COVID-19 Updates: Fall Semester

College-wide CW Courses

Courses offered in the past four years.
indicates offered in the current term
indicates offered in the upcoming term[s]

AMST 0203 - Media, Sports, & Identity      

Media, Sports, & Identity
In this course we will examine the relationship between media, sports, and the formulation of one’s identity. We will examine issues pertaining to gender identification, violence, and hero worship. Reading critical essays on the subject, studying media coverage of sporting events, and writing short analytical essays will enable us to determine key elements concerning how sports are contextualized in American culture. Student essays will form the basis of a more in-depth inquiry that each student will then present, using media, at the end of the course. (Not open to students who have taken WRPR 1002) AMR CW NOR SOC

Winter 2018, Fall 2019, Spring 2020

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AMST 0231 - Tourism in American Culture      

See the U.S.A.: The History of Tourism in American Culture
In this course, we will explore the history and evolution of American tourism, beginning in the 1820s, when middle-class tourists first journeyed up the Hudson River valley, and ending with our contemporary and continuing obsession with iconic destinations such as Graceland, Gettysburg, and the Grand Canyon. We will explore how the growth of national transportation systems, the development of advertising, and the rise of a middle class with money and time to spend on leisure shaped the evolution of tourism. Along the way, we will study various types of tourism (such as historical, cultural, ethnic, eco-, and 'disaster' tourism) and look at the creative processes by which places are transformed into 'destinations'. Our texts will come from visual art, travel literature, material culture, and film and television. We will consider their cultural meaning and reflect on our own motivations and responses as tourists, and by so doing contemplate why tourism was-and still is-such an important part of American life. 3 hrs. lect. AMR CW HIS NOR

Fall 2016, Fall 2018

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AMST 0251 - Monuments and Memorials      

Constructing Memory: American Monuments and Memorials
“Democracy has no monuments,” John Quincy Adams once famously argued. “It strikes no medals; it bears the head of no man upon its coin; its very essence is iconoclastic.” Yet nearly 250 years after America’s founding, monuments and memorials surround us. In this course we will explore the memorializing impulse; the complexity and depth of emotion evoked by memorial acts; and the oftentimes heated controversies about modes, placement, and subject of representation. We will consider how and why America chooses to memorialize certain people and events, and what is gained—and sometimes erased—in the process. By choosing among a broad range of traditional and non-traditional modes of representation, we will consider how public memorials both reflect and shape Americans’ shared cultural values. The course will include site visits to local monuments and projects in which we propose designs or redesigns of memorials for a 21st century audience. AMR ART CW NOR

Spring 2018, Spring 2021

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AMST 1019 - American Comedy      

American Comedy: Cultural and Ethnic Perspectives
In this course we will focus on how American comedy has shaped, and been shaped by, particular cultural and ethnic sensibilities. Beginning with the 1960s, we will analyze the developments and transformations in comic personae, techniques, and what can serve as comedic material. Students will have the opportunity to discuss comedy as a genre of entertainment and mode of discourse. Some of the guiding questions include: how has American comedy enabled or disrupted a sense of shared cultural sensibilities in particular historical moments? In what ways does ethnic humor facilitate conversations about conflicts and controversies in ways that bring about new understanding and solidarities, or lay bare societal fissures? How does comedy imbue the person holding the mic with the power to grapple with, and even transgress, social and political norms? AMR ART CW NOR SOC WTR

Winter 2018

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AMST 1020 - Asian American Food Studies      

Asian American Food Studies
In this course we will discuss how food shapes a sense of belonging and identity in Asian America. Going beyond how Asian American cultures are consumed through food items and restaurants, we will focus on how Asian Americans have defined themselves through food. Required readings will engage questions about the production, circulation, and consumption of food. We will critically engage the genres of memoir, recipe books, fiction, historical accounts, cultural criticism, and food criticism as we write pieces in each of these styles. There will also be a limited amount of cooking involved in the course. AMR CW NOR SOC WTR

Winter 2019, Winter 2020

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ARBC 0210 - Arabia: A Literary Approach      

Arabia: A Literary Approach (in English)
In this course we will examine the Arabian Peninsula as a literary topos that has beguiled representation in both Eastern and Western literature. Whether it is depicted as a glittering spectacle of petro-dollars, the haunt of Bedouin tribesmen or as a sacred focal point, Arabia is an open canvas on which successive societies have sketched their anxieties and aspirations Simultaneously, Arabia has its own rich legacy of self-representation that has been shaped by its harsh environment and unique resources. We will sift through these representations in texts that range among pre-Islamic poetry, the accounts of foreign explorers, novels by modern Arab authors, and contemporary Bedouin oral poetry. All readings will be in English and no previous knowledge of Arabic is required. 3 hrs. sem. AAL CW LIT MDE

Fall 2016

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ARBC 0235 - Gender Politics in Arab World      

Gender Politics of the Arab World
The aim of this course is to explore the ways in which the social and cultural construction of sexual difference shapes the politics of gender and sexuality in the Middle East and North Africa. Using interdisciplinary feminist theories, we will explore key issues and debates including the interaction of religion and sexuality, women’s movements, gender-based violence, queerness and gay/straight identities. Looking at the ways in which the Arab Spring galvanized what some have called a “gender revolution,” we will examine women’s roles in the various revolutions across the Arab World, and explore the varied and shifting gender dynamics in the region. Taught in English (formerly ARBC/GSFS 0328) 3 hrs. Sem. (National/Transnational Feminisms) AAL CMP CW MDE SOC

Fall 2019

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ARBC 0328 - Gender Politics in Arab World      

Gender Politics of the Arab World
The aim of this course is to explore the ways in which the social and cultural construction of sexual difference shapes the politics of gender and sexuality in the Middle East and North Africa. Using interdisciplinary feminist theories, we will explore key issues and debates including the interaction of religion and sexuality, women’s movements, gender-based violence, queerness and gay/straight identities. Looking at the ways in which the Arab Spring galvanized what some have called a “gender revolution,” we will examine women’s roles in the various revolutions across the Arab World, and explore the varied and shifting gender dynamics in the region. (Any one GSFS course or by approval) 3 hrs. Sem. (National/Transnational Feminisms) AAL CMP CW MDE SOC

Spring 2018

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CHEM 0311 - Instrumental Analysis      

Instrumental Analysis
This course introduces fundamental concepts of analytical chemistry, instrumental analysis, and scientific writing. Lecture topics include experimental design and quality control; sample collection and preparation; calibration, error, and data analysis; statistics; and the theory and operation of chemical instrumentation. Multi-week laboratory projects provide hands-on experience in qualitative and quantitative analysis using a variety of research-quality instrumentation (e.g., graphite furnace atomic absorption spectroscopy, UV/Vis spectrometry, gas chromatography mass spectrometry, circular dichroism spectroscopy, high pressure liquid chromatography). Writing workshops promote professional scientific writing skills through guided practice in writing analysis, peer review, and revision. For Fall 2020, hands-on skill development emphasized despite remote instruction using “lab kits” (all food grade, safe materials) sent to all students, with encouraged in-person options for students residing on-campus, as safety allows. (CHEM 0204 or CHEM 0242) 3 hr. lect., 6 hrs. lab. CW

Fall 2016, Fall 2017, Fall 2018, Fall 2019, Fall 2020

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CHEM 0313 - Biochemistry Laboratory      

Biochemistry Laboratory
Experimental biochemistry emphasizing the isolation, purification and characterization of enzymes and the cloning of genes and expression of recombinant protein. Traditional biochemical techniques such as UV-VIS spectroscopy, gel filtration, ion exchange and affinity chromatography, electrophoresis, and immunoblotting will be used in the investigation of several enzymes. Specific experiments will emphasize enzyme purification, enzyme kinetics, and enzyme characterization by biochemical and immunochemical methods. Major techniques in molecular biology will be introduced through an extended experiment that will include DNA purification, polymerase chain reaction, bacterial transformation, DNA sequencing, and the expression, purification, and characterization of the recombinant protein. Class discussions emphasize the underlying principles of the biochemical and molecular techniques employed in the course, and how these experimental tools are improved for particular applications. Laboratory reports stress experimental design, data presentation, and interpretation of results. (CHEM 0322) 2 hr. lect., 6 hrs. lab. CW

Spring 2017, Spring 2018, Spring 2019, Spring 2020, Spring 2021

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CLAS 0144 - Literature of the Roman Empire      

Literature of the Roman Empire
In this course we will investigate the literature, culture, and history of the Roman Empire, focusing on how Romans sought, often at the cost of their own lives, to define the role and powers of the emperor and their place as subjects to this new, autocratic power. Texts we will read include: epic (Lucan), tragedy (Seneca), history (Tacitus), biography (Suetonius), prose fiction (Petronius), as well as early Christian literature. As we read we will seek to answer questions about the nature of freedom and empire, what is gained and lost by replacing a republican with an autocratic political system, and whether literature in this period can offer an accurate reflection of reality, function as an instrument of change and protest, or of fearful praise and flattery. 3 hrs lect. 1 hr. disc. CW EUR HIS LIT

Spring 2017, Fall 2019, Spring 2021

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CMLT 0101 - Intro to World Literature      

