Middlebury

Middlebury Course Catalog 2014-2015

ARTS Division
   Dance
   Film and Media Cultures
   Music
   Studio Art
   Theatre

HUMANITIES Division
  Classics/Classical Studies
   History
   History of Art/Architecture
   Philosophy
   Religion

INTERDISCIPLINARY Division
   American Studies
   Environmental Studies
   Gender, Sexuality, Feminist 
     Studies
   Independent Scholar
   Int'l Politics & Economics
   International/Global Studies
   Molecular Biology/ 
    Biochemistry
   Neuroscience
   Writing Program

LANGUAGE Division
   Arabic
   Chinese
   French
   German
   Hebrew
   Italian
   Japanese Studies
   Russian
   Spanish & Portuguese
   Literature Courses in 
      English

LITERATURE Division
   Comparative Literature
   English & American
     Literatures
   Literature at Middlebury
   Literary Studies

NATURAL SCIENCES Division
   Biology
   Chemistry & Biochemistry
   Computer Science
   Geology
   Mathematics
   Physical Education
   Physics

SOCIAL SCIENCES Division
   Economics
   Education Studies
   Geography
   Political Science
   Psychology
   Sociology/Anthropology
  

Interdisciplinary Minors
   African American Studies
   African Studies
   Global Health
   Jewish Studies
   Linguistics
   South Asian Studies

Interdepartmental Courses

African American Studies

This program offers a minor in African American studies to students who complete the following requirements:

(1) The following core courses, designed to offer theoretical perspectives and broad background:

* AMST 0224 Race and Ethnicity in the US
* HIST 0225 African American History

 (2) Two of the following courses, which are more focused explorations of a part of the African American experience:

* AMST 0310 Livin’ for the City
* ENAM/AMST 0252 African American Literature
* HIST/AMST 0226 The Civil Rights Revolution

(3) One advanced, relevant 0400 level course or an independent 0500-level project.

Other appropriate courses offered during the fall and spring semesters, or during the winter term, may be substituted for courses in category 2 at the discretion of the program director. The director or minor advisor will also approve courses to count in category 3.

African Studies

This program offers a minor in African Studies to students who complete the following requirements:

(1) Two of the following courses which focus primarily on Africa:

DANC 0163 From Africa to America: Moving from Our Core
ECON 0327 Economic Development in Africa
FREN 0395 Women's Voices from the Francophone World
FREN 0396 (Re) Constructing Identities in Francophone Colonial and Postcolonial Fiction
FREN 0398 Children and Civil War in Francophone African Literature
FREN 0492 Denunciation and Literature: The Awakening of the Maghreb
HIST 0113 History of Africa to 1800
HIST 0114 History of Modern Africa
HIST 0375 Struggles in Southern Africa
HIST 0441 Readings in African History: Environmental History of Africa
HIST 0442 Popular Culture and History in Africa
HIST/GSFS 0443 Readings in African History: Women and Gender in African History
MUSC 0236 African Soundscapes
MUSC 0244 African Music and Dance Performance
PSCI 0202 African Politics
PSCI 0321 Anglophone versus Francophone Africa (CW)
PSCI 0431 Seminar on African Government
PSCI 1016 Dictators and Democrats
SOAN 0232 Anthropology of Continuity and Change in Sub-Saharan Africa
SOAN/IGST 1070 Introduction to Swahili anital d East African Cultures
SOAN/IGST 1080 Swahili and East African Culture II

(2) Two additional courses, either chosen from group (1) above or from the following courses, which include significant materials on Africa and/or the African Diaspora. When given the option to pursue independent research projects in these courses, students are expected to choose Africa-related topics to contribute to their minor:

ECON 0425 Seminar on Economic Development
ECON 0465 Special Topics in Environmental Economics
FREN 0394 Black and Beur Expression
GEOG 0210 Geographical Perspectives on International Development
HIST 0105 The Atlantic World: 1492-1900
HIST 0109 History of Islam and the Middle East, Since 1453
HIST 0225 African American History
HIST 0263 Religion and Politics in Islamic History
HIST 0427 Diaspora and Exile
HIST/GSFS 0438 Readings in Middle Eastern History: Women and Islam
MUSC 1066 The History of the American Negro Spiritual
PSCI 0209 Local Green Politics
PSCI 0258 The Politics of International Humanitarian Action
PSCI 0330 Comparative Development Strategies
RELI 0150 The Islamic Tradition
RELI 0272 African American Religious History
RELI 0359 Issues in Islamic Law and Ethics: Questions of Life and Death
SOAN 0211 Human Ecology
SOAN 0267 Global Health?
SOAN 0340 The Anthropology of Human Rights
SOAN/RELI 0353 Islam in Practice: Anthropology of Muslim Cultures
SOAN 0468 Success and Failure in Global Health and Development Projects

*Courses offered during the winter term may apply to the minor.

(3) One advanced seminar course (0300- or 0400-level, depending on the department), or a relevant, independent 0500-level project (at the discretion of the program director).

Other courses offered during the fall, winter, or spring terms, or at affiliated institutions abroad, may be substituted for the above listed courses at the discretion of the program director. As a general rule, no more than one course from a study abroad program will be counted towards the fulfillment of the minor.

