Middlebury

 

Courses

Courses offered in the past four years.
indicates offered in the current term
indicates offered in the upcoming term[s]

PGSE 0101 - Beginning Portuguese I      

This course is a fast-paced introduction to Brazilian Portuguese and contemporary Brazilian culture. It focuses on the development of skills in listening, reading, speaking, and writing within a cultural context. Students are expected to continue with PGSE 0102 in winter term, and PGSE 0103 in spring term, after successful completion of PGSE 0101. 5 hrs. lect./disc.

LNG

Fall 2010, Fall 2011, Fall 2012, Fall 2013, Fall 2014

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PGSE 0102 - Beginning Portuguese II      

Beginning Portuguese
This course is a continuation of PGSE 0101 and a pre-requisite for PGSE 0103. (PGSE 0101)

LNG WTR

Winter 2011, Winter 2012, Winter 2013, Winter 2014

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PGSE 0103 - Beginning Portuguese III      

This course is a continuation of Portuguese 0102. Intensive reading, writing, and speaking. (PGSE 0102) 5 hrs. lect./disc.

LNG

Spring 2011, Spring 2012, Spring 2013, Spring 2014, Spring 2015

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PGSE 0201 - Intermediate Portuguese I      

This is a course designed to consolidate the linguistic skills and expand the cross-cultural knowledge acquired in the PGSE 0101 - PGSE 0103 sequence. A grammar review will accompany critical readings, discussions, and compositions on contemporary Brazilian culture. (PGSE 0103 or equivalent) 3 hrs. lect./disc.

LNG

Fall 2010, Fall 2011, Fall 2012, Fall 2013, Fall 2014

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PGSE 0210 - Beginning Port/RomanceSpeakers      

Beginning Portuguese for Romance-Language Speakers
This course is designed for Romance-language speakers and advanced Romance-language learners at the 0200 or 0300-level, depending on the language. It is an intensive introduction to Portuguese, covering all of the basic structures and vocabulary as well as important aspects of the cultures of Lusophone countries. Language learning is based on the students’ previous knowledge of one or more Romance languages. Students are expected to continue with PGSE 0215, after successful completion of PGSE 0210. (FREN 0205, ITAL 0251, SPAN 0220, or placement at French 0210 or above, Italian 0252 or above, Spanish 0300 or above, or instructor’s approval) 6 hrs. lect./disc.

LNG

Fall 2010, Fall 2011, Fall 2012, Fall 2013, Fall 2014, Spring 2015

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PGSE 0215 - Advanced Portuguese      

Advanced Portuguese
This course is a continuation of either PGSE 0103 or PGSE 0210. It is designed to balance textual and cultural analysis with a thorough review of grammar at an intermediate/high level. Students will hone their critical thinking and linguistic skills through guided readings, oral discussions, and short written assignments on Lusophone cultural topics. (PGSE 0103 or PGSE 0210 or by waiver) 4 hrs. lect./disc.

LNG

Spring 2011, Spring 2012, Spring 2013, Spring 2014, Spring 2015

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PGSE 0353 - Faces of Brazil      

Faces of Brazil
In this course we will study four central elements in contemporary Brazilian culture which have been reshaping the country's "face." We will focus on the legacies of a slave-based social structure by studying the favelas and the MST (Landless Rural Workers' Movement) which led to new formations in both urban and rural landscapes, but also to a perplexing mirror of social violence. We will analyze different narrative texts from directors and authors such as Sérgio Bianchi and Ferréz. Critical texts will be drawn from social activists as well as from theorists, such as philosopher Renato Janine Ribeiro and anthropologist Alba Zaluar. (PGSE 0215 or equivalent) 3 hrs. lect./disc.

AAL LIT SOC

Fall 2013

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PGSE 0356 - Murdered Women: Port & Brazil      

Murdered Women: Politics and Literary Representation in Portugal and Brazil
In this course we will study the tragic history of three women ordered to be executed by political chiefs for political reasons. The course's aim is twofold: to analyze, in their historical frameworks, the political ideologies used to justify the women's murders, and to examine through textual analysis how these events are represented in fictional and non-fictional literature. The women are Inês de Castro (1320-1355), the lover of the Portuguese Prince Pedro; Olga Benario (1908-1942), the Jewish-German wife of the Brazilian communist leader Luís Carlos Prestes; and Elza Fernandes (1918-1934), the girlfriend of a high member of the communist party in Brazil. Inês was killed because her imminent marriage to Pedro could have rendered Portugal politically unstable. Olga died in a Nazi concentration camp, to which she was sent by Prestes' enemy Getúlio Vargas, then President of Brazil. Elza was accused of political betrayal and eventually murdered by communist party members, with the support of Luís Carlos Prestes. Readings will include poetry, a biography, and a historical novel. (PGSE 0215 or equivalent) 3hrs. lect./disc.

AAL LIT LNG

Fall 2011

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PGSE 0358 - Poetry and Fernando Pessoa      

Principles of Poetry and the Works of Fernando Pessoa
In the first part of this course we will study general aspects of poetry. Some questions that will guide us are: "What is poetry?", "What has been its role in society since ancient times?", "How does one read a poem?", "How does one establish the value of a poem?". In considering these questions, we will analyze poetic pieces from Lusophone poets such as Camões, Drummond, and José Craveirinha. In the second part we will focus on the Portuguese poet Fernando Pessoa (1888-1935), his works, and his "case”-which refers to the literary phenomenon called heteronym, which, roughly speaking, means the fragmentation of the "author" into other "authors". (PGSE 0215 or equivalent) 3 hrs lect./disc.

EUR LIT LNG

Fall 2010

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PGSE 0375 - Colonial Discourse/Lusophone      

Colonial Discourse and the “Lusophone World”
In this course we will analyze how European colonialism and imperial endeavors produced meaning, particularly in the interconnected realms of culture, race, language, gender, sexuality, and place. In addition to studying the colonial period, we will pay particular attention to the role and manifestations of colonial discourse more contemporarily in the contexts of nationhood, globalization, sports, and cultural consumption. In doing so, we will address the problematics of the concept of “Lusophone,” starting with the historical legacies and cultural implications of such a transnational entity. Course materials will include critical theory, literary texts, primary historical sources, visual media, and music from Brazil, Lusophone Africa, Lusophone Asia, and Portugal. (PGSE 0215 or equivalent) 3 hrs. lect./disc.

AAL CMP LNG SOC

Spring 2015

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PGSE 0405 - Narratives from the Margin      

Narratives from the Margins: Occupying Minds
In this course we will investigate the narratives that marginal voices create in order to symbolically occupy a "space" in society. Taking, as our starting point, the concept of ocupação developed by the MST (Movimento dos Trabalhadores Rurais Sem Terra), we will focus on marginal groups composing of Brazilian society, such as landless workers, inmates, or favelado. We will also analyze literary and filmic texts that express dissident viewpoints in the 20th century as well as the contemporary scene. In conjunction with these texts, we will discuss an array of online articles that deal with analyzed authors and/or issues that serve as context and counterpoint to these narratives. Texts analyzed will include Tetê Moraes's and Paulo Sacramento's documentaries, MST's poetry and songs, inmates' literature, or Carolina Maria de Jesus's narratives. (PGSE 0320 or equivalent) 3 hrs. lect./disc.

