotle, Augustine, Machiavelli, Hobbes, Locke, Montesquieu, Rousseau, Constant, Tocqueville, Mill, Marx, and Nietzsche. 3 hrs. lect./disc. (Political Theory)

PSCI0101Z-F14

CRN: 92692

Intro to Political Philosophy
Discussion

Introduction to Political Philosophy
What is politics? What is the purpose of politics? Is there a best regime? Is it attainable? What is justice? What is the good life? How is each related to political life? Is there a science of politics? In this course, we will raise these and other fundamental questions through a study of major ancient and modern works of political philosophy. Authors may include Plato, Aristotle, Augustine, Machiavelli, Hobbes, Locke, Montesquieu, Rousseau, Constant, Tocqueville, Mill, Marx, and Nietzsche. 3 hrs. lect./disc. (Political Theory)

PSCI0103A-F14

CRN: 90606

Intro to Comparative Politics

Introduction to Comparative Politics
This course offers an introduction to the comparative study of political systems and to the logic of comparative inquiry. How are different political systems created and organized? How and why do they change? Why are some democratic and others authoritarian? Why are some rich and others poor? Other topics covered in this course include nationalism and political ideologies, forms of representation, the relationship between state institutions and civil society, and globalization. The goal in this course is to use comparative methods to analyze questions of state institutions -- how they arise, change, and generate different economic, social, and political outcome. 3 hrs. lect./disc. (Comparative Politics)

PSCI0103X-F14

CRN: 91856

Intro to Comparative Politics
Discussion

Introduction to Comparative Politics
This course offers an introduction to the comparative study of political systems and to the logic of comparative inquiry. How are different political systems created and organized? How and why do they change? Why are some democratic and others authoritarian? Why are some rich and others poor? Other topics covered in this course include nationalism and political ideologies, forms of representation, the relationship between state institutions and civil society, and globalization. The goal in this course is to use comparative methods to analyze questions of state institutions -- how they arise, change, and generate different economic, social, and political outcome. 3 hrs. lect./disc. (Comparative Politics)

PSCI0103Y-F14

CRN: 91857

Intro to Comparative Politics
Discussion

Introduction to Comparative Politics
This course offers an introduction to the comparative study of political systems and to the logic of comparative inquiry. How are different political systems created and organized? How and why do they change? Why are some democratic and others authoritarian? Why are some rich and others poor? Other topics covered in this course include nationalism and political ideologies, forms of representation, the relationship between state institutions and civil society, and globalization. The goal in this course is to use comparative methods to analyze questions of state institutions -- how they arise, change, and generate different economic, social, and political outcome. 3 hrs. lect./disc. (Comparative Politics)

PSCI0103Z-F14

CRN: 91858

Intro to Comparative Politics
Discussion

Introduction to Comparative Politics
This course offers an introduction to the comparative study of political systems and to the logic of comparative inquiry. How are different political systems created and organized? How and why do they change? Why are some democratic and others authoritarian? Why are some rich and others poor? Other topics covered in this course include nationalism and political ideologies, forms of representation, the relationship between state institutions and civil society, and globalization. The goal in this course is to use comparative methods to analyze questions of state institutions -- how they arise, change, and generate different economic, social, and political outcome. 3 hrs. lect./disc. (Comparative Politics)

PSCI0104A-F14

CRN: 90605

Intro to American Politics

Introduction to American Politics
This course introduces the institutions and practices of American government and politics. The aim is to give students a firm understanding of the workings of and the balance of power among the American Congress, President, bureaucracy, and court system. We begin with the Constitution, which provides the set of founding principles upon which the American government is based. We then look at how American citizens make decisions about politics. Finally, we examine how political institutions, interest groups, parties, elections, and legislative bodies and rules aggregate diverse, often conflicting preferences and how they resolve or exacerbate problems. 3 hrs. lect./disc. (American Politics)/

PSCI0104X-F14

CRN: 90072

Intro to American Politics
Discussion

Introduction to American Politics
This course introduces the institutions and practices of American government and politics. The aim is to give students a firm understanding of the workings of and the balance of power among the American Congress, President, bureaucracy, and court system. We begin with the Constitution, which provides the set of founding principles upon which the American government is based. We then look at how American citizens make decisions about politics. Finally, we examine how political institutions, interest groups, parties, elections, and legislative bodies and rules aggregate diverse, often conflicting preferences and how they resolve or exacerbate problems. 3 hrs. lect./disc. (American Politics)/

