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PSCI0101A-S14

CRN: 21016

Intro to Political Philosophy

Introduction to Political Philosophy
What is politics? What is the purpose of politics? Is there a best regime? Is it attainable? What is justice? What is the good life? How is each related to political life? Is there a science of politics? In this course, we will raise these and other fundamental questions through a study of major ancient and modern works of political philosophy. Authors may include Plato, Aristotle, Augustine, Machiavelli, Hobbes, Locke, Montesquieu, Rousseau, Constant, Tocqueville, Mill, Marx, and Nietzsche. 3 hrs. lect./disc. (Political Theory)

PSCI0101X-S14

CRN: 21017

Intro to Political Philosophy
Discussion

Introduction to Political Philosophy
What is politics? What is the purpose of politics? Is there a best regime? Is it attainable? What is justice? What is the good life? How is each related to political life? Is there a science of politics? In this course, we will raise these and other fundamental questions through a study of major ancient and modern works of political philosophy. Authors may include Plato, Aristotle, Augustine, Machiavelli, Hobbes, Locke, Montesquieu, Rousseau, Constant, Tocqueville, Mill, Marx, and Nietzsche. 3 hrs. lect./disc. (Political Theory)

PSCI0101Y-S14

CRN: 21018

Intro to Political Philosophy
Discussion

Introduction to Political Philosophy
What is politics? What is the purpose of politics? Is there a best regime? Is it attainable? What is justice? What is the good life? How is each related to political life? Is there a science of politics? In this course, we will raise these and other fundamental questions through a study of major ancient and modern works of political philosophy. Authors may include Plato, Aristotle, Augustine, Machiavelli, Hobbes, Locke, Montesquieu, Rousseau, Constant, Tocqueville, Mill, Marx, and Nietzsche. 3 hrs. lect./disc. (Political Theory)

PSCI0101Z-S14

CRN: 21020

Intro to Political Philosophy
Discussion

Introduction to Political Philosophy
What is politics? What is the purpose of politics? Is there a best regime? Is it attainable? What is justice? What is the good life? How is each related to political life? Is there a science of politics? In this course, we will raise these and other fundamental questions through a study of major ancient and modern works of political philosophy. Authors may include Plato, Aristotle, Augustine, Machiavelli, Hobbes, Locke, Montesquieu, Rousseau, Constant, Tocqueville, Mill, Marx, and Nietzsche. 3 hrs. lect./disc. (Political Theory)

PSCI0102A-S14

CRN: 21289

American Political Regime

The American Political Regime
This is a course in American political and constitutional thought. The theme, taken from de Tocqueville's Democracy in America, is the problem of freedom. The first half covers the American founding up through the Civil War and the "refounding." This includes de Tocqueville, Madison's Notes on the Debates in the Federal Convention, the Federalist-Anti-Federalist ratification debate, Supreme Court decisions (Marbury, McCulloch), writings of Jefferson, Calhoun, and Lincoln. The second half considers basic problems in American politics, such as race, gender, foreign policy, and education. Readings include a novel, de Tocqueville, and Supreme Court decisions (Brown, Frontiero, Roe, Casey, Grutter, Lawrence). 4 hrs. lect./disc. (American Politics)/

PSCI0102X-S14

CRN: 21909

American Political Regime
Discussion

The American Political Regime
This is a course in American political and constitutional thought. The theme, taken from de Tocqueville's Democracy in America, is the problem of freedom. The first half covers the American founding up through the Civil War and the "refounding." This includes de Tocqueville, Madison's Notes on the Debates in the Federal Convention, the Federalist-Anti-Federalist ratification debate, Supreme Court decisions (Marbury, McCulloch), writings of Jefferson, Calhoun, and Lincoln. The second half considers basic problems in American politics, such as race, gender, foreign policy, and education. Readings include a novel, de Tocqueville, and Supreme Court decisions (Brown, Frontiero, Roe, Casey, Grutter, Lawrence). 4 hrs. lect./disc. (American Politics)/

PSCI0102Y-S14

CRN: 21319

American Political Regime
Discussion

The American Political Regime
This is a course in American political and constitutional thought. The theme, taken from de Tocqueville's Democracy in America, is the problem of freedom. The first half covers the American founding up through the Civil War and the "refounding." This includes de Tocqueville, Madison's Notes on the Debates in the Federal Convention, the Federalist-Anti-Federalist ratification debate, Supreme Court decisions (Marbury, McCulloch), writings of Jefferson, Calhoun, and Lincoln. The second half considers basic problems in American politics, such as race, gender, foreign policy, and education. Readings include a novel, de Tocqueville, and Supreme Court decisions (Brown, Frontiero, Roe, Casey, Grutter, Lawrence). 4 hrs. lect./disc. (American Politics)/

