Courses

Courses offered in the past four years.
indicates offered in the current term
indicates offered in the upcoming term[s]

PSYC 0105 - Introduction To Psychology      

Introduction to Psychology
This course will provide a general introduction to the field of psychology. The most central and important theories, concepts, findings, controversies, and applications in the following areas will be considered: biological bases of behavior, learning, perception, thinking, development, personality, psychological disorders, and social behavior. (Open to Juniors and Seniors by waiver only) 3 hrs lect./1 hr. disc. SOC

Fall 2013, Spring 2014, Fall 2014, Spring 2015, Fall 2015, Spring 2016, Fall 2016, Spring 2017, Fall 2017, Spring 2018

More Information »

PSYC 0106 - Intro to Psych for Jrs and Srs      

Introduction to Psychology for Juniors and Seniors
This course will provide a general introduction to the field of psychology. The most central and important theories, concepts, findings, controversies, and applications in the following areas will be considered: biological bases of behavior, learning, perception, thinking, development, personality, psychological disorders, and social behavior. This course fulfills the requirement for psychology coursework for premedical students; it does not satisfy the PSYC 0105 requirement for psychology majors or minors. First year and sophomore pre-medical students should enroll in PSYC 0105. (Open to Juniors and Seniors; First-Year Students and Sophomores by waiver only) 3 hrs. lect. SOC

Spring 2015

More Information »

PSYC 0201 - Psychological Statistics      

Psychological Statistics
This course will examine statistical methods used in the behavioral and biological sciences. Students will learn the logic underlying statistical analysis, focusing primarily on inferential techniques. They also will become familiar with the application and interpretation of statistics in psychological empirical research, including the use of computer software for conducting and interpreting statistical analyses. (PSYC 0105; Fall: open to psychology and neuroscience majors and undeclared majors, others by waiver; Spring: open to psychology and neuroscience majors; others by waiver. Not open to students who have taken MATH 0116 or ECON 0210) 3 hrs. lect./1.5 hr. lab DED

Fall 2013, Spring 2014, Fall 2014, Spring 2015, Fall 2015, Spring 2016, Fall 2016, Spring 2017, Fall 2017, Spring 2018

More Information »

PSYC 0202 - Research Methods in Psychology      

Research Methods in Psychology
This course will provide students with an understanding of the research methodology used by psychologists. Students will learn to read psychological studies and other related research as informed consumers. Students will collect, analyze, and interpret data during lab assignments. They will also design an empirical study, review the related literature, and write a formal APA-style research proposal. (PSYC 0105 and PSYC 0201 or MATH 0116 or ECON 0210; not open to first-year students; open to psychology and neuroscience majors) 3 hrs. lect./1.5 hr. lab CW DED

Fall 2013, Spring 2014, Fall 2014, Spring 2015, Fall 2015, Spring 2016, Fall 2016, Spring 2017, Fall 2017, Spring 2018

More Information »

PSYC 0203 - Social Psychology      

Social Psychology
Social psychology is the study of how social situations affect the thoughts, feelings, and behaviors of individuals. This course will provide an overview of social psychological theory and research findings, as well as reviewing the ways in which these findings are applied to the study of issues such as aggression, close relationships, prejudice, and altruism. Students will also learn about the research methods that social psychologists use to test their theories. (PSYC 0105; open to seniors by waiver only) 3 hrs. lect. SOC

Spring 2014, Fall 2014, Spring 2015, Spring 2016, Fall 2016, Fall 2017

More Information »

PSYC 0204 - Personality Psychology      

Personality Psychology
This course provides an overview of personality psychology. Several central theories of personality, including psychoanalytic, humanistic, cognitive, trait, behavioristic, and social learning, will be discussed. The course will also emphasize the connection between personality theory and personality research. (PSYC 0105, open to seniors by waiver only) 3 hrs. lect. SOC

Fall 2013, Fall 2015, Fall 2016, Spring 2018

More Information »

PSYC 0209 - Mindfulness and Psychology      

Religion and Science: Mindfulness and Modern Psychology
Mindfulness meditation is now widely embraced as a way to enhance personal wellbeing. To better understand this ancient practice, we will explore its traditional Buddhist background alongside its application and study in modern psychology and neuroscience. We will first study mindfulness in its historical context and examine how a traditionally religious practice was adapted for modern individualistic and therapeutic purposes. We will learn basic neural and psychological foundations of emotion, cognition, social behavior, and psychological disorders and raise theoretical and methodological issues in the scientific study of mindfulness. As an experiential component, students will also receive meditation training throughout the semester. (Open to psychology, religion, and neuroscience majors) 3 hrs. lect./1 hr. disc.