PSCI0104Y-F14

CRN: 90080

Intro to American Politics
Discussion

Introduction to American Politics
This course introduces the institutions and practices of American government and politics. The aim is to give students a firm understanding of the workings of and the balance of power among the American Congress, President, bureaucracy, and court system. We begin with the Constitution, which provides the set of founding principles upon which the American government is based. We then look at how American citizens make decisions about politics. Finally, we examine how political institutions, interest groups, parties, elections, and legislative bodies and rules aggregate diverse, often conflicting preferences and how they resolve or exacerbate problems. 3 hrs. lect./disc. (American Politics)/

PSCI0104Z-F14

CRN: 90087

Intro to American Politics
Discussion

Introduction to American Politics
This course introduces the institutions and practices of American government and politics. The aim is to give students a firm understanding of the workings of and the balance of power among the American Congress, President, bureaucracy, and court system. We begin with the Constitution, which provides the set of founding principles upon which the American government is based. We then look at how American citizens make decisions about politics. Finally, we examine how political institutions, interest groups, parties, elections, and legislative bodies and rules aggregate diverse, often conflicting preferences and how they resolve or exacerbate problems. 3 hrs. lect./disc. (American Politics)/

PSCI0109A-F14

CRN: 91081

International Politics

International Politics
What causes conflict or cooperation among states? What can states and other international entities do to preserve global peace? These are among the issues addressed by the study of international politics. This course examines the forces that shape relations among states, and between states and international regimes. Key concepts include: the international system, power and the balance of power, international institutions, foreign policy, diplomacy, deterrence, war, and global economic issues. Both the fall and spring sections of this course emphasize rigorous analysis and set theoretical concepts against historical and contemporary case studies. 3 hrs. lect./disc. (International Relations and Foreign Policy)/

PSCI0109X-F14

CRN: 91082

International Politics
Discussion

International Politics
What causes conflict or cooperation among states? What can states and other international entities do to preserve global peace? These are among the issues addressed by the study of international politics. This course examines the forces that shape relations among states, and between states and international regimes. Key concepts include: the international system, power and the balance of power, international institutions, foreign policy, diplomacy, deterrence, war, and global economic issues. Both the fall and spring sections of this course emphasize rigorous analysis and set theoretical concepts against historical and contemporary case studies. 3 hrs. lect./disc. (International Relations and Foreign Policy)/

PSCI0109Y-F14

CRN: 91083

International Politics
Discussion

International Politics
What causes conflict or cooperation among states? What can states and other international entities do to preserve global peace? These are among the issues addressed by the study of international politics. This course examines the forces that shape relations among states, and between states and international regimes. Key concepts include: the international system, power and the balance of power, international institutions, foreign policy, diplomacy, deterrence, war, and global economic issues. Both the fall and spring sections of this course emphasize rigorous analysis and set theoretical concepts against historical and contemporary case studies. 3 hrs. lect./disc. (International Relations and Foreign Policy)/

PSCI0109Z-F14

CRN: 91084

International Politics
Discussion

International Politics
What causes conflict or cooperation among states? What can states and other international entities do to preserve global peace? These are among the issues addressed by the study of international politics. This course examines the forces that shape relations among states, and between states and international regimes. Key concepts include: the international system, power and the balance of power, international institutions, foreign policy, diplomacy, deterrence, war, and global economic issues. Both the fall and spring sections of this course emphasize rigorous analysis and set theoretical concepts against historical and contemporary case studies. 3 hrs. lect./disc. (International Relations and Foreign Policy)/

PSCI0208A-F14

CRN: 92388

Politics of US Congress

The Politics of the U.S. Congress
Introduces students to the analysis of Congress and congressional policy-making. Considers how congressional elections, institutions, and policy hang together roughly in equilibrium. Focuses on the internal organization of Congress-committees, parties, House and Senate leadership, rules and norms, and congressional staff. Analyzes the power of Congress relative to the president, the bureaucracy, and the courts, specifically in the policy process. Investigates how unified and divided party control of the government affects legislation in the House and Senate. Finally, applies congressional theories to determine the fates of specific policy proposals in Congress. (PSCI 0102 or PSCI 0104 or waiver) 3 hrs. lect./disc. (American Politics)/