PSCI0102Z-S14

CRN: 21320

American Political Regime
Discussion

The American Political Regime
This is a course in American political and constitutional thought. The theme, taken from de Tocqueville's Democracy in America, is the problem of freedom. The first half covers the American founding up through the Civil War and the "refounding." This includes de Tocqueville, Madison's Notes on the Debates in the Federal Convention, the Federalist-Anti-Federalist ratification debate, Supreme Court decisions (Marbury, McCulloch), writings of Jefferson, Calhoun, and Lincoln. The second half considers basic problems in American politics, such as race, gender, foreign policy, and education. Readings include a novel, de Tocqueville, and Supreme Court decisions (Brown, Frontiero, Roe, Casey, Grutter, Lawrence). 4 hrs. lect./disc. (American Politics)/

PSCI0103A-S14

CRN: 20013

Intro to Comparative Politics

Introduction to Comparative Politics
This course offers an introduction to the comparative study of political systems and to the logic of comparative inquiry. How are different political systems created and organized? How and why do they change? Why are some democratic and others authoritarian? Why are some rich and others poor? Other topics covered in this course include nationalism and political ideologies, forms of representation, the relationship between state institutions and civil society, and globalization. The goal in this course is to use comparative methods to analyze questions of state institutions -- how they arise, change, and generate different economic, social, and political outcome. 3 hrs. lect./disc. (Comparative Politics)

PSCI0103X-S14

CRN: 20646

Intro to Comparative Politics
Discussion

Introduction to Comparative Politics
This course offers an introduction to the comparative study of political systems and to the logic of comparative inquiry. How are different political systems created and organized? How and why do they change? Why are some democratic and others authoritarian? Why are some rich and others poor? Other topics covered in this course include nationalism and political ideologies, forms of representation, the relationship between state institutions and civil society, and globalization. The goal in this course is to use comparative methods to analyze questions of state institutions -- how they arise, change, and generate different economic, social, and political outcome. 3 hrs. lect./disc. (Comparative Politics)

PSCI0103Y-S14

CRN: 20647

Intro to Comparative Politics
Discussion

Introduction to Comparative Politics
This course offers an introduction to the comparative study of political systems and to the logic of comparative inquiry. How are different political systems created and organized? How and why do they change? Why are some democratic and others authoritarian? Why are some rich and others poor? Other topics covered in this course include nationalism and political ideologies, forms of representation, the relationship between state institutions and civil society, and globalization. The goal in this course is to use comparative methods to analyze questions of state institutions -- how they arise, change, and generate different economic, social, and political outcome. 3 hrs. lect./disc. (Comparative Politics)

PSCI0103Z-S14

CRN: 20648

Intro to Comparative Politics
Discussion

Introduction to Comparative Politics
This course offers an introduction to the comparative study of political systems and to the logic of comparative inquiry. How are different political systems created and organized? How and why do they change? Why are some democratic and others authoritarian? Why are some rich and others poor? Other topics covered in this course include nationalism and political ideologies, forms of representation, the relationship between state institutions and civil society, and globalization. The goal in this course is to use comparative methods to analyze questions of state institutions -- how they arise, change, and generate different economic, social, and political outcome. 3 hrs. lect./disc. (Comparative Politics)

PSCI0109A-S14

CRN: 21064

International Politics

International Politics
What causes conflict or cooperation among states? What can states and other international entities do to preserve global peace? These are among the issues addressed by the study of international politics. This course examines the forces that shape relations among states, and between states and international regimes. Key concepts include: the international system, power and the balance of power, international institutions, foreign policy, diplomacy, deterrence, war, and global economic issues. Both the fall and spring sections of this course emphasize rigorous analysis and set theoretical concepts against historical and contemporary case studies. 3 hrs. lect./disc. (International Relations and Foreign Policy)/

PSCI0109X-S14

CRN: 21065

International Politics
Discussion

International Politics
What causes conflict or cooperation among states? What can states and other international entities do to preserve global peace? These are among the issues addressed by the study of international politics. This course examines the forces that shape relations among states, and between states and international regimes. Key concepts include: the international system, power and the balance of power, international institutions, foreign policy, diplomacy, deterrence, war, and global economic issues. Both the fall and spring sections of this course emphasize rigorous analysis and set theoretical concepts against historical and contemporary case studies. 3 hrs. lect./disc. (International Relations and Foreign Policy)/

PSCI0109Y-S14

CRN: 21066

International Politics
Discussion

International Politics
What causes conflict or cooperation among states? What can states and other international entities do to preserve global peace? These are among the issues addressed by the study of international politics. This course examines the forces that shape relations among states, and between states and international regimes. Key concepts include: the international system, power and the balance of power, international institutions, foreign policy, diplomacy, deterrence, war, and global economic issues. Both the fall and spring sections of this course emphasize rigorous analysis and set theoretical concepts against historical and contemporary case studies. 3 hrs. lect./disc. (International Relations and Foreign Policy)/

