Middlebury

 

Rebecca Kneale Gould

Senior Lecturer in Environmental Studies

Email: 
Phone: work802.443.2548
Office Hours: Spring 2014: Tuesday 1:30-3:30 and Wednesday 11:00-12:00 and by appointment
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Rebecca Kneale Gould is a scholar, writer and environmental advocate. She served for eight years as a tenured Associate Professor of Religion at Middlebury College and now holds the position of Senior Lecturer in Environmental Studies.  Her book on spirituality and back-to-the-land practices, At Home in Nature, was published by The University of California Press in 2005.  Gould has spoken and published widely on the connection between religious identity and environmental advocacy including "Religion: A Dialogue" (co-author, Mark Wallace) in Grounding Religion: A Field Guide to the Study of Religion and Ecology (Whitney Bauman, Richard Bohannon and Kevin O'Brien, editors; Routledge, 2011)and "Binding Life to Values," in Ignition (Jon Isham, Sissel Waage and Bill McKibben, editors; Island Press, 2007).  Gould also teaches and writes about Thoreau and Thoreauvians and has most recently published "Deliberate Lives, Deliberate Living: Thoreau and Steiner in Conversation," in American Philosophy and Rudolph Steiner, Robert McDermott, editor (Lindisfarne Books, 2012).

Gould writes and consults for a broader audience beyond the academy.  She is the co-creator with Phil Walker (Jump/Cut Productions) of the 2012 documentary film, The Fire Inside: Place, Passion and Planetary Healing and served as the primary librettist for The Emergent Universe Oratorio (2013) a choral work based on the writings of Thomas Berry and on Journey of the Universe, by Brain Swimme and Mary Evelyn Tucker (Yale University Press, 2011).  She is a monthly contributor to the "Ways of Seeing" series in the Addison County Independent.  Gould also speaks and consults on the role of contemplative practice in Higher Education. Her current book project is entitled Spacious.

 

Courses

Courses offered in the past four years.
indicates offered in the current term
indicates offered in the upcoming term[s]

ENVS 0215 - Nature's Meanings      

Topic determined by the instructor - please refer to the section.

NOR

Fall 2010, Fall 2011, Spring 2013, Spring 2014

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ENVS 0401 - Environmental Studies Sr Sem      

Environmental Studies Senior Seminar
A single environmental topic will be explored through reading, discussion, and individual research. Topics will vary from semester to semester, but will focus on issues with relevance to the local region and with interdisciplinary dimensions, such as temperate forests, lake ecosystems, or public lands policy. The class involves extensive reading, student-led discussions, and a collaborative research project. (Senior standing; ENVS 0112, ENVS 0211, ENVS 0215, and GEOG 0120) 3 hrs. sem./3 hrs. lab

Fall 2013, Fall 2014

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ENVS 0500 - Independent Study      

Independent Study
A one- or two-semester research project on a topic that relates to the relationship between humans and the environment. The project, carried out under the supervision of a faculty member with related expertise, must involve a significant amount of independent research and analysis. Students may enroll in ENVS 0500 no more than twice for a given project. (Approval only)

Fall 2010, Fall 2011, Spring 2012, Fall 2012, Spring 2013, Fall 2013, Winter 2014, Spring 2014, Fall 2014, Spring 2015

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ENVS 0700 - ES Senior Honors Work      

Senior Honors Work
The final semester of a multi-semester research project on a topic pertinent to the relationship between humans and the environment. Students may enroll in ENVS 0700 only once. (Previous work would have been conducted as one or two semesters of an ENVS 0500 Independent Study project.) The project, carried out under the supervision of a faculty member, will result in a substantial piece of writing, and will be presented to other ENVS faculty and students in a public forum. (Senior standing; ENVS 0112, ENVS 0211, ENVS 0215, GEOG 0120, and ENVS 0500; Approval only)

Fall 2010, Fall 2011, Spring 2012, Fall 2012, Spring 2013, Fall 2013, Winter 2014, Spring 2014, Fall 2014, Spring 2015

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INTL 0504 - SAS Independent Project      

South Asian Studies Independent Project
(Approval Required)

Spring 2011

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RELI 0170 / AMST 0170 / HIST 0170 - Religion in America      

Religion in America AR
America often has been defined paradoxically as both the "most religious" and "least religious" of nations. This course, a historical survey of American religious life, will trace the unique story of American religion from colonial times to the present. Guiding our exploration will be the ideas of "contact," "conflict," and "combination." Along the way, we will examine the varieties of religious experiences and traditions that have shaped and been shaped by American culture such as, Native American traditions, Puritan life and thought, evangelicalism, immigration, African-American religious experience, women's movements, and the on-going challenges of religious diversity. Readings include sermons, essays, diaries and fiction, as well as secondary source material. 2 hrs. lect./1 hr. disc.