American Studies

Requirements: A minimum of eleven courses including AMST 0209, AMST 0210, AMST 0400, three AMST electives, four courses in a concentration designed in consultation with a faculty advisor, and AMST 0705 (senior research tutorial). Students writing honors theses will undertake an additional term of independent research and writing (AMST 0710).
     Electives: Three AMST electives, two of which must be numbered 0200 or higher. These courses must be listed or cross-listed as AMST courses in the course catalog. Courses may not count toward both the elective and concentration requirements.
     Junior Seminar (AMST 0400): Students should normally take this seminar in the Fall of their Junior year. Where compelling circumstances make doing this impossible, arrangements to take the course as a senior may be made with the director of the American Studies program.
     Senior Research Tutorial (AMST 0705): Seniors must complete either a one-credit research project and essay of approximately 30 pages, or, if otherwise qualified, a two-credit honors thesis of approximately 70 pages. Equivalent work in other media may be possible. All AMST seniors must enroll in AMST 0705, the senior research tutorial, in the fall of their senior year. This seminar will focus on the development of sophisticated research skills, the sharing with peers of research and writing in progress, and the completion of a substantial research project. Those writing one-credit essays will complete their projects over the course of this tutorial. Students writing two-credit honors theses will complete at least one chapter in the seminar and then continue work on the project over another term (AMST 0710) in consultation with a faculty adviser. To qualify for the writing of an honors thesis, a student must have a GPA of at least 3.5 in courses taken for the major. Faculty will make determinations on the awarding of honors after theses are completed.
     Concentrations: Concentrations must bring together coherent clusters of four courses that address particular themes, periods, movements, or modes of thought and expression. In consultation with an advisor and with approval of the program, students will develop an interdisciplinary concentration in one of these areas:
     Popular Culture: Students will study popular cultural forms, their reception, and the history of their production in the United States. Courses will especially focus on the conflicts between popular culture as a site of creativity and democratic empowerment on the one hand, and as a product of dominant commercialized cultural industries on the other.
     Race and Ethnicity: Students will examine specific groups in depth and in comparison, exploring racial and ethnic history, political struggles, creative and cultural practices, and individual and collective modes of identity formation. By studying how and why racial and ethnic identities have evolved in the United States, students will understand their central place in the formation of the American nation.
     Artistic and Intellectual Traditions: Students will focus on literary, religious, philosophical, and social thought and its expression in the United States. They will be encouraged to examine particular currents of thought (e. g. evangelicalism, liberalism, romanticism, modernism, progressivism) or modes of expression (e.g. literature, visual art, or film) that have been important to American culture.
     Space and Place: Students will explore the importance of landscape and place in American culture. Course work may include the study of American regional geography, the historical and aesthetic dimensions of the built environment, the impacts of urban growth, suburbanization, or the imagining of utopian spaces.
     Cultural Politics: Students will explore the relationship between culture, ideology, and the political system. People create meaning about their personal and public lives through cultural practices, but those practices take place within institutional and ideological structures. Relevant courses might explore ethics and religion; political parties and social movements; feminism and gender studies; and representation and visual culture.
     Self-Designed Concentration: Self-designed concentrations must be built in close consultation with a faculty advisor and should focus on a cultural theme or interdisciplinary area of inquiry. Potential topics might include: Gender & American Culture; American Environmentalism; Visual Culture; Industrialization of America; and Immigration and Cultural Exchanges.
     Joint Major Requirements: Students may major in AMST jointly with another discipline or program. Students must discuss their rationale for doing so with their advisor in AMST and joint majors must be approved by the faculty in AMST. Required courses for a joint major in AMST are: AMST 0209, AMST 0210, AMST 0400, and AMST 0705, and two AMST electives.
     Minor Requirements: Students may complete a minor in American Studies by taking the following courses: AMST 0210, AMST 0209, AMST 0400, three AMST electives.
     Study Abroad for American Studies Majors: The faculty members of the Program in American Studies recognize the benefits of cross-cultural learning and encourage majors to take advantage of study abroad opportunities. Often students returning from study abroad undertake senior work that responds to their cultural learning while abroad. We encourage students to take courses in their study abroad program that focus on the host culture and thereby allow the best opportunity for cultural comparison.
     American Studies majors normally take AMST 0400, a required seminar, in the fall semester of their junior year. Under compelling circumstances that leave only the fall available as an option for study abroad, majors may be able to take AMST 0400 in the fall semester of their senior year. Such arrangements must be discussed in advance with, and approved by, the director of the American Studies program. The American Studies program enjoys being host to exchange students from the American studies programs at the Universities of East Anglia and Nottingham in Great Britain.

AMST 0101 Introduction to American Studies: The Imagination of Disaster (Spring 2015)
In this course we will offer an introduction to the interdisciplinary study of American culture and identity. Integrating a range of sources and methods, we will examine myths, symbols, values, and social changes that have been used to create and contest ideas of "Americanness." Sources for the course will include movies, fiction, political and religious tracts, advertising, TV shows, music, biography, and architecture. This year, we will focus on the meaning and narration of disaster in American culture, stretching from Puritan fears of God's wrath to contemporary responses to 9/11 and the devastation of Hurricane Katrina. Specific texts will include Margaret Atwood, The Handmaid's Tale; Susan Sontag, The Imagination of Disaster; Cormac McCarthy, The Road; and films such as Irwin Allen's The Towering Inferno and Roland Emmerich's The Day After Tomorrow. 3 hrs. NOR (M. Newbury)

AMST/FMMC 0104 Television & American Culture (Fall 2014, Spring 2015)
This course explores American life in the last six decades through an analysis of our central medium: television. Spanning a history of television from its origins in radio to its future in digital convergence, we will consider television's role in both reflecting and constituting American society through a variety of approaches. Our topical exploration will consider the economics of the television industry, television's role within American democracy, the formal attributes of a variety of television genres, television as a site of gender and racial identity formation, television's role in everyday life, and the medium's technological and social impacts. 2 hrs. lect./3 hrs. screen. NOR, SOC (Fall 2014: J. Mittell; Spring 2015: L. Stein)

