Middlebury

 

Courses

Courses offered in the past four years.
indicates offered in the current term
indicates offered in the upcoming term[s]

RUSS 0101 - Beginning Russian      

Beginning Russian
This course is an approach to the language using four skills (speaking, listening, reading, and writing). It provides a firm control of the sound system and the structure of Russian. Although much emphasis is put on the spoken colloquial language, reading, writing, and a conscious understanding of the fundamentals of grammar prepare a strong foundation for work in advanced courses or for reading in specialized fields. 3 hrs. lect./3 hrs. drill.

LNG

Fall 2010, Fall 2011, Fall 2012, Fall 2013, Fall 2014

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RUSS 0102 - Beginning Russian      

Beginning Russian
This course is a continuation of RUSS 0101. (RUSS 0101 or equivalent)

LNG WTR

Winter 2011, Winter 2012, Winter 2013, Winter 2014

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RUSS 0103 - Beginning Russian      

Beginning Russian
This course is a continuation of the approach used in RUSS 0102, but with increased emphasis on reading. (RUSS 0102) 3 hrs. lect./3 hrs. drill.

LNG

Spring 2011, Spring 2012, Spring 2013, Spring 2014, Spring 2015

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RUSS 0122 - The Russian Mind (in English)      

The Russian Mind (in English)
In this course we will study the dominant themes of Russia's past and their role in shaping the present-day Russian mind. Topics will include: Slavic mythology; Russian Orthodoxy; Russian icons; the concept of autocracy; the legacy of Peter the Great and Catherine the Great; the Golden Age of Russian Literature (Pushkin, Gogol, Tolstoy and Dostoevsky); Russian composers, including the "Mighty Five"; Russian theater and ballet; the origins of Russian radicalism; the Russian Revolution; the legacy of Lenin and Stalin; and Russia from Khrushchev to Putin. 3 hrs. lect.

AAL HIS LIT

Fall 2010, Fall 2011, Spring 2013, Spring 2014, Fall 2014

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RUSS 0151 - Golden Age Russian Literature      

Russian Literature's Golden Age: 1830-1880 (in English)
Duels, ghosts, utopias, murders, prostitution, and adultery- these are the raw materials Russian authors turned into some of the world's greatest literature. This course is an introduction to Russian literature of the 19th century, from the short stories of Pushkin and Gogol to the great novels of Dostoevsky and Tolstoy. The centrality of literature in Russian society and the interrelations among the authors and texts will be discussed. How do the authors combine reality, fantasy, and philosophy to make these works both uniquely Russian and universal? 3 hrs. lect.

EUR LIT

Spring 2011, Spring 2012, Fall 2012, Fall 2013, Spring 2015

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RUSS 0152 - Russian Modernism      

Russian Literature's "Bloody Age": Twentieth-Century Literature and Society (in English)
Writers die for literature in Russia. This course is a survey of Russian literature from before the Revolution to the present. Beginning with Chekhov's stories, we will read supernatural tales, futurist utopias, and harrowing realistic accounts of life in the prison camps of Siberia. Official, émigré, and underground literature will be read to show the complex role of literature in Russian life and politics. 3 hrs. lect.

EUR LIT

Fall 2010

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RUSS 0201 - Intermediate Russian      

Intermediate Russian
Systematic review of grammar and development of the spoken and written skills attained in Beginning Russian. (RUSS 0103 or equivalent) 3 hrs. lect./3 hrs. drill

LNG

Fall 2010, Fall 2011, Fall 2012, Fall 2013, Fall 2014

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RUSS 0202 - Intermediate Russian      

Intermediate Russian
Continuation of the approach used in RUSS 0201. Reading of contemporary Russian texts, conversation, and written assignments in Russian based on reading assignments. (RUSS 0201 or equivalent) 3 hrs. lect./3 hrs. drill

LNG

Spring 2011, Spring 2012, Spring 2013, Spring 2014, Spring 2015

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RUSS 0232 - Nature and Origin of Language      

The Nature and Origin of Language
This course will provide students with the basic principles and tools needed to study and explore languages. Relying on philology and contemporary linguistics, we will examine both the history of human language, along with recent efforts to explain its origin and development. This course will encourage individual effort and learning by incorporating independent readings, research, and weekly written and oral presentations.