Spring 2015, Spring 2017

More Information »

PSYC 0216 - Adolescence      

Adolescence
This course is designed to provide an overview of adolescent development, including the biological, cognitive, and social transitions of individuals during this period of life. Development also takes place in context, and we will pay particular attention to the role of family, peer group, school, work, and culture. Students will read research literature, as well as cases, in order to examine the central psychological issues of this developmental period, including identity, autonomy, intimacy, sexuality, and achievement. (PSYC 0105; open to seniors by waiver only) 3 hrs. lect./1 hr. disc. SOC

Fall 2013, Fall 2014, Fall 2015, Spring 2017, Spring 2018

More Information »

PSYC 0224 - Psychological Disorders      

Psychological Disorders
What makes an individual “abnormal”? Under what circumstances do mental health professionals classify emotions, thoughts, or behaviors as “disordered”? In this course, we will explore these questions with attention to their historical, theoretical, ethical, and diagnostic implications. We will investigate various classes of disorders, like anxiety, mood, and psychotic disorders, with a focus on their causes and treatments. Throughout, we will aim to appreciate the complexities and uncertainties surrounding diagnosis, and to recognize and challenge common assumptions about psychological disorders. In addition to lecture, the course will include discussions of current and controversial topics, and occasional demonstrations, analysis of clinical case material, and/or role plays. (PSYC 0105; open to seniors by waiver only) 3 hrs. lect./1 hr. disc. SOC

Fall 2013, Spring 2014, Fall 2014, Spring 2015, Fall 2015, Spring 2016, Fall 2016, Spring 2017, Fall 2017, Spring 2018

More Information »

PSYC 0225 - Child Development      

Child Development
In this course, we will examine the nature of developmental change from the prenatal period through middle childhood. Our critical examination of developmental processes will invite us to consider various theoretical perspectives (e.g., learning, cognitive, biological, contextual) across various domains of development (i.e., physical, social-emotional, and cognitive). We will address major themes in developmental psychology, such as the interrelatedness of development across domains, the contributions of nature and nurture, and the relative continuity versus discontinuity of developmental change. Throughout, we will practice applying developmental principles to practical settings, policy issues, and topics of current interest. (PSYC 0105; open to seniors by waiver only) 3 hrs. lect. SOC

Fall 2013, Spring 2014, Spring 2015, Spring 2016, Spring 2017, Fall 2017, Spring 2018

More Information »

PSYC 0226 - Physiological Psychology      

Physiological Psychology
This course concerns the biological basis of human behavior. The course will consider the neurochemical, neuroanatomical, and neurophysiological bases of processes such as language, sensation, emotion, aggression, sleep, learning, and memory. In the laboratory the student will conduct experiments using standard (surgical, anatomical, biochemical, behavioral) techniques to investigate central nervous system function. (PSYC 0105 or any biology course; not open to first-year students; open to psychology majors; others by waiver. Not open to students who have taken PSYC 0301) 3 hrs. lect./3 hrs. lab. SCI

Spring 2018

More Information »

PSYC 0227 - Cognitive Psychology      

Cognitive Psychology
Questions about the nature of the mind, thinking, and knowledge have a long and rich history in the field of psychology. This course will examine the theoretical perspectives and empirically documented phenomena that inform our current understanding of cognition. Lectures, discussions, demonstrations, and experiments will form the basis for our explorations of cognition in this class. Topics to be considered include attention, perception, memory, knowledge, problem solving, and decision making. (PSYC 0105; PSYC 0201 and PSYC 0202 recommended; not open to first-year students; open to psychology and neuroscience majors; others by waiver. Not open to students who have taken PSYC 0305) 3 hrs. lect./1.5 hrs. lab. SCI

Spring 2018

More Information »

PSYC 0230 - Psychology And Work      

Psychology and Work: An Introduction to Industrial/Organizational Psychology
Students will learn how psychology is applied in industry and business settings. In particular, we will examine the psychological assessments used in hiring, evaluating, and training employees; issues involving harassment at work; organizational attitudes and behavior; employee satisfaction, stress and well being, work motivation, and leadership. Students will perform job analysis, read empirical research, and address the basic issues of validity in work assessments. (PSYC 0105; open to seniors by waiver only) 3 hrs. lect./1 hr. disc. SOC

Fall 2015, Fall 2016

More Information »

PSYC 0233 - Environmental Psychology      

Environmental Psychology
This course will provide an introduction to environmental psychology. We will discuss the relevance of psychology to understanding and addressing environmental problems as well as the potential for the natural environment to serve as a protective factor in our own psychological health. In particular, we will focus on using psychological theory to encourage conservation behavior. We will strive to understand not only the relevant psychological theories and empirical findings, but also the practical implications of the research. (PSYC 0105 or by approval; or ENVS 0112, or ENVS 0211, or ENVS 0215; open to seniors by waiver only) 3 hrs. lect. SOC

