Current Schedule

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RUSS3102A-L15

CRN: 60084

Introductory Russian
For students with very little or no previous classroom instruction in Russian. Starting from scratch, with a weekend “survival Russian” course before taking the language pledge, students learn the alphabet and learn to read and understand spoken Russian, learn to write and speak Russian in basic and predictable contexts (ordering a meal in a restaurant, asking directions on the street). Students master the basic grammatical structures of the language and acquire a beginning vocabulary, practiced in weekly compositions. Students completing this course typically have novice high or intermediate low language skills.

RUSS3103A-L15

CRN: 60085

Introductory Russian
For students with very little or no previous classroom instruction in Russian. Starting from scratch, with a weekend “survival Russian” course before taking the language pledge, students learn the alphabet and learn to read and understand spoken Russian, learn to write and speak Russian in basic and predictable contexts (ordering a meal in a restaurant, asking directions on the street). Students master the basic grammatical structures of the language and acquire a beginning vocabulary, practiced in weekly compositions. Students completing this course typically have novice high or intermediate low language skills.

RUSS3104A-L15

CRN: 60086

Introductory Russian
For students with very little or no previous classroom instruction in Russian. Starting from scratch, with a weekend “survival Russian” course before taking the language pledge, students learn the alphabet and learn to read and understand spoken Russian, learn to write and speak Russian in basic and predictable contexts (ordering a meal in a restaurant, asking directions on the street). Students master the basic grammatical structures of the language and acquire a beginning vocabulary, practiced in weekly compositions. Students completing this course typically have novice high or intermediate low language skills.

RUSS3105A-L15

CRN: 60087

Introductory Russian
For students with very little or no previous classroom instruction in Russian. Starting from scratch, with a weekend “survival Russian” course before taking the language pledge, students learn the alphabet and learn to read and understand spoken Russian, learn to write and speak Russian in basic and predictable contexts (ordering a meal in a restaurant, asking directions on the street). Students master the basic grammatical structures of the language and acquire a beginning vocabulary, practiced in weekly compositions. Students completing this course typically have novice high or intermediate low language skills.

RUSS3198A-L15

CRN: 60088

Advanced Introductory Russian
For students with approximately 100 hours of prior formal classroom instruction in Russian; students placing into this course have usually had one year of college Russian (at three hours per week). Students typically complete this course with intermediate low to intermediate-mid language skills.

RUSS3199A-L15

CRN: 60089

Advanced Introductory Russian
For students with approximately 100 hours of prior formal classroom instruction in Russian; students placing into this course have usually had one year of college Russian (at three hours per week). Students typically complete this course with intermediate low to intermediate-mid language skills.

RUSS3200A-L15

CRN: 60090

Advanced Introductory Russian
For students with approximately 100 hours of prior formal classroom instruction in Russian; students placing into this course have usually had one year of college Russian (at three hours per week). Students typically complete this course with intermediate low to intermediate-mid language skills.

RUSS3201A-L15

CRN: 60091

Advanced Introductory Russian
For students with approximately 100 hours of prior formal classroom instruction in Russian; students placing into this course have usually had one year of college Russian (at three hours per week). Students typically complete this course with intermediate low to intermediate-mid language skills.

RUSS3202A-L15

CRN: 60092

Basic Intermediate Russian
For students with approximately 150 hours of prior formal classroom instruction in Russian. In this class, students review the basic grammatical and syntactical structures of the Russian language and improve their mastery of this foundation of the language while acquiring an active vocabulary of approximately 1,500 words. Students typically complete this course with intermediate-mid language skills.

RUSS3203A-L15

CRN: 60093

Basic Intermediate Russian
For students with approximately 150 hours of prior formal classroom instruction in Russian. In this class, students review the basic grammatical and syntactical structures of the Russian language and improve their mastery of this foundation of the language while acquiring an active vocabulary of approximately 1,500 words. Students typically complete this course with intermediate-mid language skills.

