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PSCI0101A-F17

CRN: 91665

Intro to Political Philosophy
Introduction to Political Philosophy
What is politics? What is the purpose of politics? Is there a best regime? Is it attainable? What is justice? What is the good life? How is each related to political life? Is there a science of politics? In this course, we will raise these and other fundamental questions through a study of major ancient and modern works of political philosophy. Authors may include Plato, Aristotle, Augustine, Machiavelli, Hobbes, Locke, Montesquieu, Rousseau, Constant, Tocqueville, Mill, Marx, and Nietzsche. 4 hrs. lect./disc. (Political Theory)

PSCI0101X-F17

CRN: 91668

Intro to Political Philosophy
Discussion
Introduction to Political Philosophy
What is politics? What is the purpose of politics? Is there a best regime? Is it attainable? What is justice? What is the good life? How is each related to political life? Is there a science of politics? In this course, we will raise these and other fundamental questions through a study of major ancient and modern works of political philosophy. Authors may include Plato, Aristotle, Augustine, Machiavelli, Hobbes, Locke, Montesquieu, Rousseau, Constant, Tocqueville, Mill, Marx, and Nietzsche. 4 hrs. lect./disc. (Political Theory)

PSCI0101Y-F17

CRN: 91666

Intro to Political Philosophy
Discussion
Introduction to Political Philosophy
What is politics? What is the purpose of politics? Is there a best regime? Is it attainable? What is justice? What is the good life? How is each related to political life? Is there a science of politics? In this course, we will raise these and other fundamental questions through a study of major ancient and modern works of political philosophy. Authors may include Plato, Aristotle, Augustine, Machiavelli, Hobbes, Locke, Montesquieu, Rousseau, Constant, Tocqueville, Mill, Marx, and Nietzsche. 4 hrs. lect./disc. (Political Theory)

PSCI0101Z-F17

CRN: 91667

Intro to Political Philosophy
Discussion
Introduction to Political Philosophy
What is politics? What is the purpose of politics? Is there a best regime? Is it attainable? What is justice? What is the good life? How is each related to political life? Is there a science of politics? In this course, we will raise these and other fundamental questions through a study of major ancient and modern works of political philosophy. Authors may include Plato, Aristotle, Augustine, Machiavelli, Hobbes, Locke, Montesquieu, Rousseau, Constant, Tocqueville, Mill, Marx, and Nietzsche. 4 hrs. lect./disc. (Political Theory)

PSCI0103A-F17

CRN: 90508

Intro to Comparative Politics
Introduction to Comparative Politics
This course offers an introduction to the comparative study of political systems and to the logic of comparative inquiry. How are different political systems created and organized? How and why do they change? Why are some democratic and others authoritarian? Why are some rich and others poor? Other topics covered in this course include nationalism and political ideologies, forms of representation, the relationship between state institutions and civil society, and globalization. The goal in this course is to use comparative methods to analyze questions of state institutions -- how they arise, change, and generate different economic, social, and political outcome. 3 hrs. lect./disc. (Comparative Politics)

PSCI0103B-F17

CRN: 92324

Intro to Comparative Politics
Introduction to Comparative Politics
This course offers an introduction to the comparative study of political systems and to the logic of comparative inquiry. How are different political systems created and organized? How and why do they change? Why are some democratic and others authoritarian? Why are some rich and others poor? Other topics covered in this course include nationalism and political ideologies, forms of representation, the relationship between state institutions and civil society, and globalization. The goal in this course is to use comparative methods to analyze questions of state institutions -- how they arise, change, and generate different economic, social, and political outcome. 3 hrs. lect./disc. (Comparative Politics)

PSCI0103U-F17

CRN: 92431

Intro to Comparative Politics
Discussion PSCI 0103 A
Introduction to Comparative Politics
This course offers an introduction to the comparative study of political systems and to the logic of comparative inquiry. How are different political systems created and organized? How and why do they change? Why are some democratic and others authoritarian? Why are some rich and others poor? Other topics covered in this course include nationalism and political ideologies, forms of representation, the relationship between state institutions and civil society, and globalization. The goal in this course is to use comparative methods to analyze questions of state institutions -- how they arise, change, and generate different economic, social, and political outcome. 3 hrs. lect./disc. (Comparative Politics)