Spring 2015, Spring 2016, Spring 2017

More Information »

PSYC 0301 - Physiological Psychology      

Physiological Psychology
This course concerns the biological basis of human behavior. The course will consider the neurochemical, neuroanatomical, and neurophysiological bases of processes such as language, sensation, emotion, aggression, sleep, learning, and memory. In the laboratory the student will conduct experiments using standard (surgical, anatomical, biochemical, behavioral) techniques to investigate central nervous system function. (PSYC 0105 or any biology course; not open to first-year students; open to psychology majors; others by waiver) 3 hrs. lect./3 hrs. lab. SCI

Fall 2013, Spring 2014, Fall 2014, Spring 2015, Fall 2015, Spring 2016

More Information »

PSYC 0302 - Conditioning and Learning      

Conditioning and Learning
This course introduces students to a wide range of scientific theories regarding the research and theories relating to how animals, including humans, learn about events in thethe causal structure of their environment and shape their behaviors in response. A contemporary review ofStudents will learn the principles of classical and instrumental conditioning, motivation, cognition, and problem-solving; become familiar with the research supporting these theories; and discuss practical applications to education, psychological disorders, and behavioral therapies.generated by the experimental analysis of behavior is considered within the context of a psychobiological approach to learning and behavior. (PSYC 0105; not open to first-year students; open to psychology and neuroscience majors; others by waiver) 3 hrs. lect. SCI

Fall 2013

More Information »

PSYC 0303 - Sensation and Perception      

Sensation and Perception
Remarkably, using just five basic senses, our brains translate simple external stimuli (e.g. light and sound waves) into unique and vivid perceptual experiences enabling us to interact with our surrounding physical reality. Focusing primarily on the underlying mechanisms of vision and audition, we will explore how our brains construct detailed representations of our world. Throughout these explorations, we will identify perceptual limitations and investigate how mental processes such as attention and emotion affect our perceptions. We will review recent scientific articles and conduct experiments. (PSYC 0105 or any BIOL course; not open to first year students; open to psychology and neuroscience majors; others by waiver) 3 hrs. lect./1 hr. disc. SCI

Fall 2014, Fall 2015, Fall 2016, Fall 2017

More Information »

PSYC 0305 - Cognitive Psychology      

Cognitive Psychology
Questions about the nature of the mind, thinking, and knowledge have a long and rich history in the field of psychology. This course will examine the theoretical perspectives and empirically documented phenomena that inform our current understanding of cognition. Lectures, discussions, demonstrations, and experiments will form the basis for our explorations of cognition in this class. Topics to be considered include attention, perception, memory, knowledge, problem solving, and decision making. (PSYC 0105; PSYC 0201 and PSYC 0202 recommended; not open to first-year students; open to psychology and neuroscience majors; others by waiver) 3 hrs. lect./1.5 hrs. lab. SCI

Spring 2014, Spring 2015, Fall 2015, Fall 2016, Spring 2017

More Information »

PSYC 0307 - Human Sexuality      

Human Sexuality
In this course we will discuss the biological, psychological, behavioral, and cultural aspects of human sexuality, starting with a review of anatomy, physiology and function. We will use current research findings to inform discussions of topics such as arousal and desire, relationships, sexual orientation, consent, pornography, and compulsive sexual behavior. We will look at how issues like contraception, sexuality, and sexually transmitted diseases have influenced and been influenced by their cultural context. (Two psychology courses; not open to first year students; open to Psychology and GSFS majors) 3 hrs. lect.

Fall 2013, Spring 2016, Fall 2016, Fall 2017

More Information »

PSYC 0309 - Psychopharmacology      

Psychopharmacology
This course will examine ways in which drugs act on the brain to influence behavior. Students will learn the basics of brain function, will learn basic properties of drug action, and will learn how legal and illegal drugs, including drugs used to treat psychological disorders, alter the brain function and behavior of humans and experimental animals. (PSYC 0226 or PSYC 0301 or PSYC 0303 or BIOL 0370 or NSCI 0252; not open to first-year students; open to psychology and neuroscience majors; others by waiver) 3 hrs. lect. SCI

Fall 2014, Fall 2015, Spring 2017, Spring 2018

More Information »