PSCI0109Z-S14

CRN: 21067

International Politics
Discussion

International Politics
What causes conflict or cooperation among states? What can states and other international entities do to preserve global peace? These are among the issues addressed by the study of international politics. This course examines the forces that shape relations among states, and between states and international regimes. Key concepts include: the international system, power and the balance of power, international institutions, foreign policy, diplomacy, deterrence, war, and global economic issues. Both the fall and spring sections of this course emphasize rigorous analysis and set theoretical concepts against historical and contemporary case studies. 3 hrs. lect./disc. (International Relations and Foreign Policy)/

PSCI0202A-S14

CRN: 21259

African Politics

African Politics
This course surveys the challenges and possibilities that Sub-Saharan Africa presents in our era of globalization. We will look at the process of state formation to appreciate the relationships between historical legacies and political and economic development. Themes include state formation, democratic governance, sustainable development, and Africa in world affairs. Topics such as colonial rule and national responses, authoritarian rule, ethnic politics, the debt burden, the HIV/AIDS pandemic, and natural resource politics will be discussed. Case studies from English-, French-, and Portuguese-speaking Africa will be used to illuminate such relationships. 3 hrs lect/disc. (Comparative Politics)/

PSCI0202Y-S14

CRN: 21260

African Politics
Discussion

African Politics
This course surveys the challenges and possibilities that Sub-Saharan Africa presents in our era of globalization. We will look at the process of state formation to appreciate the relationships between historical legacies and political and economic development. Themes include state formation, democratic governance, sustainable development, and Africa in world affairs. Topics such as colonial rule and national responses, authoritarian rule, ethnic politics, the debt burden, the HIV/AIDS pandemic, and natural resource politics will be discussed. Case studies from English-, French-, and Portuguese-speaking Africa will be used to illuminate such relationships. 3 hrs lect/disc. (Comparative Politics)/

PSCI0202Z-S14

CRN: 21261

African Politics
Discussion

African Politics
This course surveys the challenges and possibilities that Sub-Saharan Africa presents in our era of globalization. We will look at the process of state formation to appreciate the relationships between historical legacies and political and economic development. Themes include state formation, democratic governance, sustainable development, and Africa in world affairs. Topics such as colonial rule and national responses, authoritarian rule, ethnic politics, the debt burden, the HIV/AIDS pandemic, and natural resource politics will be discussed. Case studies from English-, French-, and Portuguese-speaking Africa will be used to illuminate such relationships. 3 hrs lect/disc. (Comparative Politics)/

PSCI0227A-S14

CRN: 22189

Soviet & Russian Politics

Soviet and Russian Politics
This course seeks to introduce the student to a major phenomenon of 20th century politics, the rise and decline of the Soviet Union and the emergence of Russia as its successor state. The first part of the course provides an overview of key factors that influenced Russian and Soviet politics under communism, including history, economy, ideology, institutions of the communist party, and the role of political leadership from Lenin to Gorbachev. The second part surveys radical political and social transformations in the 1990s and analyzes Russia's struggle with the twin challenges of democratic and market reform under Yeltsin and Putin. 3 hrs. lect./disc. (Comparative Politics)/

PSCI0227X-S14

CRN: 22190

Soviet & Russian Politics
Discussion

Soviet and Russian Politics
This course seeks to introduce the student to a major phenomenon of 20th century politics, the rise and decline of the Soviet Union and the emergence of Russia as its successor state. The first part of the course provides an overview of key factors that influenced Russian and Soviet politics under communism, including history, economy, ideology, institutions of the communist party, and the role of political leadership from Lenin to Gorbachev. The second part surveys radical political and social transformations in the 1990s and analyzes Russia's struggle with the twin challenges of democratic and market reform under Yeltsin and Putin. 3 hrs. lect./disc. (Comparative Politics)/

PSCI0227Y-S14

CRN: 22191

Soviet & Russian Politics
Discussion

Soviet and Russian Politics
This course seeks to introduce the student to a major phenomenon of 20th century politics, the rise and decline of the Soviet Union and the emergence of Russia as its successor state. The first part of the course provides an overview of key factors that influenced Russian and Soviet politics under communism, including history, economy, ideology, institutions of the communist party, and the role of political leadership from Lenin to Gorbachev. The second part surveys radical political and social transformations in the 1990s and analyzes Russia's struggle with the twin challenges of democratic and market reform under Yeltsin and Putin. 3 hrs. lect./disc. (Comparative Politics)/

PSCI0227Z-S14

CRN: 22192

Soviet & Russian Politics
Discussion

Soviet and Russian Politics
This course seeks to introduce the student to a major phenomenon of 20th century politics, the rise and decline of the Soviet Union and the emergence of Russia as its successor state. The first part of the course provides an overview of key factors that influenced Russian and Soviet politics under communism, including history, economy, ideology, institutions of the communist party, and the role of political leadership from Lenin to Gorbachev. The second part surveys radical political and social transformations in the 1990s and analyzes Russia's struggle with the twin challenges of democratic and market reform under Yeltsin and Putin. 3 hrs. lect./disc. (Comparative Politics)/

