Middlebury

 

Carlos Velez-Blasini

Professor of Psychology

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Phone: work802.443.5035
Office Hours: Summer: By appointment only.
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Carlos Vélez is Associate Professor of Psychology at Middlebury College. He is originally from Puerto Rico and arrived at Middlebury in 1993 after completing the Ph.D. program in Psychology at the University of Vermont. He conducted his undergraduate studies, obtaining a B.S., at The Catholic University of Puerto Rico, Ponce.

His research focuses primarily on risk-taking behaviors by college students. In particular he is interested in alcohol consumption, its causes and consequences, as well as sexual risk-taking, including casual sex and protective behaviors. Recent work has examined possible avenues to reduce riskiness regarding the latter. His approach to these topics relies primarily on social-psychological, cognitive, and cognitive-behavioral models and interventions. His work has also examined personality dimensions of alcohol use and sexual risk-taking. He is also interested on these issues and on psychological processes of a more general nature in a cross-cultural context as it pertains to all U.S. minorities, especially Latinos.

Professor Vélez teaches a range in psychology including Introduction to Psychology, Personality Psychology, Addictions, The psychology of Racial and Ethnic Minorities, and Drugs, Society, and Behavior.

 

Courses

Courses offered in the past four years.
indicates offered in the current term
indicates offered in the upcoming term[s]

FYSE 1350 - Prejudice in America      

Prejudice and Discrimination in America
Prejudice and discrimination have long been the focus of psychological research, yet clear solutions to these intractable problems remain elusive. In this course we will explore the origins of stereotypes and their relationship to prejudice and discrimination. We will consider historical and contemporary prejudice, explore its prevalence, its social and personal consequences, as well as possible avenues to reduce or eliminate its existence. We will read research literature, news stories, legal writings, fiction, and social commentary. Although we will focus primarily on ethnicity and race, prejudice based on sex, sexual orientation, and other dimensions will also be considered. 3 hrs. sem.

CW NOR SOC

Fall 2011

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PSYC 0105 - Introduction To Psychology      

Introduction to Psychology
This course will provide a general introduction to the field of psychology. The most central and important theories, concepts, findings, controversies, and applications in the following areas will be considered: biological bases of behavior, learning, perception, thinking, development, personality, psychological disorders, and social behavior. (Open to Juniors and Seniors by waiver only) 3 hrs lect./1 hr. disc.

SOC

Fall 2010, Winter 2011, Fall 2011, Fall 2012, Spring 2013, Fall 2013, Spring 2014, Fall 2014

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PSYC 0203 - Social Psychology      

Social Psychology
Social psychology is the study of how social situations affect the thoughts, feelings, and behaviors of individuals. This course will provide an overview of social psychological theory and research findings, as well as reviewing the ways in which these findings are applied to the study of issues such as aggression, close relationships, prejudice, and altruism. Students will also learn about the research methods that social psychologists use to test their theories. (PSYC 0105; open to seniors by waiver only) 3 hrs. lect.

SOC

Fall 2014

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PSYC 0204 - Personality Psychology      

Personality Psychology
This course provides an overview of personality psychology. Several central theories of personality, including psychoanalytic, humanistic, cognitive, trait, behavioristic, and social learning, will be discussed. The course will also emphasize the connection between personality theory and personality research. (PSYC 0105, open to seniors by waiver only) 3 hrs. lect.

SOC

Spring 2011, Spring 2012, Spring 2013, Fall 2013

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PSYC 0300 - Addiction      

Addiction
In this course we will explore current research and theories regarding the concept of addiction. We will examine addiction in its complexity by integrating multiple perspectives including the biological, conditioning, cognitive, socio-cultural, and psychodynamic approaches. Addiction to substances will be emphasized but addiction to behaviors and experiences will also be considered. Popular conceptions of addiction will be examined with a critical eye. The treatment of the addicted person will also be addressed and its effectiveness evaluated. (One psychology course beyond PSYC 0105; open to first-year students by waiver only; open to psychology and neuroscience majors; others by waiver) 3 hrs. lect.