PSYC 0312 - Play Therapy: Theory, Practice      

Play Therapy: Theory and Practice
For over fifty years, therapists have been using play to understand and relieve psychological distress in children. Does it work? If so, how and for whom? In this course, we will critically examine the theoretical underpinnings of play therapy, weigh the research evidence supporting its effectiveness in treating a range of diagnoses, and explore issues at the intersection of theory and practice. Our work will be guided by theoretical and empirical texts, as well as videotaped and live play sessions that students will at times observe, conduct, and critique. (PSYC 0105; PSYC 0216 or PSYC 0224 or PSYC 0225; open to psychology majors, others by waiver) 2 hrs. lect./1.5 hrs. lab. SOC

Fall 2013

More Information »

PSYC 0314 - Psychology of Morality      

Psychology of Morality
The psychological study of morality has existed for nearly a century, but recently there has been a renewed and lively interest in this area. Questions that were raised by early psychologists continue to be central, such as the relationship between morality and society, reasoning and emotions, judgment and action, and universality and diversity. In this course we will address these questions through our exploration of such topics as moral judgment and justification, moral emotions, moral development, moral identity, moral psychopathology, and empathy. Course readings will be comprised solely of empirical and theoretical primary sources, drawn largely from psychology. By the end of the semester, students should be able to understand methodological and theoretical issues in the scientific study of morality, develop a reflective perspective on social and personal attitudes using the lens of moral psychology, and be able to discuss these ideas with a general audience. (Two psychology courses; not open to first-year students) 3 hrs. lect. SOC

Spring 2015

More Information »

PSYC 0316 - Cultural Child Development      

Cultural Child Development
In this course we will explore ideas and research that have combined cultural and developmental approaches to psychology. We will begin with an understanding of cultural psychology, and from there, several core questions will organize our course: What is childhood like among people's across the world? What are the roles of play, school, and work in children’s lives? How are the sequences and endpoints of development culturally shaped, for example, in areas such as problem-solving, attention, attachment, self, and emotions? This course emphasizes primary empirical and theoretical sources. Through lectures, in-class discussion and reflection, student-led debates and expert panels, and an interview project, we will seek to understand the cultural nature of child development in our own lives and in the lives of others (Not open to students who have taken PSYC 0417) (PSYC 105; open to psychology majors) 3 hrs. lect. SOC

Spring 2018

More Information »

PSYC 0320 - Social/Emotional Development      

Social and Emotional Development
In this course students will explore current research and theory on the interrelated domains of social and emotional development from infancy through adulthood. Families and peers serve as the primary relationships for children’s and adolescents’ socialization, and relationships will be explored to further understand how they influence emotion regulation, adaptation to stressful life events, and intrapersonal conflicts. Emphasis will be placed on the role of context and culture in the formation of social and emotional competencies and experiences. We will explore the theory and practice of Social Emotional Learning (SEL) curricula to enhance individuals’ social and emotional skills. (PSYC 0105; PSYC 0216 or PSYC 0225; not open to first-year students; open to Psychology majors, others by waiver). 3 hrs. lect./1.5 hrs lab. SOC

Fall 2014, Fall 2015, Fall 2016, Fall 2017

More Information »

PSYC 0327 - Educational Psychology      

Educational Psychology
The goal of this course is to introduce students to a psychological understanding of teaching and learning through an overview of principles, issues, and related research in educational psychology. The course will examine theories of learning, complex cognitive processes, cognitive and emotional development, motivation, and the application of these constructs to effective instruction, the design of optimum learning environments, assessment of student learning, and teaching in diverse classrooms. (PSYC 0105 and PSYC 0216 or PSYC 0225; not open to first-year students; open to psychology majors, and to education studies minors) 3 hrs. lect./1 hr. disc. SOC

Spring 2014, Spring 2015, Spring 2016, Fall 2016, Fall 2017

More Information »

PSYC 0330 - Psychology of Gender      

Psychology of Gender
In this course we will consider biological and psychosocial contributors to similarities and differences between male and female behavior and the brain, focusing on approaches grounded in psychological science. Topics will include aggression, cognition, gender roles, gender identity, sexual orientation, and psychological disorders, as well as issues of the workplace and parenting. Course readings and content will strongly emphasize empirical scientific articles in order to address methodological challenges and controversies. (PSYC 0105; open to psychology and GSFS majors; NSCI majors by waiver) 3 hrs. lect. SOC

Spring 2014

More Information »

PSYC 0333 - Environmental Psychology      

Environmental Psychology
This course will provide an introduction to environmental psychology. We will discuss the relevance of psychology to understanding and addressing environmental problems as well as the potential for the natural environment to serve as a protective factor in our own psychological health. In particular, we will focus on using psychological theory to encourage conservation behavior. We will strive to understand not only the relevant psychological theories and empirical findings, but also the practical implications of the research. (PSYC 0105 or by approval; or ENVS 0112, or ENVS 0211, or ENVS 0215; not open to first-year students) 3 hrs. lect. SOC

Spring 2014

More Information »

PSYC 0350 - Directed Research      

Directed Research in Psychology
Directed research provides opportunities for advanced students to become familiar with and participate in ongoing research projects under the direction of a faculty member. The student will first read background literature on the content area to be investigated and experimental methodologies to be used. Procedures involved in conducting psychological research will then be learned through firsthand experience. Potential activities include the design of research and the defining of conceptual variables and the gathering, analyzing, and interpretation of data. Finally, students will learn how to write technical articles in psychology by preparing a paper describing the project, using APA style. (Approval required; not open to first-year students) 3 hrs. lect.