AAL LIT LNG

Fall 2010, Spring 2014

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PGSE 0429 - Brazilian Popular Music      

Listening to Brazilian Popular Music
In this course we will study the roots, development, and contemporary trends in Brazilian popular music from both a historical and a cultural/literary perspective. We will focus on musical traditions as diverse as samba, bossa nova, and Brazilian rap, as well as on literary texts that, since the late 19th century, question the very notion of popular music in Brazil. Singers and composers analyzed will include Carmen Miranda, Tom Jobim, and MV Bill. Writers such as Machado de Assis and Lima Barreto will provide us with a literary counterpart to thinking about Brazilian popular music. Proficiency in Portuguese or Spanish recommended.

AAL HIS LIT

Spring 2011

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PGSE 0436 - Madness in Brazilian Culture      

Madness in Brazilian Culture
In this course we will examine the extent to which madness may constitute a counter-hegemonic discourse in Brazilian culture. If, as objects made by asylum patient Arthur Bispo do Rosário seem to suggest, language is breaking up, how can we understand it? To answer this question, we will initially focus on the pioneer work of psychiatrist Nise da Silveira and then venture into the interconnections between madness and trauma as well as madness and waste. One cannot apparently speak what must be said; and in the second, the physical world (bodies and objects) is on the limits of rejection. Works studied in this course may include Foucault’s seminal text on madness, selections from Gramsci’s prison notebooks, a novel by Conceição Evaristo, and a film by Marcos Prado, among others. (PGSE 0353 or equivalent) 3hrs. lect./disc.

AAL LIT SOC

Fall 2014

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PGSE 0500 - Independent Study      

Independent Study
(Approval Required)

Fall 2010, Winter 2011, Spring 2011, Fall 2011, Winter 2012, Spring 2012, Fall 2012, Winter 2013, Spring 2013, Fall 2013, Winter 2014, Spring 2014, Fall 2014, Spring 2015

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SPAN 0101 - Beginning Spanish I      

Beginning Spanish I
This course is an introduction to the fundamentals of grammar and focuses on the development of four skills in Spanish: comprehension, speaking, reading, and writing. Emphasis will be placed on active communication aimed at the development of oral and comprehension skills. This course is for students who have not previously studied Spanish. Students are expected to continue with SPAN 0102 and SPAN 0103 after successful completion of SPAN 0101. 5 hrs. lect./disc.

Fall 2010, Fall 2011, Fall 2012, Fall 2013, Fall 2014

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SPAN 0102 - Beginning Spanish II      

Beginning Spanish II
This course is a continuation of SPAN 0101. (SPAN 0101)

WTR

Winter 2011, Winter 2012, Winter 2013, Winter 2014

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SPAN 0103 - Beginning Spanish III      

Beginning Spanish III
This course is a continuation of SPAN 0102. Intensive reading, writing, and oral activities will advance students' proficiency in Spanish in an academic setting. (SPAN 0102) 5 hrs. lect./disc.

Spring 2011, Spring 2012, Spring 2013, Spring 2014, Spring 2015

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SPAN 0105 - Accelerated Basic Spanish      

Accelerated Basic Spanish
This accelerated course is designed to reinforce, in one semester, the basic linguistic structures that students need in order to reach the intermediate level of proficiency in Spanish. Strong emphasis will be given to reading and composition. SPAN 0105 is designed specifically for students with 2-3 years of high school Spanish, but who have not yet achieved intermediate proficiency. (Placement test required) 5 hrs. lect./disc.

Fall 2010, Spring 2011, Fall 2011, Spring 2012, Fall 2012, Spring 2013, Fall 2013, Spring 2014

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SPAN 0201 - Intermediate Spanish      

Intermediate Spanish
This accelerated course is designed to review, reinforce, and consolidate the linguistic structures that students need in order to reach the intermediate level of proficiency in Spanish. A grammar review will accompany intensive language acquisition, vocabulary expansion, readings, discussions, and compositions. (Placement test required) 3 hrs. lect., 1 hr. drill.

LNG

Fall 2014, Spring 2015

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SPAN 0210 - Intermediate Spanish I      

Intermediate Spanish I
A course designed to consolidate the skills attained in SPAN 0101, SPAN 0102, and 0103 or the equivalent (0105). A grammar review will accompany an intensive component of readings, discussions, and compositions. (SPAN 0103, SPAN 0105, or placement) 3 hrs. lect./disc.

LNG

Fall 2010, Spring 2011, Fall 2011, Spring 2012, Fall 2012, Spring 2013, Fall 2013, Spring 2014

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SPAN 0215 - Accelerated Intermed Spanish      

Accelerated Intermediate Spanish
This course offers an accelerated review of intermediate Spanish, with a strong focus on correct expression, cultural awareness, and analytical reading and writing. It is designed for students who wish to cover the equivalent of the second year of Spanish in one semester and continue at the 0300-level in the spring. (SPAN 0103 or by approval) 6 hrs. lect./disc.

LNG

Fall 2011

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SPAN 0220 - Intermediate Spanish II      

Intermediate Spanish II
A course for students seeking to perfect their academic writing skills in Spanish. The course is also an introduction to literary analysis and critical writing and will include reading and oral discussion of literary texts. The course will also include a thorough review of grammar at a fairly advanced level. This course may be used to fulfill the foreign languages distribution requirement. (SPAN 0210 or placement) 3 hrs. lect./disc.

LNG

Fall 2010, Spring 2011, Fall 2011, Spring 2012, Fall 2012, Spring 2013, Fall 2013, Spring 2014, Fall 2014, Spring 2015

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SPAN 0300 - Intro to Hispanic Literature      

An Introduction to the Study of Hispanic Literature
This course in literature and advanced language is designed to introduce students to literary analysis and critical writing. The work will be based on the reading of a number of works in prose, drama, and poetry. Frequent short, critical essays will complement readings and provide students with practice in writing. This course is required for Spanish majors. (SPAN 0220 or placement) 3 hrs. lect./disc.

AAL LIT LNG

Fall 2010, Spring 2011, Fall 2011, Spring 2012, Fall 2012, Spring 2013, Fall 2013, Spring 2014, Fall 2014, Spring 2015

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SPAN 0301 - Advanced Spanish Grammar      

Advanced Spanish Grammar
This course offers a detailed study of complex aspects of Spanish grammar and syntax. Designed to build upon students' existing knowledge of Spanish grammar, the course will begin with a reconsideration of all the tenses in both the indicative and subjunctive moods, their values and their uses. After briefly reviewing the structure of simple sentences, we will analyze in depth all the different types of dependent clauses. Within the context of sentence structure, we will also look at several key aspects of Spanish grammar (ser and estar, prepositions, the infinitive, and the gerund, among others). Students will demonstrate their understanding of the material through a variety of practical and creative exercises. (SPAN 0220 or placement; not open to students who have taken SPAN 0380).

LNG

Fall 2013, Fall 2014

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SPAN 0302 - Creative NonFiction in Spanish      

Creative Non-Fiction in Spanish
This course will introduce students to creative non-fiction in the Spanish language. We will explore the techniques and literary skills necessary for researching and writing memoirs and personal essays, and students will produce at least three polished essays. Readings will include Spanish and Latin American masters and theorists of the genre will include Borges, Cortázar, Castellanos, Larra, Hostos, Paz, and Poniatowska. 3 hrs. lect. (At least one course at the 0300 level or by waiver)

AAL ART CW LIT LNG

Spring 2015

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SPAN 0303 - Intro Span Phonetics/Pronunc.      