PSCI0242A-S14

CRN: 22277

International Politics and WMD

International Politics and WMD
In this course we will examine the international ramifications of nuclear, biological, and chemical weapons use. What is a weapon of mass destruction (WMD)? How have WMD changed the way states behave toward international conflicts and within international crises? How has the development of these weapons influenced the policies states have adopted in response? Beyond these questions, major course themes include the threats of proliferation and the highs and lows of weapons reduction initiatives. 3 hrs. lect./disc. (International Relations and Foreign Policy)/

PSCI0242Y-S14

CRN: 22278

International Politics and WMD
Discussion

International Politics and WMD
In this course we will examine the international ramifications of nuclear, biological, and chemical weapons use. What is a weapon of mass destruction (WMD)? How have WMD changed the way states behave toward international conflicts and within international crises? How has the development of these weapons influenced the policies states have adopted in response? Beyond these questions, major course themes include the threats of proliferation and the highs and lows of weapons reduction initiatives. 3 hrs. lect./disc. (International Relations and Foreign Policy)/

PSCI0242Z-S14

CRN: 22279

International Politics and WMD
Discussion

International Politics and WMD
In this course we will examine the international ramifications of nuclear, biological, and chemical weapons use. What is a weapon of mass destruction (WMD)? How have WMD changed the way states behave toward international conflicts and within international crises? How has the development of these weapons influenced the policies states have adopted in response? Beyond these questions, major course themes include the threats of proliferation and the highs and lows of weapons reduction initiatives. 3 hrs. lect./disc. (International Relations and Foreign Policy)/

PSCI0250A-S14

Cross-Listed As:
IGST0250A-S14

CRN: 22032

Intl Diplomacy and Mod. S Asia
Please register via IGST 0250A

International Diplomacy and Modern South Asia
In this course we will examine current political and economic issues in the countries of South Asia - Afghanistan, Pakistan, India, Nepal, Bangladesh, Sri Lanka, Maldives and Bhutan. We will first examine the background of the South Asian region in general (pre-colonial and colonial eras) and of South Asian countries after independence. We will look at specific interstate and intrastate issues, focusing on the combined quests for political stability and economic development. Students will look at topical issues from the perspective of an officer working in a U.S. Embassy or in a U.S. foreign policy agency. The course will combine rigorous academic understanding of the region with current policy issues. Readings will include both academic studies and contemporary policy/issues papers. This course is equivalent to IGST 0250. 3 hrs. lect./disc. (International Relations and Foreign Policy)/

PSCI0260A-S14

CRN: 21366

Pol Economy Drug Trafficking

The Political Economy of Drug Trafficking
This course examines the political economy of drug trafficking in the Western Hemisphere. How have transnational drug markets evolved, and why? What effects has narco-trafficking had on the political, economic, legal, financial, and social systems of producer, consumer, and transshipment countries? What policy responses are available to combat it? How should we weigh alternative policy options? Examination of these issues centers on source countries in Latin America's Andean region, the chief transshipment country (Mexico), and the principal consumer country (the US). Attention also is devoted to the drug trade's effects on American society and criminal justice system. 3 hrs. lect./disc.
(International Relations and Foreign Policy)/

PSCI0278A-S14

CRN: 21433

Politics of Insurgency

The Politics of Insurgency
In this course we will survey the full range of insurgencies, from violent civil wars and classic insurgencies to strategically nonviolent movements. Drawing from the international relations and comparative politics literatures, this class will work to analyze an array of research questions on why insurgencies begin, endure, and terminate. We will also consider the efficacy of different resistance methods, the role of the international community, and the impact of insurgency on post-conflict outcomes. Students will synthesize course content in a professional research analysis that provides policy prescriptions for ongoing conflicts throughout the world. (PSCI 0103 or 0109) Note: To align the Middlebury and MIIS schedules, Middlebury students will need to begin their coursework prior to their return to campus for the spring semester. 3 hrs. lect. (Comparative Politics)/

PSCI0303A-S14

CRN: 22383

US-Latin American Relations

U.S.-Latin American Relations
This course examines American foreign policy toward Latin America. Grounded in international relations theory, it chronicles the expansion of U.S. power in the nineteenth century, the interwar period, the Cold War, and the current era of continental economic integration. To ensure rigorous analysis the course sets theoretical concepts against specific case studies. Topics include the Inter-American System, specific doctrines (Monroe Doctrine, Roosevelt Corollary), specific policies (Good Neighbor Policy, Alliance for Progress), and milestone events in U.S.-Latin American relations, including the Cuban missile crisis, Falkland Islands War, and North American Free Trade Agreement. 3 hrs. lect./disc.
(International Relations and Foreign Policy)/

