COVID-19 Updates: Fall Semester

James Chase Sanchez

Asst Professor of Writing & Rhetoric

 
 work(802) 443-5971
 Fall Term: Tuesdays and Thursdays 11-12 and by Appt
 Carr Hall 206

James Chase Sanchez is an Assistant Professor of Writing at Middlebury College and comes here after living in Texas all of his life. His research interests are in cultural and racial rhetorics, public memory, and writing assessment, and his research has appeared or is forthcoming in College Composition and Communication, Present Tense, Writing Program Administration, and Pedagogy. Sanchez recently produced a film titled Man on Fire, which stems from his dissertation project. This documentary investigates why an elderly, white minister self-immolated in Sanchez’s hometown of Grand Saline, Texas in 2014 and attempts to uncover the racial history of this town.

 

Courses

Course List: 

Courses offered in the past four years.
indicates offered in the current term
indicates offered in the upcoming term[s]

EDST 0227 - JusTalks At Middlebury      

JusTalks at Middlebury
In this course students will develop the ability to facilitate the JusTalks First-Year Forums that will take place during winter term and spring semester. The First Year Forums are intended to (i) foster the habits of listening empathically and responding constructively when engaging in complex discussions that address topics such as privilege and difference, and (ii) develop greater awareness of how to contribute actively to building an inclusive community. The knowledge, skills, and dispositions that students will develop in this course are consciously intended to be transferable to other settings and transformative for the Middlebury community. SOC WTR

Winter 2019

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FYSE 1546 - Lang of Conspiracy Theories      

The Language of Conspiracy Theories
In this course we will explore the language of conspiracy theories by examining some longstanding theories—such as that of the moon landing hoax—as well as more recent theories spread by the likes of Alex Jones and other talking heads. Our work will pinpoint the rhetorical nature of conspiracy theories (what makes them viable, how they spread, and how to spot them), while also finding ways to argue against people making bad-faith arguments. Overall, this course will emphasize the various dimensions of conspiracies and challenge students to find approaches to counteract them. CW SOC

Fall 2019

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WRPR 0100 - Writing in Academic Contexts I      

Writing in Academic Contexts I
In this class students will build upon their identities as writers and thinkers, engaging complex issues within a diverse and supportive classroom community. Class activities and assignments will focus on building rhetorical awareness, analyzing texts and media by prominent writers, and understanding academic culture. We will critically examine various genres and grammatical structures, with attention to cultural context. Students will explore their voices and perspectives in class discussion and throughout all phases of the writing process, including planning, peer review, and revision. Each student will meet frequently with the instructor. This course does not fulfill the college writing requirement 3 hrs. lect/disc

Fall 2017

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WRPR 0101 - Writing Academic Contexts II      

A Writing in Academic Contexts II
Students in this class will continue building upon their identities as writers and thinkers, while engaging a complex, interdisciplinary theme, within a diverse and supportive classroom community. Class activities and assignments will focus on building rhetorical awareness, analyzing texts from a variety of sources, and conducting library research. Students will explore their voices and perspectives in class discussion and throughout all phases of the writing process, including planning, peer review, and revision. Each student will meet frequently with the instructor, and will have opportunities for growth in oral communication as well. This course does not fulfill the college writing requirement. 3 hrs. lect./disc.

Fall 2018, Spring 2020

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WRPR 0205 / GSFS 0205 - Race, Rhetoric, and Protest      

Race, Rhetoric, and Protest
In this course we will study the theoretical and rhetorical underpinnings of racial protest in America. We will begin by studying movements from the 1950s and 1960s, moving from bus boycotts to Black Power protests, and will build to analyzing recent protests in Ferguson, Dallas, and New York. Readings will include texts from Charles E. Morris III, Aja Martinez, Shon Meckfessel, Gwendolyn Pough, and various articles and op-eds. Students will write analyses of historical and contemporary protest, op-eds about the local culture, and syntheses on the course readings. 3 hrs. Lect AMR CW NOR SOC

Fall 2017, Spring 2018, Fall 2019, Fall 2020

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WRPR 0208 / LNGT 0208 - Cultural Rhetorics      

Cultural Rhetorics
In this course we will focus on the budding field of cultural rhetorics—a set of practices and methodologies that help us understand the way different groups of people make meaning and interact. We will study Latinx, Black, Asian, Native, feminist, LGBTQ+, and public memory rhetorics, focusing on the language and persuasion practices these groups use in their discourses. In this class students will write comparative analyses of cultural rhetorics, compose their own cultural literacy narratives, construct arguments about culture, and build multimodal projects. Students will leave the class with an understanding of the various cultural practices of rhetoric in the United States. 3 hrs. lect. AMR CMP CW NOR SOC

Fall 2018

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WRPR 0211 / GSFS 0211 - Trickery, Bodies: Rhetoric      

Trickery, Bodies, and Resistance: The Tradition(s) of Rhetoric
How do female identifying subjects position themselves (and their bodies) rhetorically in a male-dominated society? How do Black and Latinx rhetorical traditions of call-and-response and code-switching connect with and resist classical traditions of oration and stylistics? In this course we will study the tradition(s) of rhetoric by moving from the trickery of sophists to budding works in feminist rhetorics and cultural rhetorics. Students in this class will learn to synthesize the various traditions of rhetoric in historical and contemporary terms and to critically understand cultural customs that exist outside the white, heteronormative Greco-Roman tradition. 3 hrs. lect. AMR CMP CW SOC

Spring 2018, Spring 2019, Spring 2020

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WRPR 0354 / HARC 0354 - Rhetoric of Public Memory      

The Rhetoric of Public Memory
This course focuses on public memory and the various statues, memorials, sites, and spaces that construct public memory in contemporary U.S. society. In this course, we will study local Middlebury and Vermont public memories, Civil War and Confederate memories, and spaces of contention and controversy, while visiting nearby memorials and museums. Students in this class will compose analyses on these public memories and create arguments on the viability of memories in different shapes and forms. Overall, students will leave this class with a stronger understanding of not only public memory rhetoric but the various components that keep these memories alive. 3 hrs. lect. AMR CW HIS NOR SOC

Spring 2019, Fall 2020

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WRPR 0500 - Special Project: Lit      

Special Project: Literature
(Approval Required)

Spring 2018, Fall 2018, Spring 2019, Fall 2019, Spring 2020, Fall 2020, Spring 2021

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