Introduction to World Literature
This course is an introduction to the critical analysis of imaginative literature of the world, the dissemination of themes and myths, and the role of translation as the medium for reaching different cultures. Through the careful reading of selected classic texts from a range of Western and non-Western cultures, students will deepen their understanding and appreciation of the particular texts under consideration, while developing a critical vocabulary with which to discuss and write about these texts, both as unique artistic achievements of individual and empathetic imagination and as works affected by, but also transcending their historical periods. 3 hrs. lect./disc. CMP CW LIT

Spring 2017, Spring 2018, Spring 2019, Spring 2020, Spring 2021

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CMLT 0210 - Arabia: A Literary Approach      

Arabia: A Literary Approach (in English)
In this course we will examine the Arabian Peninsula as a literary topos that has beguiled representation in both Eastern and Western literature. Whether it is depicted as a glittering spectacle of petro-dollars, the haunt of Bedouin tribesmen or as a sacred focal point, Arabia is an open canvas on which successive societies have sketched their anxieties and aspirations Simultaneously, Arabia has its own rich legacy of self-representation that has been shaped by its harsh environment and unique resources. We will sift through these representations in texts that range among pre-Islamic poetry, the accounts of foreign explorers, novels by modern Arab authors, and contemporary Bedouin oral poetry. All readings will be in English and no previous knowledge of Arabic is required. 3 hrs. sem. AAL CW LIT MDE

Fall 2016

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CMLT 0286 - Philosophy & Literature      

Philosophy & Literature
In this course we will explore the border both separating and joining philosophy and literature. How does literature evoke philosophical problems, and how do philosophers interpret such works? How does fiction create meaning? Beginning with Greek tragedy, we investigate Plato’s “quarrel” with, and Aristotle’s defense of, poetry. Then we will turn to modern works, mostly European, on topics such as: tragedy and ethics; style and rhetoric; author and reader; time and temporality; mood and emotion; existence and mortality. Literary readings after Sophocles will be selected from Borges, Calvino, Camus, Kafka, Tolstoy, and Woolf. Philosophical readings after Plato and Aristotle will be selected from Bergson, Danto, Freud, Murdoch, Ricoeur, and Nussbaum. Not open to students who have taken PHIL/CMLT 1014. CW EUR LIT PHL

Fall 2016, Fall 2018, Fall 2020

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CRWR 0218 - Playwriting I: Beginning      

Playwriting I: Beginning
The purpose of the course is to gain a theoretical and practical understanding of writing for the stage. Students will read, watch, and analyze published plays, as well as work by their peers, but the focus throughout will remain on the writing and development of original work. (Formerly THEA/ENAM 0218) ART CW

Winter 2017, Fall 2017, Spring 2018, Spring 2019, Fall 2019, Fall 2020

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CRWR 0318 - Playwriting II: Advanced      

Playwriting II: Advanced
For students with experience writing short scripts or stories, this workshop will provide a support structure in which to write a full-length stage play. We will begin with extended free and guided writing exercises intended to help students write spontaneously and with commitment. Class discussions will explore scene construction, story structure, and the development of character arc. (ENAM 0170 or THEA 0218 or ENAM/THEA 0240; by approval) (Formerly THEA/ENAM 0318) 2 1/2 hrs. lect./individual labs ART CW

Spring 2017, Winter 2019, Spring 2020

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CRWR 0333 - Writing on Contemporary Issues      

Writing On Contemporary Issues: Writing, Editing, and Publishing Online
This course is an introduction to writing prose for a public audience. Students will create both critical and personal essays that feature strong ideas and perspectives. The readings and writing will focus on American popular culture, broadly defined. Essays will critically engage elements of contemporary American popular culture via a vivid personal voice and presence. Readings will address current issues in popular culture – Gladwell, “Brain Candy,” Klosterman, “Campus Confidential,” for instance. ReMix: Reading in Contemporary Culture is the central text. The end result will be a new online magazine of writings on American popular culture 3 hrs. lect. AMR ART CW NOR SOC

Spring 2017, Spring 2018

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CRWR 0363 - Science Writing for the Public      

Science Writing for the Public
This class is an introduction to writing about science–including nature, medicine, and technology–for general readers and for online publication. Students will publish in our online magazine (constructed Spring 2017). In our reading and writing we explore the craft of making scientific concepts, and the work of scientists, accessible to the public through news articles and essays. The chief work of the class is students' writing. Students will also learn to manipulate images and how to use digital storytelling. As part of our exploration of the craft of science writing, we will read essays and articles by writers such as David Quammen, Atul Gawande, Michael Pollan, and Elizabeth Kolbert; we will also read from The Best Science and Nature Writing (Amy Stewart, ed, 2016). 3 hrs. Sem. AMR CW LIT NOR

Fall 2018

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CRWR 0388 - Environmental Writing      

Writing the Environment in the Digital Age
In this course we will explore the environmental narrative in the digital age. Equipped with laptop, camera, audio and video recorders–the tools of today’s investigative journalists–students will undertake their own environmental investigation in the Middlebury area (anything from wind energy to bat disappearance to land-use along rivers), then sharpen their skills as writers, focusing on setting, character, history and narrative thread. Students will read from a wide selection of environmental authors including Andy Revkin, Elizabeth Kolbert, Tim Robinson, Michael Pollan, Gretel Ehrlich, Rick Bass, Bill McKibben, Annie Dillard, Carl Safina, and Barry Lopez, and write in the environmental genre, incorporating interviews, photos, and audio and video files in the final writing projects. (ENVS 215 and CRWR 170 or CRWR 173) Approval required. (Video and audio equipment supplied by the college) Approval required; please apply online at http://www.middlebury.edu/academics/enam/resources/forms 3 hrs. sem. ART CW

Fall 2019

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CSCI 0401 - Computational Complexity      

Computational Complexity
We will study models of computation and investigate whether a model of computation can solve a given problem efficiently or not. We will consider models that involve all-knowing provers, constrained space, communication limitations, randomness, and quantum resources, among others. While not all of these models are realistic, by studying them, we will gain insight into why certain classes of problems are easy or difficult to solve. Students enrolled in the College Writing (CW) section of the course will explore these ideas through writing, in particular, in three contexts that are critical for theoretical computer science: the proof (expert audience), a review paper (non-expert computer science audience), and a popular science article (educated public audience). (CSCI 0301 and CSCI 0302, or instructor approval).3 hrs. sem./1 hr. disc. Hyflex: in-person participation will be on a rotating schedule, as there is a limited daily capacity. CW DED

Fall 2020, Spring 2021

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DANC 0277 - Body & Earth      

Body and Earth
This course has been designed for students with an interest in the dialogue between the science of body and the science of place. Its goals are to enhance movement efficiency through experiential anatomy and to heighten participants' sensitivity to natural processes and forms in the Vermont bioregion. Weekly movement sessions, essays by nature writers, and writing assignments about place encourage synthesis of personal experience with factual information. Beyond the exams and formal writing assignments, members of the class will present a final research project and maintain an exploratory journal. 3 hrs. lect. 1 hr. lab. AMR ART CW NOR PE

Spring 2017, Spring 2018, Spring 2019, Spring 2020, Fall 2020, Spring 2021

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DANC 0285 - Ethics/Aesthetics/Body      

Ethics, Aesthetics, and the Moving Body
What are you willing to do to "look right?" In this course we will investigate how questions about what is good, and what is beautiful, affect how we treat our bodies. We will explore somatic techniques, in which the body is used as a vehicle for understanding compassion. In contrast, we will examine the extreme physical regimens of concert dance techniques that originated in the U.S., Europe, and Asia, in which the body is seen as an object to be molded into an aesthetic ideal. The course will utilize readings in philosophy and dance history, reflective and research based writing, and movement practices. (No previous experience necessary) 3 hrs. lect./1 hr. lab ART CW

Spring 2017

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ECON 0200 - Health Economics & Policy      

Health Economics and Policy
In this course we will focus on the health care system of the United States. We will apply standard microeconomic tools to the problems of health and health care markets. The course provides the fundamental tools with which to understand how the health care market is different from the markets for other goods. For example, students will learn about the dominant presence of uncertainty at all levels of health care, the government's unusually large presence in the market, the pronounced difference in knowledge between doctors and patients, and the prevalence of situations where the actions of some impose costs or benefits on others (e.g., vaccinations, drug research). (ECON 0155) 3 hrs. lect. AMR CW NOR SOC

Fall 2016, Fall 2018, Spring 2020

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ECON 0207 - Economics and Gender      

Economics and Gender
Economics and Gender is an introduction to using the tools of economics to understand gender-related issues. In the first part of the course we will review economic models of the household, fertility, and labor supply and discuss how they help us interpret long-term trends in marriage and divorce, fertility, and women’s labor-force participation. In the second part of the course we will study economic models of wage determination and focus on explanations of, and policy remedies for, earnings differentials by gender. The final part of the course will focus on new research in economics on gender-related topics. (ECON 0155) 3hrs. lect. CW SOC

Spring 2017, Fall 2017, Spring 2020, Spring 2021

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ECON 0225 - Econ Dev In Latin America      

Theories of Economic Development in Latin America
This course is designed to provide a survey of the most important issues facing Latin American policymakers today. The course will place contemporary problems in their historical perspective and will use applied economic analysis to examine the opportunities and constraints facing the economies of Latin America. (ECON 0150) 3 hrs. lect. AAL AMR CW SOC