PSCI0304A-S14

CRN: 20638

Internatl Political Economy

International Political Economy
This course examines the politics of global economic relations, focusing principally on the advanced industrial states. How do governments and firms deal with the forces of globalization and interdependence? And what are the causes and consequences of their actions for the international system in turn? The course exposes students to both classic and contemporary thinking on free trade and protectionism, exchange rates and monetary systems, foreign direct investment and capital movements, regional integration, and the role of international institutions like the WTO. Readings will be drawn mainly from political science, as well as law and economics. (PSCI 0109) 3 hrs. lect./disc.
(International Relations and Foreign Policy)/

PSCI0310A-S14

CRN: 21367

American Public Policy

American Public Policy
This course examines the functioning of the entire United States political system, with an emphasis on the policies or outcomes of this political system. The first part of the course will examine the context in which policy is made (e.g., history, capitalism, liberalism). The second part of the course will focus on the policy-making process. We will examine the major stages of the policy process: agenda setting, policy formulation, adoption, implementation, and evaluation. The third and final part of the course will focus on specific policy areas, such as education policy and health care policy. 3 hrs. lect./disc. (American Politics)/

PSCI0311A-S14

CRN: 22194

American Foreign Policy

American Foreign Policy
Does America exercise its power in the world in a distinctive way? If yes, has it always done so? In this course we will examine the evolution of American foreign policy from the time of the founding to the present. As we make our way from the height of the Cold War to the 21st century, we will assess how leaders, institutions, domestic politics, and the actions and inactions of other countries have shaped American international behavior. Topics considered include terrorism, nuclear proliferation, globalization, democracy promotion, whether the rich US has an obligation to help the less fortunate, how much power the Pentagon should have, what role the private sector can and should play in advancing American interests, and the Bush revolution in foreign policy. A central aim of the course is to map competing perspectives so that the student can draw his or her own political conclusions. 3 hrs. lect./disc. (International Relations and Foreign Policy)/

PSCI0311X-S14

CRN: 22195

American Foreign Policy
Discussion

American Foreign Policy
Does America exercise its power in the world in a distinctive way? If yes, has it always done so? In this course we will examine the evolution of American foreign policy from the time of the founding to the present. As we make our way from the height of the Cold War to the 21st century, we will assess how leaders, institutions, domestic politics, and the actions and inactions of other countries have shaped American international behavior. Topics considered include terrorism, nuclear proliferation, globalization, democracy promotion, whether the rich US has an obligation to help the less fortunate, how much power the Pentagon should have, what role the private sector can and should play in advancing American interests, and the Bush revolution in foreign policy. A central aim of the course is to map competing perspectives so that the student can draw his or her own political conclusions. 3 hrs. lect./disc. (International Relations and Foreign Policy)/

PSCI0311Y-S14

CRN: 22196

American Foreign Policy
Discussion

American Foreign Policy
Does America exercise its power in the world in a distinctive way? If yes, has it always done so? In this course we will examine the evolution of American foreign policy from the time of the founding to the present. As we make our way from the height of the Cold War to the 21st century, we will assess how leaders, institutions, domestic politics, and the actions and inactions of other countries have shaped American international behavior. Topics considered include terrorism, nuclear proliferation, globalization, democracy promotion, whether the rich US has an obligation to help the less fortunate, how much power the Pentagon should have, what role the private sector can and should play in advancing American interests, and the Bush revolution in foreign policy. A central aim of the course is to map competing perspectives so that the student can draw his or her own political conclusions. 3 hrs. lect./disc. (International Relations and Foreign Policy)/

PSCI0311Z-S14

CRN: 22197

American Foreign Policy
Discussion

American Foreign Policy
Does America exercise its power in the world in a distinctive way? If yes, has it always done so? In this course we will examine the evolution of American foreign policy from the time of the founding to the present. As we make our way from the height of the Cold War to the 21st century, we will assess how leaders, institutions, domestic politics, and the actions and inactions of other countries have shaped American international behavior. Topics considered include terrorism, nuclear proliferation, globalization, democracy promotion, whether the rich US has an obligation to help the less fortunate, how much power the Pentagon should have, what role the private sector can and should play in advancing American interests, and the Bush revolution in foreign policy. A central aim of the course is to map competing perspectives so that the student can draw his or her own political conclusions. 3 hrs. lect./disc. (International Relations and Foreign Policy)/

PSCI0312A-S14

CRN: 22280

Bureaucracy

Bureaucracy
How did 9-11 happen? Why did the U.S. believe Iraq possessed weapons of mass destruction? What went wrong with relief efforts in the aftermath of Hurricane Katrina? Answering these questions requires an understanding of bureaucracies in the American political context -- the subject of this course. It begins with an overview of the nature of bureaucracies and theories for their formation, followed by an examination of bureaucratic actors (managers, operators, and executives) and the context within which they work. It concludes with an attempt to assess bureaucratic effectiveness. Case studies of particular bureaucracies, including those involved in the War on Terror, Iraq and Hurricane Katrina, are included to sharpen analyses. 3 hrs. lect./disc. (American Politics)/