PSCI0103V-F17

CRN: 91709

Intro to Comparative Politics
Discussion PSCI 0103 A
Introduction to Comparative Politics
This course offers an introduction to the comparative study of political systems and to the logic of comparative inquiry. How are different political systems created and organized? How and why do they change? Why are some democratic and others authoritarian? Why are some rich and others poor? Other topics covered in this course include nationalism and political ideologies, forms of representation, the relationship between state institutions and civil society, and globalization. The goal in this course is to use comparative methods to analyze questions of state institutions -- how they arise, change, and generate different economic, social, and political outcome. 3 hrs. lect./disc. (Comparative Politics)

PSCI0103W-F17

CRN: 91771

Intro to Comparative Politics
Discussion PSCI 0103 A
Introduction to Comparative Politics
This course offers an introduction to the comparative study of political systems and to the logic of comparative inquiry. How are different political systems created and organized? How and why do they change? Why are some democratic and others authoritarian? Why are some rich and others poor? Other topics covered in this course include nationalism and political ideologies, forms of representation, the relationship between state institutions and civil society, and globalization. The goal in this course is to use comparative methods to analyze questions of state institutions -- how they arise, change, and generate different economic, social, and political outcome. 3 hrs. lect./disc. (Comparative Politics)

PSCI0103X-F17

CRN: 92432

Intro to Comparative Politics
Discussion PSCI 0103 B
Introduction to Comparative Politics
This course offers an introduction to the comparative study of political systems and to the logic of comparative inquiry. How are different political systems created and organized? How and why do they change? Why are some democratic and others authoritarian? Why are some rich and others poor? Other topics covered in this course include nationalism and political ideologies, forms of representation, the relationship between state institutions and civil society, and globalization. The goal in this course is to use comparative methods to analyze questions of state institutions -- how they arise, change, and generate different economic, social, and political outcome. 3 hrs. lect./disc. (Comparative Politics)

PSCI0103Y-F17

CRN: 92433

Intro to Comparative Politics
Discussion PSCI 0103 B
Introduction to Comparative Politics
This course offers an introduction to the comparative study of political systems and to the logic of comparative inquiry. How are different political systems created and organized? How and why do they change? Why are some democratic and others authoritarian? Why are some rich and others poor? Other topics covered in this course include nationalism and political ideologies, forms of representation, the relationship between state institutions and civil society, and globalization. The goal in this course is to use comparative methods to analyze questions of state institutions -- how they arise, change, and generate different economic, social, and political outcome. 3 hrs. lect./disc. (Comparative Politics)

PSCI0103Z-F17

CRN: 92434

Intro to Comparative Politics
Discussion PSCI 0103 B
Introduction to Comparative Politics
This course offers an introduction to the comparative study of political systems and to the logic of comparative inquiry. How are different political systems created and organized? How and why do they change? Why are some democratic and others authoritarian? Why are some rich and others poor? Other topics covered in this course include nationalism and political ideologies, forms of representation, the relationship between state institutions and civil society, and globalization. The goal in this course is to use comparative methods to analyze questions of state institutions -- how they arise, change, and generate different economic, social, and political outcome. 3 hrs. lect./disc. (Comparative Politics)

PSCI0104A-F17

CRN: 90507

Intro to American Politics
Introduction to American Politics
This course introduces the institutions and practices of American government and politics. The aim is to give students a firm understanding of the workings of and the balance of power among the American Congress, President, bureaucracy, and court system. We begin with the Constitution, which provides the set of founding principles upon which the American government is based. We then look at how American citizens make decisions about politics. Finally, we examine how political institutions, interest groups, parties, elections, and legislative bodies and rules aggregate diverse, often conflicting preferences and how they resolve or exacerbate problems. 3 hrs. lect./disc. (American Politics)/

