Middlebury

 

Sections

« Winter 2013 Spring 2013 Fall 2013 »

PSCI0101A-S13

CRN: 21137

Intro to Political Philosophy

Introduction to Political Philosophy
What is politics? What is the purpose of politics? Is there a best regime? Is it attainable? What is justice? What is the good life? How is each related to political life? Is there a science of politics? In this course, we will raise these and other fundamental questions through a study of major ancient and modern works of political philosophy. Authors may include Plato, Aristotle, Augustine, Machiavelli, Hobbes, Locke, Montesquieu, Rousseau, Constant, Tocqueville, Mill, Marx, and Nietzsche. 3 hrs. lect./disc. (Political Theory)

PSCI0101X-S13

CRN: 21138

Intro to Political Philosophy
Discussion

Introduction to Political Philosophy
What is politics? What is the purpose of politics? Is there a best regime? Is it attainable? What is justice? What is the good life? How is each related to political life? Is there a science of politics? In this course, we will raise these and other fundamental questions through a study of major ancient and modern works of political philosophy. Authors may include Plato, Aristotle, Augustine, Machiavelli, Hobbes, Locke, Montesquieu, Rousseau, Constant, Tocqueville, Mill, Marx, and Nietzsche. 3 hrs. lect./disc. (Political Theory)

PSCI0101Y-S13

CRN: 21139

Intro to Political Philosophy
Discussion

Introduction to Political Philosophy
What is politics? What is the purpose of politics? Is there a best regime? Is it attainable? What is justice? What is the good life? How is each related to political life? Is there a science of politics? In this course, we will raise these and other fundamental questions through a study of major ancient and modern works of political philosophy. Authors may include Plato, Aristotle, Augustine, Machiavelli, Hobbes, Locke, Montesquieu, Rousseau, Constant, Tocqueville, Mill, Marx, and Nietzsche. 3 hrs. lect./disc. (Political Theory)

PSCI0101Z-S13

CRN: 21141

Intro to Political Philosophy
Discussion

Introduction to Political Philosophy
What is politics? What is the purpose of politics? Is there a best regime? Is it attainable? What is justice? What is the good life? How is each related to political life? Is there a science of politics? In this course, we will raise these and other fundamental questions through a study of major ancient and modern works of political philosophy. Authors may include Plato, Aristotle, Augustine, Machiavelli, Hobbes, Locke, Montesquieu, Rousseau, Constant, Tocqueville, Mill, Marx, and Nietzsche. 3 hrs. lect./disc. (Political Theory)

PSCI0102A-S13

CRN: 21463

American Political Regime

The American Political Regime
This is a course in American political and constitutional thought. The theme, taken from de Tocqueville's Democracy in America, is the problem of freedom. The first half covers the American founding up through the Civil War and the "refounding." This includes de Tocqueville, Madison's Notes on the Debates in the Federal Convention, the Federalist-Anti-Federalist ratification debate, Supreme Court decisions (Marbury, McCulloch), writings of Jefferson, Calhoun, and Lincoln. The second half considers basic problems in American politics, such as race, gender, foreign policy, and education. Readings include a novel, de Tocqueville, and Supreme Court decisions (Brown, Frontiero, Roe, Casey, Grutter, Lawrence). 4 hrs. lect./disc. (American Politics)/

PSCI0102X-S13

CRN: 22471

American Political Regime
Discussion

The American Political Regime
This is a course in American political and constitutional thought. The theme, taken from de Tocqueville's Democracy in America, is the problem of freedom. The first half covers the American founding up through the Civil War and the "refounding." This includes de Tocqueville, Madison's Notes on the Debates in the Federal Convention, the Federalist-Anti-Federalist ratification debate, Supreme Court decisions (Marbury, McCulloch), writings of Jefferson, Calhoun, and Lincoln. The second half considers basic problems in American politics, such as race, gender, foreign policy, and education. Readings include a novel, de Tocqueville, and Supreme Court decisions (Brown, Frontiero, Roe, Casey, Grutter, Lawrence). 4 hrs. lect./disc. (American Politics)/

PSCI0102Y-S13

CRN: 21519

American Political Regime
Discussion

The American Political Regime
This is a course in American political and constitutional thought. The theme, taken from de Tocqueville's Democracy in America, is the problem of freedom. The first half covers the American founding up through the Civil War and the "refounding." This includes de Tocqueville, Madison's Notes on the Debates in the Federal Convention, the Federalist-Anti-Federalist ratification debate, Supreme Court decisions (Marbury, McCulloch), writings of Jefferson, Calhoun, and Lincoln. The second half considers basic problems in American politics, such as race, gender, foreign policy, and education. Readings include a novel, de Tocqueville, and Supreme Court decisions (Brown, Frontiero, Roe, Casey, Grutter, Lawrence). 4 hrs. lect./disc. (American Politics)/