Fall 2013, Winter 2014, Spring 2014, Fall 2014, Winter 2015, Spring 2015, Fall 2015, Winter 2016, Spring 2016, Fall 2016, Winter 2017, Spring 2017, Fall 2017, Spring 2018

More Information »

PSYC 0403 - Human Motivation      

Human Motivation
Why do we throw ourselves into some projects enthusiastically, while only a hefty bribe could induce us to work on others? In this seminar, we will explore the vicissitudes of human motivation across multiple perspectives (e.g., drive, learning, social-cognitive theories), domains of human activity (e.g., academics, athletics), and developmental periods. Through our own observational studies and critical reading of theory and research, we will challenge popular notions of what motivates, examine individual differences in motivation, and complicate our everyday intuitions of how motivation is experienced and measured. (PSYC 0105; open to junior and senior psychology majors only) 3 hrs. sem.

Spring 2014, Spring 2017

More Information »

PSYC 0405 - Psych Racial/Ethnic Minorities      

The Psychology of Racial/Ethnic Minorities
This course will explore areas within the field of psychology that relate to the experiences of racial and ethnic groups currently living in the United States. The course is designed to examine psychological perspectives to provide a comprehensive understanding of the issues and problems confronted by members of various racial/ethnic minority groups today. We will examine issues related to stereotypes, prejudice, discrimination, identity, self-concept, cognitive development, acculturation, assessment, mental health, and public policy as they pertain to U.S. minorities. (PSYC 0105; open to junior and senior psychology majors, others by waiver) 3 hrs. sem.

Spring 2014, Spring 2015, Spring 2018

More Information »

PSYC 0406 - Psychological Trauma      

Psychological Trauma
Current evidence indicates that we have a 50/50 chance of being exposed to a psychologically-traumatizing event during our lifetime. This seminar explores psychological trauma from social, psychological, and biological perspectives. The course will cover the antecedents and consequences of trauma, past and present treatment approaches, and current controversies in the field (i.e., repressed memory, false disability claims). We will consider examples from literature, case studies, and current journal articles Assessment will be based on participation, presentation, and written work. (PSYC 0105; open to junior and senior psychology majors; neuroscience majors by waiver) 3 hrs sem.

Spring 2015, Spring 2016

More Information »

PSYC 0408 - Family in Psychology      

Family in Psychology
In this course we will examine the influences of family relationships on psychological development, and the effects of mental health problems on family cohesion. Our course is organized around the following central questions: How do children form emotional bonds with their family? How does family environment impact children’s neuropsychological development? How can family relationships be harnessed for treatment? Students will build knowledge on the interaction between family dynamics and psychological processes, and their clinical applications through foundational literature and cutting-edge research articles. Evaluation will be based on student-led presentations and discussions that culminate in a final research project. (Open to junior/senior psychology majors; neuroscience majors and other by waiver) 3hr. sem.

Fall 2017

More Information »

PSYC 0413 - Theories of Clinical Psych      

Approaches to Clinical Psychology: Theory and Practice
What are the major theoretical orientations of clinical psychology, and how does each view the domains of thinking, behavior, free will, psychopathology, and treatment? In this discussion-based course, we will explore cognitive behavioral, psychodynamic, behaviorist, existential, and other approaches to clinical psychology. Each has its own emphasis; some focus on symptoms, while others teach emotional tolerance or address unconscious drives. Using philosophy, theory, evidence, and case examples, we will explore similarities and differences among the major orientations and consider their consequences for researchers, therapists, and society at large. (PSYC 0224 recommended; open to junior/senior psychology majors; others by waiver.) 3 hrs. sem.