RUSS3204A-L15

CRN: 60094

Basic Intermediate Russian
For students with approximately 150 hours of prior formal classroom instruction in Russian. In this class, students review the basic grammatical and syntactical structures of the Russian language and improve their mastery of this foundation of the language while acquiring an active vocabulary of approximately 1,500 words. Students typically complete this course with intermediate-mid language skills.

RUSS3205A-L15

CRN: 60095

Basic Intermediate Russian
For students with approximately 150 hours of prior formal classroom instruction in Russian. In this class, students review the basic grammatical and syntactical structures of the Russian language and improve their mastery of this foundation of the language while acquiring an active vocabulary of approximately 1,500 words. Students typically complete this course with intermediate-mid language skills.

RUSS3298A-L15

CRN: 60096

Enhanced Intermediate Russian
For students with approximately 200 hours of prior formal classroom instruction in Russian. In this class students review the basic grammatical and syntactical structures of the Russian language and improve their mastery of this foundation of the language while acquiring an active vocabulary of approximately 1,700 words. We expect students to complete this course with intermediate-mid to intermediate high language skills.

RUSS3299A-L15

CRN: 60097

Enhanced Intermediate Russian
For students with approximately 200 hours of prior formal classroom instruction in Russian. In this class students review the basic grammatical and syntactical structures of the Russian language and improve their mastery of this foundation of the language while acquiring an active vocabulary of approximately 1,700 words. We expect students to complete this course with intermediate-mid to intermediate high language skills.

RUSS3300A-L15

CRN: 60098

Enhanced Intermediate Russian
For students with approximately 200 hours of prior formal classroom instruction in Russian. In this class students review the basic grammatical and syntactical structures of the Russian language and improve their mastery of this foundation of the language while acquiring an active vocabulary of approximately 1,700 words. We expect students to complete this course with intermediate-mid to intermediate high language skills.

RUSS3301A-L15

CRN: 60099

Enhanced Intermediate Russian
For students with approximately 200 hours of prior formal classroom instruction in Russian. In this class students review the basic grammatical and syntactical structures of the Russian language and improve their mastery of this foundation of the language while acquiring an active vocabulary of approximately 1,700 words. We expect students to complete this course with intermediate-mid to intermediate high language skills.

RUSS3302A-L15

CRN: 60100

Advanced Intermediate Russian
For students with 300 hours of prior formal classroom instruction in Russian. In this class students review the basic grammatical and syntactical structures of the Russian language and focus their attention on more challenging structures of the language such as participles, comparative forms, and verbs of motion. At the end of the summer most students have an active vocabulary approaching 2,000 words. Readings for the class include poetry, short stories, and longer prose works, as well as newspaper articles. During half the summer program significant time is devoted to watching television news reports and reading news items. Students typically complete this course with intermediate-mid to intermediate high language skills.

RUSS3303A-L15

CRN: 60101

Advanced Intermediate Russian
For students with 300 hours of prior formal classroom instruction in Russian. In this class students review the basic grammatical and syntactical structures of the Russian language and focus their attention on more challenging structures of the language such as participles, comparative forms, and verbs of motion. At the end of the summer most students have an active vocabulary approaching 2,000 words. Readings for the class include poetry, short stories, and longer prose works, as well as newspaper articles. During half the summer program significant time is devoted to watching television news reports and reading news items. Students typically complete this course with intermediate-mid to intermediate high language skills.

RUSS3304A-L15

CRN: 60102

Advanced Intermediate Russian
For students with 300 hours of prior formal classroom instruction in Russian. In this class students review the basic grammatical and syntactical structures of the Russian language and focus their attention on more challenging structures of the language such as participles, comparative forms, and verbs of motion. At the end of the summer most students have an active vocabulary approaching 2,000 words. Readings for the class include poetry, short stories, and longer prose works, as well as newspaper articles. During half the summer program significant time is devoted to watching television news reports and reading news items. Students typically complete this course with intermediate-mid to intermediate high language skills.