PSCI0321A-S14

Cross-Listed As:
PSCI0321B-S14

CRN: 22351

Anglo vs. Franco Africa

Anglophone vs. Francophone Africa
Multiple European powers fought to colonize Africa, but only a few prevailed. In this course we will focus on two major post-colonial blocs: English- and French-speaking Africa. We will examine whether, to what extent, and why the current political systems of Anglophone Africa differ from those of Francophone Africa. To do so, we will explore variations in modes of colonial rule, processes of decolonization, and post-colonial political developments in Algeria, Belgian Congo, Madagascar, Senegal, Cameroon, Kenya, Nigeria, South Africa, and Uganda. 3 hrs. lect./disc. (Comparative Politics)/

PSCI0321B-S14

Cross-Listed As:
PSCI0321A-S14

CRN: 22453

Anglo vs. Franco Africa

Anglophone vs. Francophone Africa
Multiple European powers fought to colonize Africa, but only a few prevailed. In this course we will focus on two major post-colonial blocs: English- and French-speaking Africa. We will examine whether, to what extent, and why the current political systems of Anglophone Africa differ from those of Francophone Africa. To do so, we will explore variations in modes of colonial rule, processes of decolonization, and post-colonial political developments in Algeria, Belgian Congo, Madagascar, Senegal, Cameroon, Kenya, Nigeria, South Africa, and Uganda. 3 hrs. lect./disc. (Comparative Politics)/

PSCI0324A-S14

CRN: 22198

Pol Development Western Europe

The Political Development of Western Europe
In what ways are the political systems and politics of France, Germany, Italy, and Britain similar? In what ways do they differ? How might we explain these patterns? This course attempts to answer these questions through comparative investigation of the processes and consequences of economic and political modernization in these nations from the feudal period to the 21st century. 3 hrs. lect./disc. (Comparative Politics)/

PSCI0344A-S14

Cross-Listed As:
PSCI0444A-S14

CRN: 22199

Race, Sex, & the Constitution

Race, Sex, and the Constitution
In this course we will examine how courts in America have framed and decided cases involving sex and race. We will consider issues such as sex discrimination, birth control and abortion, and sexual orientation, as well as the Court's doctrine concerning heightened levels of scrutiny for suspect classifications and fundamental rights. Course readings will consist of Supreme Court decisions, relevant state supreme court and lower federal court decisions on same sex marriage, and scholarly commentary. We will examine both the legitimacy and the efficacy of judicial power in these areas. Seniors needing to fulfill a political science seminar requirement may arrange with the instructor to do so. (PSCI 0102) 3 hrs. lect./disc. (American Politics)/

PSCI0351A-S14

Cross-Listed As:
FREN0351A-S14

CRN: 22323

Presidents of Fifth Republic
Please register via FREN 0351A

Presidents of the Fifth Republic
In this course we will examine presidential power in France's Fifth Republic, introduced in 1958. We will study the seven presidents of the Fifth Republic - Charles de Gaulle, Georges Pompidou, Valéry Giscard d'Estaing, François Mitterrand, Jacques Chirac, Nicolas Sarkozy, and the current president François Hollande - through memoirs, speeches, research monographs, journal articles, and biographies. We will focus on the content of their domestic and foreign policies as well as their leadership strategies and visions for France in a comparative perspective. (This course will be taught in French; FREN 0230 or by waiver). 3 hrs. lect./disc. and film screenings. (Comparative Politics)/

PSCI0368A-S14

CRN: 22200

Frontiers in Political Science

Frontiers in Political Science Research
Nothing is more controversial among political scientists than the topic of how to study politics. In this course, we consider a variety of advanced techniques for studying political phenomena, including statistical methods, game theory, institutional analysis, case study techniques, experiments, and agent-based modeling. We will work with concrete examples (drawn from major political science journals) of how scholars have used these techniques, and consider the ongoing philosophical controversies associated with each approach. Students will have the opportunity to conduct original research using a method and subject of their choosing. (Two political science courses) 3 hrs. lect./disc. (Political Theory)/

PSCI0372A-S14

Cross-Listed As:
GSFS0372A-S14

CRN: 22377

Gender and Int'l Relations

Gender and International Relations
Many issues facing international society affect, and are affected by, gender. Global poverty, for example, is gendered, since 70% of the world's population living below $1.25 per day is female. Women are far more vulnerable to rape in war and water scarcity, and they are moreover globally politically underrepresented. In this course we will use theories of international relations, including realism, neoliberalism, and feminism, to study how international society addresses (or fails to address) these challenges through bodies such as the UN and treaties such as the Elimination of Violence Against Women. 3 hrs. lect./disc. (International Relations and Foreign Policy)/