Fall 2016, Fall 2017

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ECON 0301 - CSPW: Economic Journalism      

Calderwood Seminar in Public Writing: Economic Journalism*
Drawing on core courses in the major, students will strengthen their understanding of economic analysis and develop their writing skills by addressing contemporary economic issues in a journalistic format. In a series of weekly assignments, including book reviews, op-eds, and coverage of recent research articles, students will translate the language of formal economics into pieces that are both interesting and accessible to educated non-economists. Most class sessions will be organized as workshops devoted to critiquing the economic and expository content of student work. (ECON 211 and ECON 250 and ECON 255) 3 hr. sem. CW SOC

Spring 2019

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ECON 0329 - Theory & Measurement/Econ Hist      

Theory and Measurement in Economic History
Economic historians study past events, employing diverse methodologies to understand technology adoption, market integration, and the effect of institutions on performance. In this course we will focus on strategies economists use to learn about the past itself and to use past events to understand how all economies function. We will ponder especially conflicts and complementarities between theoretical and empirical reasoning. Each student will complete a research proposal that justifies applying a set of tools to address an economic history question. (ECON 0210 and ECON 0240 or ECON 0255; or by approval) 3 hrs. sem. CMP CW HIS SOC

Spring 2017, Spring 2018, Spring 2019, Spring 2021

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ECON 0352 - Structuralist Macroeconomics      

Structuralist Macroeconomics: Theory and Policies for Developing Countries
In this course we will examine key macroeconomics challenges faced by developing countries . In contrast to the senior seminar in Macroeconomics of Development, which focuses on long-run growth, this course focuses on short-run and medium-run macroeconomic issues; as such, it builds more closely on the Macroeconomic Theory core course. The topics covered include structural constraints on aggregate demand, fiscal and monetary policies, distributive conflict, and debt. We will examine these topics through a combination of formal theoretical models and real-world applications. (MATH 0121 and ECON 0240 or ECON 0250) 3 hrs. lect. AAL CW SAF

Spring 2018, Spring 2019

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EDST 0410 - Student Teaching Seminar      

Student Teaching Seminar
Concurrent with student teaching, this course is designed to provide guidance in curriculum development and its implementation in the classroom, and to explore issues related to the teaching process and the profession. Students will construct a Teaching Licensure Portfolio as well as exchange ideas about their student teaching experiences. Topics including technology, classroom management, special education, and assessment will be featured. The Vermont Framework of Standards and Learning Opportunities, the five Standards for Vermont Educators, the Principles for Vermont Educators, and ROPA-R will guide the development of the Teacher Licensure Portfolio. (Corequisite: EDST 0405, EDST 0406, EDST 0407 or EDST 0415, EDST 0416 EDST 0417) (Approval required) 3 hrs. lect. CW

Fall 2016, Fall 2017, Spring 2018, Fall 2018, Fall 2019, Fall 2020

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ENAM 0103 - Reading Literature      

Reading Literature
Please refer to each section for specific course descriptions. CW LIT

Fall 2016, Spring 2017, Fall 2017, Spring 2018, Fall 2018, Spring 2019, Fall 2019, Winter 2020, Spring 2020, Fall 2020, Spring 2021

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ENVS 0442 - Transnational Feminist Conserv      

Transnational Feminist Conservation
In this course we explore a transnational feminist approach to conservation. We will start by delving into the masculinist history of conservation, and reviewing a set of theories and vocabularies focused on gender, as well as race, class, and ability as key sites of power that effect both human and non-human bodies and ecological processes, from coral reefs to the arctic tundra. We will compare case studies across multiple regions globally on topics such as conservation via population control, feminist food, community-based conservation, and feminist-indigenous approaches to inquiry. We will debate feminist science, examining the conflicting epistemic foundations of objective versus situated knowledge. We will hone our writing skills in a variety of genres including blogs, academic essays, poems, and zines. (ENVS 0211, ENVS 0215 or ENVS/GSFS 209) 3 hrs. sem. AAL CMP CW SAF SOC

Fall 2019, Spring 2021

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FMMC 0355 - Theories of Popular Culture      

Theories of Popular Culture
This writing-intensive course introduces a range of theoretical approaches to study American popular culture, exploring the intersection between everyday life, mass media, and identity and social power. We will consider key theoretical readings and approaches to studying culture, including ideology and hegemony theory, audience studies, subcultural analysis, the politics of taste, and cultural representations of identity. Using these theoretical tools, we will examine a range of popular media and sites of cultural expression, from television to toys, films to music, to understand popular culture as a site of ongoing political and social struggle. (FMMC 0102 or FMMC 0104 or AMST 0101 or instructor approval) 3 hrs. sem/3 hrs. screen. CW SOC

Fall 2016, Fall 2019

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FMMC 0358 - Theories of Spectatorship      

Theories of Spectatorship, Audience, and Fandom
With the spread of digital technologies, remix has come to the forefront as a major form of artistic work and cultural and political commentary. In this course we will explore the history, cultural and legal impact, and creative logics of remix traditions. We will examine how digital technologies shape transformative creativity. Drawing on the work of theorists such as DJ Spooky and Lawrence Lessig, we will consider the creative and legal ramifications of remix logics. We will explore a range of remix works across media with a focus on video. Students will also produce remixes through individual and group work. Note to students: this course involves substantial streaming of films and television for assigned viewing. (FMMC 0101 or FMMC 0102 or FMMC 0104 or FMMC 0254) 3 hrs. lect./disc./3 hrs. screen. AMR ART CW NOR SOC

Fall 2018, Fall 2020

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FMMC 0360 - Methods of Film Criticism      

Methods of Film & Media Criticism
This writing-intensive seminar takes a close look at four key theoretical concepts for film & media criticism: textuality, authorship, genre, and narrative. How do we understand the boundaries between any film “text” and its broader intertextual contexts? How does authorship frame our understanding of the style and ethics of any given film? How do genre categories help us make sense of films and media, as well as their cultural contexts? How do films and media tell stories in distinctive and innovative ways? Through theoretical readings and exemplary screenings, we will learn to become sharper critics of films and media. (FMMC 0101 or FMMC 0102 or FMMC 0104 or instructor's approval) 3 hrs. sem./3 hrs. screen CW

Spring 2018, Spring 2020, Spring 2021

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GEOG 0339 - Practicing Human Geography      

Practicing Human Geography
Whether you are planning to do your own research or want to be a more savvy consumer of research produced by others, it is useful to develop an understanding of the process of creating, discovering, and interpreting information about the world. In this course, students will explore quantitative and qualitative methodologies and the ways they can be used in human geography research. Through examples, exercises, and readings, students will learn the types of questions different techniques are designed to answer, how they work, and how to interpret the results. Students will gain hands on experience conducting surveys, generating and interpreting qualitative data, selecting and implementing statistical analyses, and writing research reports, to build competence and critical awareness in the practice and communication of research. (At least one course in geography, AP human geography credit, or instructor approval) 3 hrs. lect./3 hrs. lab CW DED

Fall 2016, Fall 2017, Spring 2019, Spring 2020, Spring 2021

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GEOL 0201 - Bedrock Geology of Vermont      

Bedrock Geology of Vermont
This course explores the fascinating geology of Vermont. Students learn the geology through six field problems, involving extended trips around western Vermont. Lectures on the meaning of rocks support the fieldwork. The last few indoor labs are devoted to understanding the geologic map of Vermont. Emphasis is on descriptive writing and on use of data to interpret origin of rocks. Culminates in a written report on the geologic and plate tectonic evolution of Vermont. (One geology course) 3 hrs. lect., 3 hrs. lab/field trips CW SCI

Fall 2017, Fall 2018, Fall 2019

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GEOL 0281 - Structural Geology      

Structural Geology
Plate tectonics and mountain building processes result in deformation of the Earth's crust. Structural geology is the study of this deformation, and this course will examine the many types of structures found in crustal rocks (folds, faults, etc.) and explore the forces responsible for their formation. Laboratory exercises will emphasize the hands-on description and analysis of structures in the field, as well as the practical aspects of map interpretation and computer analysis of structural data. (GEOL 0112, or GEOL 0161, or GEOL 0170 or by waiver) 3 hrs. lect., 3 hrs. lab/field trips CW SCI

Fall 2016, Fall 2017, Fall 2019, Fall 2020

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GSFS 0205 - Race, Rhetoric, and Protest      

Race, Rhetoric, and Protest
In this course we will study the theoretical and rhetorical underpinnings of racial protest in America. We will begin by studying movements from the 1950s and 1960s, moving from bus boycotts to Black Power protests, and will build to analyzing recent protests in Ferguson, Dallas, and New York. Readings will include texts from Charles E. Morris III, Aja Martinez, Shon Meckfessel, Gwendolyn Pough, and various articles and op-eds. Students will write analyses of historical and contemporary protest, op-eds about the local culture, and syntheses on the course readings. 3 hrs. Lect AMR CW NOR SOC

Fall 2017, Spring 2018, Fall 2019, Fall 2020

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GSFS 0225 - Feminist Blogging      