AMST/THEA 0117 Dramas of the American Civil Rights Movement (1956-1966) (Spring 2015)
Racial egalitarianism was a central premise of the U.S. Civil Rights Movement; playwrights, using their voices as cultural arbiters, played a significant role in raising awareness about racial injustices, thus contributing in an important way to the success of the movement. Relying on critical analyses, archival material, oral interview,s and dramatic texts, students will explore how dramatists (Loften Mitchell, Lorraine Hansberry, Ossie Davis, Amiri Baraka, George Sklar) addressed crucial issues (education, housing, and voting) in their plays. Students will also have an opportunity to explore the role of comedy and militancy on the stage while simultaneously understanding how the theatre served as a vehicle for political progress and social change. ART, LIT, NOR (N. Nesmith)

AMST 0200 Global Cities of the United States (Fall 2014)
In this course we will engage the study of New York, Chicago, and Los Angeles as "global cities." We will explore each as a site of networks that link populations in the United States to people, things, media, money, and ideas beyond the borders of the nation-state. The principal themes and issues covered during the semester will include the formation of transnational communities, flows of labor and capital, cultural production, and religious responses to diaspora. 3 hrs. lect. CMP, SOC (R. Joo)

AMST/HIST 0202 The American Mind (Fall 2014)
We will consider the history of influential American ideas, and ideas about America, from the Revolution to the present, with particular regard to changing cultural contexts. A continuing question will be whether such a consensus concept as “the American Mind” has the validity long claimed for it. Among many writers we will read are Thomas Jefferson, Alexis de Tocqueville, William James, Martin Luther King, Reinhold Niebuhr and Betty Friedan. (Previously taught as HIST/AMST 0426) HIS, NOR (J. McWilliams)

AMST 0204 Black Comic Cultures (Fall 2014)
In this course we will explore a range of black comic cultures, analyzing their emergence and transformation from the early 20th century to the present. Specifically, we will examine blackface minstrels of the early 20th century such as George Walker and Bert Williams, Bill Cosby’s performances in the 60s, and the ribald humor of LaWanda Page’s 1970s party records, before moving to the urban scene embodied in television shows such as Def Comedy Jam. We will also engage with theoretical materials that help us analyze black comedy as multidimensional, such as John Limon’s Stand-up Comedy in Theory, or, Abjection in America. 3 hrs. lect. NOR, SOC (J. Finley)

AMST/ENAM 0206 Nineteenth-Century American Literature (II, AL) (Spring 2015)
This course will examine major developments in the literary world of 19th century America. Specific topics to be addressed might include the transition from Romanticism to Regionalism and Realism, the origins and evolution of the novel in the United States, and the tensions arising from the emergence of a commercial marketplace for literature. Attention will also be paid to the rise of women as literary professionals in America and the persistent problematizing of race and slavery. Among others, authors may include J. F. Cooper, Emerson, Melville, Douglass, Chopin, Whitman, Dickinson, Twain, Hawthorne, Stowe, Alcott, Wharton, and James. 3 hrs. lect./disc. LIT, NOR (B. Millier)

AMST/GSFS 0208 Unruly Bodies: Black Womanhood in Popular Culture (Spring 2015)
In this course we will examine representations of black womanhood in popular culture, analyzing the processes by which bodies and identities are constructed as dangerous, deviant, and unruly. For example, materials will include the work of bell hooks and Patricia Hill Collins to analyze the imagery of black womanhood propagated by the television shows The Jerry Springer Show and Bad Girls Club. By contrast, we will also read Saidiya Hartman’s Scenes of Subjection as a lens through which to view “bad” black womanhood as a radically stylized means of redress in the Blaxploitation-era film Foxy Brown. 3 hrs. lect. CMP, NOR (J. Finley)

AMST/ENAM 0209 American Literature and Culture: Origins-1830 (Fall 2014)
A study of literary and other cultural forms in early America, including gravestones, architecture, furniture and visual art. We will consider how writing and these other forms gave life to ideas about religion, diversity, civic obligation and individual rights that dominated not only colonial life but that continue to influence notions of "Americanness" into the present day. 3 hrs. lect./disc. LIT, NOR (M. Newbury)

AMST 0210 Formation of Modern American Culture I: 1830-1919 (Spring 2015)
An introduction to the study of American culture from 1830 through World War I with an emphasis on the changing shape of popular, mass, and elite cultural forms. We will explore a widely-accepted scholarly notion that a new, distinctively national and modern culture emerged during this period and that particular ideas of social formation (race, class, gender, sexuality, etc.) came with it. We will practice the interdisciplinary interpretation of American culture by exploring a wide range of subjects and media: economic change, social class, biography and autobiography, politics, photo-journalism, novels, architecture, painting, and photography. Required of all American studies majors. 3 hrs. lect./disc. HIS, NOR (W. Nash)

AMST 0213 Introduction to Latina/o Studies (Spring 2015)
In this course we will undertake an interdisciplinary investigation of the unique experiences and conditions of U.S. Latina/os of Caribbean, Latin American, and Mexican descent. We will critically examine transnational cultures, patterns of circular migration, and intergenerational transformations from a historical perspective while also using methodologies from the humanities and social sciences. Topics will include the conquest of Mexico’s northern frontier, Chicana/o and Nuyorican movements, Latina feminist thought, Latina/o arts, Central American migrations in the 1980s, Latina/o religiosities, as well as philosophies of resistance and acculturation. 3 hrs. lect. HIS, NOR, SOC (R. Lint Sagarena)

AMST 0214 Mastodons, Mermaids, and Dioramas: Capturing Nature in America (Fall 2014)
Why did 18th-century museums stuff and mount exotic and domestic animals? Why does the American Museum of Natural History still house dioramas of so-called native peoples hunting?  How has the study and staging of nature transferred into various kinds of artistic expression?  In this course we will examine the intertwining of art, science, and ecology in the United States from the 1700s to the present day. Objects of study will include museum dioramas, scientific models, artifacts and artworks collected during scientific expeditions, and the work of Walton Ford and Christy Rupp, contemporary artists whose work engages ecological issues. 3 hrs. lect. ART, CW, NOR (E. Foutch)