Fall 2015, Spring 2017, Fall 2017

More Information »

PSYC 0414 - Rhythms of the Brain      

Rhythms of the Brain
How do the ~86 billion neurons of the human brain coordinate their activity to produce complex cognition and behavior? In this course we will explore how rhythmic oscillations in neuronal activity may provide a unified mechanism that contributes to diverse brain functions including attention, learning and memory, motor coordination, sleep, respiration, and perhaps even consciousness itself. Through background lectures and class discussion of primary scientific literature, students will develop their understanding of the relationships between ongoing neuronal activity, cognition, and behavior. (PSYC 0226/0301 or PSYC 0303 or NSCI 0100 or NSCI 0252; open to junior/senior psychology and neuroscience majors; others by waiver) 3 hrs. sem. SCI

Spring 2016, Spring 2018

More Information »

PSYC 0415 - Psychology&Emerging Technology      

Psychology and Emerging Technology
New media and technology, such as smart phones and social media, are changing how we think, relate, connect, learn, and work. In this course we will examine what recent psychological literature tells us about the pros and cons of our wired world. We will review research on the use of cell phones, social media, video games, and the internet, and look at topics such as attention, addiction, cyber-bullying, learning, brain and mind, and relationships with friends and family. In this course we will draw on multiple areas of psychology, including social, developmental, cognitive, educational, and neuroscience, and will undertake critical analysis and understanding of research in a new field. Students will also conduct empirical research on related topics of their choice. (Open to junior and senior psychology majors, others by approval) 3 hr. sem. SOC

Fall 2014, Spring 2016

More Information »

PSYC 0416 - Environmental Prob. & Behavior      

Environmental Problems and Human Behavior
We live in the Anthropocene – a time defined by human dominance over nature. Most people report caring about the environment, yet there is a large disconnect between attitudes and actions. Over the semester we will examine: (1) the state of the environment and how personal perceptions of nature have led to this situation, (2) the psychological levers that motivate pro-environmental behaviors (or not), (3) the extent to which different modes of messaging and feedback serve to shift individuals’ behavior, (4) the underpinnings of framing and decision making around individual environmental choices and policy support, and (5) the psychological benefits of spending time in nature. We will explore psychology's understanding of wellbeing, consumerism, community, and nature. By the end of the semester we should be able to offer, based on the psychological research, suggestions for personal and policy changes to increase sustainability on campus and beyond. (Any three psychology or environmental studies courses; open to junior and senior psychology, and environmental studies majors; open to others by waiver). 3 hrs. sem.

Fall 2013, Fall 2014, Fall 2015

More Information »

PSYC 0417 - Cultural Child Development      

Cultural Nature of Child Development
In this course we will examine the cultural contexts and processes of child development. Our course will be organized by several core questions: What does childhood look like across diverse cultures? What do children typically do, what are their responsibilities, and how are they perceived? How are the sequences and endpoints of development culturally shaped, for example, in domains such as self, morality, memory, and reasoning? Our goal throughout will be to understand the dynamic interaction between culture and psychology; that is, how it is that culture “gets into” our minds and bodies, and how psychological processes create culture. (Open to junior and senior psychology majors, others by approval) 3 hrs. sem

Spring 2017

More Information »

PSYC 0421 - Psychotherapy with Children      

Psychotherapy with Children and Adolescents
How is psychotherapy carried out with children and adolescents who are so different from adults? What therapeutic approaches meet their emotional, social, and developmental needs? How does a therapist use play and other expressive therapies to help children grow and flourish? In this seminar we will explore the central theories and practices of several therapeutic approaches using the research and clinical literature and clinical materials (e.g. case discussions, videotaped therapy sessions, artwork, narratives). Evaluation will be based on student led-discussions, group presentations, and research and reaction papers. (PSYC 0105; open to junior and senior psychology majors only) 3 hrs. sem.

Fall 2013, Fall 2016

More Information »

PSYC 0430 - Research Sem. in Human Memory      

Research Seminar in Human Memory
The goal of this course is for students to form a deep understanding of human memory via student-driven inquiry. Students will research the existing literature about a topic of their choice related to human memory, and will design and execute a novel research study. We will review basic principles of memory at the start of the semester to provide students a strong understanding of basic memory phenomena. Evaluation will be based on interim assignments that contribute to the final research project (project proposal, project design), as well as dissemination of the final research project’s results (poster presentation, in-class talk, and manuscript write-up). (PSYC 0201 or ECON 0210 or MATH 0116 or BIOL 0211; open to junior and senior psychology and neuroscience majors only) 3 hrs. sem.

Spring 2015, Spring 2017

More Information »

PSYC 0433 - Neurobiology Memory Cognition      

Neurobiology of Memory and Cognition
In this course we will explore the neurobiological mechanisms that allow animals, humans included, to store, process and recall information used to guide behavior. We will discuss topics that include cellular and chemical mechanisms of synaptic plasticity, network theories of brain function, cognitive enhancement, and the neurobiology of psychiatric disorders. Through reading and discussion of review articles and the primary scientific literature, students will gain an in-depth understanding of how neurochemistry, neuroanatomy, and neurophysiology translate into behavior and complex cognitive abilities. (PSYC 0301 or by waiver; open to junior and senior psychology and neuroscience majors only) 3 hrs. sem.