RUSS3305A-L15

CRN: 60103

Advanced Intermediate Russian
For students with 300 hours of prior formal classroom instruction in Russian. In this class students review the basic grammatical and syntactical structures of the Russian language and focus their attention on more challenging structures of the language such as participles, comparative forms, and verbs of motion. At the end of the summer most students have an active vocabulary approaching 2,000 words. Readings for the class include poetry, short stories, and longer prose works, as well as newspaper articles. During half the summer program significant time is devoted to watching television news reports and reading news items. Students typically complete this course with intermediate-mid to intermediate high language skills.

RUSS3398A-L15

CRN: 60104

Advanced Russian I
For students with at least 350 hours of prior formal instruction in Russian, or fewer hours of formal instruction but a semester or more in Russia. In this class, students already have a firm grasp of the grammatical problems in Russian, such as participles, verbal adverbs, quantitative expressions (measurements and other numeric expressions), and verbs of motion. Students work hard on expanding their vocabulary in this course, building up semantic fields in various topic areas related to both everyday and political/societal topics (active vocabulary of 2,250 words). Students watch Russian films, read short stories, poetry, and newspaper articles, complete listening and writing assignments on journalistic topics, and complete oral assignments including the preparation and delivery of short presentations. We expect students to complete this course with intermediate high to advanced low language skills.

RUSS3399A-L15

CRN: 60105

Advanced Russian I
For students with at least 350 hours of prior formal instruction in Russian, or fewer hours of formal instruction but a semester or more in Russia. In this class, students already have a firm grasp of the grammatical problems in Russian, such as participles, verbal adverbs, quantitative expressions (measurements and other numeric expressions), and verbs of motion. Students work hard on expanding their vocabulary in this course, building up semantic fields in various topic areas related to both everyday and political/societal topics (active vocabulary of 2,250 words). Students watch Russian films, read short stories, poetry, and newspaper articles, complete listening and writing assignments on journalistic topics, and complete oral assignments including the preparation and delivery of short presentations. We expect students to complete this course with intermediate high to advanced low language skills.

RUSS3400A-L15

CRN: 60106

Advanced Russian I
For students with at least 350 hours of prior formal instruction in Russian, or fewer hours of formal instruction but a semester or more in Russia. In this class, students already have a firm grasp of the grammatical problems in Russian, such as participles, verbal adverbs, quantitative expressions (measurements and other numeric expressions), and verbs of motion. Students work hard on expanding their vocabulary in this course, building up semantic fields in various topic areas related to both everyday and political/societal topics (active vocabulary of 2,250 words). Students watch Russian films, read short stories, poetry, and newspaper articles, complete listening and writing assignments on journalistic topics, and complete oral assignments including the preparation and delivery of short presentations. We expect students to complete this course with intermediate high to advanced low language skills.

RUSS3401A-L15

CRN: 60107

Advanced Russian I
For students with at least 350 hours of prior formal instruction in Russian, or fewer hours of formal instruction but a semester or more in Russia. In this class, students already have a firm grasp of the grammatical problems in Russian, such as participles, verbal adverbs, quantitative expressions (measurements and other numeric expressions), and verbs of motion. Students work hard on expanding their vocabulary in this course, building up semantic fields in various topic areas related to both everyday and political/societal topics (active vocabulary of 2,250 words). Students watch Russian films, read short stories, poetry, and newspaper articles, complete listening and writing assignments on journalistic topics, and complete oral assignments including the preparation and delivery of short presentations. We expect students to complete this course with intermediate high to advanced low language skills.

RUSS3402A-L15

CRN: 60108

Advanced Russian II
For students with at least 400 hours of prior formal instruction in Russian, or fewer hours of formal instruction but a semester or more in Russia. In this class, students tackle the more complicated grammatical and syntactical structures of the Russian language and significantly increase their vocabulary by studying Russian root-based semantic groups, idioms, and synonyms. The course focuses a good deal of attention on the development of students’ lexical competence (active vocabulary of 2,500 words) by acquainting them with prototypical models of the word formation and derivation processes of contemporary standard Russian. Much of the class’s work is devoted to the detailed analysis of Russian films, as well as the reading of contemporary poems, short stories, and excerpts of longer prose works. Students give short presentations on the writers whose works they read. Students typically complete this course with advanced low to advanced mid language skills.