PSCI0211A-F14

Cross-Listed As:
ENVS0211A-F14

CRN: 91347

Conservation and Env Policy
Please register via ENVS 0211A

Conservation and Environmental Policy
This course examines conservation and environmental policy in the United States. In order to better understand the current nature of the conservation and environmental policy process, we will begin by tracing the development of past ideas, institutions, and policies related to this policy arena. We will then focus on contemporary conservation and environmental politics and policy making—gridlock in Congress, interest group pressure, the role of the courts and the president, and a move away from national policy making—toward the states, collaboration, and civil society. 3 hrs. lect./disc. (American Politics)/

PSCI0211X-F14

Cross-Listed As:
ENVS0211X-F14

CRN: 91348

Conservation and Env Policy
Please register via ENVS 0211X

Conservation and Environmental Policy
This course examines conservation and environmental policy in the United States. In order to better understand the current nature of the conservation and environmental policy process, we will begin by tracing the development of past ideas, institutions, and policies related to this policy arena. We will then focus on contemporary conservation and environmental politics and policy making—gridlock in Congress, interest group pressure, the role of the courts and the president, and a move away from national policy making—toward the states, collaboration, and civil society. 3 hrs. lect./disc. (American Politics)/

PSCI0211Y-F14

Cross-Listed As:
ENVS0211Y-F14

CRN: 91349

Conservation and Env Policy
Please register via ENVS 0211Y

Conservation and Environmental Policy
This course examines conservation and environmental policy in the United States. In order to better understand the current nature of the conservation and environmental policy process, we will begin by tracing the development of past ideas, institutions, and policies related to this policy arena. We will then focus on contemporary conservation and environmental politics and policy making—gridlock in Congress, interest group pressure, the role of the courts and the president, and a move away from national policy making—toward the states, collaboration, and civil society. 3 hrs. lect./disc. (American Politics)/

PSCI0211Z-F14

Cross-Listed As:
ENVS0211Z-F14

CRN: 91350

Conservation and Env Policy
Please register via ENVS 0211Z

Conservation and Environmental Policy
This course examines conservation and environmental policy in the United States. In order to better understand the current nature of the conservation and environmental policy process, we will begin by tracing the development of past ideas, institutions, and policies related to this policy arena. We will then focus on contemporary conservation and environmental politics and policy making—gridlock in Congress, interest group pressure, the role of the courts and the president, and a move away from national policy making—toward the states, collaboration, and civil society. 3 hrs. lect./disc. (American Politics)/

PSCI0214A-F14

CRN: 91248

Intl Environmental Politics

International Environmental Politics
What happens when the global economy outgrows the earth's ecosystem? This course surveys the consequences of the collision between the expanding world economy and the earth's natural limits: shrinking forests, falling water tables, eroding soils, collapsing fisheries, rising temperatures, and disappearing species. We will examine how countries with different circumstances and priorities attempt to work together to stop global environmental pollution and resource depletion. 3 hrs. lect./disc. (International Relations and Foreign Policy)/

PSCI0214Y-F14

CRN: 91630

Intl Environmental Politics
Discussion

International Environmental Politics
What happens when the global economy outgrows the earth's ecosystem? This course surveys the consequences of the collision between the expanding world economy and the earth's natural limits: shrinking forests, falling water tables, eroding soils, collapsing fisheries, rising temperatures, and disappearing species. We will examine how countries with different circumstances and priorities attempt to work together to stop global environmental pollution and resource depletion. 3 hrs. lect./disc. (International Relations and Foreign Policy)/

PSCI0214Z-F14

CRN: 91631

Intl Environmental Politics
Discussion

International Environmental Politics
What happens when the global economy outgrows the earth's ecosystem? This course surveys the consequences of the collision between the expanding world economy and the earth's natural limits: shrinking forests, falling water tables, eroding soils, collapsing fisheries, rising temperatures, and disappearing species. We will examine how countries with different circumstances and priorities attempt to work together to stop global environmental pollution and resource depletion. 3 hrs. lect./disc. (International Relations and Foreign Policy)/