Spring 2014

More Information »

PSYC 0434 - Genes, Brain, Behavior      

Genes, Brain, and Behavior
What we experience—and how we experience it—is influenced by our unique combination of genes. For better or worse, the gene variants we inherit from our parents contribute to our predispositions to psychological disorders, our personalities, and even the way in which we perceive the world around us. To be clear, anything that you can do or think is in some way influenced by your genes. However, this statement comes with a large caveat: except in the case of (relatively) rare single gene mutations, your genes do not determine but rather contribute to who you are. Working within the field of behavior genetics, we will cover topics such as social behavior, obesity, sexual promiscuity, drug abuse, language, and anxiety. (NSCI/PSYC 0301 or BIOL 0370; Open to junior/senior neuroscience or psychology majors only, others by approval) 3hrs. sem. SCI

Fall 2014

More Information »

PSYC 0436 - Positive Psychology      

Positive Psychology: What Works and Why
In this course we will focus on the field of positive psychology to broaden our understanding of what makes people thrive in this hectic world. We will review the literature on the antecedents of happiness, well-being, and grit, and explore the extent to which there are clear, predictable explanations for why some people are more resilient in life than others. To do this, we will begin with popular press representations of positive psychology (books and blogs) and then reverse engineer the process from which they emerged by reading the academic articles that form the basis of these recommendations. Students will use their foundational knowledge in methodology and statistics to assess the practical value of these recommendations to schools, businesses, and society in general. Not open to students who have taken FYSE 1435. (Open to junior and senior psychology majors) 3 hrs. sem.

Fall 2016

More Information »

PSYC 0437 - Social Emotional Brain      

The Social and Emotional Brain
Social relationships profoundly impact our emotional and physical well-being. For instance, healthy relationships bring joy, but difficult relationships bring pain. Social/affective (emotional) neuroscience collectively utilizes social psychology, emotions research, and neuroscience to inform our understanding of social interactions. It addresses questions like: How does the brain process social/emotional information? How do emotions help us discern other’s intentions? How are relationships shaped by emotion? Topics for discussion will include the interconnectedness of the social/emotional brain, self-concepts, theory of mind, empathy, and disorders of social/emotional function. Psychology and neuroscience students will bring their relative expertise to the class content for thoughtful discourse. (PSYC 0105; Open to junior and senior neuroscience and psychology majors only, others by waiver) 3 hrs. Sem.

Spring 2018

More Information »

PSYC 0438 - Lenses on Sex and Gender      

Lenses on Sex and Gender
Where do sex and gender come from, and what difference do they make? In this course we will address these questions using social psychological and neuroscientific/hormonal perspectives. We will investigate gender identity, stereotyping, and power, and will explore issues of sex and gender in multiple contexts, including childhood socialization and play, sexual orientation and attraction, close relationships and affiliation, cognition, the workplace, and mental health. Students will learn to think critically about these issues as portrayed in academic and popular discourse. (PSYC 0105; Open to junior and senior psychology; neuroscience; and gender, sexuality, and feminist studies majors only; not open to students who have taken PSYC/GSFS 0330) 3 hrs. sem.

Fall 2015

More Information »

PSYC 0440 - Health Psychology      

Health Psychology
In this course we will explore contributions of psychological research and theory to the treatment, management, and prevention of illness, as well as the promotion of health. Students will consider how the psychological study of health has led to new insights of mind-body connections. We will primarily focus on health issues in the United States, but we will also explore health in a global context. Course readings and activities will focus on such topics as HIV/AIDS, obesity, stress management, and health promotion behaviors. Students will choose a health promotion topic that will be pursued in greater detail throughout the course, and present their work in class. (Open to junior and senior psychology majors, others by approval) 3 hr. sem. SOC

Fall 2013, Spring 2015, Fall 2016

More Information »

PSYC 0500 - Advanced Research      

Advanced Research
A program of research arranged to meet the needs of advanced students majoring in psychology. (Approval required)

Fall 2013, Winter 2014, Spring 2014, Fall 2014, Winter 2015, Spring 2015, Fall 2015, Winter 2016, Spring 2016, Fall 2016, Winter 2017, Spring 2017, Fall 2017, Spring 2018

More Information »

PSYC 0700 - Senior Research      

Senior Research
A program of research arranged to meet the needs of advanced senior majors in psychology. (PSYC 0201 and PSYC 0202; Approval required)

Fall 2013, Spring 2014, Fall 2014, Winter 2015, Spring 2015, Fall 2015, Winter 2016, Spring 2016, Fall 2016, Winter 2017, Spring 2017, Fall 2017, Spring 2018