AMST 0221 Segregation in America: Baseball's Negro Leagues (Spring 2015)
Like many aspects of American life, organized baseball was segregated, black and white, from the end of the 19th century to the mid 20th century. In this course we will examine the absorbing chronicle of baseball's "Negro leagues." We will learn about the great players and teams, and consider how this sporting phenomenon reflects American values and represents this period in our history. We will address important questions about sports and their cultural significance. What do sports tell us about ourselves and our past? Can we understand our cultural heritage by looking through the lens of sports, black baseball in this case? We will also consider how art is created from these historical roots. (Student who have taken FYSE 1004 or AMST 0223 are not eligible to register for this course.) 3 hrs. lect./disc. CMP, NOR  (K. Lindholm)

AMST 0224 Formations of Race and Ethnicity in the U.S. (Spring 2015)
Historical memories, everyday experiences, and possible futures are powerfully shaped by racial and ethnic differences. Categories of race and ethnicity structure social relationships and cultural meanings in the United States and beyond. In this course we will track the theoretical and historical bases of ideas of race and ethnicity in modern America. We will investigate how race and ethnicity intersect at particular historical moments with other forms of difference including gender, sexuality, nation, and class. The course offers an approach informed by critical studies of race including texts in history, political theory, cultural studies, and anthropology. 3 hrs. lect. NOR, SOC (R. Joo)

AMST/FMMC 0225 Gothic and Horror (Spring 2015)
This course examines the forms and meanings of the Gothic and horror over the last 250 years in the West. How have effects of fright, terror, or awe been achieved over this span and why do audiences find such effects attractive? Our purpose will be to understand the generic structures of horror and their evolution in tandem with broader cultural changes. Course materials will include fiction, film, readings in the theory of horror, architecture, visual arts, and electronic media. 3 hrs. lect./disc. 3 hrs. lect. HIS, NOR (M. Newbury)

AMST/MUSC 0232 Music in the United States (Spring 2015)
In this course we will examine folk, classical, and popular music in the United States from the 18th century to the present. We will use historical and analytical approaches to gain insight into the music, the musicians, and the social and cultural forces that have shaped them. Students will explore music’s relation to historical events, other artistic movements, technological changes, and questions of national identity and ethnicity. Topics may include music in the British colonies, minstrelsy, American opera and orchestras, the rise of the popular music industry, and the experimentalist composers of the 20th century. (Assumes ability to read music.) 3 hrs. lect./disc. ART, NOR (L. Hamberlin)

AMST 0234 American Consumer Culture (Spring 2015)
For many Americans in the 20th century, consumer goods came to embody the promise of the "good life." Yet mass consumption also fostered economic, political, and social inequalities and engendered anti-consumerist activism. In this course we will pursue an interdisciplinary approach to American consumer culture, focusing on the rise of commercialized leisure and advertising; the role of radio, television, and film in shaping consumer practices; and the relationship of consumerism to social inequality and democratic citizenship. Readings will include works by Veblen, Marcuse, Bordieu, Marchand, Cohen, and Schor. 3 hrs. lect. HIS, NOR (H. Allen)

AMST/ENAM 0237 Emergence of Black Modernism, 1900-1938 (Fall 2014)
The modern period stands as one of the landmarks of African American literary, artistic, political, and intellectual history. At the crossroads of rebellion and experimentation that defined modernism, black writers—American and immigrants—forged new genres to express the complexity of the black experience. In this course we will track their creations by closely reading key texts like those of W.E.B. Du Bois, Langston Hughes, Zora Neale Hurston, Nella Larsen, and Jean Toomer. At the same time, we will examine the broader intellectual and cultural terrain that influenced these authors such as film, music, and visual arts.  3 hrs. lect. HIS, LIT, NOR (A. Henry)

AMST/FMMC 0238 Film Noir (Spring 2015)
A series of urban crime films and melodramas made in Hollywood between 1940-1960, but concentrated in the decade immediately after World War II, have been understood by critics to constitute the movement of film noir. This course will study prominent films from this group as well as contemporary films influenced by them, and the critical literature they have elicited in order to understand the cultural sources, the stylistic attributes, the social significance, and the long-term influence attributed to film noir. 3 hrs. lect./3 hrs. screen. ART, NOR (L. Grindon)

AMST/ENAM 0240 Captivity Narratives (Spring 2015)
Captivity narratives—first-person accounts of people's experiences of being forcibly taken and held against their will by an "other"—were immensely popular and important in early America; the captivity motif has been perpetuated and transformed throughout later American literature and film. In this course we will explore what these types of tales reveal about how Americans have handled the issues of race and racism, religion, gender, violence and sexuality that experiences of captivity entail. Beginning with classic Puritan narratives (Mary Rowlandson) and moving forward through the 19th and 20th centuries, we will consider the ways that novels (The Last of the Mohicans), autobiographies (Patty Hearst, Iraqi captivity of Pvt. Jessica Lynch) and films (The Searchers, Little Big Man, Dances with Wolves) do cultural work in shaping and challenging images of American national identity. 3 hrs. lect. ART, LIT, NOR (D. Evans)

AMST/GSFS 0241 Sexuality in the United States: Histories and Identities (Fall 2014)
What does sexuality mean? In the United States the meanings of sexuality are highly contested, historically and in the present. Working from an interdisciplinary perspective, we will look at different historical and theoretical approaches to thinking about issues of sexuality and to writing its histories. Drawing from feminist scholarship, queer theory, and lesbian, gay, and transgender studies, we will discuss sexual identities, representations of sexuality, and sexual cultures, and examine how intersecting categories such as race, class, disability, and gender influence how sexuality is understood. 3 hrs. lect. CMP, HIS, NOR, SOC (A. Koch-Rein)