PSCI0102Z-S13

CRN: 21520

American Political Regime
Discussion

The American Political Regime
This is a course in American political and constitutional thought. The theme, taken from de Tocqueville's Democracy in America, is the problem of freedom. The first half covers the American founding up through the Civil War and the "refounding." This includes de Tocqueville, Madison's Notes on the Debates in the Federal Convention, the Federalist-Anti-Federalist ratification debate, Supreme Court decisions (Marbury, McCulloch), writings of Jefferson, Calhoun, and Lincoln. The second half considers basic problems in American politics, such as race, gender, foreign policy, and education. Readings include a novel, de Tocqueville, and Supreme Court decisions (Brown, Frontiero, Roe, Casey, Grutter, Lawrence). 4 hrs. lect./disc. (American Politics)/

PSCI0103A-S13

CRN: 20015

Intro to Comparative Politics

Introduction to Comparative Politics
This course offers an introduction to the comparative study of political systems and to the logic of comparative inquiry. How are different political systems created and organized? How and why do they change? Why are some democratic and others authoritarian? Why are some rich and others poor? Other topics covered in this course include nationalism and political ideologies, forms of representation, the relationship between state institutions and civil society, and globalization. The goal in this course is to use comparative methods to analyze questions of state institutions -- how they arise, change, and generate different economic, social, and political outcome. 3 hrs. lect./disc. (Comparative Politics)

PSCI0103B-S13

CRN: 22483

Intro to Comparative Politics

Introduction to Comparative Politics
This course offers an introduction to the comparative study of political systems and to the logic of comparative inquiry. How are different political systems created and organized? How and why do they change? Why are some democratic and others authoritarian? Why are some rich and others poor? Other topics covered in this course include nationalism and political ideologies, forms of representation, the relationship between state institutions and civil society, and globalization. The goal in this course is to use comparative methods to analyze questions of state institutions -- how they arise, change, and generate different economic, social, and political outcome. 3 hrs. lect./disc. (Comparative Politics)

PSCI0103U-S13

CRN: 22485

Intro to Comparative Politics
Discussion PSCI 0103 B

Introduction to Comparative Politics
This course offers an introduction to the comparative study of political systems and to the logic of comparative inquiry. How are different political systems created and organized? How and why do they change? Why are some democratic and others authoritarian? Why are some rich and others poor? Other topics covered in this course include nationalism and political ideologies, forms of representation, the relationship between state institutions and civil society, and globalization. The goal in this course is to use comparative methods to analyze questions of state institutions -- how they arise, change, and generate different economic, social, and political outcome. 3 hrs. lect./disc. (Comparative Politics)

PSCI0103V-S13

CRN: 22486

Intro to Comparative Politics
Discussion PSCI 0103 B

Introduction to Comparative Politics
This course offers an introduction to the comparative study of political systems and to the logic of comparative inquiry. How are different political systems created and organized? How and why do they change? Why are some democratic and others authoritarian? Why are some rich and others poor? Other topics covered in this course include nationalism and political ideologies, forms of representation, the relationship between state institutions and civil society, and globalization. The goal in this course is to use comparative methods to analyze questions of state institutions -- how they arise, change, and generate different economic, social, and political outcome. 3 hrs. lect./disc. (Comparative Politics)

PSCI0103W-S13

CRN: 22487

Intro to Comparative Politics
Discussion PSCI 0103 B

Introduction to Comparative Politics
This course offers an introduction to the comparative study of political systems and to the logic of comparative inquiry. How are different political systems created and organized? How and why do they change? Why are some democratic and others authoritarian? Why are some rich and others poor? Other topics covered in this course include nationalism and political ideologies, forms of representation, the relationship between state institutions and civil society, and globalization. The goal in this course is to use comparative methods to analyze questions of state institutions -- how they arise, change, and generate different economic, social, and political outcome. 3 hrs. lect./disc. (Comparative Politics)