Feminist Blogging
Blogging is a genre that lends itself to both feminist theory and practice because it involves writing from a particular place and a particular embodiment, about how power operates in our social worlds. Feminist theory demands intersectionality: an ability to weave race, class, gender, sexuality and other forms of power into a single theoretical approach. Feminist blogging transforms intersectionality into a single narrative arc. In this course we will think about blogging as a genre and how feminist theory can infuse that genre into a more vibrant, complex, and even transformative site. Throughout the course we will read feminist theory, analyze feminist blogs, and produce our own feminist blogs. 3 hrs. lect. AMR CMP CW LIT NOR SOC

Spring 2017, Fall 2017, Fall 2019

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GSFS 0235 - Gender Politics in Arab World      

Gender Politics of the Arab World
The aim of this course is to explore the ways in which the social and cultural construction of sexual difference shapes the politics of gender and sexuality in the Middle East and North Africa. Using interdisciplinary feminist theories, we will explore key issues and debates including the interaction of religion and sexuality, women’s movements, gender-based violence, queerness and gay/straight identities. Looking at the ways in which the Arab Spring galvanized what some have called a “gender revolution,” we will examine women’s roles in the various revolutions across the Arab World, and explore the varied and shifting gender dynamics in the region. Taught in English (formerly ARBC/GSFS 0328) 3 hrs. Sem. (National/Transnational Feminisms) AAL CMP CW MDE SOC

Fall 2019

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GSFS 0288 - Writing Race and Class      

Writing Race and Class
In this course we will take a literary and intersectional approach to topics of race and class. Readings include stories, essays, and poems by modern and contemporary writers, including James Baldwin, Audre Lorde, Louise Erdrich, Gloria Anzaldua, Adrienne Rich, Amy Tan, Junot Diaz, and Eli Clare. Students will write short critical and creative pieces and will develop one longer essay, a critical narrative. We will engage in writing workshops and contemplative activities. Students will preferably have prior experience in discussing issues of race and class, although introductory theories will be made available to provide frameworks for discussion. CW LIT SOC

Winter 2020, Fall 2020

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GSFS 0303 - Outlaw Women      

Outlaw Women
In this course we will read and discuss literary texts that feature women who defy social norms: daring survivors, scholars, “whores,” queers, artists, servants, revolutionaries. Texts include Powell’s The Pagoda, Duras’s The Lover, Lorde’s Zami, and Nafisi's Reading Lolita in Tehran. The course will take postcolonial and global approaches to desire and difference and to narratives of resistance, rescue and freedom. We will discuss rhetorical practices, such as écriture féminine, and readerships, such as women’s book groups, through a transnational lense. Students will develop their critical imaginations through discussion, contemplation, research, and analytical and creative writing. 3 hrs. lect. CMP CW LIT SOC

Spring 2017, Spring 2018, Spring 2019, Spring 2020, Spring 2021

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GSFS 0328 - Gender Politics in Arab World      

Gender Politics of the Arab World
The aim of this course is to explore the ways in which the social and cultural construction of sexual difference shapes the politics of gender and sexuality in the Middle East and North Africa. Using interdisciplinary feminist theories, we will explore key issues and debates including the interaction of religion and sexuality, women’s movements, gender-based violence, queerness and gay/straight identities. Looking at the ways in which the Arab Spring galvanized what some have called a “gender revolution,” we will examine women’s roles in the various revolutions across the Arab World, and explore the varied and shifting gender dynamics in the region. (Any one GSFS course or by approval) 3 hrs. Sem. AAL CMP CW MDE SOC

Spring 2018

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GSFS 0358 - Theories of Spectatorship      

Theories of Spectatorship, Audience, and Fandom
In this course we will explore a range of theoretical approaches to the study of spectatorship and media audiences. How has the viewer been theorized throughout the history of film, television, and digital media? How have theoretical understandings of the relationship between viewer and media changed in the digital age? How have gender, class, and race informed cultural notions of media audiences from silent cinema to today? We will consider key theoretical readings and approaches to studying spectators, viewers, audiences, fans, and anti-fans across the history of the moving image. (FMMC 0101 or FMMC 0102 or FMMC 0104 or FMMC 0254) 3 hrs. lect./disc./3 hrs. screen. AMR ART CW NOR SOC

Fall 2018, Fall 2020

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GSFS 0420 - Representing Reproduction      

Representing Reproduction: The Politics of Reproduction 2
In this project-based seminar on reproductive politics, students will construct materials related to an animation about abortion that is being produced in the Middlebury Animation Studio. These materials may include a podcast, website, or game. Extending the discussions we had in GSFS 329: The Politics of Reproduction, we will also view popular cultural representations that focus on reproductive issues in the United States (such as television series, films, etc) and examine broader discussions of these representations (in blogs, podcasts, etc). Doing so will allow us to produce materials that both draw from academic discussions of reproduction and push beyond the limits of these texts for addressing contemporary reproductive politics. (GSFS 0329) AMR CW NOR SOC WTR

Winter 2019

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GSFS 0425 - Men and Masculinities      

Men and Masculinities
In this course we will consider the creation and performance of masculinities in the American context.  We will ask how men are made and how that making relies on class, race, sexuality, and nation. We will begin with early capitalism and the birth of the ideal man as “market man.”  We will then look at how ideal masculinity depends on the creation of “degenerate” men, like the myth of the hyper-masculinized Black male “beast” and the creation of the mythic mannish lesbian.  We will then trace these late 19th century men and masculinities into our current moment of political machismo, trolling misogyny, bromance, feminist men, hipster men, dandy bois, transmen, and more.  Readings will include: Michael Kimmel, Guyland; C.J. Pascoe and Tristan Bridges, Exploring Masculinities: Identity, Inequality, Continuity and Change; C.J. Pascoe, Dude, You’re a Fag: Masculinity and Sexuality in High School; Judith Halberstam, Female Masculinity, and bell hooks, We Real Cool: Black Men and Masculinity.  (GSFS 0191 or GSFS 0200 or GSFS 0289) 3 hrs. sem. (Critical Race Feminisms)/ AMR CW HIS NOR SOC

Spring 2018, Spring 2020

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GSFS 0435 - Feminist Engaged Research      

Feminist Engaged Research
What makes research feminist? How does one conduct feminist research? How has feminist research been useful to social movements and how have movements informed feminist research? What happens to feminist research when it moves to the public sphere? In this class students learn how to produce original feminist research—how to craft research questions, write a literature review, choose relevant methodologies, and collect and analyze qualitative data. In addition to writing a research paper, students will translate their research findings into an alternative (non-academic paper) format and for an audience beyond our classroom. (GSFS 0320 or instructor approval). 3 hrs. Sem. AMR CW NOR SOC

Fall 2017, Fall 2018, Fall 2019, Fall 2020

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GSFS 0442 - Transnational Feminist Conserv      

Transnational Feminist Conservation
In this course we explore a transnational feminist approach to conservation. We will start by delving into the masculinist history of conservation, and reviewing a set of theories and vocabularies focused on gender, as well as race, class, and ability as key sites of power that effect both human and non-human bodies and ecological processes, from coral reefs to the arctic tundra. We will compare case studies across multiple regions globally on topics such as conservation via population control, feminist food, community-based conservation, and feminist-indigenous approaches to inquiry. We will debate feminist science, examining the conflicting epistemic foundations of objective versus situated knowledge. We will hone our writing skills in a variety of genres including blogs, academic essays, poems, and zines. (ENVS 0211, ENVS 0215 or ENVS/GSFS 209) (National/Transnational Feminisms) 3 hrs. sem. AAL CMP CW SAF SOC

Fall 2019, Spring 2021

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HARC 0301 - Ways of Seeing      

Ways of Seeing
In this course we will focus on the various methods and theories that can enrich and deepen our understanding of art, architecture, and visual culture. Students will hone their analytical skills, both verbal and written, often with recourse to objects from the College Museum and the campus at large. In general, this seminar will develop students’ awareness of objects of culture broadly construed, and sharpen their understanding of the scope and intellectual history of the field. To be taken during the sophomore or junior year as a prerequisite for HARC 0710 and HARC 0711. 3 hrs. sem. ART CW

Fall 2016, Fall 2017, Spring 2018, Fall 2018, Spring 2019, Fall 2019, Spring 2020, Fall 2020, Spring 2021

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HARC 0331 - Architectural Utopias      

The Utopian Impulse in Architecture
In this seminar we will explore the impulse to create the world anew through urban planning and architecture. From St. Augustine to the New Urbanism, the imagining and building of utopian communities has played a central role in architectural thought. We will see that while some utopias were built (and generally failed), many were never meant to serve as real prescriptions for human progress, but instead functioned as critical devices that challenged the status quo (while remaining impossible dreams of a more perfect world). By the conclusion of this course you will see architectural utopias as nuanced and complex constructions, and will be able to confidently read, describe and analyze scholarly secondary and primary texts in the field of architectural history, as well as buildings and urban spaces. 3 hrs. sem. ART CW EUR HIS

Spring 2017

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HARC 0354 - Rhetoric of Public Memory      

The Rhetoric of Public Memory
This course focuses on public memory and the various statues, memorials, sites, and spaces that construct public memory in contemporary U.S. society. In this course, we will study local Middlebury and Vermont public memories, Civil War and Confederate memories, and spaces of contention and controversy, while visiting nearby memorials and museums. Students in this class will compose analyses on these public memories and create arguments on the viability of memories in different shapes and forms. Overall, students will leave this class with a stronger understanding of not only public memory rhetoric but the various components that keep these memories alive. 3 hrs. lect. AMR CW HIS NOR SOC