Introduction to Spanish Phonetics and Pronunciation
In this course we will study the sound system of Spanish with the aims of introducing the fields of phonetics and phonology while improving pronunciation. Students will become familiar with phonetic transcription, comparing and contrasting articulatory and acoustic characteristics of Spanish as well as English in order to understand and implement different phonological patterns produced by native speakers of Spanish. Additionally, we will discuss major pronunciation differences across the Spanish-speaking world. (SPAN 0220 or placement) 3 hrs. lect./disc.

LNG

Fall 2012, Spring 2014, Fall 2014

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SPAN 0304 - Ideas and Cultures of Spain      

Ideas and Cultures of Spain
In this course we will analyze the major sociopolitical and cultural elements in representative Spanish texts from the Middle Ages to the present. We will discuss literary, historical, and political texts, works of art, and films that illustrate cultural elements that bear upon the formation of present day Spanish culture and civilization. (SPAN 0220 or placement) 3 hrs. lect./disc.

EUR LNG

Fall 2010, Fall 2011, Spring 2013, Spring 2014, Fall 2014

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SPAN 0305 - Ideas & Cultures of SP America      

Ideas and Cultures of Spanish America
An analysis of major sociopolitical and cultural elements present in representative Spanish American texts, from the pre-Columbian period of the conquest to the present time. Works to be discussed will illustrate cultural elements that bear upon the formation of present day Spanish American civilizations. (SPAN 0220 or equivalent) fall: 4 hrs. lect./disc.; spring: 3 hrs. lect./disc.

AAL LNG

Fall 2010, Spring 2011, Fall 2011

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SPAN 0308 - Spain and Spanish America      

Today's Issues in Spain and Spanish America
In this course we will survey current issues in Spain and Spanish America. Based mainly on readings from Latin American and Spanish publications, we will examine the recent history of Spanish speaking countries, within the context of cultural, social, political, and economic changes. Specific case studies will include government policies pertaining to sustainable development; the impact of poverty, land distribution, and growing megatropolis; trade agreements (Mercosur, FTAA, NAFTA, EU); the role of Indian movements; immigration; the debates surrounding use, and control of natural resources; regional vs. global integration; and the Region's perception of United States' international policy. This is a discussion based course that will use multiple information sources. (SPAN 0220 or equivalent) 3 hrs. lect./disc.

AAL LNG SOC

Spring 2013

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SPAN 0309 - Representing Hispanic Theatre      

From Page to Stage: Representing Hispanic Theatre
In this course we will both study and perform a selected play from Spain or Latin America. The first half of the course will be dedicated to an in-depth analysis of the selected play. We will complement our study with readings on semiotics and performance studies, other works by the author, other plays, and texts on relevant socio-historical and political topics. The second half of the semester will be dedicated to preparing a full production of the play to be presented at the end of the semester. Students will be involved as actors as well as in all aspects of production and decision-making, requiring about three hours of rehearsal time per week outside of class. Through performance students will find deeper meaning in the literary text. (At least two courses at the 0300-level or above or by waiver; this course is also being offered as SPAN 0399) 3 hrs. lect./disc/rehearsal

ART EUR LIT LNG

Spring 2014

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SPAN 0310 - Otherness in Hispanic Lit.      

(Intimate) Otherness in Contemporary Hispanic Fiction*
Recent Hispanic literature locates otherness in ambiguous spaces. The "other" can be excluded in order to demarcate selfhood, but also recognized as internal ("intimate") to a complex and perhaps richer self. In this course students will sharpen oral and written communication skills and build a sophisticated vocabulary to analyze the literary and cultural context of the Spanish speaking world. This goal will be accomplished through readings in late 20th/early 21st century short stories and novellas from the Iberian Peninsula and Spanish America. Race, gender, class, nationality, and health are some perspectives we will adopt in order to map the literary production/deconstruction of "others" as marginalized/embraced subjects. (SPAN 0220 or placement) 3 hrs. lect./disc.

CMP LIT LNG

Fall 2013, Spring 2015

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SPAN 0311 - Hispanic Theater      

Hispanic Theatre
In this course we will explore a broad selection of dramas from Spain and Spanish America. We will focus on close readings of plays, considering, where relevant, their historical and cultural contexts. Emphasis will also be placed on the development of critical vocabulary and writing skills in Spanish. Texts will be selected from various periods from the Middle Ages to present day. Authors include: Cervantes, Lope de Vega, Calderón, sor Juana Inés de la Cruz, Tirso de Molina, Alarcón, Castellanos, Gambaro, García Lorca, Mihura, Díaz, Solórsano. Satisfies the College writing requirement. (SPAN 0220 or placement) 3 hrs. lect./disc.

AAL LIT LNG

Spring 2012, Fall 2013

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SPAN 0313 - Hispanic Short Story      

The Hispanic Short Story
In this course we will study the main literary, sociopolitical, and cultural issues in a selection of short stories from the Hispanic world. Emphasis will be on the close reading of texts with the purpose of developing critical vocabulary and writing skills. Authors may include: Pardo Bazán, Valle Inclán, Palma, Borges, Rulfo, Corázar, Quiroga, Matute. (SPAN 0220 or placement) 3 hrs. lect./disc.

AAL LIT LNG

Spring 2011, Spring 2012, Fall 2013, Spring 2014, Fall 2014

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SPAN 0315 - Hispanic Film      

This course will provide an introduction to the cinema of Spain and Spanish America. We will study, among other topics: the idiosyncrasies of film language in Hispanic cultures, the relationships between text and image, representation of history, culture and society. Films from Mexico, Cuba, Argentina, Spain, and other countries will be included in the course. Selected readings on film theory and social and political history, as well as various literary works. In Spanish (SPAN 0220 or placement) 3 hrs. lect./disc.

AAL LIT LNG

Spring 2011, Spring 2012, Fall 2012, Spring 2014

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SPAN 0317 - Spanish Pronunciation      

Spanish Pronunciation: How to Sound Like a Native Speaker
Why do language learners have a “foreign” accent? Why do native Spanish speakers roll their r’s so effortlessly? In this course we will explore basic concepts in phonetics and phonology in order to demystify the difficulties that second language learners face while learning Spanish pronunciation. By comparing and contrasting the sound systems of Spanish and English, as well as how their sounds are produced and perceived, students will acquire the theoretical and practical tools to make your Spanish pronunciation more native-like. (SPAN 0220 or equivalent)

LNG WTR

Winter 2013

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SPAN 0318 - Narrative Spanish-Amer Women      

Narratives of Spanish American Women Writers: Representations of the Self
In this course we will read selected texts by contemporary Spanish American women writers. The aim of the course is to explore the diverse writing strategies women use to represent themselves in their particular socio-cultural contexts. In the analysis of these texts, we will focus on the feminine characters of these narratives. We will also consider whether these characters might be representations of the authors. We will read texts by Elena Poniatowska, Rosario Ferré, Luisa Valenzuela, Cristina Peri Rossi, and others. This course is organized around a series of close readings and class discussions of short stories and theoretical texts. (SPAN 0220 or equivalent). 3 hrs. lect./disc.

AAL LIT LNG

Fall 2010

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SPAN 0320 - Hispanic Creative Writing      

Hispanic Creative Writing
In this course we will focus on creative writing as a way to develop a deeper understanding of the Spanish language. We will achieve this goal by using the language and our imagination to tell stories. This course will also provide the opportunity to read and discuss literary works of important Hispano-American authors including Onneti, Borges, Rulfo, Cortázar, and Méndez. We will also read theoretical texts by Francisco Guzmán Burgos, Pablo Fernández, Alex Grijelmo, Ricardo Piglia, Jorge Luis Borges, among others. (SPAN 0220 or placement). 3 hrs. lect./disc.

