Rebecca Kneale Gould

Senior Lecturer in Environmental Studies

 
 work802.443.2548
 Fall 2016 Tues 1:45- 3:15, Wed 2:00- 3:00 and by appointment
 Franklin Environmental Ctr Hillcrest 209

Rebecca Kneale Gould is a scholar, writer and environmental advocate. She served for eight years as a tenured Associate Professor of Religion at Middlebury College and now holds the position of Senior Lecturer in Environmental Studies.  Her book on spirituality and back-to-the-land practices, At Home in Nature, was published by The University of California Press in 2005.  Gould has spoken and published widely on the connection between religious identity and environmental advocacy including "Religion: A Dialogue" (co-author, Mark Wallace) in Grounding Religion: A Field Guide to the Study of Religion and Ecology (Whitney Bauman, Richard Bohannon and Kevin O'Brien, editors; Routledge, 2011) and "Binding Life to Values," in Ignition (Jon Isham, Sissel Waage and Bill McKibben, editors; Island Press, 2007).  Gould also teaches and writes about Thoreau and Thoreauvians and has most recently published "Deliberate Lives, Deliberate Living: Thoreau and Steiner in Conversation," in American Philosophy and Rudolph Steiner, Robert McDermott, editor (Lindisfarne Books, 2012).

Gould writes and consults for a broader audience beyond the academy.  She is the co-creator with Phil Walker (Small Circle Films) of the 2012 documentary film, The Fire Inside: Place, Passion and the Primacy of Nature.  She is a monthly contributor to the "Ways of Seeing" series in the Addison County Independent.  Gould also speaks and consults on the role of contemplative practice in Higher Education. Her current book project is entitled Spacious.

 

Courses

Course List: 

Courses offered in the past four years.
indicates offered in the current term
indicates offered in the upcoming term[s]

ENVS0215 - Contested Grounds      

Contested Grounds: U.S. Cultures and Environments
Throughout the history of the United States, Americans have created a complex set of meanings pertaining to the environments (wild, pastoral, urban, marine) in which they live. From European-Native contact to the present, Americans’ various identities, cultures, and beliefs about the bio-physical world have shaped the stories they tell about “nature,” stories that sometimes share common ground, but often create conflicting and contested understandings of human-environment relationships. In this course we will investigate these varied and contested stories from multi-disciplinary perspectives in the humanities—history, literature, and religion--and will include attention to race, class, gender, and environmental justice. 3 hrs. lect./disc. NOR

Spring 2013, Spring 2014, Fall 2015, Fall 2016

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ENVS0395 / RELI0395 - Religion, Ethics + Environment      

Religion, Ethics, and the Environment ET
We will explore the relationship between religion and ecology through two general approaches. Firstly, we will examine what religious traditions (especially, Jewish and Christian, but also Hindu and Buddhist) have had to say about the human-nature relationship by studying such dominant themes as: doctrines of creation and stewardship, restraints on human impact, concepts of interdependence, and ideas of sacred space. Secondly, we will turn our attention to contemporary religiously-based environmental activism, examining the possibilities and problems that emerge when religious traditions are mobilized on behalf of the environment. Students may write research papers using one or both of these approaches. (RELI 0110 or RELI 0130 or RELI 0160 or RELI 0190 or RELI 0295 or ENVS 0215) 3 hrs. sem. PHL

Spring 2015, Spring 2017

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ENVS0401 - Environmental Studies Sr Sem      

Environmental Studies Senior Seminar
See section for course description.

Fall 2013, Fall 2014, Spring 2016

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ENVS0500 - Independent Study      

Independent Study
In this course, students (non-seniors) carry out an independent research or creative project on a topic pertinent to the relationship between humans and the environment. The project, carried out under the supervision of a faculty member with related expertise who is appointed in or affiliated with the Environmental Studies Program, must involve a significant amount of independent research and analysis. The expectations and any associated final products will be defined in consultation with the faculty advisor. Students may enroll in ENVS 0500 no more than twice for a given project. (Approval only)

Fall 2012, Spring 2013, Fall 2013, Winter 2014, Spring 2014, Fall 2014, Winter 2015, Spring 2015, Fall 2015, Winter 2016, Spring 2016, Fall 2016, Winter 2017, Spring 2017

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ENVS0700 - Senior Independent Study      