PSCI0104X-F17

CRN: 90057

Intro to American Politics
Discussion
Introduction to American Politics
This course introduces the institutions and practices of American government and politics. The aim is to give students a firm understanding of the workings of and the balance of power among the American Congress, President, bureaucracy, and court system. We begin with the Constitution, which provides the set of founding principles upon which the American government is based. We then look at how American citizens make decisions about politics. Finally, we examine how political institutions, interest groups, parties, elections, and legislative bodies and rules aggregate diverse, often conflicting preferences and how they resolve or exacerbate problems. 3 hrs. lect./disc. (American Politics)/

PSCI0104Y-F17

CRN: 90063

Intro to American Politics
Discussion
Introduction to American Politics
This course introduces the institutions and practices of American government and politics. The aim is to give students a firm understanding of the workings of and the balance of power among the American Congress, President, bureaucracy, and court system. We begin with the Constitution, which provides the set of founding principles upon which the American government is based. We then look at how American citizens make decisions about politics. Finally, we examine how political institutions, interest groups, parties, elections, and legislative bodies and rules aggregate diverse, often conflicting preferences and how they resolve or exacerbate problems. 3 hrs. lect./disc. (American Politics)/

PSCI0104Z-F17

CRN: 90069

Intro to American Politics
Discussion
Introduction to American Politics
This course introduces the institutions and practices of American government and politics. The aim is to give students a firm understanding of the workings of and the balance of power among the American Congress, President, bureaucracy, and court system. We begin with the Constitution, which provides the set of founding principles upon which the American government is based. We then look at how American citizens make decisions about politics. Finally, we examine how political institutions, interest groups, parties, elections, and legislative bodies and rules aggregate diverse, often conflicting preferences and how they resolve or exacerbate problems. 3 hrs. lect./disc. (American Politics)/

PSCI0109A-F17

CRN: 90907

International Politics
International Politics
What causes conflict or cooperation among states? What can states and other international entities do to preserve global peace? These are among the issues addressed by the study of international politics. This course examines the forces that shape relations among states, and between states and international regimes. Key concepts include: the international system, power and the balance of power, international institutions, foreign policy, diplomacy, deterrence, war, and global economic issues. Both the fall and spring sections of this course emphasize rigorous analysis and set theoretical concepts against historical and contemporary case studies. 3 hrs. lect./disc. (International Relations and Foreign Policy)/

PSCI0109B-F17

CRN: 91710

International Politics
International Politics
What causes conflict or cooperation among states? What can states and other international entities do to preserve global peace? These are among the issues addressed by the study of international politics. This course examines the forces that shape relations among states, and between states and international regimes. Key concepts include: the international system, power and the balance of power, international institutions, foreign policy, diplomacy, deterrence, war, and global economic issues. Both the fall and spring sections of this course emphasize rigorous analysis and set theoretical concepts against historical and contemporary case studies. 3 hrs. lect./disc. (International Relations and Foreign Policy)/

PSCI0109U-F17

CRN: 91853

International Politics
Discussion PSCI 0109 A
International Politics
What causes conflict or cooperation among states? What can states and other international entities do to preserve global peace? These are among the issues addressed by the study of international politics. This course examines the forces that shape relations among states, and between states and international regimes. Key concepts include: the international system, power and the balance of power, international institutions, foreign policy, diplomacy, deterrence, war, and global economic issues. Both the fall and spring sections of this course emphasize rigorous analysis and set theoretical concepts against historical and contemporary case studies. 3 hrs. lect./disc. (International Relations and Foreign Policy)/

PSCI0109V-F17

CRN: 91708

International Politics
Discussion PSCI 0109 A
International Politics
What causes conflict or cooperation among states? What can states and other international entities do to preserve global peace? These are among the issues addressed by the study of international politics. This course examines the forces that shape relations among states, and between states and international regimes. Key concepts include: the international system, power and the balance of power, international institutions, foreign policy, diplomacy, deterrence, war, and global economic issues. Both the fall and spring sections of this course emphasize rigorous analysis and set theoretical concepts against historical and contemporary case studies. 3 hrs. lect./disc. (International Relations and Foreign Policy)/

