Middlebury

 

Suzanne Gurland

Dean of Curriculum; Associate Professor of Psychology

Email: 
Phone: work802.443.5323
Office Hours: By appointment only.
Download Contact Information

Suzanne Gurland is an Associate Professor of Psychology. She earned a B.A. in Sociology from the University of Chicago, and later an M.A. and Ph.D. in Clinical Psychology from Clark University.

She conducts research on interpersonal processes that help children thrive in their family, school, and other contexts. She has studied, for example, which of adults’ interpersonal styles result in greatest rapport with children; how children respond to parents’ ways of motivating them; and how children's beliefs about their teachers affect the teacher-student relationship. She is also interested, more generally, in the effects of interpersonal styles on motivation, creativity, and perspective-taking.

Professor Gurland teaches courses in the Department’s foundation sequence (Psychological Statistics), developmental/educational core area (Child Development), and clinical/personality core area (Psychological Disorders). In addition, she teaches a senior seminar on Human Motivation, and occasional courses on interpersonal processes.

 

Courses


indicates offered in the current term
indicates offered in the upcoming term[s]

PSYC 0201 - Psychological Statistics      

Psychological Statistics
This course will examine statistical methods used in the behavioral and biological sciences. Students will learn the logic underlying statistical analysis, focusing primarily on inferential techniques. They also will become familiar with the application and interpretation of statistics in psychological empirical research, including the use of computer software for conducting and interpreting statistical analyses. (PSYC 0105; Fall: open to psychology and neuroscience majors and undeclared majors, others by waiver; Spring: open to psychology and neuroscience majors; others by waiver. Not open to students who have taken MATH 0116 or ECON 0210) 3 hrs. lect./1.5 hr. lab

DED

Spring 2011, Spring 2012, Spring 2013, Spring 2014, Spring 2015

More Information »

PSYC 0224 - Psychological Disorders      

Psychological Disorders
What makes an individual “abnormal”? Under what circumstances do mental health professionals classify emotions, thoughts, or behaviors as “disordered”? In this course, we will explore these questions with attention to their historical, theoretical, ethical, and diagnostic implications. We will investigate various classes of disorders, like anxiety, mood, and psychotic disorders, with a focus on their causes and treatments. Throughout, we will aim to appreciate the complexities and uncertainties surrounding diagnosis, and to recognize and challenge common assumptions about psychological disorders. In addition to lecture, the course will include discussions of current and controversial topics, and occasional demonstrations, analysis of clinical case material, and/or role plays. (PSYC 0105; open to seniors by waiver only) 3 hrs. lect./1 hr. disc.

SOC

Spring 2011, Fall 2011, Fall 2012, Fall 2013

More Information »

PSYC 0312 - Play Therapy: Theory, Practice      

Play Therapy: Theory and Practice
For over fifty years, therapists have been using play to understand and relieve psychological distress in children. Does it work? If so, how and for whom? In this course, we will critically examine the theoretical underpinnings of play therapy, weigh the research evidence supporting its effectiveness in treating a range of diagnoses, and explore issues at the intersection of theory and practice. Our work will be guided by theoretical and empirical texts, as well as videotaped and live play sessions that students will at times observe, conduct, and critique. (PSYC 0105; PSYC 0216 or PSYC 0224 or PSYC 0225; open to psychology majors, others by waiver) 2 hrs. lect./1.5 hrs. lab.

SOC

Fall 2011, Fall 2012, Fall 2013

More Information »

PSYC 0350 - Directed Research      

Directed Research in Psychology
Directed research provides opportunities for advanced students to become familiar with and participate in ongoing research projects under the direction of a faculty member. The student will first read background literature on the content area to be investigated and experimental methodologies to be used. Procedures involved in conducting psychological research will then be learned through firsthand experience. Potential activities include the design of research and the defining of conceptual variables and the gathering, analyzing, and interpretation of data. Finally, students will learn how to write technical articles in psychology by preparing a paper describing the project, using APA style. (Approval required; not open to first-year students) 3 hrs. lect.

Winter 2011, Spring 2011, Fall 2011, Winter 2012, Spring 2012, Fall 2012, Winter 2013, Spring 2013, Fall 2013, Winter 2014, Spring 2014, Fall 2014, Winter 2015, Spring 2015

More Information »

PSYC 0403 - Human Motivation      

Human Motivation
Why do we throw ourselves into some projects enthusiastically, while only a hefty bribe could induce us to work on others? In this seminar, we will explore the vicissitudes of human motivation across multiple perspectives (e.g., drive, learning, social-cognitive theories), domains of human activity (e.g., academics, athletics), and developmental periods. Through our own observational studies and critical reading of theory and research, we will challenge popular notions of what motivates, examine individual differences in motivation, and complicate our everyday intuitions of how motivation is experienced and measured. (PSYC 0105; open to junior and senior psychology majors only) 3 hrs. sem.