ART LNG

Fall 2011, Spring 2013, Spring 2014, Spring 2015

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SPAN 0322 - Hispanic Linguistics      

Introduction to Hispanic Linguistics
This course is an introduction to the theory and methodology of linguistics as applied to the study of Spanish. The goals of the course are to understand the basic characteristics of human language (and of Spanish in particular), and to learn the techniques used to describe and explain linguistic phenomena. In this course, we will study the sound system (phonetics/phonology), the structure of words (morphology), the construction of sentences (syntax), the history of the Spanish language, and variation. We will examine texts, speech samples, and songs that illustrate the linguistic phenomena. (SPAN 0220 or placement) 3 hrs. lect./disc.

EUR LNG

Spring 2013, Spring 2015

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SPAN 0324 - Images of America      

Images of America
In this course we will explore how America has been imagined by travelers, writers, photographers, and filmmakers from the 15th to the 21st century. We will study how Latin America was envisioned as a continent; how its internal regional differences have been depicted; and how it was pictured in comparison with its neighbor, North America. We will read Guamán Poma, Bolivar, Martí, Mario de Andrade, and Neruda and will consider the artistic production of Martin Chambi and Nelson Pereira Dos Santos, among others. Edmundo O'Gorman's conceptualization of the "invention of America" will inform our theoretical approach to the topic. lect./disc. (SPAN 0220 or equivalent)

AAL LIT LNG

Spring 2011, Fall 2012

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SPAN 0325 - Childhood Through Culture      

Childhood Through Culture
In this course we will analyze childhood as a social construction: a time of psychological development, a stage when myths trigger certain imaginary beliefs, and a phase when children learn lessons about human nature. We will read theoretical and literary texts about childhood and its development, and we will reflect on how human beings are created through mythological, literary, scientific, and pedagogic productions of our culture. We will read theoretical works by Agnes Heller, Boris Cyrulnik, Steven Pinker, Lloyd deMause, Bruno Bettelheim, and fictional works by Ulises Carrión, Marta Traba, Juan Carlos Botero, Juan José Millás, Juan Rulfo, Julio Cortázar, Juan Tovar, Elvira Navarro, Horacio Quiroga. (SPAN 0220 or placement exam at 0300 level).

LNG

Spring 2012

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SPAN 0326 - Queer Latin Amer. Lit Cinema      

Queer Latin American Literature and Cinema
While there is no equivalent word for queer in the Spanish language, queerness is a theoretical framework that informs Latin American Studies on gender and sexuality. In this course we will begin with an exploration of how Latin American and Caribbean intellectuals have thought about queer art and cultural productions from a diversity of concepts: "leche negra," "loca geografía," and "nación marica," among others. Through encounters with a selection of literature and cinema we will think aesthetically and contextually about the specificities of queerness in Latin America. We will read literary texts by Alejandra Pizarnik, Cristina Peri Rossi, José Joaquín Blanco, Reinaldo Arenas, Manuel Ramos Otero, Lilliana Ramos Collado, Severo Sarduy, Néstor Perlongher, and Pedro Lemebel. We will also watch movies such as El lugar sin límites, Plata quemada, Y tu mamá también, Fresa y chocolate, and Antes que anochezca. (SPAN 0220 or equivalent)

AAL LIT LNG

Fall 2013

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SPAN 0327 - Gender & Nat Identities Lat Am      

Gender and National Identities in Latin America
What did it mean to be a man in Mexico in the ‘40s, a Chicana woman in the ‘70s, a homosexual in Cuba in the ‘90s, or a Puerto Rican mermaid at the turn of the new millennium? By studying these four specific gender constructions of the 20th century in Latin America we will explore the diversity and complexity that lies beneath the label latino. This will be a multidisciplinary course where students will analyze films, other visual arts, music, and literature by Mayra Santos-Febres, Reinaldo Arenas, and Senel Paz. Readings will also include theoretical texts by Judith Butler, Susan Bordo, and Marjorie Garber. (SPAN 0220 or equivalent) 3 hrs. lect./disc.

AAL ART LIT LNG

Spring 2011

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SPAN 0328 - Spain in the Globalized World      

Spain in the Globalized World
In this course we will look at the historical, cultural, and social development of 21st century Spain and its full integration into the Globalized World. One of the main goals of the course will be to provide an array of opportunities to practice oral expression, reading, and writing in the Spanish language. Topics will include Europeanization, the challenge of regional/national identities, and contemporary social issues such as the changing roles of: the family, women, religion, sexual attitudes, and immigration. We will engage these themes through the analysis and discussion of a wide variety of materials such as literary texts, essays, and films. Readings and films will include: Crematorio by Rafael Chirbes, La ciudadanía se moviliza: Los movientos sociales y la globalización en España by Joseph Pont Vidal, and También la lluvia by Icíar Bollaín. (SPAN 0220 or placement)

EUR LNG

Fall 2013

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SPAN 0335 - Modernity in Lat Am Poetry      

Modernity and its Discontents in Latin American Poetry
In this course we will read selected texts by modern Latin American poets from different times and regions. The aim of the course is to understand the tensions and paradoxes inherent to socioeconomic modernization as expressed in the aesthetics of José Martí, Rubén Darío, César Vallejo, Vicente Huidobro, among others. This course is organized around a series of close readings of poems, manifestoes, and essays. The student is expected to become familiar with linguistic and literary terminology and to apply these concepts in the readings of poems. There will be individual in-class oral presentations of poems, as well as outside-class assignments and cultural activities. This course counts as a prerequisite for SPAN 0350 courses and above. (SPAN 0220 or equivalent). 3 hrs. lect./disc.

AAL LIT LNG SOC

Fall 2010, Winter 2012

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SPAN 0340 - Spanish Identities      

Representations of Social, Cultural, and Political Identities in Spain
In this course we will study the different representations of Spanish culture and politics. We will emphasize specific aspects that make Spain richly varied: Spain´s breathtaking reinvention and reaffirmation of its own identity after the Disaster of 1898, religious customs and conflicts, gender relations, political values of Spaniards. At the same time, the cultural impact of Don Quixote, Goya, Lorca, republicanism and dictatorship, civil war, flamenco, bullfighting, and soccer. Works to be discussed include a short selection of literary pieces, cultural, visual, musical, and film representations. This course is recommended for students planning to study in Spain. (SPAN 0220 or placement) 3 hrs. lect. disc.

EUR LNG

Fall 2010, Spring 2015

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SPAN 0350 - Los raros: Alternative Fiction      

Los raros: Alternative Hispanic Fiction
In this course we will analyze fiction by authors often described as “raros” (“strange”). “Los raros” is a category coined by poet Rubén Darío and later adopted by critic Angel Rama and others to designate a “secret society” of peripheral and imaginative writers who have spawned unclassifiable, experimental, sometimes dreamlike, always revolutionary texts. We will delve into the narrative worlds of “raros” (Bellatin, Hernández, Levrero, Somers, Vila-Matas, etc.) and articulate the threat that “rareza” poses to dominant notions of identity, normality, sanity, and coherence. (Two Spanish courses at the 0300-level or above, or waiver) 3 hrs. lect./disc.