PSCI0390A-S14

Cross-Listed As:
ENVS0390A-S14

CRN: 22201

Env Negotiation/Dispute Res

Environmental Negotiation and Dispute Resolution
In this seminar, we will gain an understanding of environmental negotiation and dispute resolution as applied to public policy at both the domestic and international levels. We will consider the mutual gains approach to negotiation, facilitation, mediation, and dispute systems design. We will grapple with challenging features typical of environmental negotiations, such as the large number of stakeholders involved, scientific uncertainty, and value differences. We will undertake role-playing simulations. Throughout, we will think critically about the negotiating styles and assumptions employed by both seminar participants and those presented in course materials. (Junior or Senior standing; Sophomores by approval; ENVS 0211 or IGST 0101 or PSCI 0109). 3 hrs. sem. (International Relations and Foreign Policy)/

PSCI0410A-S14

CRN: 22455

Statesmanship & Modern Liberty

Statesmanship and Modern Liberty: Montesquieu and Tocqueville
Montesquieu's Spirit of the Laws and Tocqueville's Democracy in America offer profound treatments of modern representative government, its promise, and its perils. In this course we will focus on each author's understanding of the often neglected role of statesmanship in shaping political and cultural conditions favorable to the emergence and preservation of human liberty in the modern world. We will consider key themes such as the relationship between liberty and equality, the role of the passions in politics, the meaning of despotism, the relationship between culture and politics, and the promise and dangers of modern commerce for liberal democracy.

PSCI0413A-S14

CRN: 22202

Mass Media&Democratization

Media and Democratization
The news media can either support or undermine non-democratic regimes. This tension between media liberalization and political control is well-captured in Yuezhi Zhao’s book Communication in China: Political Economy, Power and Conflict, which will serve as a thematic anchor for this course. We will examine the impact of print, television, and new media on democratization in Eastern Europe, East Asia, and Africa, while drawing from the literature on democratic transitions and the communications literature on media effects. The goal of the course is to understand the causes of press freedom, its role in the erosion of state control, and its implications for the survival of authoritarian regimes. 3 hrs. sem. (Comparative Politics)/

PSCI0421A-S14

CRN: 21368

American Environ Politics

American Environmental Politics
In this seminar we will examine various aspects of environmental politics in the United States. Topics to be covered include how society seeks to influence environmental policy (through public opinion, voting, interest groups, and political parties) and how policy is made through Congress, the executive branch, the courts, collaboration, and through the states and corporate social responsibility. Students will write a major research paper on an aspect of U.S. environmental politics. (PSCI/ENVS 0211; open to PSCI/ESEP majors, others by approval) 3 hrs. sem. (American Politics)

PSCI0429A-S14

CRN: 22203

Seminar on US Congress

Seminar on the U.S. Congress
The U.S. Congress is the most powerful political institution in the nation, and one of the least popular. To understand why, this course examines theories of representation and how they relate to the contemporary Congress; the historical development and institutionalization of the Congress; the roles of parties, candidates, media, and money in Congressional elections; the legislative process, including roles of committees, interest groups, parties, congressional leaders, and presidents; the impact of representational and policy-making processes on the nature of legislation enacted by Congress; and Congress in comparative perspective. (Open to junior and senior majors) 3 hrs. sem. (American Politics)/

PSCI0434A-S14

Cross-Listed As:
IGST0434A-S14

CRN: 22341

War and Consequences
Please register via IGST 0434A

War: Causes, Conduct, Consequences
Why do human beings organize themselves in armed groups to attack and kill other human beings? What is it like to experience war, both as a combatant and a non-combatant caught in its vortex? How has warfare evolved over time? Which legal or moral considerations affect how wars are fought? What are the mechanisms of war propaganda? What are the immediate and long-term consequences of war? What is the future of war? These are some of the questions we will try to answer. Readings include works by psychologists, political scientists, historians, philosophers, poets, fiction writers, dramatists, film-makers, and participants. This course is equivalent to IGST 0434. (International Relations and Foreign Policy)/

PSCI0437A-S14

CRN: 22281

Understanding Intervention

In this seminar we will examine third-party intervention and its effects on conflict. Why do interveners get involved? In what ways do third parties try to manage or influence conflict? We will discuss various types of intervention, including economic sanctions, military assistance, and covert operations. We will then consider how interveners affect the outbreak, duration, and conclusion of conflict. Do interveners make conflict more or less likely to start? Do they shorten or lengthen fighting? How do they affect war outcomes? Case studies of intervention include Bosnia and Kosovo, World War I and World War II, and various Cold War conflicts. 3 hrs. sem. (International Relations and Foreign Policy)/

PSCI0454A-S14

CRN: 22204

Leadership Pol & Personality

Leadership: Politics and Personality
What difference do leaders make? Are leaders born or made? What accounts for effective leadership? Do answers to these questions change when the social, cultural, and political context varies? This course will approach the subject of leadership from a multidisciplinary perspective, focusing on (1) the individual personalities and values of leaders; (2) the relationship of leaders to the institutions they serve; (3) the role of the state and cultural context in which the leadership is exercised; and (4) the process of leading. (One course in comparative politics) 3 hrs. sem. (Comparative Politics)/