RUSS3403A-L15

CRN: 60109

Advanced Russian II
For students with at least 400 hours of prior formal instruction in Russian, or fewer hours of formal instruction but a semester or more in Russia. In this class, students tackle the more complicated grammatical and syntactical structures of the Russian language and significantly increase their vocabulary by studying Russian root-based semantic groups, idioms, and synonyms. The course focuses a good deal of attention on the development of students’ lexical competence (active vocabulary of 2,500 words) by acquainting them with prototypical models of the word formation and derivation processes of contemporary standard Russian. Much of the class’s work is devoted to the detailed analysis of Russian films, as well as the reading of contemporary poems, short stories, and excerpts of longer prose works. Students give short presentations on the writers whose works they read. Students typically complete this course with advanced low to advanced mid language skills.

RUSS3404A-L15

CRN: 60110

Advanced Russian II
For students with at least 400 hours of prior formal instruction in Russian, or fewer hours of formal instruction but a semester or more in Russia. In this class, students tackle the more complicated grammatical and syntactical structures of the Russian language and significantly increase their vocabulary by studying Russian root-based semantic groups, idioms, and synonyms. The course focuses a good deal of attention on the development of students’ lexical competence (active vocabulary of 2,500 words) by acquainting them with prototypical models of the word formation and derivation processes of contemporary standard Russian. Much of the class’s work is devoted to the detailed analysis of Russian films, as well as the reading of contemporary poems, short stories, and excerpts of longer prose works. Students give short presentations on the writers whose works they read. Students typically complete this course with advanced low to advanced mid language skills.

RUSS3405A-L15

CRN: 60111

Advanced Russian II
For students with at least 400 hours of prior formal instruction in Russian, or fewer hours of formal instruction but a semester or more in Russia. In this class, students tackle the more complicated grammatical and syntactical structures of the Russian language and significantly increase their vocabulary by studying Russian root-based semantic groups, idioms, and synonyms. The course focuses a good deal of attention on the development of students’ lexical competence (active vocabulary of 2,500 words) by acquainting them with prototypical models of the word formation and derivation processes of contemporary standard Russian. Much of the class’s work is devoted to the detailed analysis of Russian films, as well as the reading of contemporary poems, short stories, and excerpts of longer prose works. Students give short presentations on the writers whose works they read. Students typically complete this course with advanced low to advanced mid language skills.

RUSS6507A-L15

CRN: 60552

Russian Syntax & Punctuation
Russian Syntax and Punctuation

Russian syntax is a very interesting and important part of Russian grammar. Without knowledge of Russian syntactic constructions, one cannot understand the rules of Russian punctuation. We will examine all the main Russian syntactic structures, such as verbal and nominal word combinations and simple and compound sentences, and discuss “free” word order in Russian. Students will listen to lectures, complete exercises, read Russian writers and analyze their texts, and write essays. Grades will be determined according to participation in class discussions, homework, weekly tests and compositions, and a final exam.

Required Text: О.И. Глазунова. Грамматика русского языка в упражнениях и комментариях. Ч.2. Синтаксис. Санкт-Петербург: Златоуст, 2014.

RUSS6607A-L15

CRN: 60553

The Language of Propaganda
The Language of Propaganda: Linguistic Manipulation and Hate Speech in Russian

The aim of the course is to study manipulative mechanisms of the Russian language with two purposes in mind: to avoid falling under the influence of propaganda, on the one hand, and to learn how to create manipulative texts in Russian, on the other. Russian offers speakers a rich arsenal of means to realize propagandistic aims. Manipulative functions of discourse create a covert, masked layer of linguistic data that is not easily separated from purely informational content. This is why manipulative texts are not so easy to identify or translate. We will consider linguistic means typical of manipulative texts and language signs of different levels that help us interpret the speaker’s intentions. We will discuss hate speech, now used in Russian political communication. Students will listen to lectures, read articles from the Russian media and internet, watch videos on Russian politics and society, discuss these materials, and write compositions. Grades will be based on participation in class discussions, weekly compositions and oral presentations, and a final examination.