AAL LIT LNG

Fall 2014

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SPAN 0351 - Science & Latin Am Lit      

Science and Latin American Literature
In 1959, British novelist and scientist C.P. Snow argued that the breakdown in communication between the sciences and the humanities was a major obstacle to solving the world's problems. In this course we will explore the intersections of Snow's “two cultures,” science and literature, in Latin American narrative. We will examine how works of literature are informed by scientific thinking, how they reflect attitudes toward science and technology, and how the discourse of science functions within their discursive fields. By looking at narratives that engage evolutionary theory, mathematics, chaos theory, quantum physics, medicine, and cybertext, this course will explore the relations of culture, literature, the sciences, and technology in Latin America. Readings will include works by Sigüenza y Góngora, Borges, Cortázar, Bioy Casares, García Márquez, Giardinelli, Paz Soldán, and Iparraguirre. This course satisfies the IS advanced language requirement in Spanish. (At least two Spanish courses at the 0300 level or above, or by waiver) 3 hrs. lect./disc.

AAL LIT

Spring 2011

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SPAN 0352 - Spanish Literary Realism      

Spanish Literary Realism
Literary Realism, a trend in the second half of 19th century Spain, depicts contemporary life and society as it is instead of a romanticized or stylized presentation. In this course we will read the most significant writers for the study of Spanish Realism: Valera, Pereda, Pardo Bazán, Clarín, and Galdós. Students will be required to work with theory and criticism. Satisfies the IS advanced language requirement in Spanish. (At least two Spanish courses at the 0300 level or above, or by waiver) 3 hrs. lect./disc.

EUR LIT

Spring 2011, Fall 2011

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SPAN 0359 - Captains, Kings, and Caudillos      

Captains, Kings, and Caudillos
The figure of the “strong leader” in the history of both Spain and Latin America had, and still has, a correspondingly strong presence in the literature of those regions. From the Middle Ages to today, the “strong man,” and the occasional “strong woman,” have attracted the attention of writers of poetry, theater, fiction, and the essay. We will study a representative sample of works that feature this figure and will consider their historical and political background. Readings will include the anonymous Poem of the Cid, and works by Lope de Vega, Sarmiento, Azuela, and Vargas Llosa (Not open to students who have taken FYSE 1256).

AAL LIT

Fall 2010

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SPAN 0361 - Hispanic Musical Films      

Hispanic Musical Films
In this course we will study Hispanic musical films (including fiction and documentaries) from Spain, Latin America, and the United States. Our main goal will be to understand how Hispanic countries use this cinematic genre to establish nationalist constructions and ideologies, and how this has consequently affected the development of Hispanic musical narratives in the United States. Analyses will focus on how different ethnic aspects are defined as 'Other' in musical genres such as Flamenco, Tango, Rancheras, Tex-Mex, Salsa, Reggaeton, Merengue, and Spanish Rock. We will explore why Hispanic musicals are perceived as exotic in relation to their Anglophone counterparts while studying films such as Buena Vista Social Club, Allá en el rancho grande, Selena, and El día que me quieras. (At least two Spanish courses at the 0300 level or above, or by waiver) 3 hrs. lect./screening

AAL LIT

Spring 2012, Fall 2013, Spring 2015

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SPAN 0366 - Lat Am Vision/Space/Modernity      

On Alephs and Moebius Strips: Vision and Space in Latin American Modernity
Taking as our cue Jorge Luis Borges' short story "The Aleph" and its cinematic interpretation in the cult film Moebius, we will explore how the defining features of modern experience, simultaneity and speed, influence the way spaces are represented in Latin American cultural artifacts. We will analyze short stories by Abraham Valdelomar, Oscar Cerruto, Julio Cortázar, and Borges; a novel by César Aira; essays by Ezequiel Martínez Estrada; paintings by Rugendas and Xul Solar; and a selection of cartographic material. Our reading of the primary material will be informed by theories developed by Beatriz Sarlo and Marc Augé. (At least two courses at the 0300-level or above or by waiver) 3 hrs. lect./disc.

AAL LIT LNG

Spring 2013

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SPAN 0371 - Don Quixote/Visual Culture      

Don Quixote/ and Its Representation in Visual Culture*
In this course we will read Cervantes’ masterpiece, Don Quixote. Special attention will be given to the historical, philosophical, and cultural context of the period. Emphasis will be placed on specific topics such as religion, governance, intercultural relationships, madness, parody, authorship, and love. We will also study the novel’s representation and adaption in a selection of illustrations, graphic novels, animated films, comics, children’s books, and music. Representation in contemporary global cinema, television, and advertising will also be examined. Students will study different adaptations from Europe, Latin America, Asia, and the United States. (At least two courses at the 0300-level or above or by waiver). 3 hrs. lect../screening.

CMP EUR LIT LNG

Fall 2014

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SPAN 0372 - Writing Memory In Spanish Lit      

Writing Memory in Contemporary Spanish Literature
In this course we will explore the politics of memory in Spain during the Transition to democracy. There are numerous reasons why the Transition to democracy in Spain depended on the erasure of memory and the invention of a new political tradition. But, the question is: What are the Spanish people supposed to do with their memory? This is where the role of the Spanish artist becomes so important: we see that memory has been an object of reflection for an extremely large number of film directors and fiction writers, who have shown that the return of the repressed is inevitable. Works may include fiction by Almudena Grandes, Loriga, Gopegui, Dulce Chacón, Saura, Ericé, etc. We will also read theoretical texts by Pierre Nora, Natalie Zemon, Chandra Talpade, Raymond Williams, among others (At least two courses at the 0300-level or above or by waiver) 3 hrs. lect./disc.

EUR LIT SOC

Fall 2012

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SPAN 0373 - Painting And Poetry      

Painting and Poetry in the Spanish Golden Age
In this course we will explore the relationship between painting and poetry during the Spanish Renaissance and Baroque by focusing on relevant themes of the time: the revival of interest in figures from pagan mythology (e.g. Europa, Venus, Vulcan, Laocoön); the Council of Trent and its influence on Christian painting and literature; the representation of women according to the period norms of beauty; and melancholy as sickness. Paintings of El Greco, Zurbarán, Velázquez, among others, will be analyzed in conjunction with their counterparts in literary texts by Theresa of Avila, Garcilaso de la Vega, Lope de Vega, Francisco de Quevedo, and Sor Juana Inés de la Cruz. Satisfies the IS advanced language requirement in Spanish. (At least two Spanish courses at the 0300 level or above, or by waiver) 3 hrs. lect./disc.

ART EUR LIT

Fall 2010

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SPAN 0376 - US Latino Narrative      

Reading and Writing the New U.S. Latino Narrative
This course focuses on a new generation of U.S.-Latino authors writing about migration, identity, and otherness. They distinguish themselves from prior generations by publishing primarily in Spanish and by a new sense of ownership of their U.S. environment, which allows them to play with and undermine assumptions commonly associated with their "Latino" identity. In addition to studying these authors, students will produce at least two fiction pieces of their own. Satisfies the IS advanced language requirement in Spanish. (At least two Spanish courses at the 0300 level or above, or by waiver) 3 hrs. lect./disc.

