Hector Vila

Assistant Professor of Writing

 
 work802.443.2181
 Spring Term: Monday and Wednesday 2:30-3:45 and by appointment
 Davis Family Library 224

 

Courses

Course List: 

Courses offered in the past four years.
indicates offered in the current term
indicates offered in the upcoming term[s]

CRWR0711 - Senior Thesis: Creative Writ.      

Senior Thesis: Creative Writing
Discussions, workshops, tutorials for those undertaking two-term projects in the writing of fiction, poetry, or creative nonfiction. (Formerly ENAM 0711)

Fall 2013, Spring 2014

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ENAM0500 - Special Project: Lit      

Special Project: Literature
Approval Required.

Fall 2013

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ENVS0210 / WRPR0210 - Social Class & the Environment      

Social Class and the Environment
In this course we will explore the consequence of growth, technological development, and the evolution of ecological sacrifice zones. Texts will serve as the theoretical framework for in-the-field investigations, classroom work, and real-world experience. The Struggle for Environmental Justice outlines resistance models; Shadow Cities provides lessons from the squatters movement; Ben Hewitt's The Town that Food Saved describes economy of scale solutions, and David Owen's The Conundrum challenges environmentalism. Texts will guide discussions, serve as lenses for in-the-field investigations, and the basis for writing. We will also travel to Hardwick and Putney, Vermont, to explore new economic-environmental models. (Not open to students who have taken ENVS/WRPR 1014) AMR NOR SOC

Spring 2013, Spring 2015, Spring 2016, Spring 2017

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FYSE1145 - Voices Along The Way      

Voices Along the Way
In this seminar—designed for international as well as U.S. students—we will examine American culture, as perceived both in the U.S. and abroad, through the lenses of gender, sexuality, race, class, and migration. Using literature and popular media, we will develop an understanding of the complexities and challenges in American culture, articulating them in inquiry-based writing and oral presentations, and learning how scholarly work has been integral to understanding them. 3 hrs. sem. CW NOR SOC

Fall 2014, Fall 2015, Fall 2016, Fall 2017

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FYSE1411 - Social Class & Environment      

Social Class and the Environment
In this seminar we will explore the consequence of growth, technological development, and the evolution of ecological sacrifice zones. Texts will serve as the theoretical framework for in-the-field investigations, classroom work, and real-world experience. The Struggle for Environmental Justice outlines resistance models; Shadow Cities provides lessons from the squatters movement; Ben Hewitt's The Town that Food Saved describes economy of scale solutions, and David Owen's The Conundrum challenges environmentalism. Texts will guide discussions, serve as lenses for in-the-field investigations, and the basis for writing. 3 hrs. sem. CW NOR SOC

Fall 2013

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WAGS0710 - Senior Thesis      

Senior Thesis
(Approval Required)

Spring 2013

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WRPR0100 - The Writing Workshop I      

This course is for students who would like extra work on critical thinking and analytical writing. All sections of this course will address a variety of writing strategies and technologies, from free writing to online writing. Each section will focus on a particular theme to be determined by the instructor. This course does not fulfill the college writing requirement. 3 hrs. lect./disc.

Fall 2013

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WRPR0101 - Writing Workshop II      

Writing Workshop II
All sections of this course will address a variety of writing techniques and communications tools. Each section will focus on a particular theme. This course does not fulfill the college writing requirement. 3 hrs. lect./disc.

Spring 2013, Spring 2015, Spring 2016, Fall 2016

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WRPR0203 / AMST0203 - Media, Sports, & Identity      

Media, Sports, & Identity
In this course we will examine the relationship between media, sports, and the formulation of one’s identity. We will examine issues pertaining to gender identification, violence, and hero worship. Reading critical essays on the subject, studying media coverage of sporting events, and writing short analytical essays will enable us to determine key elements concerning how sports are contextualized in American culture. Student essays will form the basis of a more in-depth inquiry that each student will then present, using media, at the end of the course. (Not open to students who have taken WRPR 1002) AMR CW NOR SOC

Fall 2013, Winter 2015, Winter 2016

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WRPR0333 / CRWR0333 - Writing on Contemporary Issues      

Writing On Contemporary Issues: Writing, Editing, and Publishing Online
This course is an introduction to writing prose for a public audience. Students will create both critical and personal essays that feature strong ideas and perspectives. The readings and writing will focus on American popular culture, broadly defined. Essays will critically engage elements of contemporary American popular culture via a vivid personal voice and presence. Readings will address current issues in popular culture – Gladwell, “Brain Candy,” Klosterman, “Campus Confidential,” for instance. ReMix: Reading in Contemporary Culture is the central text. The end result will be a new online magazine of writings on American popular culture 3 hrs. lect. ART CW NOR SOC

Spring 2017

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WRPR0334 / CRWR0334 - Writing and Experience      

Writing and Experience: Exploring Self in Society
The reading and online writing for this course will focus on what it means to construct a sense of self in relation to the larger social world of family and friends, education, media, work, and community. Readings will include nonfiction and fiction works by authors such as Maya Angelou, James Baldwin, Andre Dubus, Tim O'Brien, Flannery O'Connor, Amy Tan, Tobias Wolff, and Alice Walker. Students will explore the craft of storytelling and the multiple ways in which one can employ the tools of fiction in crafting creative nonfiction and fiction narratives for a new online magazine on American popular culture. This magazine will have been created by students in Writing on Contemporary Issues. Narratives about self and society will therefore lean towards aspects of American popular culture. 3 hrs sem. AMR CW LIT NOR SOC

Fall 2017

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WRPR0500 - Special Project: Lit      

Special Project: Literature
(Approval Required)

Spring 2013, Fall 2013, Winter 2014, Spring 2014, Fall 2014, Winter 2015, Spring 2015, Fall 2015, Winter 2016, Spring 2016, Fall 2016, Winter 2017, Spring 2017, Fall 2017, Spring 2018

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