More Information »

PSYC 0701 - Senior Thesis Proposal      

Senior Thesis Proposal
Students hoping to be considered as candidates for departmental honors must enroll in PSYC 0701 under the sponsorship of a department faculty member and submit a formal, written research proposal to the department by 5 p.m. on the Wednesday during the final week of fall classes in their senior year. If the proposal is approved, the student will enroll in PSYC 0702 during the winter term and PSYC 0703 during the spring term of their senior year. (Feb graduates should consult with their advisors about the appropriate semester in which to begin a thesis.) (PSYC 0201 and PSYC 0202; Approval required)

Fall 2013, Winter 2014, Spring 2014, Fall 2014, Winter 2015, Spring 2015, Fall 2015, Winter 2016, Spring 2016, Fall 2016, Winter 2017, Spring 2017, Fall 2017, Spring 2018

More Information »

PSYC 0702 - Senior Thesis Second Semester      

Senior Thesis Second Semester
Students whose honors thesis proposal (PSYC 0701) has been approved will collect, analyze, and interpret their data. This is the second semester of the 3-semester senior thesis. (PSYC 0201, PSYC 0202, and PSYC 0701; Approval required)

Fall 2013, Winter 2014, Spring 2014, Fall 2014, Winter 2015, Spring 2015, Fall 2015, Winter 2016, Spring 2016, Fall 2016, Winter 2017, Spring 2017, Fall 2017, Spring 2018

More Information »

PSYC 0703 - Senior Thesis      

Senior Thesis*
This is the third and final semester of the senior thesis. Students will finish analyzing, and interpreting their data. This process culminates in a written thesis to be submitted by 4 p.m. on the Monday BEFORE the final week of spring classes, a presentation, and an oral defense. The decision about awarding departmental honors will be made after the student submits the thesis. (PSYC 0201, PSYC 0202, and PSYC 0702; Approval required)

Fall 2013, Winter 2014, Spring 2014, Fall 2014, Winter 2015, Spring 2015, Fall 2015, Winter 2016, Spring 2016, Fall 2016, Winter 2017, Spring 2017, Fall 2017, Spring 2018

More Information »

PSYC 1003 - Living With Illness      

Children and Families Living with Illness: Psychological, Spiritual, and Cultural Perspectives
Over the course of a lifetime, most people are confronted with their own illness or the illness of a loved one. How do children and families cope with illness? How do they make meaning of their experiences? How do their spiritual and cultural beliefs impact their care and their views on healing? We will examine developmental, psychological, cultural and spiritual issues confronting children and families living with acute, chronic, and life-threatening illnesses. We will explore the psychological and spiritual interventions provided to children & families. Writings, artwork and videotaped interviews will be used to illustrate varied perspectives on illness and healing. This course counts as elective credit towards the Psychology major. SOC WTR

Winter 2015

More Information »

PSYC 1020 - Moral Minds      

Moral Minds
We have all “taken one for the team,” stood loyally by friends, overcome desires to cheat, and helped others before ourselves. We have also all stretched the truth to make ourselves look better, treated others intolerantly, and given preferential treatment to a friend. What motivates us to act in these moral and immoral ways? Are these actions guided by emotion or by reason? Are certain moral ideals respected by people universally? What makes something “moral” in the first place? In this course, we will grapple with these issues by exploring moral psychology from developmental, evolutionary, and cultural perspectives in psychology using primary sources. We will apply theories and concepts in moral psychology to Supreme Court cases, while also becoming attuned to the subtle, often unnoticed patterning of moral psychology in our everyday lives. We will use a variety of formats to address these issues, including theoretical and empirical readings, student-led discussions, essays, small group projects, and oral presentations. This course counts as elective credit towards the Psychology major. SOC WTR

Winter 2015, Winter 2017

More Information »

PSYC 1045 - The Sleeping Brain      

The Sleeping Brain
The average person will sleep approximately a third of his or her lifetime. What is the brain doing during this altered state of consciousness? In this course we will broadly explore the neuroscience of sleep, including anatomy and physiology, pharmacology, human disease, behavioral and cognitive neuroscience, sleep deprivation, and dreaming. Sleep and cognition, and particularly the effects of sleep on memory, will be emphasized. Students will become skilled at critically reading peer-reviewed journal articles, and will participate in hands-on labs and demonstrations (i.e., collecting sleep data and polysomnography training). This course counts as a Psychology elective. SCI WTR

Winter 2016

More Information »

Department of Psychology

McCardell Bicentennial Hall
276 Bicentennial Way
Middlebury College
Middlebury, VT 05753