PSCI0228A-F14

CRN: 91859

Central/East European Politics

Central and East European Politics
This introductory course surveys the key stages in the political development of East and Central Europe in the 20th century, including the imposition of communist rule, crises of de-Stalinization, the revolutions of 1989, the politics of post-communist transitions, the Balkan wars, and democratization. It focuses on those factors that either promote or impede the development of stable democratic regimes and assesses East Europe's prospects in the context of EU enlargement and NATO expansion. 3 hrs. lect./disc. (Comparative Politics)/

PSCI0228Y-F14

CRN: 91860

Central/East European Politics
Discussion

Central and East European Politics
This introductory course surveys the key stages in the political development of East and Central Europe in the 20th century, including the imposition of communist rule, crises of de-Stalinization, the revolutions of 1989, the politics of post-communist transitions, the Balkan wars, and democratization. It focuses on those factors that either promote or impede the development of stable democratic regimes and assesses East Europe's prospects in the context of EU enlargement and NATO expansion. 3 hrs. lect./disc. (Comparative Politics)/

PSCI0228Z-F14

CRN: 91861

Central/East European Politics
Discussion

Central and East European Politics
This introductory course surveys the key stages in the political development of East and Central Europe in the 20th century, including the imposition of communist rule, crises of de-Stalinization, the revolutions of 1989, the politics of post-communist transitions, the Balkan wars, and democratization. It focuses on those factors that either promote or impede the development of stable democratic regimes and assesses East Europe's prospects in the context of EU enlargement and NATO expansion. 3 hrs. lect./disc. (Comparative Politics)/

PSCI0234A-F14

CRN: 92389

Religion and Politics

Religion & Politics: Ancient & Modern
What role should religion play in politics? And what is the proper role of the state in regulating religion? Is religious conviction a precondition of or threat to healthy civic life? Why should regimes prefer religious toleration to religious uniformity? In this course we will examine these and other questions at the intersection of religion and politics in the western political tradition, affording special attention to early modern debates over the separation of church and state, toleration, and civil religion. Authors will include Plato, Emperor Julian, Augustine, Machiavelli, Luther, Calvin, Bayle, Hobbes, Locke, Montesquieu, Rousseau, Lessing, and Tocqueville. (Political Theory)/

PSCI0260A-F14

CRN: 92387

Pol Economy Drug Trafficking

The Political Economy of Drug Trafficking
This course examines the political economy of drug trafficking in the Western Hemisphere. How have transnational drug markets evolved, and why? What effects has narco-trafficking had on the political, economic, legal, financial, and social systems of producer, consumer, and transshipment countries? What policy responses are available to combat it? How should we weigh alternative policy options? Examination of these issues centers on source countries in Latin America's Andean region, the chief transshipment country (Mexico), and the principal consumer country (the US). Attention also is devoted to the drug trade's effects on American society and criminal justice system. 3 hrs. lect./disc.
(International Relations and Foreign Policy)/

PSCI0280A-F14

CRN: 92470

Politics of Policy Innovation

The Politics of Policy Innovation
Why do policymakers engage in policy innovation and experimentation? In this course we will explore the incentive structure facing policymakers to understand why they create new policies even if the outcome of experimentation is uncertain and perhaps risky. We will examine case studies from around the world, including countries at different levels of development and different regime types, to understand the conditions under which policymakers innovate. Finally, in this course, we will analyze the effectiveness of policy innovation and experimentation in generating positive outcomes such as economic growth and social welfare. 3 hrs. lect. (Comparative Politics)/

PSCI0292A-F14

CRN: 92471

Political Communication

Political Communication
How are media and communications technology re-shaping politics? From a global comparative perspective—ranging from the United States to the Middle East and to Asia—this course will survey the historical development of communications, the role of media in shaping public opinion and behavior, the impact of new media, and the rise of transnational satellite TV. Conceptually, the course will assess the importance of communications for understanding authoritarianism, democracy, and foreign policy. We will develop general comparative frameworks for understanding the growing importance of communications in the information age, while clarifying the limitations of media for shaping polities. (This course is not open to students who have taken PSCI 0413) 3 hrs. lect. (Comparative Politics)/