Spring 2019, Fall 2020

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HARC 0370 - How Asian Art is Made      

Potter, Painter, and Goldsmith: How Asian Art is Made
In this seminar we will explore the manner in which the distinctive artistic traditions of China, Korea, and Japan were shaped by the materials and techniques available to ancient craftsmen. Some of these technologies remained localized, while others—like porcelain and silk—went on to transform world history by fueling major export markets. Through observation of objects from the Middlebury Museum of Art, we will explore such questions as: How was Asian art made; Why was it made that way? What was its historical impact? Topics will include jade and other hardstones, bronze, textiles, ceramics, painting, lacquer, glass, and gold. AAL ART CW HIS NOA

Fall 2019

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INTD 0253 - Art & Craft of Statesmanship      

The Art and Craft of Statesmanship
This course explores the art and craft of statesmanship. It is a hands-on course that explores how an academic idea is translated into a policy proposal. Students will work in teams learning the skills needed to move from abstract idea to political proposal. They will do background research, write a white paper report, and draft speeches that communicate a policy proposal to the general public. 3 hrs. sem. CW

Fall 2016

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INTD 0255 - Reporting and Writing the News      

Reporting and Writing the News
Students in this introductory journalism class will learn how to conceive, report, write, edit, and publish a variety of stories, including hard news, features, and opinion pieces. They will develop story ideas, conduct interviews, and write balanced, engaging articles on deadline, covering the campus and local community. Like professional journalists, they will practice crafting clear, accurate, and fair stories. They will follow the news daily and read a wide range of exemplary pieces. We will also explore the pros and cons of social media, and discuss the key ethical and legal issues facing reporters today. (Not open to students who have taken CRWR 1002) 3 hrs. lect. CW

Spring 2017, Fall 2018, Fall 2019

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INTD 0400 - Learning with Maps      

Learning with Maps
In this studio we will create online educational resources that help undergraduate students learn digital methods for mapping and spatial analysis. We will design and evaluate these learning materials by applying cognitive research on spatial thinking, multimedia learning, and instructional design. Studio participants will engage with an academic department or Middlebury program in order to identify existing and potential applications of digital mapping and spatial analysis, produce distributable multimedia tutorials to help novices integrate software techniques with more general concepts of spatial representation and analysis, and assess the effectiveness of their instructional design on student learning. (GEOG 0120; Approval required) 3 hrs. sem. CW

Fall 2016

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ITAL 0354 - Italian Identity      

Italian Identity through History, Literature, and Music
What does it mean to be “Italian”? What is “campanilismo”? What role do languages and dialects play, and how important is music, from opera to contemporary songs, in the construction of Italian identity? This course acquaints students with the major 19th to 21st century debates on Italy and Italian iscdentity, and develops students' linguistic, critical, and analytical skills. Readings will introduce literary genres within their historical framework. Special emphasis will be placed on the skills of both Academic and Public Writing, also focusing on rewriting, editing, and peer reviewing. (ITAL 0252 or equivalent, taught in Italian) 3 hrs. lect./disc., 2 hrs. screen. CW EUR LIT

Fall 2017, Fall 2020

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ITAL 0380 - CSPW: Italy and Migrants      

Calderwood Seminar in Public Writing: Italy and Migrants
International migration is a major contemporary phenomenon for many countries, including Italy. We will read, analyze, and write effectively about migrants' stories, struggles, related issues for host countries, and how migrants' lives are portrayed in various media. The goals of this Calderwood Seminar are to learn about migration through the lenses of Italy, and to improve student writing. We will pay particular attention to writing effectively and for a general audience, through peer-writing sessions and group discussions. Class meetings are once a week, but students will be required to interact regularly outside of class, providing in-depth feedback to each other's essays. (ITAL 0252 or by approval) 3 hrs. sem. CW EUR LNG

Fall 2018, Spring 2020

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LNGT 0206 - Narratives in News Media      

Narratives in News Media
In this course we will consider questions such as: What linguistic strategies do the news media use to craft compelling stories? What are the dominant narratives at play about national and global social issues, and how are some journalists working to counter those narratives? We will employ Critical Discourse Analysis as a central framework, reading theoretical and empirical work by linguists such as Teun van Dijk, as well as from sociologists and political scientists. We will engage with “On the Media” and other podcasts, TED talks, documentaries such as Outfoxed (2004), and online magazines. Students will write for a variety of audiences. 3 hrs. lect./disc. CW SOC

Spring 2018, Spring 2019, Spring 2020

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LNGT 0208 - Cultural Rhetorics      

Cultural Rhetorics
In this course we will focus on the budding field of cultural rhetorics—a set of practices and methodologies that help us understand the way different groups of people make meaning and interact. We will study Latinx, Black, Asian, Native, feminist, LGBTQ+, and public memory rhetorics, focusing on the language and persuasion practices these groups use in their discourses. In this class students will write comparative analyses of cultural rhetorics, compose their own cultural literacy narratives, construct arguments about culture, and build multimodal projects. Students will leave the class with an understanding of the various cultural practices of rhetoric in the United States. 3 hrs. lect. AMR CMP CW NOR SOC

Fall 2018

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LNGT 0261 - Revival of the Hebrew Language      

The Sleeping Beauty: Themes in the Cultural and Linguistic History of the Hebrew Language
The Hebrew Language has been awakened. In this course we will explore when, where, why, and by whom was this Sleeping Beauty was revived; how both its awakening and hibernation has been connected to linguistic, cultural, and societal transformation over 25 centuries. We will examine poetry, liturgy, Midrash, and other writing by philosophers, poets, linguists, and religious leaders. We will discuss the connection of the revival of the language to the Zionist movement. Throughout the course we will try to answer questions such as: Why do we regard Hebrew as one and the same language after three millennia of constant linguistic change? Was the revival of Hebrew a miracle or a failure? How did Hebrew influence Jewish practices of exegesis? 3 hrs. lect./disc. CW SOC

Spring 2017, Spring 2018

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MATH 0190 - Math Proof: Art and Argument      

Mathematical Proof: Art and Argument
Mathematical proof is the language of mathematics. As preparation for upper-level coursework, this course will give students an opportunity to build a strong foundation in reading, writing, and analyzing mathematical argument. Course topics will include an introduction to mathematical logic, standard proof structures and methods, set theory, and elementary number theory. Additional topics will preview ideas and methods from more advanced courses. We will also explore important historical examples of proofs, both ancient and modern. The driving force behind this course will be mathematical expression with a primary focus on argumentation and the creative process. (MATH 0122 or MATH 0200) 3 hrs. lect. CW DED

Spring 2017

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MATH 0328 - Numerical Linear Algebra      

Numerical Linear Algebra
Numerical linear algebra is the study of algorithms for solving problems such as finding solutions of linear systems and eigenvalues of matrices. Many real-life applications simplify to these scenarios and often involve millions of variables. We will analyze shortcomings of direct methods such as Gaussian Elimination, which theoretically produces the true solution but fails in practical applications. In contrast, iterative methods are often more practical and precise, and continually evolve with changing technology and our understanding of mathematics. Our study will include the First Order Richardson, Steepest Descent, and Conjugate Gradient algorithms for linear systems, and the power method for eigenvalue problems. (MATH 0200) 3 hrs. lect. CW DED

Spring 2017, Spring 2019, Fall 2020

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MUSC 0333 - Music in Western Cultures      

Music in Western Cultures
In this course we will develop skills for assessing music’s social, economic, and political importance in Western societies. Through a series of units focusing on various aspects of music (such as composition, performance, dissemination, and reception) and on various eras from ancient Greece to the present, students will engage with the principal questions and methods of historical musicology. (MUSC 0101) 3 hrs. lect. ART CMP CW HIS

Fall 2018, Fall 2019, Fall 2020

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PHIL 0303 - Aristotle      

Philosophy of Aristotle
In this class we will explore both the original breadth and the contemporary relevance of Aristotle's thought. We will read a diverse selection of his writings, beginning with ethical and political works, continuing to works on art and poetry, the soul, and nature, and concluding with logical and ontological works. We will ask why Aristotelian virtue ethics in particular has enjoyed a recent renaissance and generated special interest in Aristotle's ideas about the ethical role of friendship, the perceptive power of the emotions, and the different kinds of intelligence. (Previous course in philosophy or waiver.) 3 hrs. sem. CW EUR PHL

Spring 2019

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PHIL 0322 - Liberalism and Its Critics      

Liberalism and Its Critics
Liberal political thought is widely touted and accepted in Western societies. In this course, we will take a close look at what liberalism is by investigating the origins of liberalism in the writings of John Locke and John Stuart Mill and by evaluating the thought of contemporary liberal political philosophers, e.g. John Rawls and Will Kymlicka. We will also analyze the arguments of those like Michael Sandel and Yael Tamir who have criticized liberalism as misguided or incomplete. We seek to gain an understanding of the political and moral principles that give priority to liberty and related values or concepts like toleration, autonomy, and fairness. (One course in philosophy or waiver) 3hrs. CW PHL

Spring 2020

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PHYS 0321 - Experimental Physics      