AMST 0243 American Bodies (Fall 2014)
In this course we will examine the material culture of the body and the body as material culture. Themes to be explored include skin (tattoos, tans, cosmetics), muscle (exercise and ideal bodies, historical and contemporary), adornment (fashion, jewelry, body modification practices), health crazes, performance, medical imaging, and enhancement (fictional and technological cyborgs, plastic surgery). We will explore practices that fragment the body and objects that were exchanged as tokens of affection, such as 19th century hairwork and eye miniatures. Historical figures to be discussed include cosmetics magnate Madame C.J. Walker, health enthusiasts Sylvester Graham and the Kellogg brothers, bodybuilder and exercise entrepreneur Eugen Sandow, dancer Josephine Baker, efficiency expert Frederick Winslow Taylor, and P.T. Barnum’s collaborations with performers such as Tom Thumb and the conjoined twins Chang and Eng. 3 hrs. lect. NOR (E. Foutch)

AMST 0245 American Landscape: 1825-1865 (Fall 2014)
This course will explore American landscape painting through an interdisciplinary approach, employing art, literature, religion, and history. In studying the landscape paintings of Thomas Cole, Asher B. Durand, and Frederic Church, we will also consider the commercial growth of New York City; the myths and legends of the Catskill Mountains; the writings of James Fenimore Cooper, Washington Irving, and Henry David Thoreau; the opening of the Erie Canal; and the design and construction of Central Park. 3 hrs. lect./disc. ART, HIS, NOR (C. Wilson)

AMST/ENAM 0249 Literary Form and the Experience of Race (AL) (Spring 2015)
What does it mean to be a person of color in America? In this course we will look at how African American, Asian American, Chicana, Latina, and Native American writers have dealt with this question in fiction, autobiography, poetry, and film.  We will analyze the differences and similarities between the literatures of these cultural groups. We will also look at how these writers have used the distinctly literary nature of their texts in grappling with race in America.  Authors may include Julia Alvarez, Octavia Butler, Lorraine Hansberry, Maxine Hong Kingston, Malcolm X, Richard Rodriguez, Leslie Silko, and Amy Tan.  3 hrs. lect./disc. CMP, LIT, NOR, SOC (A. Henry)

AMST/ENAM 0252 African American Literature (Spring 2015)
This course surveys developments in African American fiction, drama, poetry, and essays during the 20th century. Reading texts in their social, historical, and cultural contexts—and often in conjunction with other African American art forms like music and visual art—we will explore the evolution and deployment of various visions of black being and black artistry, from the Harlem Renaissance through social realism and the Black Arts Movement, to the contemporary post-soul aesthetic. Authors may include Langston Hughes, Zora Neale Hurston, Gwendolyn Brooks, Ralph Ellison, Lorraine Hansberry, Amiri Baraka, Ishmael Reed, Toni Morrison, Charles Johnson, and Octavia Butler. 3 hrs. lect./disc. LIT, NOR (W. Nash)

AMST 0260 American Disability Studies: History, Meanings, and Cultures (Fall 2014)
In this course we will examine the history, meanings, and realities of disability in the United States. We will analyze the social, political, economic, environmental, and material factors that shape the meanings of "disability," examining changes and continuities over time. Students will draw critical attention to the connections between disability, race, ethnicity, gender, sexuality, socioeconomic status, and age in American and transnational contexts. Diverse sources, including films and television shows, music, advertising, fiction, memoirs, and material objects, encourage inter and multi-disciplinary approaches to disability. Central themes we consider include language, privilege, community, citizenship, education, medicine and technology, and representation. HIS, NOR, SOC (S. Burch)

AMST 0295 Across the Great Divide: Science, Humanities, and the American Landscape (Fall 2014)
The American landscape encompasses a diversity of built and natural environments. In this course, we will survey 200 years of history, using the tools of science and the humanities to understand how people have changed the landscape and how the landscape has shaped its human inhabitants. We will read historical, literary, and scientific works—and employ a variety of archival and aesthetic materials—to explore moments of transformation within four geographic regions: New England, the Midwest, the West, and the South. In so doing, we will arrive at an understanding of the interdependency of cultural and ecological history and the intersections between scientific and humanistic modes of inquiry. Readings will emphasize primary texts, and will include writings by Harriett Beecher Stowe, George Perkins Marsh, and photography by Dorothea Lange and others. HIS, NOR (A. Lloyd, T. Spears)

AMST 0301 Madness in America (Spring 2015)
It's a mad, mad course. In this course we will focus on representations of madness from colonial to late 20th century America, emphasizing the links between popular and material culture, science, medicine, and institutions. We will consider how ideas about madness (and normalcy) reflect broader (and shifting) notions of identity. Thus, issues of race, ethnicity, gender and sexual orientation, community, class, and region will play significant roles in our discussions and critiques. To complement foundational readings, this course will draw on American literature, documentary and entertainment films, music, and materials from the college's special collections. NOR, SOC (S. Burch)

AMST 0310 Livin' for the City (Fall 2014)
In this course we will engage the idea of the "ghetto" as constructed through literature, film, music, and television. Our exploration will relate this concept to geographic spaces and to a socially-constructed set of ideas about urban African American spaces and communities. We will combine critical textual analysis with fundamental concepts from human geography and social history to explore shifting conceptions of the “ghetto”, consider its impact on urban African American space, and examine how the responses of urban black American artists affect, resist, and change its imaginative geography. 3 hrs. lect./disc. CMP, NOR, SOC (W. Nash)