PSCI0109W-F17

CRN: 91707

International Politics
Discussion PSCI 0109 A
International Politics
What causes conflict or cooperation among states? What can states and other international entities do to preserve global peace? These are among the issues addressed by the study of international politics. This course examines the forces that shape relations among states, and between states and international regimes. Key concepts include: the international system, power and the balance of power, international institutions, foreign policy, diplomacy, deterrence, war, and global economic issues. Both the fall and spring sections of this course emphasize rigorous analysis and set theoretical concepts against historical and contemporary case studies. 3 hrs. lect./disc. (International Relations and Foreign Policy)/

PSCI0109Y-F17

CRN: 90909

International Politics
Discussion PSCI 0109 B
International Politics
What causes conflict or cooperation among states? What can states and other international entities do to preserve global peace? These are among the issues addressed by the study of international politics. This course examines the forces that shape relations among states, and between states and international regimes. Key concepts include: the international system, power and the balance of power, international institutions, foreign policy, diplomacy, deterrence, war, and global economic issues. Both the fall and spring sections of this course emphasize rigorous analysis and set theoretical concepts against historical and contemporary case studies. 3 hrs. lect./disc. (International Relations and Foreign Policy)/

PSCI0109Z-F17

CRN: 90910

International Politics
Discussion PSCI 0109 B
International Politics
What causes conflict or cooperation among states? What can states and other international entities do to preserve global peace? These are among the issues addressed by the study of international politics. This course examines the forces that shape relations among states, and between states and international regimes. Key concepts include: the international system, power and the balance of power, international institutions, foreign policy, diplomacy, deterrence, war, and global economic issues. Both the fall and spring sections of this course emphasize rigorous analysis and set theoretical concepts against historical and contemporary case studies. 3 hrs. lect./disc. (International Relations and Foreign Policy)/

PSCI0202A-F17

CRN: 92325

African Politics
African Politics
This course surveys the challenges and possibilities that Sub-Saharan Africa presents in our era of globalization. We will look at the process of state formation to appreciate the relationships between historical legacies and political and economic development. Themes include state formation, democratic governance, sustainable development, and Africa in world affairs. Topics such as colonial rule and national responses, authoritarian rule, ethnic politics, the debt burden, the HIV/AIDS pandemic, and natural resource politics will be discussed. Case studies from English-, French-, and Portuguese-speaking Africa will be used to illuminate such relationships. 3 hrs lect/disc. (Comparative Politics)/

PSCI0202Y-F17

CRN: 92413

African Politics
Discussion
African Politics
This course surveys the challenges and possibilities that Sub-Saharan Africa presents in our era of globalization. We will look at the process of state formation to appreciate the relationships between historical legacies and political and economic development. Themes include state formation, democratic governance, sustainable development, and Africa in world affairs. Topics such as colonial rule and national responses, authoritarian rule, ethnic politics, the debt burden, the HIV/AIDS pandemic, and natural resource politics will be discussed. Case studies from English-, French-, and Portuguese-speaking Africa will be used to illuminate such relationships. 3 hrs lect/disc. (Comparative Politics)/

PSCI0202Z-F17

CRN: 92414

African Politics
Discussion
African Politics
This course surveys the challenges and possibilities that Sub-Saharan Africa presents in our era of globalization. We will look at the process of state formation to appreciate the relationships between historical legacies and political and economic development. Themes include state formation, democratic governance, sustainable development, and Africa in world affairs. Topics such as colonial rule and national responses, authoritarian rule, ethnic politics, the debt burden, the HIV/AIDS pandemic, and natural resource politics will be discussed. Case studies from English-, French-, and Portuguese-speaking Africa will be used to illuminate such relationships. 3 hrs lect/disc. (Comparative Politics)/

