Middlebury

 

Matthew Kimble

Associate Professor of Psychology

Email: 
Phone: work802.443.5402
Office Hours: By appointment only. On leave academic year 2013-14
Download Contact Information

Matthew Kimble is an Assistant Professor of Psychology at Middlebury College. He arrived at Middlebury in 2004 after six years at the Veteran Administration Hospital in Boston and two years teaching at the University of Wales, Bangor (GB).  He received a B.A. from Dartmouth College 1991 a Ph.D. in clinical psychology from Boston University 1996.

Kimble graph for faculty profile
His research interests focus on attentional processes in survivors of psychological trauma, particularly military veterans.  He uses eye tracking and brain imaging to better understand difficulties with concentration and hypervigilance in trauma survivors.  He is published a number of articles on the topic, most recently one that looks at EEG responses to novel sounds in military cadets and has presented his work at national and international conferences.  See his CV for more details, or his scholarly writings for downloadable content.
Professor Kimble teaches a range of courses in the Psychology Department including Introduction to Psychology, Research Methods, Psychological Disorders, Psychological Trauma, and Happiness.
 

Courses

Courses offered in the past four years.
indicates offered in the current term
indicates offered in the upcoming term[s]

NSCI 0500 - Independent Research      

Independent Research
Students enrolled in NSCI 0500 complete individual research projects involving laboratory or extensive library study on a topic chosen by the student and approved in advance by a NSCI faculty advisor. This course is not open to seniors; seniors should enroll in NSCI 0700. (Approval required)

Spring 2010, Fall 2010, Winter 2011, Spring 2011, Fall 2011, Winter 2012, Spring 2012, Fall 2012, Winter 2013, Spring 2013, Fall 2013, Winter 2014, Spring 2014, Fall 2014, Spring 2015

More Information »

NSCI 0700 - Senior Research      

Senior Research
This course is for senior NSCI majors who plan to conduct one or more semesters of independent research, or who plan to complete preparatory work toward a senior thesis, such as researching and writing a thesis proposal as well as, if appropriate, collecting data that will form the basis for a senior thesis. Senior NSCI majors who plan to complete a senior thesis should register initially for NSCI 0700. Additional requirements may include participation in weekly meetings with advisors and/or lab groups and attending neuroscience seminars. (Approval required, open to seniors only)

Spring 2010, Fall 2010, Winter 2011, Spring 2011, Fall 2011, Winter 2012, Spring 2012, Fall 2012, Winter 2013, Spring 2013, Fall 2013, Winter 2014, Spring 2014, Fall 2014, Spring 2015

More Information »

NSCI 0701 - Senior Thesis      

Senior Thesis
Senior NSCI majors who have completed one or more terms of NSCI 0700, who have a GPA of 3.3 in their major courses, and who plan to complete a senior thesis should register for NSCI 0701 for the final semester of the senior thesis process. Students enrolled in NSCI 0701 write a thesis, give a public presentation of their research, and present an oral defense of the thesis before a committee of at least two Neuroscience faculty members. Faculty may recommend High honors in Neuroscience after considering the quality of these components of a student’s thesis and the student’s GPA in major courses. Additional requirements may include participation in weekly meetings with advisors and/or lab groups and attending neuroscience seminars. (NSCI 0700, Approval required)

Fall 2012, Spring 2013, Fall 2013, Winter 2014, Spring 2014, Fall 2014, Spring 2015

More Information »

PSYC 0105 - Introduction To Psychology      

Introduction to Psychology
This course will provide a general introduction to the discipline field of psychology. The most central and important theories, concepts, findings, controversies, and applications in the following areas will be considered: biological bases of behavior, learning, perception, thinking, development, personality, abnormality disorders, and social behavior. (Open to Juniors and Seniors by waiver only) 3 hrs lect./1 hr. disc.

SOC

Spring 2011, Fall 2011, Spring 2012, Fall 2012

More Information »

PSYC 0202 - Research Methods in Psychology      

Research Methods in Psychology
This course will provide students with an understanding of the research methodology used by psychologists. Students will learn to read psychological studies and other related research as informed consumers. Students will collect, analyze, and interpret data during lab assignments. They will also design an empirical study, review the related literature, and write a formal APA-style research proposal. (PSYC 0105 and PSYC 0201; not open to first-year students; open to psychology and neuroscience majors) 3 hrs. lect./1.5 hr. lab

CW DED

Spring 2011, Spring 2012, Fall 2012, Fall 2014

More Information »

PSYC 0224 - Psychological Disorders      

Psychological Disorders
What makes an individual “abnormal”? Under what circumstances do mental health professionals classify emotions, thoughts, or behaviors as “disordered”? In this course, we will explore these questions with attention to their historical, theoretical, ethical, and diagnostic implications. We will investigate various classes of disorders, like anxiety, mood, and psychotic disorders, with a focus on their causes and treatments. Throughout, we will aim to appreciate the complexities and uncertainties surrounding diagnosis, and to recognize and challenge common assumptions about psychological disorders. In addition to lecture, the course will include discussions of current and controversial topics, and occasional demonstrations, analysis of clinical case material, and/or role plays. (PSYC 0105; open to seniors by waiver only) 3 hrs. lect./1 hr. disc.