AMST/HARC 0324 The American Civil War in Art and Visual Culture, Present  (Spring 2015)
We will examine the art, artifacts, and material culture of the “War Between the States,” from flag and uniform design, periodical illustrations, and photography, to Sanitary Fairs, fundraisers, and keepsakes. History and genre paintings by Winslow Homer and Lilly Martin Spencer will illuminate both battlefield and homefront. We will also explore the legacy of the Civil War, analyzing monuments and memorials, anniversary commemorations (especially the 1960s Centennial and the Civil Rights Movement), reenactments, and contemporary artists’ engagement with the War’s visual imagery (Kara Walker, Glenn Ligon, Matthew Day Jackson). Several sessions will meet at the Middlebury College Museum of Art. ART, HIS, NOR (E. Foutch)

AMST/HARC 0339 Home: The Why Behind the Way We Live (Spring 2015)
In this course we will examine the development of numerous housing types in America (with references to Europe). The prevalence of the single-family home today and its importance as the symbol of the “American dream” was never a forgone conclusion. In fact, the American home has been the focus of and battleground for cooperative movements, feminism, municipal socialism, benevolent capitalism, and government interventions on a national scale. 3 hrs. sem. ART, HIS, NOR (E. Sassin)

AMST/ENAM 0342 Literature of the American South (Spring 2015)
In William Faulkner's Absolom, Absolom! Canadian Shreve McCannon commands his roommate, Mississippian Quentin Compson, "Tell about the South. What's it like there. What do they do there. Why do they live there. Why do they live at all?" Our course will take on writers who want to "tell about the South" in the post-Civil War era and beyond, as they seek to help re-define and revitalize their region. We will focus our regional exploration on the "Southern Renascence," when writers and theorists like the Agrarians re-examined Southern history and reconsidered their role in relation to their regional community. Authors including William Faulkner, Zora Neale Hurston, Robert Penn Warren, Eudora Welty, and Tennessee Williams developed a new awareness of the restrictions of racial and gender roles, an interest in literary experimentation, and an increasingly realistic presentation of social conditions in the south. We will consider the legacy of these writers in later 20th century texts by authors such as Flannery O'Connor, Walker Percy, Alice Walker, Cormac McCarthy, Ernest Gaines, Randall Kenan and even relative newcomers such as Jackson Tippett McCrea. (Not open to students who have taken FYSE 1336) 3 hrs. lect./disc.  LIT, NOR (D. Evans)

AMST/FMMC 0355 Theories of Popular Culture (Spring 2015)
This course introduces a range of theoretical approaches to study popular culture, exploring the intersection between everyday life, mass media, and broader political and historical contexts within the United States. We will consider key theoretical readings and approaches to studying culture, including ideology and hegemony theory, political economy, audience studies, subcultural analysis, the politics of taste, and cultural representations of identity. Using these theoretical tools, we will examine a range of popular media and sites of cultural expression, from television to toys, technology to music, to understand popular culture as a site of ongoing political and social struggle. (Formerly AMST/FMMC 0275) (FMMC 0102 or FMMC 0104 or FMMC 0236 or AMST 0211) 3 hrs. lect./disc./3 hrs. screen. CW, SOC (J. Mittell)

AMST/ENAM 0358 Reading, Slavery, and Abolition (Fall 2014)
In this course we will study both black and white writers' psychological responses to, and their verbal onslaughts on, the "peculiar institution" of chattel slavery. We will work chronologically and across genres to understand how and by whom the written word was deployed in pursuit of physical and mental freedom and racial and socioeconomic justice. As the course progresses, we will deepen our study of historical context drawing on the substantial resources of Middlebury's special collections, students will have the opportunity to engage in archival work if they wish. Authors will include Emerson, Douglass, Jacobs, Thoreau, Stowe, Walker, and Garrison. 3 hrs. sem. HIS, LIT, NOR (W. Nash)

AMST/HIST 0372 The Civil Rights Revolution (Fall 2014)
A study of the quest for a more inclusive American polity in the twentieth century. The modern civil rights movement is the central focus, but this course offers more than a survey of events from Montgomery to Memphis. It explores the pre-World War II roots of the modern black freedom struggle, the impact of the heroic phase of the civil rights movement, and the ambiguous developments since 1970. This course employs a "race relations" perspective, stressing the linkages among the experiences of African Americans, whites, and other groups. 2 hrs. lect., 1 hr. disc. CMP, HIS, NOR (J. Ralph)

AMST 0400 Theory and Method in American Studies (Fall 2014)
A reading of influential secondary texts that have defined the field of American Studies during the past fifty years. Particular attention will be paid to the methodologies adopted by American Studies scholars, and the relevance these approaches have for the writing of senior essays and theses. (Open to junior American studies majors only.) 3 hrs. lect./disc. (H. Allen)

AMST 0408 American Art in Context: Art and Life of Winslow Homer (Fall 2014)
Although generally regarded as a popular painter of American life, Winslow Homer often provides a penetrating and sometimes disturbing view of post-Civil War America. Among the topics to be considered: Homer's paintings of the Civil War; his illustrations of leisure and recreation; and his depictions of women and children in the Gilded Age. During the second half of the course, we will turn our attention to Homer's landscape paintings of the Adirondacks, the Caribbean and the Maine coast, as well as his seascapes of the Gulf Stream and the North Atlantic. 3 hrs. lect./disc. ART, HIS, NOR (C. Wilson)

AMST 0420 Visual Cultures of the Americas (Fall 2014)
From murals to monuments and telenovelas to veladoras, this bilingual [Spanish/English] seminar will explore the role of visual expression in the history of cultural formation throughout the Americas. We will take a hemispheric and transnational approach to our studies. As such, two related premises inform the material we will examine: images traverse the boundaries of nation-states, and they are intrinsically tied to the developments of modern history. We will combine theoretical works with a variety of still and moving images (artifacts of mass culture, photography, artwork, film, mixed media, and performance) to study the relationship between "visuality" and flows of culture throughout Latin and Anglo Americas. This course is equivalent to IGST 0420. 3 hr. sem. ART, CMP (R. Lint)

AMST 0500 Independent Study (Fall 2014, Spring 2015)
Select project advisor prior to registration. (Staff)

AMST 0705 Senior Research Tutorial (Fall 2014)
This seminar will focus on the development of sophisticated research skills, the sharing with peers of research and writing in progress, and the completion of a substantial research project. Those writing one-credit essays will complete their projects over the course of this tutorial. (H. Allen)

AMST 0710 Honors Thesis (Spring 2015)
For students who have completed AMST 0705, and qualify to write two-credit interdisciplinary honors thesis on some aspect of American culture. The thesis may be completed on a fall/winter schedule or a fall/spring schedule. (Select a thesis advisor prior to registration) (Staff)

Arabic

The Arabic major requires four years of language study or its equivalent. Majors must also choose one of two disciplinary tracks: literature or linguistics. Each disciplinary track requires the completion of four content courses, including one introductory course specific to the discipline. Majors have the option of preparing a senior project or a senior thesis for honors.