PSCI0103X-S13

CRN: 20717

Intro to Comparative Politics
Discussion PSCI 0103 A

Introduction to Comparative Politics
This course offers an introduction to the comparative study of political systems and to the logic of comparative inquiry. How are different political systems created and organized? How and why do they change? Why are some democratic and others authoritarian? Why are some rich and others poor? Other topics covered in this course include nationalism and political ideologies, forms of representation, the relationship between state institutions and civil society, and globalization. The goal in this course is to use comparative methods to analyze questions of state institutions -- how they arise, change, and generate different economic, social, and political outcome. 3 hrs. lect./disc. (Comparative Politics)

PSCI0103Y-S13

CRN: 20718

Intro to Comparative Politics
Discussion PSCI 0103 A

Introduction to Comparative Politics
This course offers an introduction to the comparative study of political systems and to the logic of comparative inquiry. How are different political systems created and organized? How and why do they change? Why are some democratic and others authoritarian? Why are some rich and others poor? Other topics covered in this course include nationalism and political ideologies, forms of representation, the relationship between state institutions and civil society, and globalization. The goal in this course is to use comparative methods to analyze questions of state institutions -- how they arise, change, and generate different economic, social, and political outcome. 3 hrs. lect./disc. (Comparative Politics)

PSCI0103Z-S13

CRN: 20719

Intro to Comparative Politics
Discussion PSCI 0103 A

Introduction to Comparative Politics
This course offers an introduction to the comparative study of political systems and to the logic of comparative inquiry. How are different political systems created and organized? How and why do they change? Why are some democratic and others authoritarian? Why are some rich and others poor? Other topics covered in this course include nationalism and political ideologies, forms of representation, the relationship between state institutions and civil society, and globalization. The goal in this course is to use comparative methods to analyze questions of state institutions -- how they arise, change, and generate different economic, social, and political outcome. 3 hrs. lect./disc. (Comparative Politics)

PSCI0109A-S13

CRN: 21189

International Politics

International Politics
What causes conflict or cooperation among states? What can states and other international entities do to preserve global peace? These are among the issues addressed by the study of international politics. This course examines the forces that shape relations among states, and between states and international regimes. Key concepts include: the international system, power and the balance of power, international institutions, foreign policy, diplomacy, deterrence, war, and global economic issues. Both the fall and spring sections of this course emphasize rigorous analysis and set theoretical concepts against historical and contemporary case studies. 3 hrs. lect./disc. (International Relations and Foreign Policy)/

PSCI0109B-S13

CRN: 21650

International Politics

International Politics
What causes conflict or cooperation among states? What can states and other international entities do to preserve global peace? These are among the issues addressed by the study of international politics. This course examines the forces that shape relations among states, and between states and international regimes. Key concepts include: the international system, power and the balance of power, international institutions, foreign policy, diplomacy, deterrence, war, and global economic issues. Both the fall and spring sections of this course emphasize rigorous analysis and set theoretical concepts against historical and contemporary case studies. 3 hrs. lect./disc. (International Relations and Foreign Policy)/

PSCI0109U-S13

CRN: 21651

International Politics
Discussion PSCI 0109 A

International Politics
What causes conflict or cooperation among states? What can states and other international entities do to preserve global peace? These are among the issues addressed by the study of international politics. This course examines the forces that shape relations among states, and between states and international regimes. Key concepts include: the international system, power and the balance of power, international institutions, foreign policy, diplomacy, deterrence, war, and global economic issues. Both the fall and spring sections of this course emphasize rigorous analysis and set theoretical concepts against historical and contemporary case studies. 3 hrs. lect./disc. (International Relations and Foreign Policy)/

PSCI0109V-S13

CRN: 21652

International Politics
Discussion PSCI 0109 A

International Politics
What causes conflict or cooperation among states? What can states and other international entities do to preserve global peace? These are among the issues addressed by the study of international politics. This course examines the forces that shape relations among states, and between states and international regimes. Key concepts include: the international system, power and the balance of power, international institutions, foreign policy, diplomacy, deterrence, war, and global economic issues. Both the fall and spring sections of this course emphasize rigorous analysis and set theoretical concepts against historical and contemporary case studies. 3 hrs. lect./disc. (International Relations and Foreign Policy)/

PSCI0109W-S13

CRN: 21653

International Politics
Discussion PSCI 0109 A

International Politics
What causes conflict or cooperation among states? What can states and other international entities do to preserve global peace? These are among the issues addressed by the study of international politics. This course examines the forces that shape relations among states, and between states and international regimes. Key concepts include: the international system, power and the balance of power, international institutions, foreign policy, diplomacy, deterrence, war, and global economic issues. Both the fall and spring sections of this course emphasize rigorous analysis and set theoretical concepts against historical and contemporary case studies. 3 hrs. lect./disc. (International Relations and Foreign Policy)/