Spring 2012, Spring 2013, Spring 2014

More Information »

PSYC 0500 - Advanced Research      

Advanced Research
A program of research arranged to meet the needs of advanced students majoring in psychology. (Approval required)

Winter 2011, Spring 2011, Fall 2011, Winter 2012, Spring 2012, Fall 2012, Winter 2013, Spring 2013, Fall 2013, Winter 2014, Spring 2014, Fall 2014, Winter 2015, Spring 2015

More Information »

PSYC 0700 - Senior Research      

Senior Research
A program of research arranged to meet the needs of advanced senior majors in psychology. (PSYC 0201 and PSYC 0202; Approval required)

Fall 2012, Spring 2013, Fall 2013, Spring 2014, Fall 2014, Winter 2015, Spring 2015

More Information »

PSYC 0701 - Senior Thesis Proposal      

Senior Thesis Proposal
Students hoping to be considered as candidates for departmental honors must enroll in PSYC 0701 under the sponsorship of a department faculty member and submit a formal, written research proposal to the department by 5 p.m. on the Wednesday during the final week of fall classes in their senior year. If the proposal is approved, the student will enroll in PSYC 0702 during the winter term and PSYC 0703 during the spring term of their senior year. (Feb graduates should consult with their advisors about the appropriate semester in which to begin a thesis.) (PSYC 0201 and PSYC 0202; Approval required)

Fall 2012, Winter 2013, Spring 2013, Fall 2013, Winter 2014, Spring 2014, Fall 2014, Winter 2015, Spring 2015

More Information »

PSYC 0702 - Senior Thesis Second Semester      

Senior Thesis Second Semester
Students whose honors thesis proposal (PSYC 0701) has been approved will collect, analyze, and interpret their data. This is the second semester of the 3-semester senior thesis. (PSYC 0201, PSYC 0202, and PSYC 0701; Approval required)

Fall 2012, Winter 2013, Spring 2013, Fall 2013, Winter 2014, Spring 2014, Fall 2014, Winter 2015, Spring 2015

More Information »

PSYC 0703 - Senior Thesis      

Senior Thesis*
This is the third and final semester of the senior thesis. Students will finish analyzing, and interpreting their data. This process culminates in a written thesis to be submitted by 4 p.m. on the Monday BEFORE the final week of spring classes, a presentation, and an oral defense. The decision about awarding departmental honors will be made after the student submits the thesis. (PSYC 0201, PSYC 0202, and PSYC 0702; Approval required)

Winter 2011, Spring 2011, Fall 2011, Winter 2012, Spring 2012, Winter 2013, Spring 2013, Fall 2013, Winter 2014, Spring 2014, Fall 2014, Winter 2015, Spring 2015

More Information »

Publications

Gurland, S. T., Grolnick, W. S., Friendly, R. W. (2012). The role of expectations in children’s experience of novel events.  Journal of Experimental Child Psychology, 113, 305-321. doi: 10.1016/j.jecp.2012.06.010.

Seltzer-Kelly, D. L., Cinnamon-Morrison, S., Cunningham, C. A., Gurland, S. T., Jones, K., & Toth, S. L. (2011). (Re)imagining teacher preparation for conjoint democratic inquiry in complex classroom ecologies.  Complicity, 8(1), 5-27.

Gurland, S. T. & *Glowacky, T. (2011). Children’s lay theories of motivation. Journal of Experimental Child Psychology.

*Wiechman, B. M. & Gurland, S. T. (2009). What happens during the free-choice period?: Evidence of a polarizing effect of extrinsic rewards on intrinsic motivation. Journal of Research in Personality, 43, 716-719.

*Lam, C. F. & Gurland, S. T. (2008). Self-determined work motivation predicts job outcomes, but what predicts self-determined work motivation? Journal of Research in Personality, 42, 1109-1115.

Gurland, S. T. & Grolnick, W. S. (2008). Building rapport with children: Effects of adults’ expected, actual, and perceived behavior. Journal of Social and Clinical Psychology, 27, 226-253.

*King, L. & Gurland, S. T. (2007). Creativity and experience of a creative task: Person and environment effects. Journal of Research in Personality, 41, 1252-1259.

Gurland, S. T. & Grolnick, W. S. (2005). Perceived threat, controlling parenting, and children’s achievement orientations. Motivation and Emotion, 29, 103-121.

Gurland, S. T. & Grolnick, W. S. (2003). Children’s expectancies and perceptions of adults: Effects on rapport. Child Development, 74, 1212-1224.

Grolnick, W. S., Gurland, S. T., DeCourcey, W., & Jacob, K. (2002). Antecedents and consequences of mothers’ autonomy support: An experimental investigation. Developmental Psychology, 38, 143-155.

Grolnick, W. S., Gurland, S. T., Jacob, K., & DeCourcey, W. (2002). The development of self-determination in middle childhood and adolescence. In A. Wigfield (Ed.), The Development of Achievement Motivation (pp. 147-172). San Diego: Academic Press.

Grolnick, W. S. & Gurland, S. T. (2001). Mothering: Retrospect and prospect. In J. P. McHale & W. S. Grolnick (Eds.), Retrospect and Prospect in the Psychological Study of Families (pp. 5-33). Mahwah, NJ: Erlbaum.

Carpenter, K. M. & Gurland, S. T. (2000). Talking to family and friends about graduate school and research in psychology. Newsletter of the American Psychological Association of Graduate Students, 12, 13.

Grolnick, W. S., Kurowski, C. O., & Gurland, S. T. (1999). Family processes and the development of children’s self-regulation. Educational Psychologist, 34, 3-14.

Gurland, S. T. & Carpenter, K. M. (1999). Interpersonal dynamics in the graduate student - faculty advisor relationship. Newsletter of the American Psychological Association of Graduate Students, 11, 21-22.

Sparrow, S. S. & Gurland, S. T. (1998). Assessment of gifted children with the WISC-III. In A. Prifitera & D. H. Saklofske (Eds.), WISC-III clinical use and interpretation: Scientist-practitioner perspectives (pp. 59-72). San Diego: Academic Press.