PSCI0303A-F14

CRN: 92390

US-Latin American Relations

U.S.-Latin American Relations
This course examines American foreign policy toward Latin America. Grounded in international relations theory, it chronicles the expansion of U.S. power in the nineteenth century, the interwar period, the Cold War, and the current era of continental economic integration. To ensure rigorous analysis the course sets theoretical concepts against specific case studies. Topics include the Inter-American System, specific doctrines (Monroe Doctrine, Roosevelt Corollary), specific policies (Good Neighbor Policy, Alliance for Progress), and milestone events in U.S.-Latin American relations, including the Cuban missile crisis, Falkland Islands War, and North American Free Trade Agreement. 3 hrs. lect./disc.
(International Relations and Foreign Policy)/

PSCI0304A-F14

CRN: 92540

Internatl Political Economy

International Political Economy
This course examines the politics of global economic relations, focusing principally on the advanced industrial states. How do governments and firms deal with the forces of globalization and interdependence? And what are the causes and consequences of their actions for the international system in turn? The course exposes students to both classic and contemporary thinking on free trade and protectionism, exchange rates and monetary systems, foreign direct investment and capital movements, regional integration, and the role of international institutions like the WTO. Readings will be drawn mainly from political science, as well as law and economics. (PSCI 0109) 3 hrs. lect./disc.
(International Relations and Foreign Policy)/

PSCI0306A-F14

Cross-Listed As:
PSCI0306B-F14

CRN: 92391

American Constitutional Law

American Constitutional Law: Individual Rights
This course focuses on the Supreme Court's interpretation of the first amendment freedoms of speech, press, and religion, and, to a lesser extent, the rights of the accused, as reflected in amendments four through eight. It includes consideration of philosophic arguments regarding speech and religion (Mill, Locke), the framing of the original bill of rights, and the constitutional history of free speech in America (Levy). Sullivan and Gunther's Constitutional Lawis the text; written work includes three or four essays, a mock court exercise, and a final exam. (Sophomores, juniors, and seniors with PSCI 0102 or PSCI 0104 or PSCI 0205 or PSCI 0206 or PSCI 0305 or waiver) 4.5 hrs. lect./disc. (American Politics)/

PSCI0306B-F14

Cross-Listed As:
PSCI0306A-F14

CRN: 92822

American Constitutional Law

American Constitutional Law: Individual Rights
This course focuses on the Supreme Court's interpretation of the first amendment freedoms of speech, press, and religion, and, to a lesser extent, the rights of the accused, as reflected in amendments four through eight. It includes consideration of philosophic arguments regarding speech and religion (Mill, Locke), the framing of the original bill of rights, and the constitutional history of free speech in America (Levy). Sullivan and Gunther's Constitutional Lawis the text; written work includes three or four essays, a mock court exercise, and a final exam. (Sophomores, juniors, and seniors with PSCI 0102 or PSCI 0104 or PSCI 0205 or PSCI 0206 or PSCI 0305 or waiver) 4.5 hrs. lect./disc. (American Politics)/

PSCI0308A-F14

CRN: 92392

U.S. National Elections

U. S. National Elections
In this course we will analyze national elections in the United States. Topics covered will include party systems, electoral realignment, voting behavior and turnout, candidate strategy, the nomination process, the legal framework for elections, the Electoral College, gender, race and ethnicity, the media, the Internet, and U.S. elections in comparative perspective. Although the focus will be on the upcoming congressional and presidential contests, earlier elections will be studied for insight into continuity and change in American electoral politics. 3 hrs. lect./disc. (American Politics)

PSCI0311A-F14

CRN: 92393

American Foreign Policy

American Foreign Policy
Does America exercise its power in the world in a distinctive way? If yes, has it always done so? In this course we will examine the evolution of American foreign policy from the time of the founding to the present. As we make our way from the height of the Cold War to the 21st century, we will assess how leaders, institutions, domestic politics, and the actions and inactions of other countries have shaped American international behavior. Topics considered include terrorism, nuclear proliferation, globalization, democracy promotion, whether the rich US has an obligation to help the less fortunate, how much power the Pentagon should have, what role the private sector can and should play in advancing American interests, and the Bush revolution in foreign policy. A central aim of the course is to map competing perspectives so that the student can draw his or her own political conclusions. 3 hrs. lect./disc. (International Relations and Foreign Policy)/

