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RELI0500A-W17

CRN: 10151

Independent Research
Independent Research
(Approval Required)

RELI0500B-W17

CRN: 10152

Independent Research
Independent Research
(Approval Required)

RELI0500C-W17

CRN: 10415

Independent Research
Independent Research
(Approval Required)

RELI0500F-W17

CRN: 10683

Independent Research
Independent Research
(Approval Required)

RELI0500G-W17

CRN: 10416

Independent Research
Independent Research
(Approval Required)

RELI0500J-W17

CRN: 10157

Independent Research
Independent Research
(Approval Required)

RELI0500K-W17

CRN: 10417

Independent Research
Independent Research
(Approval Required)

RELI0500L-W17

CRN: 10684

Independent Research
Independent Research
(Approval Required)

RELI0500M-W17

CRN: 10912

Independent Research
Independent Research
(Approval Required)

RELI0500P-W17

CRN: 11192

Independent Research
Independent Research
(Approval Required)

RELI0700A-W17

CRN: 10158

Senior Project in Religion
Senior Project
(Approval Required)

RELI0700B-W17

CRN: 10159

Senior Project in Religion
Senior Project
(Approval Required)

RELI0700C-W17

CRN: 10418

Senior Project in Religion
Senior Project
(Approval Required)

RELI0700F-W17

CRN: 10687

Senior Project in Religion
Senior Project
(Approval Required)

RELI0700G-W17

CRN: 10419

Senior Project in Religion
Senior Project
(Approval Required)

RELI0700J-W17

CRN: 10164

Senior Project in Religion
Senior Project
(Approval Required)

RELI0700K-W17

CRN: 10420

Senior Project in Religion
Senior Project
(Approval Required)

RELI0700L-W17

CRN: 10688

Senior Project in Religion
Senior Project
(Approval Required)

RELI0700M-W17

CRN: 10913

Senior Project in Religion
Senior Project
(Approval Required)

RELI0700P-W17

CRN: 11193

Senior Project in Religion
Senior Project
(Approval Required)

RELI0701A-W17

CRN: 10934

Senior Thesis in Religion
Senior Research for Honors Candidates
Approval required

RELI0701B-W17

CRN: 10935

Senior Thesis in Religion
Senior Research for Honors Candidates
Approval required

RELI0701C-W17

CRN: 10936

Senior Thesis in Religion
Senior Research for Honors Candidates
Approval required

RELI0701D-W17

CRN: 10937

Senior Thesis in Religion
Senior Research for Honors Candidates
Approval required

RELI0701F-W17

CRN: 10939

Senior Thesis in Religion
Senior Research for Honors Candidates
Approval required

RELI0701G-W17

CRN: 10940

Senior Thesis in Religion
Senior Research for Honors Candidates
Approval required

RELI0701H-W17

CRN: 10941

Senior Thesis in Religion
Senior Research for Honors Candidates
Approval required

RELI0701J-W17

CRN: 10943

Senior Thesis in Religion
Senior Research for Honors Candidates
Approval required

RELI0701K-W17

CRN: 10944

Senior Thesis in Religion
Senior Research for Honors Candidates
Approval required

RELI0701L-W17

CRN: 10945

Senior Thesis in Religion
Senior Research for Honors Candidates
Approval required

RELI0701M-W17

CRN: 10946

Senior Thesis in Religion
Senior Research for Honors Candidates
Approval required

RELI0701P-W17

CRN: 11194

Senior Thesis in Religion
Senior Research for Honors Candidates
Approval required

RELI1029A-W17

Cross-Listed As:
RELI1029B-W17

CRN: 11189

Global Pentecostalism
Global Pentecostalism
In this course we will explore developments in contemporary Pentecostal and charismatic movements, rapidly growing forms of global Christianity that emphasize direct personal experience with God through the baptism of the Holy Spirit and “speaking in tongues.” We will begin with an exploration of the central beliefs and practices in Pentecostalism, its modern origins in the Azuza Street Revival, and racial tensions among the early “classical denominations” of North America. Then we will turn our attention to the global spread of Pentecostalism in the 20th century, examining its cultural and ethnic variations in South America, Africa, and China. Finally, we will consider how these diverse global movements and neo-charismatic mega churches (especially their use of the media and endorsement of prosperity theology) are re-shaping the face of traditional Christianity.