PSCI0109X-S13

CRN: 21190

International Politics
Discussion PSCI 0109 B

International Politics
What causes conflict or cooperation among states? What can states and other international entities do to preserve global peace? These are among the issues addressed by the study of international politics. This course examines the forces that shape relations among states, and between states and international regimes. Key concepts include: the international system, power and the balance of power, international institutions, foreign policy, diplomacy, deterrence, war, and global economic issues. Both the fall and spring sections of this course emphasize rigorous analysis and set theoretical concepts against historical and contemporary case studies. 3 hrs. lect./disc. (International Relations and Foreign Policy)/

PSCI0109Y-S13

CRN: 21191

International Politics
Discussion PSCI 0109 B

International Politics
What causes conflict or cooperation among states? What can states and other international entities do to preserve global peace? These are among the issues addressed by the study of international politics. This course examines the forces that shape relations among states, and between states and international regimes. Key concepts include: the international system, power and the balance of power, international institutions, foreign policy, diplomacy, deterrence, war, and global economic issues. Both the fall and spring sections of this course emphasize rigorous analysis and set theoretical concepts against historical and contemporary case studies. 3 hrs. lect./disc. (International Relations and Foreign Policy)/

PSCI0109Z-S13

CRN: 21192

International Politics
Discussion PSCI 0109 B

International Politics
What causes conflict or cooperation among states? What can states and other international entities do to preserve global peace? These are among the issues addressed by the study of international politics. This course examines the forces that shape relations among states, and between states and international regimes. Key concepts include: the international system, power and the balance of power, international institutions, foreign policy, diplomacy, deterrence, war, and global economic issues. Both the fall and spring sections of this course emphasize rigorous analysis and set theoretical concepts against historical and contemporary case studies. 3 hrs. lect./disc. (International Relations and Foreign Policy)/

PSCI0202A-S13

CRN: 21414

African Politics

African Politics
This course surveys the challenges and possibilities that Sub-Saharan Africa presents in our era of globalization. We will look at the process of state formation to appreciate the relationships between historical legacies and political and economic development. Themes include state formation, democratic governance, sustainable development, and Africa in world affairs. Topics such as colonial rule and national responses, authoritarian rule, ethnic politics, the debt burden, the HIV/AIDS pandemic, and natural resource politics will be discussed. Case studies from English-, French-, and Portuguese-speaking Africa will be used to illuminate such relationships. 3 hrs lect/disc. (Comparative Politics)/

PSCI0202Y-S13

CRN: 21415

African Politics
Discussion

African Politics
This course surveys the challenges and possibilities that Sub-Saharan Africa presents in our era of globalization. We will look at the process of state formation to appreciate the relationships between historical legacies and political and economic development. Themes include state formation, democratic governance, sustainable development, and Africa in world affairs. Topics such as colonial rule and national responses, authoritarian rule, ethnic politics, the debt burden, the HIV/AIDS pandemic, and natural resource politics will be discussed. Case studies from English-, French-, and Portuguese-speaking Africa will be used to illuminate such relationships. 3 hrs lect/disc. (Comparative Politics)/

PSCI0202Z-S13

CRN: 21416

African Politics
Discussion

African Politics
This course surveys the challenges and possibilities that Sub-Saharan Africa presents in our era of globalization. We will look at the process of state formation to appreciate the relationships between historical legacies and political and economic development. Themes include state formation, democratic governance, sustainable development, and Africa in world affairs. Topics such as colonial rule and national responses, authoritarian rule, ethnic politics, the debt burden, the HIV/AIDS pandemic, and natural resource politics will be discussed. Case studies from English-, French-, and Portuguese-speaking Africa will be used to illuminate such relationships. 3 hrs lect/disc. (Comparative Politics)/

PSCI0209A-S13

CRN: 22430

Local Green Politics

Local Green Politics
How do local communities manage natural resources throughout the world? How do they avoid natural resource degradation, and how do they interact with environmental decision makers from other levels of authority? Through case studies in wildlife and forest conservation, ecotourism, protected area management, and environmental and conservation planning, we will study community-based natural resource management efforts. Case studies – from ancient times to present – will be drawn from Africa, Asia, Europe, Latin America, and the U.S. By the end of the course, students will be expected to critically analyze cases of resource management and mismanagement. 3 hrs. lect./disc./(Comparative Politics)/