PSCI0208A-F17

CRN: 92326

Politics of US Congress
The Politics of the U.S. Congress
Introduces students to the analysis of Congress and congressional policy-making. Considers how congressional elections, institutions, and policy hang together roughly in equilibrium. Focuses on the internal organization of Congress-committees, parties, House and Senate leadership, rules and norms, and congressional staff. Analyzes the power of Congress relative to the president, the bureaucracy, and the courts, specifically in the policy process. Investigates how unified and divided party control of the government affects legislation in the House and Senate. Finally, applies congressional theories to determine the fates of specific policy proposals in Congress. (PSCI 0102 or PSCI 0104 or waiver) 3 hrs. lect./disc. (American Politics)/

PSCI0214A-F17

CRN: 92327

Intl Environmental Politics
International Environmental Politics
What happens when the global economy outgrows the earth's ecosystem? This course surveys the consequences of the collision between the expanding world economy and the earth's natural limits: shrinking forests, falling water tables, eroding soils, collapsing fisheries, rising temperatures, and disappearing species. We will examine how countries with different circumstances and priorities attempt to work together to stop global environmental pollution and resource depletion. 3 hrs. lect./disc. (International Relations and Foreign Policy)/

PSCI0214Y-F17

CRN: 92417

Intl Environmental Politics
Discussion
International Environmental Politics
What happens when the global economy outgrows the earth's ecosystem? This course surveys the consequences of the collision between the expanding world economy and the earth's natural limits: shrinking forests, falling water tables, eroding soils, collapsing fisheries, rising temperatures, and disappearing species. We will examine how countries with different circumstances and priorities attempt to work together to stop global environmental pollution and resource depletion. 3 hrs. lect./disc. (International Relations and Foreign Policy)/

PSCI0214Z-F17

CRN: 92418

Intl Environmental Politics
Discussion
International Environmental Politics
What happens when the global economy outgrows the earth's ecosystem? This course surveys the consequences of the collision between the expanding world economy and the earth's natural limits: shrinking forests, falling water tables, eroding soils, collapsing fisheries, rising temperatures, and disappearing species. We will examine how countries with different circumstances and priorities attempt to work together to stop global environmental pollution and resource depletion. 3 hrs. lect./disc. (International Relations and Foreign Policy)/

PSCI0224A-F17

CRN: 92544

Classical Political Thought
Tragedy and Order in Classical Political Thought
The world of ancient Athens is at once inescapably remote and enduringly familiar. It is the setting in which the Western tradition of political thought began. As we do today, its greatest authors struggled at once to probe the sources of chaos and tragedy and to imagine in their midst the conditions of lasting political order. In this course we will read closely the Iliad of Homer, the History of Thucydides, selected tragedies of Sophocles and Euripides, the Republic of Plato, and the Politics of Aristotle. (Political Theory) 3 hrs. lect.

PSCI0246A-F17

CRN: 92545

American Slavery & Freedom
American Slavery, American Freedom
In this course we will explore the antagonism and entanglement of slavery and freedom, the two most powerful ideas in American political thought, with a focus on the period from the Declaration of Independence to the Progressive Era. Readings will draw on a range of genres including, judicial decisions, imaginative literature, presidential addresses, canonical works of political theory. Special emphasis will be placed on the writings of African Americans and on the genre of autobiography, as one in which the classic American negotiation between slavery and freedom is often performed with particular poignancy in the course of an individual life. (Political Theory) 3 hrs. lect.

PSCI0258A-F17

CRN: 92328

Pols Intl Humanitarian Action
The Politics of International Humanitarian Action
Humanitarian intervention has emerged as a new moral imperative that challenges traditional concepts and practices in international relations. In this course we will consider how a range of actors--international organizations, states, NGOs--understand the concept of humanitarian intervention and engage (or not) in humanitarian actions. We will examine a variety of policy choices, including aid and military intervention, through case studies, including Somalia, Kosovo, and Rwanda. The goal of the course is to enable students to assess critically the benefits and challenges of a humanitarian approach to global politics. 3 hrs. lect./disc. (International Relations and Foreign Policy)/