AAL LIT LNG NOR

Fall 2013

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SPAN 0384 - Environment in Span Am Fiction      

Place and the Environment in Spanish American Fiction
This course reconsiders the role of place and the environment in a series of Spanish American novels in which the physical setting plays a significant role. We will explore the different ways in which the natural world has shaped a sense of place-bound identity and how Spanish American identities have been tied to the natural landscape; how the prairies, the jungle, the mountains, the desert, and the water contributed in shaping individuals and a sense of place. Topics include the influence of Romanticism and idealized landscapes, the autochthonous novel and regionalism, reactions to modernization, how human history is implicated in natural history, ecocriticism of the 1990s, and our own experiences of wilderness and wildness. Authors may include Isaacs, Rivera, Quiroga, Carpentier, Vargas Llosa, García Márquez, Sepúlveda, and Ferré. Satisfies the IS advanced language requirement in Spanish. (At least two Spanish courses at the 0300 level or above, or by waiver) 3 hrs. lect./disc.

AAL LIT

Fall 2011

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SPAN 0388 - Gender/Violence-Hispanic World      

Gender and Violence in the Hispanic World
Differences in the way men and women display violent behavior need to be better understood to prevent acts of murder and massive, often irreversible, harm. In this course we will try to find answers to: What are the origins and explanations of violence in all its forms? How are gendered identities produced and reproduced in society? How is gender implicated in violence? How can the new politics of masculinity inform our discussion of the connection between gender and violence? Discussion and analysis of a variety of materials from different disciplines will form the basis of our exploration, which will focus mainly on the representation of violence in Hispanic culture. Readings will include literary texts by Dolores Redondo, Sergio Álvarez, Élmer Mendoza, and theoretical texts by Suzanne E. Hatt and Elizabeth Wood. (At least two courses at the 0300-level or above or by waiver) 3 hrs. lect./disc.

AAL LIT LNG

Spring 2014

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SPAN 0390 - Linguistic Variation      

Linguistic Variation
In this course we will study linguistic variation in the Spanish-speaking world. The focus will be on the linguistic aspects of the varieties of Spanish spoken in Spain, Latin America, Asia, and the United States. Topics will include lexical variation, phonological variation, morphosyntactic variation, and geographic and social factors in linguistic variation. Special attention will be paid to Spanish in contact with other languages, e.g. with indigenous languages in Latin America, and with Basque and Catalan in Spain. The discussion will also include creole languages (e.g. Papiamentu). We will study texts, speech samples, and songs that illustrate specific cases of variation. (At least two Spanish courses at the 0300 level or above, or by waiver) 3 hrs. lect./disc.

CMP

Spring 2012, Fall 2014

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SPAN 0391 - Lat Am Cultural Studies      

Latin American Cultural Studies: Texts and Concepts
In this course we will apply Cultural Studies methodology in various cultural contexts, focusing on Latin America. Among the concepts studied will be those of nation, hegemony, postcolonialism, subalternism, performance, heterogeneity, hybridity, aesthetics, race/ethnicity, and gender. Each concept will be used in an analysis of a literary, cinematic, performative, and other artistic work. We will be analyzing, among others, the literary works of Faustino Sarmiento, José Martí, Pedro Lemebel, Manuel Puig, and José María Arguedas; the cinema of Jorge Bodansky and Barbet Schroeder; as well as testimonial literature and various other forms of popular culture. (At least two courses at the 0300-level or above or by waiver) 3 hrs. lect./ disc.

AAL ART

Fall 2011, Fall 2012

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SPAN 0392 - Span Identity/Generation '98      

Spanish National Identity at the End of the Empire: Literature and Music of the Generation of '98
National identities reflect the conflicts and contradictions in the social and political arenas in which they are constructed and conceptualized. What is the role of literature and music in the building of Spanish National Identity? In this course we will study the social and political circumstances in Spain from the end of the 19th Century to the Civil War (1936-39). We will focus on literary texts of the writers of the Generation of '98 as well as on musical traditions as diverse as the "zarzuela," and the "pasodoble," that contributed to change the notion of National Identity in Spain. Writers to be analyzed include Angel Ganivet, José Martínez Ruiz "Azorín," Pío Baroja, Ramiro de Maeztu, Antonio Machado, Miguel de Unamuno, and Ramón Maria del Valle Inclán; composers include Manuel de Falla and Isaac Albéniz. (At least two courses at the 0300-level or above or by waiver) 3 hrs. lect./disc.

ART EUR LNG

Spring 2013, Spring 2015

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SPAN 0394 - Contemp Youth Cultures-LatAm      

Contemporary Youth Cultures in Latin America
Music bazaars, DJs, and rave parties, barras de fútbol (soccer fan clubs), and loitering are some of the manifestations associated with young people in Latin American literature, film, music, and journalism. How do these literary, artistic, and media representations of youth enter into dialogue with recent events in which young people have been at the center of efforts to bring about political changes in Latin America? How do those representations compare with the ones produced by young people in political movements such as revolución de los pingüinos in Chile and Yo Soy 132 in Mexico? Examining short fiction, film and documentaries, rock and reggaeton songs, blogs, and other cultural materials (YouTube clips, images, graffiti), we will identify and compare different contemporary youth cultures in Latin America in relation to their productions, representations, and actions in the public sphere. (At least two Spanish courses numbered 0300 or above, or by waiver).

AAL LIT LNG WTR

Winter 2013

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SPAN 0395 - JM Arguedas:Beyond Indigenismo      

José María Arguedas: Beyond Indigenismo
In this course we will study texts by Peruvian writer José María Arguedas in the context of the indigenista literary and political movement, which aimed to rethink social inequalities in the Andes. Arguedas's writing approaches this topic through powerful linguistic, formal, and theoretical innovation. Among the texts to be read are: Oda al Jet (poetry), Señores e indios (ethnography), Diamantes y pedernales (short stories), Yawar fiesta (short novel), Todas las sangres, and El zorro de arriba y el zorro de abajo (novels). (At least two Spanish courses at the 0300-level or above, or by waiver) 3 hrs. lect./disc.

AAL LIT

Spring 2011, Spring 2012

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SPAN 0396 - Voices Across the Atlantic      

Voices Across the Atlantic: Literature of the Spanish (American) Avant-garde
The avant-garde was a cosmopolitan phenomenon that challenged fixed boundaries. The Spanish and Latin American vanguards have common roots, beginning with the European journey of Vicente Huidobro in 1918. This Transatlantic dialogue continued through Jorge Luis Borges, who became an ultraísta in Spain and established the Argentine branch of the movement. In this course we will read prose, poetry, and essays produced on both sides of the Atlantic in the Interwar years (1919-1938). We will emphasize how these works channel—and criticize—a desire for the modern, how they pursue radical experimentation, and how they contest reason to embrace irrationality and fragmentation. (At least two courses at the 0300-level or above or by waiver).

CMP LIT

Spring 2013

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SPAN 0397 - Maoism & Fascism Latin America      

A Struggle of Literature and Politics: Maoism and Fascism in Latin America
Despite the influence that Maoism and fascism exerted—and still exert—in Latin America, comprehensive effort to depict their effects in today’s literary and cultural fields has not been taken. In this course we will analyze how Latin American literature from the mid-20th century to present appropriates and transforms these two extreme political discourses. It does so according to its own agenda: defense, confrontation, complaint, perception of threats, or prophecies in which the nation’s future is always at stake. Works by Pérez Huarancca, Piglia, Reynoso, Salgado, De Andrade, Saenz, and Bolaño will be analyzed in conjunction with readings by Mao, Nietzsche, and Hitler. 3 hrs. sem.