Major in Arabic: (Minimum number of courses - 13)

Students majoring in Arabic must take:

1) Arabic language through ARBC 0302 or the equivalent: ARBC 0101, ARBC 0102, ARBC 0103, ARBC 0201, ARBC 0202, ARBC 0301, ARBC 0302;

2) Two courses in Arabic at the 0400-level;

3) Students must spend at least one semester in an Arabic-program abroad. The program strongly recommends that students spend a full year abroad.

4) Either

a. ENAM 0205, LITS 0205 or LITS 0360, plus three additional courses in Arabic literature (for students pursuing senior work in literature)

or

b. LNGT 0101, LNGT 0102 or ARBC 0111, plus two additional courses in Arabic linguistics and one in Arabic literature (for students pursuing senior work in linguistics);

    (Only one course per semester at a Middlebury College study abroad site may fulfill the 4a or 4b course requirement.)

     Content courses for 4a and 4b taken in schools abroad require departmental approval of the syllabus and a dossier of all written work (consisting of at least two exams and six typed pages of Arabic). The 0400-level courses for #2 taken in schools abroad require departmental approval of the syllabus and a dossier of all written work (consisting of at least two exams and eight typed pages of Arabic).

     Senior Work: Majors with a B+ average in their Arabic coursework may elect to prepare a one-term senior project (ARBC 0700, taken in the Fall or Spring) or a thesis (ARBC 0701/0702, taken in Fall and Winter or Winter and Spring). Senior projects and theses are usually written in English, but must demonstrate significant use of Arabic sources. Senior theses will include a 2000 word summary in Arabic.

Departmental honors are determined by a combination of thesis grade and grade point average in courses taken in the Arabic Program at Middlebury College and at Middlebury Colleges study abroad sites in Alexandria or Amman.

     Joint Major: Joint majors with other departments must: 1) complete Arabic language coursework through ARBC 0302 or the equivalent prior to the commencement of senior work, 2) take two courses related to Arab literature or linguistics, and 3) complete a senior project that explicitly engages the scholarly methodologies of both departments. (See above for guidelines regarding courses taken at schools abroad and at the Summer Language Program.)

     Minor in Arabic: Students may minor in Arabic by 1) studying Arabic language through ARBC 0302 or the equivalent; and 2) taking two other courses related to Arabic culture (cinema, literature, pop-culture, etc.) or Arabic linguistics. Only one of the two courses on Arabic culture or linguistics may be taken abroad. (See above for guidelines regarding courses taken at schools abroad and at the Summer Language Program.)

ARBC 0101 Beginning Arabic I (Fall 2014)
The goal of this course is to begin developing reading, speaking, listening, writing, and cultural skills in Arabic. This course stresses written and oral communication, using both formal Arabic and some Egyptian dialect. Emphasis is also placed on reading authentic texts from Arabic media sources, listening to and watching audio and video materials, and developing students' understanding of Arab culture. 6 hrs. lect./disc. LNG (S. Liebhaber, L. Nassif, B. Khattab)

ARBC 0103 Beginning Arabic III (Spring 2015)
This course is a continuation of ARBC 0102. 6 hrs. lect./disc. (ARBC 0102 or equivalent) LNG (Staff)

ARBC 0201 Intermediate Arabic I (Fall 2014)
This course is a continuation of ARBC 0103. Emphasis is placed on reading authentic materials from Arabic media, expanding students' vocabulary, listening to and watching audio and video materials, and developing students' understanding of Arab culture and communicative competence. (ARBC 0103 or equivalent) 6 hrs. lect./disc. LNG (L. Nassif, B. Khattab)

ARBC 0202 Intermediate Arabic II (Spring 2015)
This course is a continuation of Arabic 0201. Fifth in a series of courses that develop reading, speaking, listening, writing, and cultural skills in Arabic. This course stresses communication in formal and spoken Arabic. (ARBC 0201 or equivalent). 6 hrs. lect./disc. LNG (Staff)

ARBC 0205 Levantine Arabic I (Spring 2015)
In this course students will establish a foundational knowledge of the Arabic dialect spoken in the Levant (Syria, Lebanon, Palestine, and Jordan), with particular emphasis on the widely-understood Damascene Syrian Arabic. Through focusing on listening, speaking, and some written texts in a variety of contexts, we will work on the pronunciation, vocabulary, and grammatical structures specific to Levantine Arabic to enhance communication skills as well as general knowledge of Arab culture. Course materials will be drawn from a variety of sources, including textbooks, media, films, and songs. The course serves as a preparation for study abroad in an Arab country. (ARBC 0103) 3 hrs. lect./disc. AAL, LNG (L. Nassif)