HIS NOR PHL

Fall 2010

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RELI 0270 / AMST 0270 - Thoreau/Lib Relig/Soc Change      

Thoreau, Liberal Religion and Social Change AR, WT
Thoreau is best known as a “nature writer,” but his contribution to American religion and culture is much broader. In this course, we will examine Thoreau’s work within the broader context of his deepest concerns, including challenges to Christian orthodoxies, the early study of “world religions,” abolitionism, non-violence, and the critique of capitalism. We will focus on Thoreau’s life and thought including Walden and beyond, reading widely among thinkers who most influenced him. In the second half of the seminar, we will explore Thoreau’s many modern legacies: liberal religion, religious pluralism, non-violent resistance, anti-consumption, environmentalism, and civil rights campaigns. 3 hrs. sem.

NOR PHL

Spring 2012

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RELI 0274 - The Simple Life in America      

The Simple Life in American Culture AR
The pursuit of the simple life is rarely simple. Nevertheless, it has been a longstanding impulse in American culture. This course will explore the history and sociology of the American quest for the simple life, paying particular attention to the religious and spiritual contexts and dimensions of this pursuit. In the first half of the course, our approach will be historical, examining the emphasis on simplicity from Puritan beginnings to Progressive Era reformers. The second half of the course will examine more recent efforts, including those thinkers whose emphasis on simplicity includes religious, environmentalist and anti-consumerist visions of social change. (formerly RELI/AMCV 0274) 3 hrs. lect.

NOR PHL

Spring 2012

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RELI 0400 - Seminar: Study of Religion      

Seminar on the Study of Religion
This seminar for advanced religion majors examines important and influential theories and methods in the study of religion. (Open to junior and senior religion majors or by waiver.) 3 hrs. sem.

Spring 2013

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RELI 0500 - Independent Research      

Independent Research
(Approval Required)

Fall 2010, Fall 2011, Winter 2012, Spring 2012, Fall 2012, Winter 2013, Spring 2013, Winter 2014

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RELI 0601 - Senior Project in Religion      

Senior Project
(Approval Required)

Fall 2010, Fall 2011, Spring 2012

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RELI 0700 - Senior Project in Religion      

Senior Project
(Approval Required)

Fall 2010, Fall 2011, Winter 2012, Spring 2012, Fall 2012, Winter 2013, Spring 2013, Winter 2014

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RELI 0701 - Senior Thesis in Religion      

Senior Research for Honors Candidates
Approval required

Fall 2012, Winter 2013, Spring 2013, Winter 2014

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RELI 1028 / RELI 0395 - Religion and Environ Ethics      

Religion and Environmental Ethics
What is the relationship between religion and ecology? We will examine how religious traditions (Judaism, Christianity, Hinduism, and Buddhism) have characterized the human-nature relationship by studying such themes as: dominion vs. stewardship, restraints on human impact, concepts of interdependence, and ideas of sacred space. Later in the course, we will study contemporary religiously-based environmental activism, examining the possibilities and problems that emerge when religion is mobilized on behalf of the environment. We will read works by Sallie McFague, Mary Evelyn Tucker, Thomas Berry, and Rabbis Arthur Waskow and David Haberman. We will also take a field trip to an "eco-Catholic" monastery in Vermont. (Not open to students who have taken RELI 0395).

PHL WTR

Fall 2011, Winter 2013

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RELI 1072 - Contemp Practice/Social Change      

Contemplative Practice and Social Change
This course is a scholarly endeavor that includes an invitation into experiential education. We will examine the lives of those who have dedicated themselves to various kinds of social change (such as peace work, civil rights, and environmental protection). Many individuals who have taken up the call for social change have also maintained some kind of contemplative practice. We will examine the relationship between contemplative practice and transformational work with attention to such figures as King, Gandhi, Pema Chödron, Thich Nhat Hanh, and Thomas Merton. Students also will be asked to participate regularly in some forms of (non-religious) meditation practice. (Pass/Fail)

PHL WTR

Winter 2011

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