PSCI0258Y-F17

CRN: 92421

Pols Intl Humanitarian Action
Discussion
The Politics of International Humanitarian Action
Humanitarian intervention has emerged as a new moral imperative that challenges traditional concepts and practices in international relations. In this course we will consider how a range of actors--international organizations, states, NGOs--understand the concept of humanitarian intervention and engage (or not) in humanitarian actions. We will examine a variety of policy choices, including aid and military intervention, through case studies, including Somalia, Kosovo, and Rwanda. The goal of the course is to enable students to assess critically the benefits and challenges of a humanitarian approach to global politics. 3 hrs. lect./disc. (International Relations and Foreign Policy)/

PSCI0258Z-F17

CRN: 92422

Pols Intl Humanitarian Action
Discussion
The Politics of International Humanitarian Action
Humanitarian intervention has emerged as a new moral imperative that challenges traditional concepts and practices in international relations. In this course we will consider how a range of actors--international organizations, states, NGOs--understand the concept of humanitarian intervention and engage (or not) in humanitarian actions. We will examine a variety of policy choices, including aid and military intervention, through case studies, including Somalia, Kosovo, and Rwanda. The goal of the course is to enable students to assess critically the benefits and challenges of a humanitarian approach to global politics. 3 hrs. lect./disc. (International Relations and Foreign Policy)/

PSCI0286A-F17

CRN: 92330

Authoritarian Politics
Authoritarian Politics
The purpose of this course is to examine the characteristics and dynamics of non-democratic regimes. First, we will define autocracy and consider different forms of authoritarianism and how their leaders come into power. Next, we will investigate why some authoritarian regimes are able to sustain their rule while others collapse. Finally, we will explore how citizens of these regimes bolster, comply with, or revolt against their governments. Throughout the course, adopting a comparative standpoint, we will draw on various country cases. (Comparative Politics)/

PSCI0304A-F17

CRN: 92329

Internatl Political Economy
International Political Economy
This course examines the politics of global economic relations, focusing principally on the advanced industrial states. How do governments and firms deal with the forces of globalization and interdependence? And what are the causes and consequences of their actions for the international system in turn? The course exposes students to both classic and contemporary thinking on free trade and protectionism, exchange rates and monetary systems, foreign direct investment and capital movements, regional integration, and the role of international institutions like the WTO. Readings will be drawn mainly from political science, as well as law and economics. (PSCI 0109) 3 hrs. lect./disc.
(International Relations and Foreign Policy)/

PSCI0305A-F17

CRN: 92331

American Constitutional Law
American Constitutional Law: The Federal System
This course examines the development of American constitutionalism through study of Supreme Court decisions. Every major topic but the bill of rights (see PSCI 0306) is covered. Using the Sullivan and Gunther Constitutional Law casebook, we begin with judicial review and then study the development of legal doctrines surrounding the commerce clause, the due process and equal protection clauses of the fourteenth amendment, and the separation of powers. Recent cases focus on affirmative action and federal protection of civil rights. Interpretive books and essays are considered, as time permits. A mock court exercise is anticipated. (Juniors and seniors with PSCI 0102 or PSCI 0104 or PSCI 0306) 3 hrs. lect./disc. (American Politics)/

PSCI0312A-F17

CRN: 92429

Bureaucracy
Bureaucracy
How did 9-11 happen? Why did the U.S. believe Iraq possessed weapons of mass destruction? What went wrong with relief efforts in the aftermath of Hurricane Katrina? Answering these questions requires an understanding of bureaucracies in the American political context -- the subject of this course. It begins with an overview of the nature of bureaucracies and theories for their formation, followed by an examination of bureaucratic actors (managers, operators, and executives) and the context within which they work. It concludes with an attempt to assess bureaucratic effectiveness. Case studies of particular bureaucracies, including those involved in the War on Terror, Iraq and Hurricane Katrina, are included to sharpen analyses. 3 hrs. lect./disc. (American Politics)/