RUSS6618A-L15

CRN: 60554

Russian Cultural Scripts
This course will focus on helping students to better understand Russian culture using the Russian lexicon as a tool. Special attention will be paid to Russian cultural scripts, i.e. representations of cultural norms widely held in Russian society and reflected in Russian language. We will discuss words that reflect and transmit Russian ways of thinking as a “naïve” set of assumptions about what is good and what is bad to do, and what one can or cannot do. Since the worldview encoded in these words is usually presented in non-assertive components of meaning (that is, connotations, presuppositions, etc.), the speakers of Russian tend to take it for granted. Moreover, most of these words are language-specific and defy translation; when translated directly or naïvely into other languages, they may cause cross-cultural miscommunication. Students will write short essays two to three times per week discussing various aspects of Russian culture as understood through its key words. Grades will be based on class participation and essays written throughout the course.

RUSS6662A-L15

CRN: 60557

Individual & State in Russ Lit
Face to Face with the Leviathan: Individual and State in Russian Literature

Harrowing or even tragic relationships between the individual and the state exemplify one of the main topics of Russian culture. The course will focus on examining prose and poetry texts of the 19th and 20th centuries. The reading list will include writers from Imperial Russia through the post-Soviet era: Pushkin, Gogol, Tolstoy, Zamyatin, Akhmatova, Solzhenitsyn, Pelevin, and Tolstaya.

Required Texts:
Александр Пушкин. Медный всадник. Капитанская дочка.
Николай Гоголь. Петербургские повести.
Лев Толстой. Хаджи Мурат. Суеверие государства (фрагменты трактата).
Евгений Замятин. Мы.
Анна Ахматова. Избранные стихотворения.
Александр Солженицын. Один день Ивана Денисовича.
Виктор Пелевин. Девятый сон Веры Павловны. Джон Фаулз и трагедия русского либерализма.
Татьяна Толстая. На малом огне.

RUSS6663A-L15

CRN: 60563

Russia & US in 20C & 21C
History of a Bipolar World: Russia and the US in the 20th-21st Centuries

This graduate course, intended for students interested in history, is centered on the study of global economic, social, political, and cultural processes examined through the prism of interaction between the US and USSR. Of principal importance is the attempt to understand whether the 20th century was indeed bipolar, although naturally such powerful centers as the USSR and US had a serious influence on the development of historical processes. The controversial nature of the problem creates an essential basis for graduate students to work out their own independent judgments, which will be evaluated in discussion, trainings, and the exchange of opinions. In the course of examining these issues, we will consider how and to what extent the historical legacy of the 20th century has carried over and been preserved in the current century.

RUSS6687A-L15

CRN: 60561

Youth Movements & Subcultures
Youth Movements and Subcultures in Russia: From Dandies and Decembrists to Gopniki and Hipsters

The course will focus on political (the decembrists, marxists, dissidents), social (narodniki, nihilists), cultural (futurists, "shestidesiatniki"), lifestyle (dandies, stiliagi, liubery) and even virtual ("lishnie ljudi") species of multi-faceted youth activities in Russia throughout two centuries. Each trend will be carefully described, analyzed, and put in historical perspective. Most of the presented cults and movements will be provided with illustrations from literature, film and music.

RUSS6692A-L15

CRN: 60558

Reading & New Media in the 21C
Text, Context, Intertext: Readings and New Media in the 21st Century

The goal of this course is to develop students’ skills in reading and interpreting contemporary texts in the post-Soviet era. They will learn to comprehend the background of the text, to grasp the meaning of the context, and to distinguish intertexts. Students will work with different kinds of new media texts including online news, social media excerpts, forums, YouTube videos, interviews, etc. They will read articles and essays of Shenderovich, Rubinshtein, political verses of Bykov, and short stories of Tolstaya, Pelevin, and Sorokin.

During class meetings, students will gain practice in examining and interpreting readings and participate in the discussion of texts—both those assigned and those found by the students themselves. They will prepare written assignments and produce various texts, ranging from essays to reports to short fiction.