Experimental Techniques in Physics
This course will cover the design and execution of experiments, and the analysis and presentation of data, at an advanced level. Laboratory experiments will be chosen to illustrate the use of electronic, mechanical, and optical instruments to investigate fundamental physical phenomena, such as the properties of atoms and nuclei and the nature of radiation. Skills in computer-based data analysis and presentation will be developed and emphasized. This course satisfies the College writing requirement. (PHYS 0111 concurrent or prior; PHYS 0201 and PHYS 0202 and PHYS 0212; MATH 0200 recommended) 3 hrs. lect./3 hrs. lab/1 hr disc. (Approval required) CW

Fall 2016, Spring 2017, Fall 2017, Spring 2018, Fall 2018, Fall 2019, Spring 2020, Fall 2020, Spring 2021

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PSCI 0209 - Local Green Politics      

Local Green Politics
How do local communities manage their natural resources? How do they navigate global forces that often work against them? Through systematic comparisons of cases of successful and unsuccessful community resource management efforts, we will assess under what conditions local communities are likely to be successful environmental stewards. The course will draw on experiences from Africa, Asia, Europe, Latin America, and the USA. Students will compare the cultural contexts in which resource management decisions are made. By the end of the course, students will be expected to describe and critically analyze cases of resource (mis)management. They will also learn to offer solutions to situations of resource mismanagement. 3 hrs. lect./disc./(Comparative Politics)/ AAL CMP CW SOC

Spring 2020

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PSCI 0219 - Free Speech v. Racist Speech      

What Can I Say? Free Speech v. Racist Speech in the United States and Europe
In this course we will delve into the politics and law surrounding issues of racist speech in the United States and Europe. We will look at the development of speech doctrines in the post-World War Two era, drawing on well-known case studies from American constitutional history, as well as European examples such as the Danish Cartoon Controversy and Holocaust denial cases. Through comparison across time and countries, we will debate the appropriate limits on racist speech in different contexts. (Not open to students who have taken FYSE 1510 or PSCI 1023) 3 hrs. lect./disc (Comparative Politics) CMP CW SOC

Fall 2018, Fall 2020

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PSCI 0240 - Comp Pol of Ethnic Diversity      

Race Around the World: The Comparative Politics of Ethnic Diversity
This course aims to promote reflection on the interactions between the state and ethnic and racially diverse societies. We will examine the political development of concepts of race and racism and address topics such as slave emancipation, anti-Semitism and the Holocaust, and decolonization, as well as contemporary issues such as affirmative action, hate crimes, and Islamophobia. We will draw on readings and case studies from North America, South America, Europe, Africa and Asia. 3 hrs. lect./disc. (Comparative Politics)/ CMP CW SOC

Fall 2016

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PSCI 0260 - Pol Economy Drug Trafficking      

The Political Economy of Drug Trafficking
This course examines the political economy of drug trafficking in the Western Hemisphere. How have transnational drug markets evolved, and why? What effects has narco-trafficking had on the political, economic, legal, financial, and social systems of producer, consumer, and transshipment countries? What policy responses are available to combat it? How should we weigh alternative policy options? Examination of these issues centers on source countries in Latin America's Andean region, the chief transshipment country (Mexico), and the principal consumer country (the US). Attention also is devoted to the drug trade's effects on American society and criminal justice system. 3 hrs. lect./disc.
(International Relations and Foreign Policy)/ AAL AMR CMP CW SOC

Spring 2017, Spring 2020

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PSCI 0286 - Authoritarian Politics      

Authoritarian Politics
The purpose of this course is to examine the characteristics and dynamics of non-democratic regimes. First, we will define autocracy and consider different forms of authoritarianism and how their leaders come into power. Next, we will investigate why some authoritarian regimes are able to sustain their rule while others collapse. Finally, we will explore how citizens of these regimes bolster, comply with, or revolt against their governments. Throughout the course, adopting a comparative standpoint, we will draw on various country cases. (Comparative Politics)/ CMP CW SOC

Fall 2017, Fall 2018, Fall 2019, Fall 2020, Spring 2021

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PSCI 0307 - Politics of Virtual Realities      

The Politics of Virtual Realities
How has technology changed our politics? Are those changes all for the good? In this course we will explore the political, legal, and normative implications of the Internet for liberal democracy. We start with the US Constitution and explore arguments that it cannot by itself prevent the Internet from becoming a domain of manipulation rather than of freedom. How can we uphold the ideals of liberty and equality? And, since cyberspace has no country, whose laws should govern it? Cases will include President Obama's campaign and governance strategies, Google's activities abroad, cybersecurity, virtual war, and the WikiLeaks controversy. 3 hrs. lect./disc. (International Relations and Foreign Policy)/ CW SOC

Fall 2016

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PSCI 0319 - The Politics of Taxes      

The Politics of Taxes
Who gets taxed and how much they get taxed is at least as much a political decision as an economic one. Additionally, the ways governments tax their citizens (and how much they tax them) vary widely between different countries. Moreover, the purpose underlying governments’ use of taxes ranges from fighting inequality to incentivizing various behavioral changes. In this course we will examine sales taxes, wealth taxes, corporate profits, income taxes and the politics around those taxes in a variety of national contexts. (Comparative Politics). 3 hrs. sem. CW SOC

Fall 2020

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PSCI 0324 - Pol Development Western Europe      

The Political Development of Western Europe
In what ways are the political systems and politics of France, Germany, Italy, and Britain similar? In what ways do they differ? How might we explain these patterns? This course attempts to answer these questions through comparative investigation of the processes and consequences of economic and political modernization in these nations from the feudal period to the 21st century. 3 hrs. lect./disc. (Comparative Politics)/ CMP CW EUR SOC

Spring 2017

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PSCI 1020 - American Power:Soft/Hard/Smart      

American Power: Soft, Hard, or Smart
The wars in Afghanistan and Iraq, the Libya intervention and the conflicts in Syria have raised important questions about how the United States chooses to use its power on behalf of its interests. In this course we will survey historical, institutional, and theoretical factors as a prelude to consideration of how the United States has used its power since World War II. Based on selected case studies, we will examine pro and con arguments for different approaches to the use of power (soft, hard, smart) with extensive class debate and discussion. (International Relations and Foreign Policy)/ AMR CW NOR SOC WTR

Winter 2018, Winter 2020

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PSYC 0202 - Research Methods in Psychology      

Research Methods in Psychology
This course will provide students with an understanding of the research methodology used by psychologists. Students will learn to read psychological studies and other related research as informed consumers. Students will collect, analyze, and interpret data during lab assignments. They will also design an empirical study, review the related literature, and write a formal APA-style research proposal. (PSYC 0105 and PSYC 0201 or MATH 0116 or ECON 0210; not open to first-year students; open to psychology and neuroscience majors) 3 hrs. lect./1.5 hr. lab CW DED

Fall 2016, Spring 2017, Fall 2017, Spring 2018, Fall 2018, Spring 2019, Fall 2019, Spring 2020, Fall 2020, Spring 2021

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RELI 0233 - Christianity in Africa      

Christianity in Africa
Christianity has an ancient heritage in Africa and a vibrant presence today, especially in the form of charismatic and Pentecostal movements which emphasize divine healing and prophecy. In this course we will examine the texts, beliefs, and individuals who shaped early Christianity in northern Africa and Ethiopia, with emphasis on monasticism, martyrdom, and the writings of Augustine of Hippo. Then we will examine cross-cultural contact with European Christians, including Roman Catholic and Protestant missionary encounters. We will examine issues of racism, sexism, and cultural superiority past and present, to help us understand the complex role of religion and belief in the supernatural in post-colonial Africa today. 3 hrs. lect./disc. AAL CMP CW PHL SAF

Fall 2016, Fall 2017

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RELI 0248 - Religion & Class in South Asia      

Religion and Class in South Asia
In this course we will examine the shifting religious landscapes of South Asia in relationship to “new middle classes” in Nepal, India, and Pakistan. We will begin by defining class in contemporary South Asia and then consider ethnographic examples of how class is reshaping religious communities, identities, values, and practices among Hindus and Muslims. Special attention will be given to shifts in practices related to gender and caste, media (television, film, and comic books), fashion, food, and leisure in order to expand our definitions of what “counts” as religion in the modern world. 3 hrs. lect. AAL CW PHL SOA SOC

Spring 2018

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RELI 0271 - Death in Latin America      

Death in Latin America
The refrain of colonialism in the Americas was death. In its wake, encounters with dying and the dead shaped national cultures and popular religiosities across the hemisphere. In this course we will explore the diversity of rituals, stories, and devotions surrounding death in Latin America. Through a careful reading of Eduardo Galeano’s The Open Veins of Latin America, we will critically examine the geopolitical entity of Latin America in its historical context while learning how to write powerfully about its social and economic realities. We will cover death across secular and religious formations in Mexico, Haiti, Brazil, Guatemala, and the U.S.-Mexico borderlands. 3 hrs. lect. AAL AMR CMP CW PHL SOC

Fall 2019

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RUSS 0217 - Revolution: Art & Soviet Cult      

