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WRPR0101A-S16

CRN: 21837

Writing Workshop II
Writing Workshop II
All sections of this course will address a variety of writing techniques and communications tools. Each section will focus on a particular theme. This course does not fulfill the college writing requirement. 3 hrs. lect./disc.

WRPR0110A-S16

Cross-Listed As:
LNGT0110A-S16

CRN: 22107

Eng Grammar:Concepts & Controv
English Grammar: Concepts and Controversie
In this course we will study the structure of the English language, learning key terms and strategies for analyzing English syntax. We will explore English grammar from both prescriptive and descriptive perspectives and examine its relevance to language policy, linguistic prejudice, and English education. Readings will be drawn from a variety of texts, including Rhetorical Grammar (2009), Eats, Shoots & Leaves (2006), Language Myths (1999), and Origins of the Specious (2010). This course is relevant to students wanting to increase their own knowledge of the English language, as well as to those seeking tools for English teaching and/or research.

WRPR0202A-S16

CRN: 21136

Writing To Heal
This writing-intensive course examines writing as a catalyst for healing after loss or grief. In a workshop focused on student writing, we will analyze the fiction, drama, poetry and creative nonfiction of Arthur Miller, Jane Austen, Frank McCourt, C.S. Lewis, Sharon Olds, William Wordsworth, Christopher Noel, Madeleine Blais, Susan Minot. Reading James W. Pennebaker's Opening Up and Louise DeSalvo's Writing As A Way of Healing will create a theoretical underpinning for our discussions. Assignments for this course will include formal analytical essays, creative work (published online), as well as electronic journals and oral presentations.

WRPR0340A-S16

Cross-Listed As:
AMST0340A-S16

CRN: 22322

Oral History Methods/Practice
Please register via AMST 0340A
Telling Stories: Oral History Methods and Practice
In this course we will explore historical and contemporary issues in U.S. society through oral history. Key themes include: community, history, memory, power, identity, and social movements. We will practice the craft of conducting and documenting life stories interviews, paying close attention to ethical and technological issues. Readings, documentary films, NPR-StoryCorps projects, archives, and museum exhibits grounded in oral history will serve as texts to explore diverse ways of using and thinking about this dynamic source of knowledge. Collaborative projects will provide opportunities to pursue original research anchored in oral histories. With the permission of interviewees, digitally recorded interviews and related materials created during this course will be donated to Middlebury’s Special Collections. 3 hrs. lect.

WRPR0500B-S16

CRN: 20224

Special Project: Lit
Special Project: Literature
(Approval Required)

WRPR0500C-S16

CRN: 20225

Special Project: Lit
Special Project: Literature
(Approval Required)

WRPR0500E-S16

CRN: 20607

Special Project: Lit
Special Project: Literature
(Approval Required)

WRPR0500F-S16

CRN: 20859

Special Project: Lit
Special Project: Literature
(Approval Required)