PSCI0212A-S13

CRN: 21708

Comp Environmental Politics

Comparative Environmental Politics
The nation-state is confronted with both internal and external demands on its ability to manage environmental problems, and these challenges take many forms. For example, international treaties have to be effectively translated into domestic policy; environmental problems that may be considered "local" are often exacerbated by international phenomena; the ability of domestic populations to bring environmental problems to the policy agenda is influenced by state-society relationships; and state environmental agencies often have jurisdictional conflicts with vested interests. In this course we will examine such environmental issues in several countries, including Brazil, Indonesia, and Egypt in order to compare the effects of different political systems on natural resource management. 3 hrs. lect.(Comparative Politics)/

PSCI0215A-S13

CRN: 21468

Fed. State & Local Politics

Federalism, State and Local Politics
What are the unique political opportunities and constraints facing state and local governments? How have these changed over time? In this course we examine the relationships between different levels of government in the U.S. federal system, considering the particular tasks and dilemmas facing states and cities, and scrutinizing the complex interactions between governments that characterize federalism in the United States. Topics include local political culture, intergovernmental grants, state parties, and state political economy. Vermont, New York, and California will receive special scrutiny. (PSCI 0102 or PSCI 0104 or by waiver) 3 hrs. lect./disc. (American Politics)/

PSCI0234A-S13

CRN: 22347

Religion and Politics

Religion & Politics: Ancient & Modern
What role should religion play in politics? And what is the proper role of the state in regulating religion? Is religious conviction a precondition of or threat to healthy civic life? Why should regimes prefer religious toleration to religious uniformity? In this course we will examine these and other questions at the intersection of religion and politics in the western political tradition, affording special attention to early modern debates over the separation of church and state, toleration, and civil religion. Authors will include Plato, Emperor Julian, Augustine, Machiavelli, Luther, Calvin, Bayle, Hobbes, Locke, Montesquieu, Rousseau, Lessing, and Tocqueville. (Political Theory)/

PSCI0258A-S13

CRN: 21417

Pols Intl Humanitarian Action

The Politics of International Humanitarian Action
Humanitarian intervention has emerged as a new moral imperative that challenges traditional concepts and practices in international relations. In this course we will consider how a range of actors--international organizations, states, NGOs--understand the concept of humanitarian intervention and engage (or not) in humanitarian actions. We will examine a variety of policy choices, including aid and military intervention, through case studies, including Somalia, Kosovo, and Rwanda. The goal of the course is to enable students to assess critically the benefits and challenges of a humanitarian approach to global politics. 3 hrs. lect./disc. (International Relations and Foreign Policy)/

PSCI0260A-S13

CRN: 21655

Pol Economy Drug Trafficking

The Political Economy of Drug Trafficking
This course examines the political economy of drug trafficking in the Western Hemisphere. How have transnational drug markets evolved, and why? What effects has narco-trafficking had on the political, economic, legal, financial, and social systems of producer, consumer, and transshipment countries? What policy responses are available to combat it? How should we weigh alternative policy options? Examination of these issues centers on source countries in Latin America's Andean region, the chief transshipment country (Mexico), and the principal consumer country (the US). Attention also is devoted to the drug trade's effects on American society and criminal justice system. 3 hrs. lect./disc.
(International Relations and Foreign Policy)/

PSCI0278A-S13

CRN: 21912

Politics of Insurgency

The Politics of Insurgency
In this course we will survey the full range of insurgencies, from violent civil wars and classic insurgencies to strategically nonviolent movements. Drawing from the international relations and comparative politics literatures, this class will work to analyze an array of research questions on why insurgencies begin, endure, and terminate. We will also consider the efficacy of different resistance methods, the role of the international community, and the impact of insurgency on post-conflict outcomes. Students will synthesize course content in a professional research analysis that provides policy prescriptions for ongoing conflicts throughout the world. (PSCI 0103 or 0109)

PSCI0290A-S13

CRN: 22335

Social Unrest in Asia

Social Unrest in Asia
In this course we will compare protest, social mobilization, and contentious politics across Asia. While some have argued that "Asian values" cause harmonious and stable political systems, we will start from the premise that contentious politics in the region reflect the same dynamics seen elsewhere throughout history. However, as with all countries, the specific institutional and cultural context often shapes particular forms of contention. Empirically, we will focus on key regions including East and Southeast Asia as well as the domestic and international dimensions of activism. (PSCI 0103 or PSCI 0109) 3 hrs. lect. (Comparative Politics)