The Idea of Revolution: Aesthetics, Politics and the Avant-Garde in Early Soviet Culture
In this course we will explore intersections between aesthetics and politics in the context of one of the great upheavals of the twentieth century, the Russian Revolution of 1917 and the rise of the Soviet Union. How might art represent a revolutionary politics, and in what ways might it betray it? What does Communism mean for artistic production? We will consider these and other questions across different media, including literature, cinema, and the plastic arts. We will discuss works by Mayakovsky, Malevich, Babel, Zamiatin, Tatlin, Eisenstein, Vertov, Olesha, Platonov, and others. Taught in English. 3 hrs. lect. AAL ART CW LIT NOA

Fall 2017

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RUSS 0355 - Gogol and Romantic Melancholy      

Gogol and Romantic Melancholy (In English)
In this course we will explore the corpus of one of the canonical figures of nineteenth-century Russian literature, Nikolai Gogol, and situate him within a broader tradition of romantic melancholy in Western, and later, Russian culture (e.g. writers such as Poe, Baudelaire, Benjamin, Dostoevsky, Platonov, filmmakers such as Tarkovsky and Zviagintsev). How does one describe a world where formerly familiar pathways to transcendence have been left in ruins by modernity? Can this loss be remedied in art, or only repeated? Twice weekly discussions of materials in English, though students are encouraged to engage with the original texts. 3 hrs. lect. CW EUR LIT

Fall 2020

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SOAN 0301 - Soc Research Methods      

The Logic of Sociological Inquiry
In this course students will be introduced to the basic tools of sociological research including problem formulation, strategies of design and data collection, and analysis and presentation of results. This class will help students formulate a research question and develop a research strategy to best explore that question. Those strategies may include interviews, structured observation, participant observation, content analysis, and surveys. This class, strongly recommended for juniors, will culminate in the submission of a senior project proposal. (SOAN 0103 or SOAN 0105) 3 hrs. lect./disc. (Sociology) CW SOC

Spring 2017, Spring 2018, Spring 2019

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SOAN 0302 - Ethnographic Research      

The Research Process: Ethnography and Qualitative Methods
The aim of this course is to prepare the student to conduct research, to analyze and present research in a scholarly manner, and to evaluate critically the research of others. Practice and evaluation of such basic techniques as observation, participant-observation, structured and open-ended interviews, and use of documents. Introduction to various methodological and theoretical frameworks. Thesis or essay prospectus is the final product of this course. Strongly recommended for juniors. Three-hour research lab required. (SOAN 0103 or SOAN 0105) 3 hrs. lect./disc./3 hrs. research lab (Anthropology) CW SOC

Fall 2016, Fall 2017, Fall 2018

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SOAN 0494 - Writing for Social Change      

Writing Ethnography for Social Change
In this course we will use frequent writing assignments, extensive peer reviews, and analysis of famous texts in a concentrated and intensive effort to improve our own ability to communicate in writing. In the first half of the course, we will focus on writing conventions and controversies in Anthropology, building skills useful in preparing senior work. In the second half of the course, we will break out of these academic conventions to focus on writing for broader audiences. We will ask: how can we successfully communicate the relevance of theoretical concepts in sociology and anthropology to the general public? (SOAN 301 or SOAN 302) 3 hrs. sem. (Anthropology) CW SOC

Fall 2017

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SOCI 0301 - Soc Research Methods      

The Logic of Sociological Inquiry
In this course students will be introduced to the basic tools of sociological research including problem formulation, strategies of design and data collection, and analysis and presentation of results. This class will help students formulate a research question and develop a research strategy to best explore that question. Those strategies may include interviews, structured observation, participant observation, content analysis, and surveys. This class, strongly recommended for juniors, will culminate in the submission of a senior project proposal. (SOAN 0105 or SOCI 0105) (formerly SOAN 03010) 3 hrs. lect./disc. CW SOC

Spring 2020, Spring 2021

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SPAN 0300 - Intro to Hispanic Literature      

An Introduction to the Study of Hispanic Literature
This course in literature and advanced language is designed to introduce students to literary analysis and critical writing. The work will be based on the reading of a number of works in prose, drama, and poetry. Frequent short, critical essays will complement readings and provide students with practice in writing. (SPAN 0220 or placement) 3 hrs. lect./disc. AAL AMR CMP CW LIT LNG

Spring 2018, Fall 2018, Fall 2019, Fall 2020

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SPAN 0302 - Creative NonFiction in Spanish      

Creative Non-Fiction in Spanish
This course will introduce students to creative non-fiction in the Spanish language. We will explore the techniques and literary skills necessary for researching and writing memoirs and personal essays, and students will produce at least three polished essays. Readings will include Spanish and Latin American masters and theorists of the genre will include Borges, Cortázar, Castellanos, Larra, Hostos, Paz, and Poniatowska. (SPAN 0220 or by placement) 3 hrs. lect. AAL AMR ART CW LIT LNG

Spring 2017, Spring 2019

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THEA 0218 - Playwriting I: Beginning      

Playwriting I: Beginning
The purpose of the course is to gain a theoretical and practical understanding of writing for the stage. Students will read, watch, and analyze published plays, as well as work by their peers, but the focus throughout will remain on the writing and development of original work. (Formerly THEA/ENAM 0218) ART CW

Winter 2017, Fall 2017, Spring 2018, Spring 2019, Fall 2019, Fall 2020

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THEA 0318 - Playwriting II: Advanced      

Playwriting II: Advanced
For students with experience writing short scripts or stories, this workshop will provide a support structure in which to write a full-length stage play. We will begin with extended free and guided writing exercises intended to help students write spontaneously and with commitment. Class discussions will explore scene construction, story structure, and the development of character arc. (ENAM 0170 or THEA 0218 or ENAM/THEA 0240; by approval) 2 1/2 hrs. lect./individual labs ART CW

Spring 2017, Winter 2019, Spring 2020

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WRPR 0202 - Writing To Heal      

This writing-intensive course examines writing as a catalyst for healing after loss or grief. In a workshop focused on student writing, we will analyze the fiction, drama, poetry and creative nonfiction of Arthur Miller, Jane Austen, Frank McCourt, C.S. Lewis, Sharon Olds, William Wordsworth, Christopher Noel, Madeleine Blais, Susan Minot. Reading James W. Pennebaker's Opening Up and Louise DeSalvo's Writing As A Way of Healing will create a theoretical underpinning for our discussions. Assignments for this course will include formal analytical essays, creative work (published online), as well as electronic journals and oral presentations. CW LIT

Spring 2017, Spring 2018, Spring 2019

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WRPR 0203 - Media, Sports, & Identity      

Media, Sports, & Identity
In this course we will examine the relationship between media, sports, and the formulation of one’s identity. We will examine issues pertaining to gender identification, violence, and hero worship. Reading critical essays on the subject, studying media coverage of sporting events, and writing short analytical essays will enable us to determine key elements concerning how sports are contextualized in American culture. Student essays will form the basis of a more in-depth inquiry that each student will then present, using media, at the end of the course. (Not open to students who have taken WRPR 1002) AMR CW NOR SOC

Winter 2018, Fall 2019, Spring 2020

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WRPR 0204 - Narratives on Rivers & Ecology      

Narratives on Rivers, Nature, and Ecology
In this course we will travel to Acadia National Park in Maine for several days for place-based experiential learning and writing. The remaining time will be spent on campus in Middlebury. We will practice non-fiction story telling with a focus on narrative essay-writing about rivers and water as places that are ecologically, emotionally, imaginatively, and spiritually significant.  We will also explore other forms of narratives, including story-telling through combination of image and word. Students should be prepared to travel off-campus for four days and three-nights and to spend time outdoors traipsing through woods along rivers and streams. Travel costs are covered. Registration is by approval only from the instructor. Questions about travel and financial or time implications of missed work or practice should also be directed to the instructor, Prof. Matthew Dickerson. (Approval Only) CW WTR

Winter 2019

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WRPR 0205 - Race, Rhetoric, and Protest      

Race, Rhetoric, and Protest
In this course we will study the theoretical and rhetorical underpinnings of racial protest in America. We will begin by studying movements from the 1950s and 1960s, moving from bus boycotts to Black Power protests, and will build to analyzing recent protests in Ferguson, Dallas, and New York. Readings will include texts from Charles E. Morris III, Aja Martinez, Shon Meckfessel, Gwendolyn Pough, and various articles and op-eds. Students will write analyses of historical and contemporary protest, op-eds about the local culture, and syntheses on the course readings. 3 hrs. Lect AMR CW NOR SOC

Fall 2017, Spring 2018, Fall 2019, Fall 2020

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WRPR 0206 - Narratives in News Media      

Narratives in News Media
In this course we will consider questions such as: What linguistic strategies do the news media use to craft compelling stories? What are the dominant narratives at play about national and global social issues, and how are some journalists working to counter those narratives? We will employ Critical Discourse Analysis as a central framework, reading theoretical and empirical work by linguists such as Teun van Dijk, as well as from sociologists and political scientists. We will engage with “On the Media” and other podcasts, TED talks, documentaries such as Outfoxed (2004), and online magazines. Students will write for a variety of audiences. 3 hrs. lect./disc. CW SOC

Spring 2018, Spring 2019, Spring 2020

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WRPR 0208 - Cultural Rhetorics      