SOC

Spring 2010, Fall 2010, Spring 2013, Fall 2014

More Information »

PSYC 0350 - Directed Research      

Directed Research in Psychology
Directed research provides opportunities for advanced students to become familiar with and participate in ongoing research projects under the direction of a faculty member. The student will first read background literature on the content area to be investigated and experimental methodologies to be used. Procedures involved in conducting psychological research will then be learned through firsthand experience. Potential activities include the design of research and the defining of conceptual variables and the gathering, analyzing, and interpretation of data. Finally, students will learn how to write technical articles in psychology by preparing a paper describing the project, using APA style. (Approval required; not open to first-year students) 3 hrs. lect.

Spring 2010, Fall 2010, Winter 2011, Spring 2011, Fall 2011, Winter 2012, Spring 2012, Fall 2012, Winter 2013, Spring 2013, Fall 2013, Winter 2014, Spring 2014, Fall 2014, Spring 2015

More Information »

PSYC 0406 - Psychological Trauma      

Psychological Trauma
Current evidence indicates that we have a 50/50 chance of being exposed to a psychologically-traumatizing event during our lifetime. This seminar explores psychological trauma from social, psychological, and biological perspectives. The course will cover the antecedents and consequences of trauma, past and present treatment approaches, and current controversies in the field (i.e., repressed memory, false disability claims). We will consider examples from literature, case studies, and current journal articles Assessment will be based on participation, presentation, and written work. (PSYC 0105; open to junior and senior psychology majors; neuroscience majors by waiver) 3 hrs sem.

Spring 2010, Fall 2010

More Information »

PSYC 0412 - Psychology-Integrated Approach      

Putting It All Together: An Integrated Look at Psychology
In this capstone seminar students will be asked to integrate what they have learned throughout their course of study to produce comprehensive works (both oral and written) that focus on a topic of interest to them. We will begin with a unit that looks at happiness from multiple perspectives (i.e., biological, social, developmental). Students will then similarly explore an area of their choosing and present their work to their classmates. Topics will vary based on student interest but, in the past, have included explorations of topics such as risk-taking, language acquisition, and music and behavior. (Open to junior and senior psychology majors only) 3 hrs. sem.

SOC

Fall 2011, Spring 2013

More Information »

PSYC 0500 - Advanced Research      

Advanced Research
A program of research arranged to meet the needs of advanced students majoring in psychology. (Approval required)

Spring 2010, Fall 2010, Winter 2011, Spring 2011, Fall 2011, Winter 2012, Spring 2012, Fall 2012, Winter 2013, Spring 2013, Fall 2013, Spring 2014, Fall 2014, Spring 2015

More Information »

PSYC 0700 - Senior Research      

Senior Research
A program of research arranged to meet the needs of advanced senior majors in psychology. (PSYC 0201 and PSYC 0202; Approval required)

Fall 2012, Spring 2013, Fall 2013, Spring 2014, Fall 2014, Spring 2015

More Information »

PSYC 0701 - Senior Thesis Proposal      

Senior Thesis Proposal
Students hoping to be considered as candidates for departmental honors must enroll in PSYC 0701 under the sponsorship of a department faculty member and submit a formal, written research proposal to the department by 5 p.m. on the Wednesday during the final week of fall classes in their senior year. If the proposal is approved, the student will enroll in PSYC 0702 during the winter term and PSYC 0703 during the spring term of their senior year. (Feb graduates should consult with their advisors about the appropriate semester in which to begin a thesis.) (PSYC 0201 and PSYC 0202; Approval required)

Fall 2012, Winter 2013, Spring 2013, Fall 2013, Winter 2014, Spring 2014, Fall 2014, Spring 2015

More Information »

PSYC 0702 - Senior Thesis Second Semester      

Senior Thesis Second Semester
Students whose honors thesis proposal (PSYC 0701) has been approved will collect, analyze, and interpret their data. This is the second semester of the 3-semester senior thesis. (PSYC 0201, PSYC 0202, and PSYC 0701; Approval required)

Fall 2012, Winter 2013, Spring 2013, Fall 2013, Winter 2014, Spring 2014, Fall 2014, Spring 2015

More Information »

PSYC 0703 - Senior Thesis      

Senior Thesis*
This is the third and final semester of the senior thesis. Students will finish analyzing, and interpreting their data. This process culminates in a written thesis to be submitted by 5 p.m. on the Monday BEFORE the final week of spring classes, a presentation, and an oral defense. The decision about awarding departmental honors will be made after the student submits the thesis. (PSYC 0201, PSYC 0202, and PSYC 0702; Approval required)

Spring 2010, Fall 2010, Winter 2011, Spring 2011, Fall 2011, Winter 2012, Spring 2012, Winter 2013, Spring 2013, Fall 2013, Winter 2014, Spring 2014, Fall 2014, Spring 2015

More Information »

Publications

Kimble, M.O., *Batterink, L., *Marks, L., *Ross, C., & Fleming, K. (in press).  Negative expectancies in PTSD:  Neurophysiological (N400) and behavioral evidence.  Journal of Psychiatric Research.

Kimble, M.O., Flack, W.F., *Burbridge, E. (in press).  Study abroad increases risk for sexual assault in female undergraduates. 

Kimble, M.O., Fleming, K., Bandy, C., *Kim, J., & *Zambetti, A. (2010).  Eye tracking and visual attention to traumatic stimuli in veterans of the Iraq War.  Journal of Anxiety Disorders, 24(3), 293-299.

Media Coverage

Middlebury Magazine, Fall 2008