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WRPR0100A-S17

CRN: 22285

The Writing Workshop I
This course is for students who would like extra work on critical thinking and analytical writing. All sections of this course will address a variety of writing strategies and technologies, from free writing to online writing. Each section will focus on a particular theme to be determined by the instructor. This course does not fulfill the college writing requirement. 3 hrs. lect./disc.

WRPR0102A-S17

Cross-Listed As:
EDST0102A-S17

CRN: 22286

English Lang in Global Context
English Language in Global Context
In this course, we will discuss and write about the dominance of English in the global landscape. The course reader, The Handbook of World Englishes (2006), offers an interdisciplinary approach to the topic. We will begin the course with a geographic and historical overview of World Englishes and then will examine the impact of English language dominance on individuals and societies, emphasizing themes such as migration, globalization, education, and identity. Throughout the course, we will explore the relevance of these issues to educators, linguists, and policy-makers around the world.

WRPR0202A-S17

CRN: 21111

Writing To Heal
This writing-intensive course examines writing as a catalyst for healing after loss or grief. In a workshop focused on student writing, we will analyze the fiction, drama, poetry and creative nonfiction of Arthur Miller, Jane Austen, Frank McCourt, C.S. Lewis, Sharon Olds, William Wordsworth, Christopher Noel, Madeleine Blais, Susan Minot. Reading James W. Pennebaker's Opening Up and Louise DeSalvo's Writing As A Way of Healing will create a theoretical underpinning for our discussions. Assignments for this course will include formal analytical essays, creative work (published online), as well as electronic journals and oral presentations.

WRPR0210A-S17

Cross-Listed As:
ENVS0210A-S17

CRN: 22290

Social Class & the Environment
Please register via ENVS 0210A
Social Class and the Environment
In this course we will explore the consequence of growth, technological development, and the evolution of ecological sacrifice zones. Texts will serve as the theoretical framework for in-the-field investigations, classroom work, and real-world experience. The Struggle for Environmental Justice outlines resistance models; Shadow Cities provides lessons from the squatters movement; Ben Hewitt's The Town that Food Saved describes economy of scale solutions, and David Owen's The Conundrum challenges environmentalism. Texts will guide discussions, serve as lenses for in-the-field investigations, and the basis for writing. We will also travel to Hardwick and Putney, Vermont, to explore new economic-environmental models. (Not open to students who have taken ENVS/WRPR 1014)

WRPR0303A-S17

Cross-Listed As:
GSFS0303A-S17

CRN: 22287

Outlaw Women
Outlaw Women
In this course we will read and discuss literary novels that feature women who defy social norms: daring survivors, scholars, “whores,” queers, artists, “madwomen,” servants, revolutionaries. We will take a critical and transnational approach to issues of race, class, gender, sexuality, ability, and religion. Texts will include Toni Morrison’s Sula, Audre Lorde’s Zami, Marguerite Duras’ The Lover, Jamaica Kincaid’s Lucy, Patricia Powell’s The Pagoda, and Azar Nafisi's Reading Lolita in Tehran. Students will write formal literary analysis,and narrative criticism. Together we will engage in some contemplative practice and study selected films. (Any one GSFS Course)

WRPR0333A-S17

Cross-Listed As:
CRWR0333A-S17

CRN: 22399

Writing on Contemporary Issues
Writing On Contemporary Issues: Writing, Editing, and Publishing Online
This course is an introduction to writing prose for a public audience. Students will create both critical and personal essays that feature strong ideas and perspectives. The readings and writing will focus on American popular culture, broadly defined. Essays will critically engage elements of contemporary American popular culture via a vivid personal voice and presence. Readings will address current issues in popular culture – Gladwell, “Brain Candy,” Klosterman, “Campus Confidential,” for instance. ReMix: Reading in Contemporary Culture is the central text. The end result will be a new online magazine of writings on American popular culture 3 hrs. lect.

WRPR0340A-S17

Cross-Listed As:
AMST0340A-S17

CRN: 21894

Oral History Methods/Practice
Please register via AMST 0340A
Telling Stories: Oral History Methods and Practice
In this course we will explore historical and contemporary issues in U.S. society through oral history. Key themes include: community, history, memory, power, identity, and social movements. We will practice the craft of conducting and documenting life stories interviews, paying close attention to ethical and technological issues. Readings, documentary films, NPR-StoryCorps projects, archives, and museum exhibits grounded in oral history will serve as texts to explore diverse ways of using and thinking about this dynamic source of knowledge. Collaborative projects will provide opportunities to pursue original research anchored in oral histories. With the permission of interviewees, digitally recorded interviews and related materials created during this course will be donated to Middlebury’s Special Collections. 3 hrs. lect.

WRPR0500B-S17

CRN: 20224

Special Project: Lit
Special Project: Literature
(Approval Required)

WRPR0500C-S17

CRN: 20225

Special Project: Lit
Special Project: Literature
(Approval Required)

WRPR0500E-S17

CRN: 20605

Special Project: Lit
Special Project: Literature
(Approval Required)

WRPR0500F-S17

CRN: 20850

Special Project: Lit
Special Project: Literature
(Approval Required)

WRPR0500G-S17

CRN: 21130

Special Project: Lit
Special Project: Literature
(Approval Required)