PSCI0304A-S13

CRN: 20707

Internatl Political Economy

International Political Economy
This course examines the politics of global economic relations, focusing principally on the advanced industrial states. How do governments and firms deal with the forces of globalization and interdependence? And what are the causes and consequences of their actions for the international system in turn? The course exposes students to both classic and contemporary thinking on free trade and protectionism, exchange rates and monetary systems, foreign direct investment and capital movements, regional integration, and the role of international institutions like the WTO. Readings will be drawn mainly from political science, as well as law and economics. (PSCI 0109) 3 hrs. lect./disc.
(International Relations and Foreign Policy)/

PSCI0304Y-S13

CRN: 22475

Internatl Political Economy
Discussion

International Political Economy
This course examines the politics of global economic relations, focusing principally on the advanced industrial states. How do governments and firms deal with the forces of globalization and interdependence? And what are the causes and consequences of their actions for the international system in turn? The course exposes students to both classic and contemporary thinking on free trade and protectionism, exchange rates and monetary systems, foreign direct investment and capital movements, regional integration, and the role of international institutions like the WTO. Readings will be drawn mainly from political science, as well as law and economics. (PSCI 0109) 3 hrs. lect./disc.
(International Relations and Foreign Policy)/

PSCI0304Z-S13

CRN: 22476

Internatl Political Economy
Discussion

International Political Economy
This course examines the politics of global economic relations, focusing principally on the advanced industrial states. How do governments and firms deal with the forces of globalization and interdependence? And what are the causes and consequences of their actions for the international system in turn? The course exposes students to both classic and contemporary thinking on free trade and protectionism, exchange rates and monetary systems, foreign direct investment and capital movements, regional integration, and the role of international institutions like the WTO. Readings will be drawn mainly from political science, as well as law and economics. (PSCI 0109) 3 hrs. lect./disc.
(International Relations and Foreign Policy)/

PSCI0310A-S13

CRN: 21657

American Public Policy

American Public Policy
This course examines the functioning of the entire United States political system, with an emphasis on the policies or outcomes of this political system. The first part of the course will examine the context in which policy is made (e.g., history, capitalism, liberalism). The second part of the course will focus on the policy-making process. We will examine the major stages of the policy process: agenda setting, policy formulation, adoption, implementation, and evaluation. The third and final part of the course will focus on specific policy areas, such as education policy and health care policy. 3 hrs. lect./disc. (American Politics)/

PSCI0318A-S13

Cross-Listed As:
PSCI0318B-S13

CRN: 22187

Modern Political Philosophy

Modern Political Philosophy
In this course. we will study: Machiavelli (Prince, Discourses); Bacon
(Advancement of Learning); Hobbes (Leviathan); Locke (Second Treatise);
Spinoza (Theological-Political Treatise); Montesquieu (Spirit of the Laws);
Rousseau (Social Contract); Burke (Reflections); Kant (Foundations of the Metaphysics of Morals, Perpetual Peace); Hegel (Introduction to Philosophy of History); Marx (Communist Manifesto, German Ideology, Capital); Nietzsche
(Beyond Good and Evil); Heidegger (Question Concerning Technology).
We will examine modernity's rejection of ancient thought, its later replacement of nature by history as the standard for right, and its subsequent rejection of any standard of right. Other topics include religion, freedom ofspeech, and the separation of powers. (PSCI 0101 or PSCI 0107 or PSCI 0317, or PSCI 0333, or waiver) 4.5 hrs. lect./disc. (Political Theory)/

PSCI0318B-S13

Cross-Listed As:
PSCI0318A-S13

CRN: 22587

Modern Political Philosophy

Modern Political Philosophy
In this course. we will study: Machiavelli (Prince, Discourses); Bacon
(Advancement of Learning); Hobbes (Leviathan); Locke (Second Treatise);
Spinoza (Theological-Political Treatise); Montesquieu (Spirit of the Laws);
Rousseau (Social Contract); Burke (Reflections); Kant (Foundations of the Metaphysics of Morals, Perpetual Peace); Hegel (Introduction to Philosophy of History); Marx (Communist Manifesto, German Ideology, Capital); Nietzsche
(Beyond Good and Evil); Heidegger (Question Concerning Technology).
We will examine modernity's rejection of ancient thought, its later replacement of nature by history as the standard for right, and its subsequent rejection of any standard of right. Other topics include religion, freedom ofspeech, and the separation of powers. (PSCI 0101 or PSCI 0107 or PSCI 0317, or PSCI 0333, or waiver) 4.5 hrs. lect./disc. (Political Theory)/