AAL LIT

Spring 2014

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SPAN 0398 - Authoritarian Leaders      

Too Much Power: Authoritarian Leaders in Spanish America
What is it like to live in a society where power is highly concentrated in the hands of one individual? The death of Venezuelan president Hugo Chávez (1954-2013) has stirred debate about political leadership, authoritarianism, populism, and democracy in Latin America. In this course we will study three very different authoritarian figures whose similarities enjoin us to rethink the borders between left and right: Hugo Chávez (in office 1999-2013), Fidel Castro (1961-2011), and Alberto Fujimori (1990-2000). In order to locate their regimes in their social, ideological, and historical contexts, materials will include their speeches and writings, along with novels, political theory, films, documentaries, news articles, pamphlets, and visual art. (At least two Spanish courses at the 0300-level or above, or by waiver)

AAL CMP LNG SOC WTR

Winter 2014

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SPAN 0399 - Representing Hispanic Theatre      

From Page to Stage: Representing Hispanic Theatre
In this course we will both study and perform a selected play from Spain or Latin America. The first half of the course will be dedicated to an in-depth analysis of the selected play. We will complement our study with readings on semiotics and performance studies, other works by the author, other plays, and texts on relevant socio-historical and political topics. The second half of the semester will be dedicated to preparing a full production of the play to be presented at the end of the semester. Students will be involved as actors as well as in all aspects of production and decision-making, requiring about three hours of rehearsal time per week outside of class. Through performance students will find deeper meaning in the literary text. (At least two courses at the 0300-level or above or by waiver) 3 hrs. lect./disc/rehearsal

ART EUR LIT LNG

Spring 2014, Spring 2015

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SPAN 0400 - Hispanic Postnat'l Identities      

Hispanic Postnational Identities
In this seminar we will discuss nationalism and postnationalism as portrayed in Hispanic literature, nonfiction, and film. Nationalism is a strong sense of belonging to a political and/or cultural community that is often compared to religious faith. Despite the centrality of the nation-state since the 18th century, some critics argue that in present times its prevalence has been eroded by local and global affiliations. This semester we will read the theory of nationalism, study the birth and development of the nation in Spain and Hispanic America, and analyze diverse textual and filmic representations of current Hispanic postnational identities. (Senior majors with at least two Spanish courses numbered 0350 or above, or by waiver.) 3 hrs. sem.

CMP LNG

Spring 2014

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SPAN 0402 - Cervantes y Don Quixote      

Cervantes y Don Quijote
A detailed discussion and analysis of the Quijote, with additional readings from major literary and cultural sources. (Senior majors with at least two Spanish courses numbered 0350 or above, or by waiver.) 3 hrs. sem.

EUR LIT

Fall 2011

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SPAN 0403 - What is Baroque      

What is Baroque?
In this seminar we will explore the concept of the Baroque in the literature, arts, and sciences of the 17th and 18th centuries, taking special care to differentiate between aesthetic and historical definitions of the term. We will study representations of the Baroque in Hispanic poetry, drama, painting, architecture, and music. We will also focus on its connections with philosophy, astronomy, mathematics and anatomy. Students will also be encouraged to look for traces of the Baroque in contemporary culture. Other questions to be considered include: What is the difference between Baroque and neo-Baroque? What do we mean when we use the adjective "baroque" to describe a contemporary painting, a film or a video game? Can we talk about a Baroque revival in the 20th or even the 21st century?

ART EUR HIS

Spring 2011

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SPAN 0416 - Who is Afraid of Poetry?      

Who is Afraid of Poetry?
In this course we will read a selection of poetry by contemporary Spanish and Latin American authors (e.g., Lorca, García Montero, Rossetti, as well as Eielson, Paz, Pizarnik). The main goal of the discussions will be the understanding of poetry in conjunction with contemporary critical ideas. We will learn how to criticize poetic texts using the main theoretical currents of our time such as structuralism, post-structuralism, feminism, and cultural studies. (Senior majors with at least two Spanish courses numbered 0350 or above, or by waiver) 3 hrs. lect./disc. sem.

Fall 2013

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SPAN 0420 - Latin American Comic Books      

Latin American Comic Books and Visual Culture
In this course we will explore the development of Latin American serialized comic books and graphic novels, and their rise from pulp entertainment to iconic national narratives. We will examine the cultural aspects that mark these Hispanic comic books as different from those produced within the framework of the U.S. visual industry. However, we will also establish a parallel with the texts' multiple esthetic and cultural influences from the United States, Europe, and Japan. Discussion topics will include controversial race issues such as the import of blackface esthetics into Mexican narratives (e.g. Memín Pinguín), political and relationship humor in serials (e.g. Elpidio Valdés and Condorito), and the variations among the narratives according to their respective countries of origin and ideology. We will pay special attention to the new global culture in which international influences merge into new narratives that defy traditional ideas of Hispanic identity (e.g. Gilbert Hernández' Poison River and Tom Beland's True Story Swear to God). (Senior majors with at least two Spanish courses numbered 0350 or above, or by waiver.) 3hrs. sem.

AAL ART

Fall 2010, Fall 2014

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SPAN 0438 - LatAm Transnational Experience      

The Latin American Transnational Experience
In this course we will focus on contemporary Latin American authors writing in the U.S. about transnational identities, bilingualism, migration, and otherness. These authors distinguish themselves from Latino writers, strictly defined by their language choice and by an ironical, playful emotional distance from both their places of origin and the U.S. environment. Through this they question assumptions commonly associated with a perceived Latino identity. Students will produce fiction, one piece of which will be based on service interactions with Mexican immigrants in Vermont. (Senior majors with at least two Spanish courses numbered 0350 or above, or by waiver.) 3 hrs. sem.

AAL CMP LIT

Fall 2011

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SPAN 0444 - Sex, Violence, and Culture      

Sex, Violence, and Culture
In this course we will critically investigate the historical and contemporary manifestations of sexual violence within their cultural, biological, and individual expressions. We will also examine how gender--as a powerful category that shapes the way we see others and others see us-can be used to create a context for the justification of gender-based violence. Discussion and analysis of a wide variety of materials, including literary texts, essays, films, music, and videos, will form the basis of our exploration of the representation of sexual violence in Hispanic literature. Readings will include literary texts by authors Antonio Muñoz Molina, Roberto Bolaño, and Juan Bonilla, as well as theoretical texts by Fausto-Sterling, Katz, Brownmiller, Jensen, and O'Toole. (Two Spanish courses numbered 0350 or above, or by waiver.) 3 hrs. sem.

EUR LIT LNG

Spring 2013

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SPAN 0450 - National Culture and Space      

National Culture and Space: Art, Narrative, and Travel of Explorations in 19th Century Bolivia and Peru
In this seminar we will study canonical and non-canonical narrative texts from 19th-century Bolivia and Peru from a socio-spatial perspective. Alongside literary texts, we will consider texts by travelers and explorers, pamphlets, maps, pictorial artwork, and photographs that highlight the importance of constructing national spaces as a prerequisite for constructing national cultures in both of these countries during the 19th century. Among other materials, we will read and analyze Nataniel Aguirre's historical novel Juan de la Rosa, extracts from Manuel Atanasio Fuentes'Lima: apuntes históricos, descriptivos, estadísticos y de costumbres, the pictorial artwork of Johann Moritz Rugendas, and relevant theory on the relationship between space and nation. (Senior majors with at least two Spanish courses numbered 0350 or above, or by waiver.)