RUSS6705A-L15

CRN: 60560

Rock Music in Russia & USSR
Rock Music in Russia and the USSR

This course will trace the emergence and development of rock and roll music – initially an exotic American influence which later grew into bona fide Russian genre – in the Soviet Union and, subsequently, the Russian Federation. As in the west, the musical developments in rock went hand in hand with ever-changing youth cults, social trends and cultural shocks: from the 'styliagi' of the 50s to Beatlemania and the Russian hippy movement of the 60s and 70s, to protest-driven 'Russian rock' of the 80s and the current contradictory situation. Lectures will be accompanied by audio and video recordings, as well as selected feature films. Course assignments will include essays on Soviet and Russian rock acts and oral reports.

RUSS6707A-L15

CRN: 60559

Women thru History Russ Cinema
Women through the History of Russian Cinema

This course will explore the history of Russian cinema through the role assigned to women in films of pre-revolutionary Russia, the Soviet Union, and the post-Soviet era. Study of the “woman question” in cinema will include cultural developments and exploration of significant directors and genres. Students will watch films that examine the cultural tendency to define the role of women in retrospective and contemporary society. Films by Yevgeni Bauer, a prominent director who was present at the beginning of world cinema, will be screened, as well as films by other world-renowned directors such as Romm, Mikhalkov, Tarkovsky, Muratova, and Shepitko.

This course includes readings of literary works and criticism, as well as detailed analyses and discussion of the cinematic works, with two film screenings weekly. Students will prepare written and oral assignments including four essays, a journal, and a final paper and project.

RUSS6711A-L15

CRN: 60556

Russ Culture between West&East
Russian Culture between West and East

The course will dwell on eternal Russian questions: Where is Russia’s place? In Europe? In Asia? Or maybe there is some “third path” between West and East? Students will investigate how the most famous Russian writers (18th-21th centuries) sought answers to these questions. We will examine how Russia was perceived by foreign travelers, and how Russian writers construed West or East while traveling abroad. Slavophiles and westernizers from Nikolay Karamzin and Denis Fonvizin up to Vladimir Maikovsky or Andrei Platonov will be among our topics. We will study literary works in the wide context of Russian political history, arts, and music.

RUSS6767A-L15

CRN: 60555

Contemporary Russia in Prose
Contemporary Russia in the Mirror of Russian Prose

The course is designed to acquaint students with the development of Russian literature over the last two decades. We will examine modern patterns of literature (prose, poetry, and non-fiction) and the ways they reflect and interpret dynamic changes in Russian society, politics, and customs. We will analyze such topics as Russian Postmodernism, its concepts and paradigms; Rituals of the Totalitarian State in the Postmodernist Mode; and Metaphors and Symbols of Post-Soviet Culture. We will also discuss modern social and political issues, as well as the most recent cultural events in Russia. We will use heterogeneous materials: works of literature (both fiction and non-fiction), Russian popular culture, and Internet texts. Authors to be read include Tatyana Tolstaya, Victor Pelevin, Liudmila Petrushevskaia, Vladimir Sorokin, Dmitry Bykov, and Lev Rubinshtein. Other requirements will include 5 short written assignments (2 pages), and a final paper (10 pages).

RUSS6790A-L15

CRN: 60562

Putinomania & Putinophobia
Putinomania and Putinophobia: The Political Image of Contemporary Russia

This graduate course, intended for students interested in contemporary Russian society and politics, is centered on the analysis of the formation of contemporary Russia's image in the world. Special attention will be paid to characterizing the political transformation of Russia in the 2000's, which is inseparably connected with the name of the Russian President. The ambiguous and conflicting assessments of this problem constitute a good field for intellectual discussion and the examination of one's own views. The course will consist of lectures, discussion, round tables, and the independent analysis of political documents. Grades will be based on the preparation of independent essays, analytical notes, and other written assignments.

RUSS6888A-L15

CRN: 60166

Independent Study
This course consists of a thesis written in Russian, for which an advisor will be assigned, and is a requirement for MA candidates. The course can only be taken for the completion of the master’s thesis and may be taken only once.

RUSS6903A-L15

CRN: 60564

Research Paper
This research paper is a requirement for DML candidates during their summer of application.