PSCI0322A-S13

CRN: 22188

War and Peace

War and Peace
What causes conflicts between states and within countries? What factors facilitate or impede their resolution? In this course we will examine interstate and intrastate conflicts and the challenges faced in resolving them, from both practical and theoretical perspectives. Employing some of the most prominent theories on war, and more recent theories of bargaining, negotiation, and conflict, we will draw upon a range of case studies to illustrate and evaluate the theoretical dynamics of conflict and conflict resolution. (PSCI 0109 or PSCI 0201 or by waiver) 3 hrs. lect./disc. (International Relations and Foreign Policy)/

PSCI0335A-S13

CRN: 22189

Latin American Revolutions

Latin American Revolutions
This course examines the causes, goals, and outcomes of revolutions in twentieth-century Latin America, with special reference to Mexico, Cuba, Venezuela, Chile, and Nicaragua. It seeks to understand (1) why this region has experienced multiple revolutions; (2) what their political, economic, or social impact has been; (3) why revolutions produced authoritarian, socialist, dictatorial, or democratic outcomes across countries; and (4) what factors have kept revolutionaries from achieving their political, social, or economic goals. Evaluation entails rigorous application of theory to in-depth case studies. 3 hrs. lect./disc. (Comparative Politics)/

PSCI0403A-S13

Cross-Listed As:
IGST0403A-S13

CRN: 22190

India and China Compared
Please register via IGST 0403A

India and China: 21st Century Superpowers?
In this course we will look at recent political and economic developments in India and China. We will examine the economic rise of India and China in contrast to their earlier economic stagnation. We will contrast political evolution into India's democracy and China's one-party autocracy, and we will study relations between the two states and their relations with the U.S. and the world. This course is equivalent to IGST 0403. (PSCI 0103 or waiver) 3 hrs. seminar (Comparative Politics)

PSCI0412A-S13

CRN: 22191

Diplomacy

Diplomacy
The practice of diplomacy and the techniques of bargaining, negotiation, and mediation are studied through theoretical works, diplomatic handbooks, memoirs, and studies of historical and contemporary cases. The seminar begins with an examination of a case of classical diplomacy at the Congress of Vienna. It then moves to consider more contemporary examples of negotiation and mediation in interstate crises, peace settlements, and cooperative efforts at problem solving. Each student will complete a case study of a diplomatic event of his or her choice. (PSCI 0109 or 0201 or PSCI 0311 or waiver) 3 hrs. sem. (International Relations and Foreign Policy)/

PSCI0421A-S13

CRN: 21659

American Environ Politics

American Environmental Politics
In this seminar we will examine various aspects of environmental politics in the United States. Topics to be covered include how society seeks to influence environmental policy (through public opinion, voting, interest groups, and political parties) and how policy is made through Congress, the executive branch, the courts, collaboration, and through the states and corporate social responsibility. Students will write a major research paper on an aspect of U.S. environmental politics. (PSCI/ENVS 0211; open to PSCI/ESEP majors, others by approval) 3 hrs. sem. (American Politics)

PSCI0425A-S13

CRN: 22192

American Presidency

The American Presidency
In-depth examination of the exercise of presidential leadership from a normative and empirical perspective. What are the sources of presidential power, the constraints on its use, and the implications for the American political system? The focus is on the leadership strategies of the modern presidents (FDR through Obama). (PSCI 0102 or PSCI 0104 or PSCI 0206 or waiver) 3 hrs. sem. (American Politics)/

PSCI0470A-S13

CRN: 22350

Race and Ethnic Politics

Race and Ethnic Politics
This seminar is designed to build upon students' own interests, as each participant will write a 30-35 page research paper on a topic in race and ethnic politics that they have selected, drawing on any time period, country, or region of the world. We will discuss how to craft a research paper and will collectively workshop student papers-in-progress. This course will be of particular interest to seniors wishing to engage in a capstone project, or to juniors exploring a potential senior thesis topic. 3 hrs. sem. (Comparative Politics)/

PSCI0495A-S13

CRN: 22193

Money and Politics

Money and Politics
Observers and political activists have long fought over how to best reconcile the existence of capitalism, with its necessary inequalities, and the principles of a democratic republic, which postulates equality with respect to rights. In this seminar, we consider what political science can teach us about the relationship between money and politics, and how best to assess the normative consequences of this interaction. 3 hrs. sem. (American Politics)/