Spring 2014

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RUSS 0241 - Russ Ballet &Creation Mod Cult      

Russian Ballet and the Creation of Modern Culture (in English)
An exploration of the phenomenon of Serge Diaghilev's Ballets Russes which, between 1909 and 1929, exerted a pervasive influence over the creation of modern culture in the Western world. We will investigate the methods employed by Diaghilev to bring together innovative choreographers, composers, artists, and writers (Fokine, Nijinsky, Stravinsky, Prokofiev, Satie, Picasso, Cocteau, etc.) to create collaborative works of art that defined modernism, and the historical context within which these works were created. Readings, music, art, film/video and other sources, will shed light on the relationship between modernism and World War I, "Russianness," commercialism, neo-classicism, commedia dell'arte, gender, and the "homosexual aesthetic". No knowledge of ballet or Russian is required. 3 hrs. lect./disc., screening

ART EUR HIS

Fall 2011

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RUSS 0311 - Russian Cult and Civ I      

Russian Culture and Civilization I
This course offers a bilingual approach to the study of Russian culture from its origins to the mid-nineteenth century. Works of literature, art, and music will be examined in their historical context. Particular emphasis will be devoted to the improvement of oral and written skills. (RUSS 0202 or equivalent) (formerly RUSS 0411) 3 hrs. lect

EUR LIT LNG

Fall 2011, Fall 2012, Fall 2013, Fall 2014

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RUSS 0312 - Russ Cult and Civ II      

Russian Culture and Civilization II
This course is a continuation of RUSS 0311 but may be taken independently. It offers a bilingual approach to the study of Russian culture from the second half of the nineteenth century to the present. Works of literature, art, and music will be examined in their historical and political context. Particular attention will be devoted to the improvement of oral and written skills. (RUSS 0202 or equivalent) (formerly RUSS 0412) 3 hrs. lect.

EUR LIT LNG

Spring 2012, Spring 2013, Spring 2014, Spring 2015

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RUSS 0332 - Language, Identity, & Politics      

Language, Identity, Politics in the Post-Soviet Space and the Balkans (in English)
In this course we will investigate the relationship between language, identity, and politics in post-Soviet and Balkan countries and examine the role that language has played in the region’s violent conflicts. We will look at the wars accompanying the dissolution of Yugoslavia and investigate how linguistic issues played into the post-Soviet development of Kazakhstan, Tajikistan, and Estonia. We also will trace the link between language laws and current violence in Ukraine. Drawing on a combination of academic writing and cultural artifacts, we will illuminate issues such as linguistic nationalism, language laws, rights of minority languages, language discrimination, language and religion, alphabet issues, and language and dialect as ethnic identity. No knowledge of Russian required. (LNGT 0102 recommended) 3 hrs lect./disc.

EUR SOC

Fall 2014

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RUSS 0351 - Dostoevsky      

Dostoevsky (in English)
A study of the most important works by literary giant Fyodor Dostoevsky. Readings include: selected early fiction (Poor Folk, The Double, The Gambler); his seminal manifesto Notes from Underground; his first major novel Crime and Punishment; and his masterpiece The Brothers Karamazov.Biographical information, excerpts from the author's notebooks, analysis of comparative translations, and film adaptations will supplement readings. No knowledge of Russian required. Open to first-year students. 3 hrs. lect.