Senior Independent Study
In this course, seniors complete an independent research or creative project on a topic pertinent to the relationship between humans and the environment. During the term prior to enrolling in ENVS 0700, a student must discuss and agree upon a project topic with a faculty advisor who is appointed in or affiliated with the Environmental Studies Program and submit a brief project proposal to the Director of Environmental Studies for Approval. The expectations and any associated final products will be defined in consultation with the faculty advisor. Students may enroll in ENVS 0700 as a one-term independent study OR up to twice as part of a multi-term project, including as a lead-up to ENVS 0701 (ES Senior Thesis). (Senior standing; Approval only)

Fall 2012, Spring 2013, Fall 2013, Winter 2014, Spring 2014, Fall 2014, Winter 2015, Spring 2015, Fall 2015, Winter 2016, Spring 2016, Fall 2016, Winter 2017, Spring 2017

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ENVS0701 - Senior Thesis      

Senior Thesis
This course is the culminating term of a multi-term independent project, resulting in a senior thesis on a topic pertinent to the relationship between humans and the environment. Approval to enroll is contingent on successful completion of at least one term (and up to two) of ENVS 0700 and the approval of the student’s thesis committee. The project, carried out under the supervision of a faculty advisor who is appointed in or affiliated with the Environmental Studies Program, will result in a substantial piece of scholarly work that will be presented to other ENVS faculty and students in a public forum and defended before the thesis committee. (Senior standing; ENVS major; ENVS 0112, ENVS 0211, ENVS 0215, GEOG 0120, and ENVS 0700; Approval only)

Winter 2016, Winter 2017

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ENVS1028 - Social & Environmental Justice      

Social Justice and Environmental Justice
In this course we will study contemporary environmental justice in the context of social justice movements that have preceded them, paying particular attention to how these earlier movements have influenced the challenges and tactics of environmental justice today. Drawing on the work of Mohandas Gandhi, Martin Luther King Jr., Dorothy Day, and others, we will explore the roles race, class, gender, and religion have played in confronting poverty, racism, and violence. We will then go on to examine contemporary environmental justice movements, exploring how these movements are rooted in as well as distinct from social justice movements of earlier periods. This course counts as a cognate for ENVS majors with a focus in the natural sciences. NOR PHL WTR

Winter 2015, Winter 2016

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RELI0400 - Seminar: Study of Religion      

Understanding Religion: Foundational Theories and Methods
In this seminar we will examine the genesis of the academic study of religion in the modern world by reading seminal texts of such founding thinkers as: Durkheim, Weber, James, Freud, Jung, and Eliade. We will analyze these and more recent theories and methods in the sociological, psychological, and comparative study of religion, discerning their assumptions and implications, strengths and weaknesses, and utilizing them in focused written assignments. We end with the study of text-critical methods, interpreting the Garden of Eden story from multiple perspectives. Open to juniors and seniors who have had two religion courses or by waiver. 3 hrs. sem.

Spring 2013

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RELI0500 - Independent Research      

Independent Research
(Approval Required)

Fall 2012, Winter 2013, Spring 2013, Winter 2014, Spring 2015

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RELI0700 - Senior Project in Religion      

Senior Project
(Approval Required)

Fall 2012, Winter 2013, Spring 2013, Winter 2014

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RELI0701 - Senior Thesis in Religion      

Senior Research for Honors Candidates
Approval required

Fall 2012, Winter 2013, Spring 2013, Winter 2014

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RELI1028 - Religion and Environ Ethics      

Religion and Environmental Ethics
What is the relationship between religion and ecology? We will examine how religious traditions (Judaism, Christianity, Hinduism, and Buddhism) have characterized the human-nature relationship by studying such themes as: dominion vs. stewardship, restraints on human impact, concepts of interdependence, and ideas of sacred space. Later in the course, we will study contemporary religiously-based environmental activism, examining the possibilities and problems that emerge when religion is mobilized on behalf of the environment. We will read works by Sallie McFague, Mary Evelyn Tucker, Thomas Berry, and Rabbis Arthur Waskow and David Haberman. We will also take a field trip to an "eco-Catholic" monastery in Vermont. (Not open to students who have taken RELI 0395). PHL WTR

Winter 2013

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Department of Religion

Munroe Hall
427 College Street
Middlebury College
Middlebury, VT 05753