RELI1029B-W17

Cross-Listed As:
RELI1029A-W17

CRN: 11490

Global Pentecostalism
Global Pentecostalism
In this course we will explore developments in contemporary Pentecostal and charismatic movements, rapidly growing forms of global Christianity that emphasize direct personal experience with God through the baptism of the Holy Spirit and “speaking in tongues.” We will begin with an exploration of the central beliefs and practices in Pentecostalism, its modern origins in the Azuza Street Revival, and racial tensions among the early “classical denominations” of North America. Then we will turn our attention to the global spread of Pentecostalism in the 20th century, examining its cultural and ethnic variations in South America, Africa, and China. Finally, we will consider how these diverse global movements and neo-charismatic mega churches (especially their use of the media and endorsement of prosperity theology) are re-shaping the face of traditional Christianity.

RELI1039A-W17

CRN: 11436

The Gita in Walden
The Gita in Walden
In the Walden chapter “The Pond in Winter,” Henry David Thoreau recounts a morning spent reading “the stupendous and cosmogonal philosophy” of the classic Hindu text the Bhagavad Gita. “The pure Walden water,” he notes, “is mingled with the sacred water of the Ganges.” In this course we will study that curious “mingling” through a comparative reading of Walden and the Bhagavad Gita. As we read these texts side-by-side, we will consider their intellectual contexts of Transcendentalism and Hinduism, and trace the influence of both texts in such thinkers as Gandhi, Martin Luther King Jr., Annie Dillard, and others.

RELI1040A-W17

CRN: 11437

Islamic Philosophy & Theology
History of Islamic Philosophy and Theology
During the 8th-10th centuries, Muslim intellectuals began engaging with Aristotelian philosophy via a massive Greek-to-Arabic translation movement. Modern opinion has tended to mourn this era as a brief golden age, stifled by religious fanaticism. However, recent scholarship questions the so-called “decline” narrative, arguing that Islamic philosophy and theology flourished into the 20th century. In this course we will survey the key movements and debates of Islamic intellectual history by reading texts by major thinkers like Avicenna and al-Ghazali. We will also read a range of scholarship to understand how and why the historical narrative is undergoing such radical revision.

RELI1041A-W17

CRN: 11438

Readings in Quran
Readings in Quran
The Quran is one of the most read and studied books in world history. For more than 1,400 years, scholars have sought to uncover the power and meanings found within the Quran. In this course we will focus on close readings of Islam’s most important text.  We will examine the Quran through multiple theological interpretations, exploring the text’s core themes and teachings.  Important contemporary questions such as the Quran’s relationship to violence and women’s rights will be explored. In doing so, we will seek to understand how this book informs the religious and spiritual understandings of Islam’s 1.8 billion adherents.

RELI1073A-W17

Cross-Listed As:
PHIL1073A-W17

CRN: 11395

Religion Enlightenment
“A Book Forged in Hell”: Religion, Enlightenment and Spinoza’s Theological-Political Treatise*
What is the role of religion in a modern state? When citizens’ religious freedoms collide with state interests, which should prevail? In his Theological-Political Treatise, Spinoza rejected the divine origin of scripture and the authority of religion and set the stage for modern textual criticism. He championed the separation of religion and state and laid the groundwork for modern secularism. One reviewer denounced the Treatise as “a book forged in hell.” We begin with a close reading of the Treatise and then consider Spinoza’s long legacy: the rise of liberalism and secularism, the origins of modern Biblical criticism, and the reasons why Spinoza has been called “the first modern Jew.”

Department of Religion

Munroe Hall
427 College Street
Middlebury College
Middlebury, VT 05753