PSCI0335A-F17

CRN: 92332

Latin American Revolutions
Latin American Revolutions
This course examines the causes, goals, and outcomes of revolutions in twentieth-century Latin America, with special reference to Mexico, Cuba, Venezuela, Chile, and Nicaragua. It seeks to understand (1) why this region has experienced multiple revolutions; (2) what their political, economic, or social impact has been; (3) why revolutions produced authoritarian, socialist, dictatorial, or democratic outcomes across countries; and (4) what factors have kept revolutionaries from achieving their political, social, or economic goals. Evaluation entails rigorous application of theory to in-depth case studies. 3 hrs. lect./disc. (Comparative Politics)/

PSCI0368A-F17

CRN: 90970

Frontiers in Political Science
Frontiers in Political Science Research
Nothing is more controversial among political scientists than the topic of how to study politics. In this course, we consider a variety of advanced techniques for studying political phenomena, including statistical methods, game theory, institutional analysis, case study techniques, experiments, and agent-based modeling. We will work with concrete examples (drawn from major political science journals) of how scholars have used these techniques, and consider the ongoing philosophical controversies associated with each approach. Students will have the opportunity to conduct original research using a method and subject of their choosing. (Two political science courses) 3 hrs. lect.disc. (Political Theory)/

PSCI0438A-F17

CRN: 91617

Political Islam
Political Islam
In this course we will survey the central questions in studies of political Islam, focusing on the emergence of Islam as a political force in the contemporary period. Discussion will center on the following core topics: (1) the nature of political Islam and Islamic interests; (2) how Islamic political movements develop; (3) why Islamic political movements flourish or fail; (4) how Islamic interests are expressed in the political arena; and (5) what types of political systems are most compatible with politicized Islam? These questions will be addressed by looking at the general history of the contemporary Islamic resurgence and by examining case studies on Egypt, Algeria, Iran, Afghanistan, Turkey, West Africa, and Southeast Asia. 3 hrs. sem. (Comparative Politics)/

PSCI0482A-F17

CRN: 92333

Public/Private Governance
Private and Public Governance in an Era of Globalization
Although the study of international affairs has traditionally focused on states, other actors play important roles in governance. Working alongside the public sector, private actors bring innovative approaches and substantial resources to social problems, but effective collaboration between public and private actors remains elusive. In this seminar we will examine general theories of private and public governance, followed by specific discussion of issues such as economic development, environmental protection, and public health. International Relations

PSCI0483A-F17

Cross-Listed As:
IGST0483A-F17

CRN: 91856

Rise of Asia and U.S. Policy
Please Register Via IGST 0483
The Rise of Asia and US Policy
In this course we will study what is arguably the most important strategic development of the 21st century: how the rise of Asia presents security challenges to the region and the United States. Drawing from international relations scholarship, the course will focus on foreign policy challenges and potential responses. These challenges include both traditional security and nontraditional areas such as water and the environment. We will integrate the analysis of these issues in South, East, and Southeast Asia with study of the policy process, in part through simulations and role-playing exercises. This course is equivalent to IGST 0483. 3 hrs. sem. (Comparative Politics)/

PSCI0484A-F17

Cross-Listed As:
IGST0484A-F17

CRN: 91599

Political Econ of Regionalism
Please Register Via IGST 0484
The Political Economy of Regionalism
In this course we will address the political economy of regionalism in a variety of national and regional contexts. We will consider both integration projects—such as the European Union and South America’s Mercosur—as well as subnational local autonomy movements, such as those in Catalonia and Scotland. We will study theories of integration as well as case studies from Europe, Latin America, Asia, and Africa, focusing on the political and economic forces driving both integration and disintegration in their historical and contemporary contexts. We will also consider how globalization affects regional integration projects. (Comparative Politics) 3 hrs. sem.