PSCI0311X-F14

CRN: 92394

American Foreign Policy
Discussion

American Foreign Policy
Does America exercise its power in the world in a distinctive way? If yes, has it always done so? In this course we will examine the evolution of American foreign policy from the time of the founding to the present. As we make our way from the height of the Cold War to the 21st century, we will assess how leaders, institutions, domestic politics, and the actions and inactions of other countries have shaped American international behavior. Topics considered include terrorism, nuclear proliferation, globalization, democracy promotion, whether the rich US has an obligation to help the less fortunate, how much power the Pentagon should have, what role the private sector can and should play in advancing American interests, and the Bush revolution in foreign policy. A central aim of the course is to map competing perspectives so that the student can draw his or her own political conclusions. 3 hrs. lect./disc. (International Relations and Foreign Policy)/

PSCI0311Y-F14

CRN: 92395

American Foreign Policy
Discussion

American Foreign Policy
Does America exercise its power in the world in a distinctive way? If yes, has it always done so? In this course we will examine the evolution of American foreign policy from the time of the founding to the present. As we make our way from the height of the Cold War to the 21st century, we will assess how leaders, institutions, domestic politics, and the actions and inactions of other countries have shaped American international behavior. Topics considered include terrorism, nuclear proliferation, globalization, democracy promotion, whether the rich US has an obligation to help the less fortunate, how much power the Pentagon should have, what role the private sector can and should play in advancing American interests, and the Bush revolution in foreign policy. A central aim of the course is to map competing perspectives so that the student can draw his or her own political conclusions. 3 hrs. lect./disc. (International Relations and Foreign Policy)/

PSCI0311Z-F14

CRN: 92396

American Foreign Policy
Discussion

American Foreign Policy
Does America exercise its power in the world in a distinctive way? If yes, has it always done so? In this course we will examine the evolution of American foreign policy from the time of the founding to the present. As we make our way from the height of the Cold War to the 21st century, we will assess how leaders, institutions, domestic politics, and the actions and inactions of other countries have shaped American international behavior. Topics considered include terrorism, nuclear proliferation, globalization, democracy promotion, whether the rich US has an obligation to help the less fortunate, how much power the Pentagon should have, what role the private sector can and should play in advancing American interests, and the Bush revolution in foreign policy. A central aim of the course is to map competing perspectives so that the student can draw his or her own political conclusions. 3 hrs. lect./disc. (International Relations and Foreign Policy)/

PSCI0330A-F14

CRN: 92397

Comp Development Strategies

Comparative Development Strategies
Why have some countries developed more rapidly than others? What do we mean by "development?" How can governments help or hinder development prospects? These broad questions are addressed by analyzing the development experiences of Asian, Latin American, and African countries. The course focuses particularly on what governments have done to try to accelerate the development process. To gain a historical perspective, the course begins with a brief consideration of the experiences of the now "developed" countries, followed by an examination of how difference countries have confronted the dilemmas of development of the 20th century. 3 hrs. lect./disc. (Comparative Politics)/

PSCI0340A-F14

CRN: 92472

Intl. Order & Organization

International Order and Organization: Theories and Practice
In this course we will study the organization of global politics in the 20th century and beyond. Using both "secondary" and "primary" perspectives, we will evaluate some of the key mechanisms by which international relations are supposed to have been ordered—international institutions (like the World Bank), international organizations (like the United Nations), and international norms (like human rights). Students will develop greater knowledge of the evolution of the international system and refine their tools for analyzing international organization. (PSCI 0109 or PSCI 0311 or waiver) 3 hrs. sem. (International Relations and Foreign Policy) 3 hrs. sem.

PSCI0340Y-F14

CRN: 92557

Intl. Order & Organization
Discussion

International Order and Organization: Theories and Practice
In this course we will study the organization of global politics in the 20th century and beyond. Using both "secondary" and "primary" perspectives, we will evaluate some of the key mechanisms by which international relations are supposed to have been ordered—international institutions (like the World Bank), international organizations (like the United Nations), and international norms (like human rights). Students will develop greater knowledge of the evolution of the international system and refine their tools for analyzing international organization. (PSCI 0109 or PSCI 0311 or waiver) 3 hrs. sem. (International Relations and Foreign Policy) 3 hrs. sem.