Fall 2010, Fall 2012

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PSYC 0350 - Directed Research      

Directed Research in Psychology
Directed research provides opportunities for advanced students to become familiar with and participate in ongoing research projects under the direction of a faculty member. The student will first read background literature on the content area to be investigated and experimental methodologies to be used. Procedures involved in conducting psychological research will then be learned through firsthand experience. Potential activities include the design of research and the defining of conceptual variables and the gathering, analyzing, and interpretation of data. Finally, students will learn how to write technical articles in psychology by preparing a paper describing the project, using APA style. (Approval required; not open to first-year students) 3 hrs. lect.

Fall 2010, Spring 2011, Fall 2011, Spring 2012, Fall 2012, Winter 2013, Spring 2013, Fall 2013, Winter 2014, Spring 2014, Fall 2014, Spring 2015

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PSYC 0405 - Psych Racial/Ethnic Minorities      

The Psychology of Racial/Ethnic Minorities
This course will explore areas within the field of psychology that relate to the experiences of racial and ethnic groups currently living in the United States. The course is designed to examine psychological perspectives to provide a comprehensive understanding of the issues and problems confronted by members of various racial/ethnic minority groups today. We will examine issues related to stereotypes, prejudice, discrimination, identity, self-concept, cognitive development, acculturation, assessment, mental health, and public policy as they pertain to U.S. minorities. (PSYC 0105; open to junior and senior psychology majors, or by waiver only) 3 hrs. sem.

Spring 2011, Spring 2012, Spring 2014

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PSYC 0500 - Advanced Research      

Advanced Research
A program of research arranged to meet the needs of advanced students majoring in psychology. (Approval required)

Fall 2010, Spring 2011, Fall 2011, Spring 2012, Fall 2012, Winter 2013, Spring 2013, Fall 2013, Winter 2014, Spring 2014, Fall 2014, Spring 2015

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PSYC 0700 - Senior Research      

Senior Research
A program of research arranged to meet the needs of advanced senior majors in psychology. (PSYC 0201 and PSYC 0202; Approval required)

Fall 2012, Spring 2013, Fall 2013, Spring 2014, Fall 2014, Spring 2015

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PSYC 0701 - Senior Thesis Proposal      

Senior Thesis Proposal
Students hoping to be considered as candidates for departmental honors must enroll in PSYC 0701 under the sponsorship of a department faculty member and submit a formal, written research proposal to the department by 5 p.m. on the Wednesday during the final week of fall classes in their senior year. If the proposal is approved, the student will enroll in PSYC 0702 during the winter term and PSYC 0703 during the spring term of their senior year. (Feb graduates should consult with their advisors about the appropriate semester in which to begin a thesis.) (PSYC 0201 and PSYC 0202; Approval required)

Fall 2012, Winter 2013, Spring 2013, Fall 2013, Winter 2014, Spring 2014, Fall 2014, Spring 2015

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PSYC 0702 - Senior Thesis Second Semester      

Senior Thesis Second Semester
Students whose honors thesis proposal (PSYC 0701) has been approved will collect, analyze, and interpret their data. This is the second semester of the 3-semester senior thesis. (PSYC 0201, PSYC 0202, and PSYC 0701; Approval required)

Fall 2012, Winter 2013, Spring 2013, Fall 2013, Winter 2014, Spring 2014, Fall 2014, Spring 2015

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PSYC 0703 - Senior Thesis      

Senior Thesis*
This is the third and final semester of the senior thesis. Students will finish analyzing, and interpreting their data. This process culminates in a written thesis to be submitted by 4 p.m. on the Monday BEFORE the final week of spring classes, a presentation, and an oral defense. The decision about awarding departmental honors will be made after the student submits the thesis. (PSYC 0201, PSYC 0202, and PSYC 0702; Approval required)

Fall 2010, Spring 2011, Fall 2011, Spring 2012, Winter 2013, Spring 2013, Fall 2013, Winter 2014, Spring 2014, Fall 2014, Spring 2015

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Selected Publications

Vélez-Blasini, C. J. (2008). Evidence against alcohol as a proximal cause of sexual risk taking among college students. Journal of Sex Research, 45(2), 118-128.

Vélez-Blasini, C. J. & Brandt, H. J. (2000). Alcohol expectancies, date setting, age, and beverage choice as predictors of estimated likelihood of sexual behaviors in hypothetical dating situations. Journal of Applied Social Psychology, 30(9), 1954-1976

Vélez-Blasini, C. J. (1997). A cross-cultural comparison of alcohol expectancies in Puerto Rico and the U.S. Psychology of Addictive Behaviors, 11(2), 124-141.