Cultural Rhetorics
In this course we will focus on the budding field of cultural rhetorics—a set of practices and methodologies that help us understand the way different groups of people make meaning and interact. We will study Latinx, Black, Asian, Native, feminist, LGBTQ+, and public memory rhetorics, focusing on the language and persuasion practices these groups use in their discourses. In this class students will write comparative analyses of cultural rhetorics, compose their own cultural literacy narratives, construct arguments about culture, and build multimodal projects. Students will leave the class with an understanding of the various cultural practices of rhetoric in the United States. 3 hrs. lect. AMR CMP CW NOR SOC

Fall 2018

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WRPR 0211 - Trickery, Bodies: Rhetoric      

Trickery, Bodies, and Resistance: The Tradition(s) of Rhetoric
How do female identifying subjects position themselves (and their bodies) rhetorically in a male-dominated society? How do Black and Latinx rhetorical traditions of call-and-response and code-switching connect with and resist classical traditions of oration and stylistics? In this course we will study the tradition(s) of rhetoric by moving from the trickery of sophists to budding works in feminist rhetorics and cultural rhetorics. Students in this class will learn to synthesize the various traditions of rhetoric in historical and contemporary terms and to critically understand cultural customs that exist outside the white, heteronormative Greco-Roman tradition. 3 hrs. lect. AMR CMP CW SOC

Spring 2018, Spring 2019, Spring 2020

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WRPR 0212 - Issues&Methods Tutor Writing      

Issues and Methods in Tutoring Writing: A Practicum Course
This course will prepare students to work with writers from diverse backgrounds and disciplines. Following appropriate ethics training, we will learn about composition theory and pedagogy, tutoring strategies, and popular trends and debates in writing center studies, such as social justice, access, and inclusion in writing centers. We will conduct ethnographic research on writing center pedagogy, using the Middlebury Writing Center as our research site. Upon successful completion of the course, students may be invited to work as paid tutors in the Writing Center. In addition to Writing Center activities, students will complete a semester-long research project, and engage in a survey project. 3 hrs. lect. CW SOC

Spring 2020, Spring 2021

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WRPR 0225 - Feminist Blogging      

Feminist Blogging
Blogging is a genre that lends itself to both feminist theory and practice because it involves writing from a particular place and a particular embodiment, about how power operates in our social worlds. Feminist theory demands intersectionality: an ability to weave race, class, gender, sexuality and other forms of power into a single theoretical approach. Feminist blogging transforms intersectionality into a single narrative arc. In this course we will think about blogging as a genre and how feminist theory can infuse that genre into a more vibrant, complex, and even transformative site. Throughout the course we will read feminist theory, analyze feminist blogs, and produce our own feminist blogs. 3 hrs. lect. AMR CMP CW LIT NOR SOC

Fall 2017, Fall 2019

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WRPR 0255 - Reporting and Writing the News      

Reporting and Writing the News
Students in this introductory journalism class will learn how to conceive, report, write, edit, and publish a variety of stories, including hard news, features, and op-eds. They will develop story ideas, conduct interviews, and write balanced, engaging articles on deadline for our class blog, which will cover the campus and local community. Like professional journalists, they will practice crafting clear, accurate, and fair stories. They will follow the news daily, and read a wide range of exemplary pieces. We will also explore the evolution of digital and social media, and discuss the key ethical and legal issues facing reporters today (Not open to students who have taken CRWR 1002) 3 hrs. lect. CW

Fall 2018, Fall 2019

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WRPR 0288 - Writing Race and Class      

Writing Race and Class
In this course we will take a literary and intersectional approach to topics of race and class. Readings include stories, essays, and poems by modern and contemporary writers, including James Baldwin, Audre Lorde, Louise Erdrich, Gloria Anzaldua, Adrienne Rich, Amy Tan, Junot Diaz, and Eli Clare. Students will write short critical and creative pieces and will develop one longer essay, a critical narrative. We will engage in writing workshops and contemplative activities. Students will preferably have prior experience in discussing issues of race and class, although introductory theories will be made available to provide frameworks for discussion. CW LIT SOC

Winter 2020, Fall 2020

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WRPR 0303 - Outlaw Women      

Outlaw Women
In this course we will read and discuss literary texts that feature women who defy social norms: daring survivors, scholars, “whores,” queers, artists, servants, revolutionaries. Texts include Powell’s The Pagoda, Duras’s The Lover, Lorde’s Zami, and Nafisi's Reading Lolita in Tehran. The course will take postcolonial and global approaches to desire and difference and to narratives of resistance, rescue and freedom. We will discuss rhetorical practices, such as écriture féminine, and readerships, such as women’s book groups, through a transnational lense. Students will develop their critical imaginations through discussion, contemplation, research, and analytical and creative writing. 3 hrs. lect. CMP CW LIT SOC

Spring 2017, Spring 2018, Spring 2019, Spring 2020

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WRPR 0332 - The Rhetoric of Transcendence      

The Rhetoric of Transcendence
In this course students will study the metaphysical nature of transcendence as a concept that relates to religion, art, popular media, and even drugs. We will study the ways people attempt to relay transcendence through words, actions, and creative endeavors while also considering how we have--or have not--achieved transcendence in our own lives. Students in this course will write reflections of their own states of transcendence, rhetorically analyze sermons and popular culture pieces that embody transcendence, and attempt to capture the ineffable in a final project. 3 hrs. Sem. CW PHL

Spring 2021

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WRPR 0333 - Writing on Contemporary Issues      

Writing On Contemporary Issues: Writing, Editing, and Publishing Online
This course is an introduction to writing prose for a public audience. Students will create both critical and personal essays that feature strong ideas and perspectives. The readings and writing will focus on American popular culture, broadly defined. Essays will critically engage elements of contemporary American popular culture via a vivid personal voice and presence. Readings will address current issues in popular culture – Gladwell, “Brain Candy,” Klosterman, “Campus Confidential,” for instance. ReMix: Reading in Contemporary Culture is the central text. The end result will be a new online magazine of writings on American popular culture 3 hrs. lect. AMR ART CW NOR SOC

Spring 2017, Spring 2018, Fall 2020

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WRPR 0334 - Writing and Experience      

Writing and Experience: Exploring Self in Society
The reading and online writing for this course will focus on what it means to construct a sense of self in relation to the larger social world of family and friends, education, media, work, and community. Readings will include nonfiction and fiction works by authors such as Maya Angelou, James Baldwin, Andre Dubus, Tim O'Brien, Flannery O'Connor, Amy Tan, Tobias Wolff, and Alice Walker. Students will explore the craft of storytelling and the multiple ways in which one can employ the tools of fiction in crafting creative nonfiction and fiction narratives for a new online magazine on American popular culture. This magazine will have been created by students in Writing on Contemporary Issues. Narratives about self and society will therefore lean towards aspects of American popular culture. 3 hrs sem. AMR CW LIT NOR SOC

Fall 2017, Fall 2018, Spring 2021

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WRPR 0354 - Rhetoric of Public Memory      

The Rhetoric of Public Memory
This course focuses on public memory and the various statues, memorials, sites, and spaces that construct public memory in contemporary U.S. society. In this course, we will study local Middlebury and Vermont public memories, Civil War and Confederate memories, and spaces of contention and controversy, while visiting nearby memorials and museums. Students in this class will compose analyses on these public memories and create arguments on the viability of memories in different shapes and forms. Overall, students will leave this class with a stronger understanding of not only public memory rhetoric but the various components that keep these memories alive. 3 hrs. lect. AMR CW HIS NOR SOC

Spring 2019, Fall 2020

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WRPR 0363 - Science Writing for the Public      

Science Writing for the Public
This class is an introduction to writing about science–including nature, medicine, and technology–for general readers and for online publication. Students will publish in our online magazine (constructed Spring 2017). In our reading and writing we explore the craft of making scientific concepts, and the work of scientists, accessible to the public through news articles and essays. The chief work of the class is students' writing. Students will also learn to manipulate images and how to use digital storytelling. As part of our exploration of the craft of science writing, we will read essays and articles by writers such as David Quammen, Atul Gawande, Michael Pollan, and Elizabeth Kolbert; we will also read from The Best Science and Nature Writing (Amy Stewart, ed, 2016). 3 hrs. Sem. AMR CW LIT NOR

Fall 2018, Fall 2019

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WRPR 1005 - Healing Through Writing      

Healing Through Writing
In this writing-intensive course we will examine how the writing process can serve as a healing tool for adversity and trauma. Using Louise De Salvo’s Writing as a Way of Healing as our theoretical base, we will analyze poems, essays, and book excerpts that demonstrate the transformative power of personal narrative. Students will write and revise their own personal narratives in a workshop setting. CW LIT WTR

Winter 2017, Winter 2018, Winter 2019

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WRPR 1006 - Opinion Writing      

Your Voice Matters: Opinion Writing for Maximum Impact
Students in this course will learn to write a variety of persuasive opinion pieces, including personal columns, op-eds, critical reviews, and letters. We will work on developing critical thinking and fact-based arguments, as well as lively, eloquent, and sensitive prose. We will read a wide range of exemplary op-eds and columns, and examine how opinion writing shapes social change. Students will publish their polished work on a class blog, and use social media to attract readers. Because this course may address issues that students find difficult, upsetting, or offensive, those who enroll must have an open mind and a willingness to engage with opposing viewpoints. CW WTR

Winter 2017, Winter 2018, Winter 2019, Winter 2020

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