PSCI0500A-S13

CRN: 20150

Independent Project

Independent Projects
A program of independent work designed to meet the individual needs of advanced students. (Approval required)

PSCI0500B-S13

CRN: 20153

Independent Project

Independent Projects
A program of independent work designed to meet the individual needs of advanced students. (Approval required)

PSCI0500E-S13

CRN: 20166

Independent Project

Independent Projects
A program of independent work designed to meet the individual needs of advanced students. (Approval required)

PSCI0500F-S13

CRN: 20168

Independent Project

Independent Projects
A program of independent work designed to meet the individual needs of advanced students. (Approval required)

PSCI0500G-S13

CRN: 20169

Independent Project

Independent Projects
A program of independent work designed to meet the individual needs of advanced students. (Approval required)

PSCI0500H-S13

CRN: 20170

Independent Project

Independent Projects
A program of independent work designed to meet the individual needs of advanced students. (Approval required)

PSCI0500J-S13

CRN: 20172

Independent Project

Independent Projects
A program of independent work designed to meet the individual needs of advanced students. (Approval required)

PSCI0500K-S13

CRN: 21011

Independent Project

Independent Projects
A program of independent work designed to meet the individual needs of advanced students. (Approval required)

PSCI0500L-S13

CRN: 20174

Independent Project

Independent Projects
A program of independent work designed to meet the individual needs of advanced students. (Approval required)

PSCI0500M-S13

CRN: 20647

Independent Project

Independent Projects
A program of independent work designed to meet the individual needs of advanced students. (Approval required)

PSCI0500N-S13

CRN: 20699

Independent Project

Independent Projects
A program of independent work designed to meet the individual needs of advanced students. (Approval required)

PSCI0500O-S13

CRN: 22423

Independent Project

Independent Projects
A program of independent work designed to meet the individual needs of advanced students. (Approval required)

PSCI0500P-S13

CRN: 20811

Independent Project

Independent Projects
A program of independent work designed to meet the individual needs of advanced students. (Approval required)

PSCI0500S-S13

CRN: 20814

Independent Project

Independent Projects
A program of independent work designed to meet the individual needs of advanced students. (Approval required)

PSCI0500T-S13

CRN: 21329

Independent Project

Independent Projects
A program of independent work designed to meet the individual needs of advanced students. (Approval required)

PSCI0500V-S13

CRN: 21398

Independent Project

Independent Projects
A program of independent work designed to meet the individual needs of advanced students. (Approval required)

PSCI0500W-S13

CRN: 21662

Independent Project

Independent Projects
A program of independent work designed to meet the individual needs of advanced students. (Approval required)

PSCI0500Y-S13

CRN: 22600

Independent Project

Independent Projects
A program of independent work designed to meet the individual needs of advanced students. (Approval required)

PSCI0700A-S13

CRN: 20175

Honors Thesis

Honors Thesis
(Approval required)

PSCI0700B-S13

CRN: 20177

Honors Thesis

Honors Thesis
(Approval required)

PSCI0700E-S13

CRN: 20179

Honors Thesis

Honors Thesis
(Approval required)

PSCI0700F-S13

CRN: 20180

Honors Thesis

Honors Thesis
(Approval required)

PSCI0700G-S13

CRN: 21013

Honors Thesis

Honors Thesis
(Approval required)

PSCI0700H-S13

CRN: 20182

Honors Thesis

Honors Thesis
(Approval required)

PSCI0700J-S13

CRN: 20186

Honors Thesis

Honors Thesis
(Approval required)

PSCI0700K-S13

CRN: 20188

Honors Thesis

Honors Thesis
(Approval required)

PSCI0700L-S13

CRN: 20189

Honors Thesis

Honors Thesis
(Approval required)

PSCI0700M-S13

CRN: 20815

Honors Thesis

Honors Thesis
(Approval required)

PSCI0700N-S13

CRN: 20700

Honors Thesis

Honors Thesis
(Approval required)

PSCI0700O-S13

CRN: 21925

Honors Thesis

Honors Thesis
(Approval required)

PSCI0700P-S13

CRN: 20816

Honors Thesis

Honors Thesis
(Approval required)

PSCI0700S-S13

CRN: 20819

Honors Thesis

Honors Thesis
(Approval required)

PSCI0700T-S13

CRN: 21330

Honors Thesis

Honors Thesis
(Approval required)

PSCI0700V-S13

CRN: 21400

Honors Thesis

Honors Thesis
(Approval required)

PSCI0700W-S13

CRN: 21663

Honors Thesis

Honors Thesis
(Approval required)