PSCI0340Z-F14

CRN: 92558

Intl. Order & Organization
Discussion

International Order and Organization: Theories and Practice
In this course we will study the organization of global politics in the 20th century and beyond. Using both "secondary" and "primary" perspectives, we will evaluate some of the key mechanisms by which international relations are supposed to have been ordered—international institutions (like the World Bank), international organizations (like the United Nations), and international norms (like human rights). Students will develop greater knowledge of the evolution of the international system and refine their tools for analyzing international organization. (PSCI 0109 or PSCI 0311 or waiver) 3 hrs. sem. (International Relations and Foreign Policy) 3 hrs. sem.

PSCI0368A-F14

CRN: 91150

Frontiers in Political Science

Frontiers in Political Science Research
Nothing is more controversial among political scientists than the topic of how to study politics. In this course, we consider a variety of advanced techniques for studying political phenomena, including statistical methods, game theory, institutional analysis, case study techniques, experiments, and agent-based modeling. We will work with concrete examples (drawn from major political science journals) of how scholars have used these techniques, and consider the ongoing philosophical controversies associated with each approach. Students will have the opportunity to conduct original research using a method and subject of their choosing. (Two political science courses) 3 hrs. lect./disc. (Political Theory)/

PSCI0438A-F14

CRN: 92559

Political Islam

Political Islam
In this course we will survey the central questions in studies of political Islam, focusing on the emergence of Islam as a political force in the contemporary period. Discussion will center on the following core topics: (1) the nature of political Islam and Islamic interests; (2) how Islamic political movements develop; (3) why Islamic political movements flourish or fail; (4) how Islamic interests are expressed in the political arena; and (5) what types of political systems are most compatible with politicized Islam? These questions will be addressed by looking at the general history of the contemporary Islamic resurgence and by examining case studies on Egypt, Algeria, Iran, Afghanistan, Turkey, West Africa, and Southeast Asia. 3 hrs. sem. (Comparative Politics)/

PSCI0482A-F14

Cross-Listed As:
IGST0482A-F14

CRN: 92492

Public/Private Governance
Please register via IGST 0482A

Private and Public Governance in an Era of Globalization
Although the study of international affairs has traditionally focused on states, other actors play important roles in governance. Working alongside the public sector, private actors bring innovative approaches and substantial resources to social problems, but effective collaboration between public and private actors remains elusive. In this seminar we will examine general theories of private and public governance, followed by specific discussion of issues such as economic development, environmental protection, and public health. The final research projects will require research in a language other than English. This course is equivalent to IGST 0482. International Relations

PSCI0483A-F14

Cross-Listed As:
IGST0483A-F14

CRN: 91920

Rise of Asia and U.S. Policy
Please register via IGST 0483A

The Rise of Asia and US Policy
In this course we will study what is arguably the most important strategic development of the 21st century: how the rise of Asia presents security challenges to the region and the United States. Drawing from international relations scholarship, the course will focus on foreign policy challenges and potential responses. These challenges include both traditional security and nontraditional areas such as water and the environment. We will integrate the analysis of these issues in South, East, and Southeast Asia with study of the policy process, in part through simulations and role-playing exercises. This course is equivalent to IGST 0483. 3 hrs. sem. (Comparative Politics)/

PSCI0484A-F14

CRN: 92473

Political Econ of Regionalism

The Political Economy of Regionalism *
In this course we will address the political economy of regionalism in a variety of national and regional contexts. We will consider both integration projects—such as the European Union and South America’s Mercosur—as well as subnational local autonomy movements, such as those in Catalonia and Scotland. We will study theories of integration as well as case studies from Europe, Latin America, Asia, and Africa, focusing on the political and economic forces driving both integration and disintegration in their historical and contemporary contexts. We will also consider how globalization affects regional integration projects. /(Comparative Politics)/ 3 hrs. sem.