EUR LIT

Spring 2013, Fall 2014

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RUSS 0352 - Tolstoy      

Tolstoy (in English)
In this course we will focus on major works by literary giant Leo Tolstoy. Students will be introduced to his epic range, philosophical depth, and psychological acuteness. Readings encompass early short fiction including selected Sevastopol Tales, Three Deaths, and Family Happiness; in-depth analysis of his masterpiece Anna Karenina; and several late, post-conversion works including The Death of Ivan Ilych, The Kreutzer Sonata, and Master and Man. Excerpts from Tolstoy's memoirs, diaries, and letters. No knowledge of Russian required. 3 hrs. lect.

EUR LIT

Spring 2014

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RUSS 0354 - Chekhov      

Chekhov (in English)
A study of Chekhov's major dramatic output: a survey of the history of Russian theatre before Chekhov; Turgenev's Month in the Country; Chekhov's evolution as a writer; analysis of his four major plays: Seagull, Uncle Vanya, Three Sisters, and Cherry Orchard; Chekhov's European contemporaries and his Russian successors. 3 hrs. lect.

EUR LIT

Fall 2010

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RUSS 0358 - Non-Conformism in Lit & Art      

The Art and Life of Non-Conformism in Twentieth-Century America and Russia (in English)
In this course we will explore the artistic production of Non-Conformists in 20th century Russia and America. Starting with the Russian Futurists, who stood behind the Soviet Revolution, we will consider how literature and art moved into the dissident realm as the new Soviet state increased its pressure to conform. We will read works by Russian dissidents within the Soviet Union and those written by political émigrés. We will compare these works to those by American non-conformists, including the New Orleans Second Line parades, Hobo, Beat Generation, Hippie, Punk, and the Burning Man cultures. 3 hrs. lect.

ART CMP EUR LIT

Spring 2014

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RUSS 0359 - The Art Of Nabokov      

The Art of Vladimir Nabokov (in English)
A study of the "perverse" aesthetics of this Russian-American writer. We will expose the hidden plots under the surface of his fiction, follow and arbitrate the ongoing contest between the author and his fictional heroes, and search for the roots of Nabokov's poetics in Western and Russian literary traditions. An attempt will be made to show the continuity between the Russian and English works of this bilingual and bicultural writer. 3 hrs. lect.

LIT NOR

Spring 2015

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RUSS 0500 - Advanced Independent Study      

Advanced Studies in Language and Literature
Supervised individual study for highly qualified students. (Approval required)

Fall 2010, Winter 2011, Spring 2011, Fall 2011, Winter 2012, Spring 2012, Fall 2012, Winter 2013, Spring 2013, Fall 2013, Winter 2014, Spring 2014, Fall 2014, Spring 2015

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RUSS 0700 - Senior Independent Study      

Senior Independent Study
(Approval required)

Fall 2010, Winter 2011, Spring 2011, Fall 2011, Winter 2012, Spring 2012, Fall 2012, Winter 2013, Spring 2013, Fall 2013, Winter 2014, Spring 2014, Fall 2014, Spring 2015

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RUSS 0704 - Senior Seminar      

Senior Seminar (in Russian)
This seminar topic changes every year. Recent seminar titles have included Research, Recast, Relay, The History of Russian Poetry, and Russian Drama. This course will provide students with the skills to identify and utilize Russian sources, provide professional quality written summaries and analyses, make oral presentations in Russian, and produce a substantial written assignment and project. (Senior Majors) 3 hrs. sem.

Fall 2010, Fall 2011, Fall 2012, Fall 2013, Fall 2014

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RUSS 1002 - Black Russians      

Black Russians
In this course we will examine the history of Blacks in Russia, from the earliest mentions in the writings of Ovid and Pindar through to present day Russia, paying particular attention to the African American experience. We will consider questions such as how did Blacks first arrive in Russia? How were they treated then, throughout Soviet and Russian history, and how are they treated today? With which group, Black or Great White Russian, do Blacks born and raised in Russia identify? We will look closely at the contributions of Black Americans to the Soviet and Russian experience. (This course counts as elective credit towards the Russian major)

CMP EUR HIS

Winter 2013

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