PSCI0460A-S14

CRN: 22205

European Politics Seminar

Seminar on West European Politics
In this course we will examine various aspects of European politics through the process of directed research projects. Students may cover any aspect of West European politics, such as how countries are responding to the contemporary economic environment, changes in domestic political party systems, the expansion of the European Union, the relationship between states and civil societies, and immigrant integration. Students will write a major research paper on a topic in European politics that they have selected. 3 hrs. sem. (Comparative Politics)/

PSCI0500A-S14

CRN: 20134

Independent Project

Independent Projects
A program of independent work designed to meet the individual needs of advanced students. (Approval required)

PSCI0500B-S14

CRN: 20137

Independent Project

Independent Projects
A program of independent work designed to meet the individual needs of advanced students. (Approval required)

PSCI0500C-S14

CRN: 20925

Independent Project

Independent Projects
A program of independent work designed to meet the individual needs of advanced students. (Approval required)

PSCI0500D-S14

CRN: 20148

Independent Project

Independent Projects
A program of independent work designed to meet the individual needs of advanced students. (Approval required)

PSCI0500E-S14

CRN: 20150

Independent Project

Independent Projects
A program of independent work designed to meet the individual needs of advanced students. (Approval required)

PSCI0500G-S14

CRN: 20153

Independent Project

Independent Projects
A program of independent work designed to meet the individual needs of advanced students. (Approval required)

PSCI0500H-S14

CRN: 20154

Independent Project

Independent Projects
A program of independent work designed to meet the individual needs of advanced students. (Approval required)

PSCI0500I-S14

CRN: 20155

Independent Project

Independent Projects
A program of independent work designed to meet the individual needs of advanced students. (Approval required)

PSCI0500J-S14

CRN: 20156

Independent Project

Independent Projects
A program of independent work designed to meet the individual needs of advanced students. (Approval required)

PSCI0500M-S14

CRN: 20584

Independent Project

Independent Projects
A program of independent work designed to meet the individual needs of advanced students. (Approval required)

PSCI0500N-S14

CRN: 20630

Independent Project

Independent Projects
A program of independent work designed to meet the individual needs of advanced students. (Approval required)

PSCI0500O-S14

CRN: 21863

Independent Project

Independent Projects
A program of independent work designed to meet the individual needs of advanced students. (Approval required)

PSCI0500P-S14

CRN: 20734

Independent Project

Independent Projects
A program of independent work designed to meet the individual needs of advanced students. (Approval required)

PSCI0500S-S14

CRN: 20737

Independent Project

Independent Projects
A program of independent work designed to meet the individual needs of advanced students. (Approval required)

PSCI0500U-S14

CRN: 21250

Independent Project

Independent Projects
A program of independent work designed to meet the individual needs of advanced students. (Approval required)

PSCI0500V-S14

CRN: 21251

Independent Project

Independent Projects
A program of independent work designed to meet the individual needs of advanced students. (Approval required)

PSCI0500W-S14

CRN: 21369

Independent Project

Independent Projects
A program of independent work designed to meet the individual needs of advanced students. (Approval required)

PSCI0700A-S14

CRN: 20159

Honors Thesis

Honors Thesis
(Approval required)

PSCI0700B-S14

CRN: 20161

Honors Thesis

Honors Thesis
(Approval required)

PSCI0700C-S14

CRN: 20927

Honors Thesis

Honors Thesis
(Approval required)

PSCI0700D-S14

CRN: 20162

Honors Thesis

Honors Thesis
(Approval required)

PSCI0700E-S14

CRN: 20163

Honors Thesis

Honors Thesis
(Approval required)

PSCI0700G-S14

CRN: 20928

Honors Thesis

Honors Thesis
(Approval required)

PSCI0700H-S14

CRN: 20166

Honors Thesis

Honors Thesis
(Approval required)

PSCI0700I-S14

CRN: 20167

Honors Thesis

Honors Thesis
(Approval required)

PSCI0700M-S14

CRN: 20738

Honors Thesis

Honors Thesis
(Approval required)

PSCI0700N-S14

CRN: 20631

Honors Thesis

Honors Thesis
(Approval required)

PSCI0700O-S14

CRN: 21439

Honors Thesis

Honors Thesis
(Approval required)

PSCI0700P-S14

CRN: 20739

Honors Thesis

Honors Thesis
(Approval required)

PSCI0700Q-S14

CRN: 20740

Honors Thesis

Honors Thesis
(Approval required)

PSCI0700S-S14

CRN: 20742

Honors Thesis

Honors Thesis
(Approval required)

PSCI0700U-S14

CRN: 21252

Honors Thesis

Honors Thesis
(Approval required)

PSCI0700V-S14

CRN: 21253

Honors Thesis

Honors Thesis
(Approval required)

PSCI0700W-S14

CRN: 21370

Honors Thesis

Honors Thesis
(Approval required)