PSCI0500A-F17

CRN: 90211

Independent Project
Independent Projects
A program of independent work designed to meet the individual needs of advanced students. (Approval required)

PSCI0500B-F17

CRN: 90215

Independent Project
Independent Projects
A program of independent work designed to meet the individual needs of advanced students. (Approval required)

PSCI0500C-F17

CRN: 90816

Independent Project
Independent Projects
A program of independent work designed to meet the individual needs of advanced students. (Approval required)

PSCI0500E-F17

CRN: 90231

Independent Project
Independent Projects
A program of independent work designed to meet the individual needs of advanced students. (Approval required)

PSCI0500F-F17

CRN: 90232

Independent Project
Independent Projects
A program of independent work designed to meet the individual needs of advanced students. (Approval required)

PSCI0500H-F17

CRN: 90233

Independent Project
Independent Projects
A program of independent work designed to meet the individual needs of advanced students. (Approval required)

PSCI0500J-F17

CRN: 90235

Independent Project
Independent Projects
A program of independent work designed to meet the individual needs of advanced students. (Approval required)

PSCI0500K-F17

CRN: 90238

Independent Project
Independent Projects
A program of independent work designed to meet the individual needs of advanced students. (Approval required)

PSCI0500L-F17

CRN: 90239

Independent Project
Independent Projects
A program of independent work designed to meet the individual needs of advanced students. (Approval required)

PSCI0500M-F17

CRN: 90653

Independent Project
Independent Projects
A program of independent work designed to meet the individual needs of advanced students. (Approval required)

PSCI0500O-F17

CRN: 90655

Independent Project
Independent Projects
A program of independent work designed to meet the individual needs of advanced students. (Approval required)

PSCI0500P-F17

CRN: 90818

Independent Project
Independent Projects
A program of independent work designed to meet the individual needs of advanced students. (Approval required)

PSCI0500Q-F17

CRN: 90656

Independent Project
Independent Projects
A program of independent work designed to meet the individual needs of advanced students. (Approval required)

PSCI0500U-F17

CRN: 90940

Independent Project
Independent Projects
A program of independent work designed to meet the individual needs of advanced students. (Approval required)

PSCI0500V-F17

CRN: 91036

Independent Project
Independent Projects
A program of independent work designed to meet the individual needs of advanced students. (Approval required)

PSCI0500W-F17

CRN: 91130

Independent Project
Independent Projects
A program of independent work designed to meet the individual needs of advanced students. (Approval required)

PSCI0500X-F17

CRN: 91532

Independent Project
Independent Projects
A program of independent work designed to meet the individual needs of advanced students. (Approval required)

PSCI0700A-F17

CRN: 90240

Honors Thesis
Honors Thesis
(Approval required)

PSCI0700B-F17

CRN: 90243

Honors Thesis
Honors Thesis
(Approval required)

PSCI0700C-F17

CRN: 90244

Honors Thesis
Honors Thesis
(Approval required)

PSCI0700E-F17

CRN: 90246

Honors Thesis
Honors Thesis
(Approval required)

PSCI0700F-F17

CRN: 90247

Honors Thesis
Honors Thesis
(Approval required)

PSCI0700H-F17

CRN: 90250

Honors Thesis
Honors Thesis
(Approval required)

PSCI0700J-F17

CRN: 90254

Honors Thesis
Honors Thesis
(Approval required)

PSCI0700K-F17

CRN: 90256

Honors Thesis
Honors Thesis
(Approval required)

PSCI0700L-F17

CRN: 90257

Honors Thesis
Honors Thesis
(Approval required)

PSCI0700M-F17

CRN: 90683

Honors Thesis
Honors Thesis
(Approval required)

PSCI0700O-F17

CRN: 90685

Honors Thesis
Honors Thesis
(Approval required)

PSCI0700P-F17

CRN: 90686

Honors Thesis
Honors Thesis
(Approval required)

PSCI0700Q-F17

CRN: 90687

Honors Thesis
Honors Thesis
(Approval required)

PSCI0700R-F17

CRN: 90688

Honors Thesis
Honors Thesis
(Approval required)

PSCI0700U-F17

CRN: 90941

Honors Thesis
Honors Thesis
(Approval required)

PSCI0700V-F17

CRN: 91048

Honors Thesis
Honors Thesis
(Approval required)

PSCI0700W-F17

CRN: 91131

Honors Thesis
Honors Thesis
(Approval required)