Christopher McGrory Klyza

Stafford Professor of Public Policy, Political Science and Environmental Studies

 
 work802.443.5309
 Monday 12:30 - 2:30, Wednesday 9:00 - 10:00 and by appointment
 Franklin Environmental Ctr Hillcrest 206

Hello. I am the Robert ’35 and Helen ’38 Stafford Professor in Public Policy, Professor of Political Science and Environmental Studies. I have taught courses at Middlebury on U.S. conservation and environmental policy and American politics since 1990, and have served as the director of the Environmental Studies Program for seven years.

I am the author or editor of five books on conservation and environmental policy, most recently co-author, with Stephen Trombulak, of a second edition of The Story of Vermont: A Natural and Cultural History (University Press of New England, 2015). Other books include American Environmental Policy: Beyond Gridlock (MIT Press, 2013, updated and expanded edition), co-author with David Sousa, the first edition of which was awarded the 2008 Lynton Keith Caldwell Award for the best book in environmental politics and policy by the American Political Science Association; editor of Wilderness Comes Home: Rewilding the Northeast (University Press of New England, 2001); author of Who Controls Public Lands? Mining, Forestry, and Grazing Policies, 1870-1990 (University of North Carolina Press, 1996); and co-editor, with Steve Trombulak, of The Future of the Northern Forest (University Press of New England, 1994).

I am currently at work on a new book tracing green state building in the United States. This quixotic project involves trips to every state library in the country.

I live in Bristol, Vermont with my wife Sheila and daughters Faye and Isabel.

 

 

Courses

Course List: 

Courses offered in the past four years.
indicates offered in the current term
indicates offered in the upcoming term[s]

ENVS 0211 / PSCI 0211 - Conservation & Env Policy      

Topic determined by instructor - please refer to the section. NOR SOC

Fall 2011, Fall 2012, Fall 2013, Fall 2014, Fall 2015

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ENVS 0330 - Conserving Endangered Species      

Conserving Endangered Species
The planet is in the midst of the sixth mass extinction event. In this course we will examine the science of species endangerment and recovery and how human society, through its political and legal systems, seeks to conserve endangered species. We will explore several case studies, primarily focused on species recovery efforts in the United States. The course will culminate in a student group project. (BIOL 0140 or ENVS 0112 or ENVS 0211) 3 hrs. sem.

Fall 2014

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ENVS 0401 - Environmental Studies Sr Sem      

Environmental Studies Senior Seminar
A single environmental topic will be explored through reading, discussion, and individual research. Topics will vary from semester to semester, but will focus on issues with relevance to the local region and with interdisciplinary dimensions, such as temperate forests, lake ecosystems, or public lands policy. The class involves extensive reading, student-led discussions, and a collaborative research project. (Senior standing; ENVS 0112, ENVS 0211, ENVS 0215, and GEOG 0120) 3 hrs. sem./3 hrs. lab

Fall 2015

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ENVS 0500 - Independent Study      

Independent Study
In this course, students (non-seniors) carry out an independent research or creative project on a topic pertinent to the relationship between humans and the environment. The project, carried out under the supervision of a faculty member with related expertise who is appointed in or affiliated with the Environmental Studies Program, must involve a significant amount of independent research and analysis. The expectations and any associated final products will be defined in consultation with the faculty advisor. Students may enroll in ENVS 0500 no more than twice for a given project. (Approval only)

Spring 2012, Fall 2012, Winter 2013, Spring 2013, Fall 2013, Winter 2014, Spring 2014, Fall 2014, Winter 2015, Spring 2015, Fall 2015, Spring 2016

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ENVS 0700 - Senior Independent Study      

Senior Independent Study
In this course, seniors complete an independent research or creative project on a topic pertinent to the relationship between humans and the environment. During the term prior to enrolling in ENVS 0700, a student must discuss and agree upon a project topic with a faculty advisor who is appointed in or affiliated with the Environmental Studies Program and submit a brief project proposal to the Director of Environmental Studies for Approval. The expectations and any associated final products will be defined in consultation with the faculty advisor. Students may enroll in ENVS 0700 as a one-term independent study OR up to twice as part of a multi-term project, including as a lead-up to ENVS 0701 (ES Senior Thesis). (Senior standing; Approval only)

Spring 2012, Fall 2012, Spring 2013, Fall 2013, Spring 2014, Fall 2014, Winter 2015, Spring 2015, Fall 2015, Spring 2016

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ENVS 1021 - Aldo Leopold: Theory/Practice      

Aldo Leopold: Theory and Practice
Aldo Leopold is perhaps the foundational thinker and practitioner of modern environmentalism. In this course we will study his life, his thought, and his actions in depth. As a humanist, a policy actor, and a scientist, Leopold's life exemplifies the interconnection and overlapping that are central to a progressive approach to human-environment interactions. In terms of ideas, Leopold was well-versed in sustainability (in forestry and game management), in preservationism (as the first to call for the creation of wilderness areas), and in ecocentrism (his essay “The Land Ethic”). We will take three outdoor field trips. (ENVS 0112 or ENVS 0211 or ENVS 0215) SOC WTR

Winter 2012

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ENVS 1027 - Farming and Food Policy      