AAL ART

Fall 2012, Spring 2015

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SPAN 0452 - Marxism in Latin America      

Marxism in Latin America
What is Latin American Marxism? The writings of Karl Marx constitute a foundational discourse, which has given rise to many interpretations. Through readings in political philosophy, history, and study of literature and film, we will explore the trajectories of the Socialist and Communist parties; proposals to imagine a specifically Latin American route to an egalitarian society; and the Liberation Theology movement, which couples Catholic and Marxist thought. Readings will include works by: Marx, Azuela, Eisenstein, Mariátegui, Trotsky, Maroff, Castro, Frei Betto, and García Linera. (Spanish Majors, must take at least two courses of level 0350 or above, or by waiver) 3 hrs. sem.

AAL LIT PHL

Spring 2013

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SPAN 0456 - Madness+Love/19-20 Cent Spain      

Manifestations of Madness, Love and Tragedy in 19th and 20th Century Spain
How did Spanish writers of the 19th and 20th century define and represent madness, a basic and controversial aspect of world culture, and how did these different conceptions of madness intersect with love, religion, politics, and other literary themes in Spanish society? In this course we will explore the theme of madness in Spanish literature and other artistic representations of the 19th and 20th centuries. Our discussion will include formative masterpieces by Spanish writers (Zorrilla, Galdós, Unamuno, Lorca, Cela, Laforet, Matute, and Luca de Tena) and filmmakers (Buñuel, Saura, and Medem). We will study each work closely by employing critical and theoretical approaches (Senior majors with at least two Spanish courses numbered 0350 or above, or by waiver.) 3 hrs. sem.

EUR LIT LNG

Fall 2012

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SPAN 0458 - Love in Modern Spain      

Narratives of Love in Modern Spain
This is a course in contemporary Spanish literature, gender politics, and cultural history. We will review characters from history, mythology, and popular culture that have influenced our contemporary ideas and attitudes toward love, men, women, marriage, and sexual equality (e.g. Eva, Venus, Helena de Troya, Don Juan, etc.). Readings will include fiction by Zorrilla, Pardo Bazán, Adelaida García Morales, Belén Gopegui, Muñoz Molina, and Javier Marías. We will also read texts by Plato, Sigmund Freud, Robert Solomon, Shulamith Firestone, Drucilla Cornell, Carol Anne Douglas, Judith Butler, among others. (Senior majors with at least two Spanish courses numbered 0350 or above, or by waiver.) 3 hrs. sem.

EUR LIT SOC

Spring 2011, Spring 2012

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SPAN 0475 - Literatura Gauchesca      

Literatura Gauchesca
In this course we will examine the roots of the culture of the Río de la Plata region through the study of gauchesca literature. We will concentrate on issues of the formation of national identity; city vs. Pampa; written vs. oral texts; the transformation of the gaucho from vagabond to national myth; and the use of literature as a political tool. Authors include Hidalgo, Pérez, Ascasubi, del Campo, Hernández, Gutiérrez, Güiraldes and Borges. (Senior majors with at least two Spanish courses numbered 0350 or above, or by waiver) 3 hrs. sem.

Fall 2013

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SPAN 0488 - Borges      

Borges
This course will be a detailed analysis and discussion of representative works of Jorge Luis Borges, with additional readings from major literary and cultural sources. We will discuss examples of Borges's poetry, short stories, essays, and translations. The Argentine author's work will serve as a gateway to such topics as literary theory, the role of the author, reproduction and teratology, philosophy, modernity and post-modernism, genre and subterfuge. (Senior majors with at least two Spanish courses numbered 0350 or above, or by waiver.) 3 hrs. sem.

AAL LIT

Fall 2010

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SPAN 0500 - Independent Study      

Independent Study
The department will consider requests by qualified juniors and senior majors to engage in independent work. (Approval only)

Fall 2010, Winter 2011, Spring 2011, Fall 2011, Winter 2012, Spring 2012, Fall 2012, Winter 2013, Spring 2013, Fall 2013, Winter 2014, Spring 2014, Fall 2014, Spring 2015

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SPAN 0705 - Senior Honors Thesis      

Senior Honors Thesis
The department will award honors, high honors, or highest honors on the basis of a student's work in the department and performance in SPAN 0705. (Approval only)

Fall 2010, Winter 2011, Spring 2011, Fall 2011, Winter 2012, Spring 2012, Fall 2012, Winter 2013, Spring 2013, Fall 2013, Winter 2014, Spring 2014, Fall 2014, Spring 2015

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SPAN 1003 - Spanish Fiction Workshop      

Spanish Fiction Workshop: Your Story
This course offers the opportunity to write short fiction in Spanish. By analyzing published stories and by writing fiction, we will explore plot, structure, character development, point of view, and dialogue. Readings include works by Borges, Bryce Echenique, Cabrera, Carpentier, Cortázar, Fuentes, Poniatowska, Quiroga, Rulfo, and Vega. Students will write at least three pieces of fiction and one essay. This course is the equivalent of a SPAN 0350 course and above. (Two courses at the 0300 level)

ART WTR

Winter 2012

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SPAN 1007 - Spain 1975 to Present      

Spain 1975 to the Present
According to a recent worldwide study conducted by UNESCO, Spain is the western country where the most profound social and material changes have occurred in the last 30 years. We will look at the historical, cultural, and social development of Spain from the death of Franco in 1975 to the present. Also, one of the main goals of the course will be to provide an array of opportunities to practice oral expression in the Spanish language. We will do so through the analysis and discussion of a wide variety of materials: literary texts, essays, films, music, and visual arts. Topics will include Europeanization, the challenge of regional/national identities, and contemporary social issues such as the changing role of women, religion, sexual attitudes, and immigration. (SPAN 0300, SPAN 0304, or SPAN 0305)

EUR SOC WTR

Winter 2011

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SPAN 1015 - Two Mexican Icons      

Two Mexican Icons of the Baroque and their Legacy
Two female figures of the Baroque have deeply influenced the way contemporary Mexico imagines itself as a nation: the Virgin of Guadalupe and Sor Juana Inés de la Cruz. Apparitions of the Virgin of Guadalupe are dated from 1531, and she has evolved into a symbol of the Mexican nation since the first texts about her were published in 1648. We will study the history of the representation of the Virgin in art, poetry, and popular culture from the 17th to the 21st century. We will also explore the figure and writings of Sor Juana Inés de la Cruz (1651-1695), known as the first feminist of the New World, some of whose poetry, drama, and autobiography reflect on the Virgin Mary and the Virgin of Guadalupe. (At least two Spanish courses at the 0300 level or above, or by waiver.)

AAL ART LIT WTR

Winter 2011

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SPAN 1111 - Hispanic Horror Cinema      

Hispanic Horror Cinema
In this course we will study horror films from Spain, Mexico, the United States, Argentina, and Cuba in order to understand how Hispanic filmmakers employ intertextual horror esthetics to create genre films. The films we will consider focus on zombies (Rec, Planet Terror, Juan of the Dead), vampires (Cronos, Vampires in Havana), ghosts (The Devil's Backbone, The Others), and misogynist stalkers (Thesis, Sleep Tight). We will discuss both the conservative and transgressive aspects of this emerging genre in transnational Hispanic cinema, focusing specifically on how these films reflect the evolving political and ideological dynamics of their respective national cultures. This course will be taught in Spanish.

ART LNG WTR

Winter 2014

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