PSCI0500A-F14

CRN: 90247

Independent Project

Independent Projects
A program of independent work designed to meet the individual needs of advanced students. (Approval required)

PSCI0500B-F14

CRN: 90251

Independent Project

Independent Projects
A program of independent work designed to meet the individual needs of advanced students. (Approval required)

PSCI0500C-F14

CRN: 90975

Independent Project

Independent Projects
A program of independent work designed to meet the individual needs of advanced students. (Approval required)

PSCI0500D-F14

CRN: 90268

Independent Project

Independent Projects
A program of independent work designed to meet the individual needs of advanced students. (Approval required)

PSCI0500F-F14

CRN: 90271

Independent Project

Independent Projects
A program of independent work designed to meet the individual needs of advanced students. (Approval required)

PSCI0500G-F14

CRN: 90976

Independent Project

Independent Projects
A program of independent work designed to meet the individual needs of advanced students. (Approval required)

PSCI0500H-F14

CRN: 90272

Independent Project

Independent Projects
A program of independent work designed to meet the individual needs of advanced students. (Approval required)

PSCI0500I-F14

CRN: 90273

Independent Project

Independent Projects
A program of independent work designed to meet the individual needs of advanced students. (Approval required)

PSCI0500J-F14

CRN: 90274

Independent Project

Independent Projects
A program of independent work designed to meet the individual needs of advanced students. (Approval required)

PSCI0500K-F14

CRN: 90278

Independent Project

Independent Projects
A program of independent work designed to meet the individual needs of advanced students. (Approval required)

PSCI0500L-F14

CRN: 90279

Independent Project

Independent Projects
A program of independent work designed to meet the individual needs of advanced students. (Approval required)

PSCI0500N-F14

CRN: 90764

Independent Project

Independent Projects
A program of independent work designed to meet the individual needs of advanced students. (Approval required)

PSCI0500O-F14

CRN: 90765

Independent Project

Independent Projects
A program of independent work designed to meet the individual needs of advanced students. (Approval required)

PSCI0500P-F14

CRN: 90977

Independent Project

Independent Projects
A program of independent work designed to meet the individual needs of advanced students. (Approval required)

PSCI0500Q-F14

CRN: 90766

Independent Project

Independent Projects
A program of independent work designed to meet the individual needs of advanced students. (Approval required)

PSCI0500V-F14

CRN: 91224

Independent Project

Independent Projects
A program of independent work designed to meet the individual needs of advanced students. (Approval required)

PSCI0500W-F14

CRN: 91351

Independent Project

Independent Projects
A program of independent work designed to meet the individual needs of advanced students. (Approval required)

PSCI0500X-F14

CRN: 92158

Independent Project

Independent Projects
A program of independent work designed to meet the individual needs of advanced students. (Approval required)

PSCI0700A-F14

CRN: 90282

Honors Thesis

Honors Thesis
(Approval required)

PSCI0700B-F14

CRN: 90285

Honors Thesis

Honors Thesis
(Approval required)

PSCI0700C-F14

CRN: 90286

Honors Thesis

Honors Thesis
(Approval required)

PSCI0700D-F14

CRN: 90287

Honors Thesis

Honors Thesis
(Approval required)

PSCI0700E-F14

CRN: 90288

Honors Thesis

Honors Thesis
(Approval required)

PSCI0700F-F14

CRN: 90289

Honors Thesis

Honors Thesis
(Approval required)

PSCI0700G-F14

CRN: 90291

Honors Thesis

Honors Thesis
(Approval required)

PSCI0700H-F14

CRN: 90292

Honors Thesis

Honors Thesis
(Approval required)

PSCI0700I-F14

CRN: 90293

Honors Thesis

Honors Thesis
(Approval required)

PSCI0700J-F14

CRN: 90296

Honors Thesis

Honors Thesis
(Approval required)

PSCI0700K-F14

CRN: 90298

Honors Thesis

Honors Thesis
(Approval required)

PSCI0700L-F14

CRN: 90299

Honors Thesis

Honors Thesis
(Approval required)

PSCI0700M-F14

CRN: 90802

Honors Thesis

Honors Thesis
(Approval required)

PSCI0700N-F14

CRN: 90803

Honors Thesis

Honors Thesis
(Approval required)

PSCI0700O-F14

CRN: 90804

Honors Thesis

Honors Thesis
(Approval required)

PSCI0700P-F14

CRN: 90805

Honors Thesis

Honors Thesis
(Approval required)

PSCI0700Q-F14

CRN: 90806

Honors Thesis

Honors Thesis
(Approval required)

PSCI0700U-F14

CRN: 91118

Honors Thesis

Honors Thesis
(Approval required)

PSCI0700V-F14

CRN: 91238

Honors Thesis

Honors Thesis
(Approval required)

PSCI0700W-F14

CRN: 91352

Honors Thesis

Honors Thesis
(Approval required)