Farming and Food Policy
The interest in farming and food policy in the United States over the last several decades has grown dramatically. Examples range from movements such as Slow Food and localvores, the growth of organic food and Free Trade, and increased concerns with food equity. In this course we will examine why these issues have risen on the public agenda, and delve into the foundations of farming and food policy at the state, national, and international levels. The class will feature guests involved in food systems, and the culminating student project will focus on how various policies affect a particular food (such as apples or milk) or an aspect of the food system (such as food inspection requirements). This course counts as a cognate for ENVS majors with a focus in the natural sciences. SOC WTR

Winter 2015

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FYSE 1400 - The Vermont Landscape      

The Vermont Landscape
The Vermont landscape has changed dramatically over the last 10,000 years. In this course we will systemically examine how geological, biological, and human forces have affected Vermont. In particular, we will explore the role of Native cultures on the landscape; ecological revolutions set off by the arrival of Europeans and the industrial revolution; the growing population of Vermont; and the effects of farming, logging, international trade, transportation systems, and energy development on the landscape. We will conclude by focusing on current themes, such as the rise of the local food movement and climate change. 3 hrs. sem. CW HIS NOR

Fall 2013

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PSCI 0310 - American Public Policy      

American Public Policy
This course examines the functioning of the entire United States political system, with an emphasis on the policies or outcomes of this political system. The first part of the course will examine the context in which policy is made (e.g., history, capitalism, liberalism). The second part of the course will focus on the policy-making process. We will examine the major stages of the policy process: agenda setting, policy formulation, adoption, implementation, and evaluation. The third and final part of the course will focus on specific policy areas, such as education policy and health care policy. 3 hrs. lect./disc. (American Politics)/ NOR SOC

Spring 2012, Spring 2013, Spring 2014, Spring 2015

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PSCI 0320 - American Pol Development      

American Political Development
This course will trace the development of the American political system from its founding through the present. We will pay special attention to the response of the governing system to crucial events in American History, such as the Civil War, the rise of industrialism, and the New Deal. Among the topics explored will be the growth in size and power of the federal executive branch and the rise in importance of interest groups in American politics. This course will be taught in a seminar format. (One course in American politics or American history) 3 hrs. lect./disc. (American Politics)/ HIS NOR SOC

Fall 2012

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PSCI 0421 - American Environ Politics      

American Environmental Politics
In this seminar we will examine various aspects of environmental politics in the United States. Topics to be covered include how society seeks to influence environmental policy (through public opinion, voting and interest groups,) and how policy is made through Congress, the executive branch, the courts, collaboration, and through the states. Policy case studies will vary from year to year. Students will write a major research paper on an aspect of U.S. environmental politics. (PSCI/ENVS 0211; open to PSCI/ESEP majors, others by approval) 3 hrs. sem. (American Politics)

Spring 2012, Spring 2013, Spring 2014, Spring 2015

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PSCI 0500 - Independent Project      

Independent Projects
A program of independent work designed to meet the individual needs of advanced students. (Approval required)

Fall 2011, Winter 2012, Spring 2012, Fall 2012, Winter 2013, Spring 2013, Fall 2013, Winter 2014, Spring 2014, Fall 2014, Winter 2015, Spring 2015, Fall 2015, Spring 2016

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PSCI 0700 - Honors Thesis      

Honors Thesis
(Approval required)

Fall 2011, Winter 2012, Spring 2012, Fall 2012, Winter 2013, Spring 2013, Fall 2013, Winter 2014, Spring 2014, Fall 2014, Winter 2015, Spring 2015, Fall 2015, Spring 2016

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Personal Website

http://blogs.middlebury.edu/klyzahomepage/

Activities and Organizations

Member, Environmental Studies Steering Committee

Editorial Board, Review of Policy Research

Board Member, The Watershed Center

Board Member, Vermont Family Forests

Recent Publications

Co-author (with Stephen Trombulak), The Story of Vermont: A Natural and Cultural History, 2d ed., 2015, Hanover, NH: University Press of New England.

Co-author (with David J. Sousa), American Environmental Policy: Beyond Gridlock, 2013, Cambridge, MA: MIT Press.

“Climate Change and the Management of National and State Owned Land in the United States,” 2011, in Climate Change, Environment, and Land Policies, edited by Gregory K. Ingram and Yu-Hung Hong, Cambridge, MA: Lincoln Land Institute.

Co-author (with David J. Sousa), "Beyond Gridlock: Green Drift in American Environmental Policymaking," 2010, Political Science Quarterly, 125 (Fall): 443-463.

Co-author (with David J. Sousa), American Environmental Policy, 1990-2006: Beyond Gridlock, 2008, Cambridge, MA: MIT Press. Winner of the American Political Science Association's 2008 Lynton Keith Caldwell Award for best book in environmental politics and policy.

Co-author (with David J. Sousa), "New Directions in Environmental Policy Making: An Emerging Collaborative Regime or Reinventing Interest Group Liberalism?," 2007, Natural Resources Journal, 47: 377-444.

Co-author (with Andrew Savage and Jonathan Isham), "Local Environmental Groups and the Creation of Social Capital: Evidence from Vermont," 2006, Society and Natural Resources, 19: 905-919.

Research Interests

U.S. Conservation and Environmental Policy
American Political Development
American Public Policy

Department of Political Science

Munroe 213
427 College Street
Middlebury College
Middlebury, VT 05753