ARBC/CMLT 0221 Modern Arabic Literature (Fall 2014)
This course is a survey of the most important moments in the development of Modern Arabic Literature from the end of 19th century to the present. We will map the developments, achievements, and innovations by Arab writers against a double background of rising nationalism, decolonization, and wars on the one hand and the idea and experiences of modernity and the west on the other. We will examine works of fiction by both male and female writers including novels, short stories, and drama, as well as poetry representing several different Arab countries. Students are encouraged to read in advance Albert Hourani's A History of the Arab People. (Open to all, no previous knowledge of Arabic is required). 3 hrs. sem. AAL, LIT (S. Liebhaber)

ARBC/LNGT 0227 Arabic Sociolinguistics (taught in English) (Spring 2015)
In this course we will focus on the inter-relationships between the way Arabic is used by native speakers and the various social contexts affecting that usage. In particular, we will discuss the phenomenon of diglossia in Arabic speech communities (that is, the co-existence of Modern Standard Arabic with the vernacular Arabic dialects of today); aspects of linguistic variation and change in the Arab world; the relation between register and language; as well as the relation between language and such sociological variables as education, social status, political discourse, and gender. Readings are primarily drawn from sociolinguists' studies in the Arab world. (ARBC 0101 or instructor's approval) AAL, SOC (Staff)

ARBC 0301 Advanced Arabic 1 (Fall 2014)
A continuation of Arabic 0202. This course aims to help students reach an intermediate-high level of proficiency in reading, speaking, writing, listening, and culture. Readings include articles on cultural, social, historical, political and literary topics. (ARBC 0202 or equivalent) 3 hrs. lect./disc. LNG (R. Greeley)

ARBC 0302 Advanced Arabic II (Spring 2015)
This course is a continuation of Arabic 0301. It aims to help students reach an advanced level of proficiency in reading, speaking, and writing Arabic, as well as to develop further an understanding of Arab culture. Readings include articles on cultural, social, historical, political, and literary topics. Course will be conducted entirely in Arabic. (ARBC 0301 or equivalent) 3 hrs. lect./disc. LNG (Staff)

ARBC 0402 Advanced Arabic IV (Spring 2015)
This course is a continuation of ARBC 0401 (ARBC 0302). 3 hrs. lect./disc. LNG (S. Liebhaber)

ARBC/LNGT 0435 Arabic Diglossia: A Linguistic Approach (Fall 2014)
Diglossia is an intricate sociolinguistic situation in which two related varieties of the same language co-exist within the same speech community. In this course we will focus on the study of diglossia as manifested in Arabic-speaking communities, where Modern Standard Arabic is used side by side with Vernacular Arabic. In particular, we will discuss the linguistic differences between the two varieties, their distinct and overlapping functions, their status in society, and code-switching between them in various contexts of language use. Course materials will be drawn from a variety of sources, including articles and book chapters, print and non-print media, political and religious discourse, and literary texts. The language of instruction is exclusively Arabic. (ARBC 0302 or equivalent) 3 hrs. sem. AAL, LNG, SOC (U. Soltan)

ARBC 0500 Arabic Independent Project (Fall 2014, Spring 2015)
Approval required. (Staff)

ARBC 0700 Arabic Senior Project (Fall 2014, Spring 2015)
Approval required. (Staff)

ARBC 0700 Senior Thesis Proposal (Fall 2014)
Approval required. (Staff)

ARBC 0701 Senior Thesis (Spring 2015)
Approval required. (Staff)

Biology

Requirements for the Biology Major: Requirements for the biology major encourage both breadth across the subdisciplines of biology as well as depth in at least one subdiscipline. The introductory sequence includes two courses, BIOL 0140 Ecology and Evolution and BIOL 0145 Cell Biology and Genetics, both of which are designed for students in their first year at the college who are considering a major in the life sciences, or for whom an in-depth coverage of the life sciences is of interest.

Requirements for the twelve course biology major are as follows:

BIOL 0140 Ecology  and Evolution

BIOL 0145 Cell Biology and Genetics

Two organismal courses from among BIOL 0201 Invertebrate Biology, BIOL 0202 Comparative Vertebrate Biology, BIOL 0203 Biology of Plants, and BIOL 0310 Microbiology.

One course in experimental design and data analysis from among BIOL 0211 (offered at a minimum each winter term), ECON 0210, MATH 0116 or PSYC 0201. (Biology majors do not need an additional Biology course to make up this one-course credit.)

A college-level chemistry course with laboratory [NOTE: AP credit in chemistry or a bypass examination cannot be used to satisfy this requirement].

Six biology electives from the 0200-0701 level, and MBBC 0324, with the following restrictions: (a) at least two electives must include a laboratory section; and(b) no more than one semester of independent research (BIOL 0500, BIOL 0700, or BIOL 0701 may count as elective credit toward the major.

Guidelines and Restrictions Relevant to the Selection of Courses for the Major:

It is expected that the core courses (BIOL 0140 and BIOL 0145) will be completed by the end of the third semester. BIOL 0140 is not open to seniors & second semester juniors in the Fall.

Students with strong high school preparation may take the BIOL 0140 or BIOL 0145 placement exam and if successful will be permitted to take 0200 and 0300-level courses.

Except for transfer students, BIOL 0140 and BIOL 0145 must be taken at Middlebury College.

The course in experimental design and data analysis (BIOL 0211, ECON 0210, MATH 0116, or PSYC 0201) should be taken by the end of the sophomore year.

Departmental courses offered with laboratories must be taken with the laboratory to satisfy major or joint major requirements.

Electives may include only one semester of independent research (BIOL 0500, BIOL 0700, or BIOL 0701), and two winter term courses designated for major credit (not including BIOL 0211).

A maximum of three courses taken off campus may be credited toward completion of the major or joint major. This includes courses taken at the Marine Biological Laboratory at Woods Hole. No BIOL 0500, BIOL 0700, or BIOL 0701 will be granted for independent study projects conducted during off-campus study programs.

Except for transfer students, off-campus biology courses must be beyond the introductory level.

When a course is offered at Middlebury with a lab or prerequisites, an equivalent off-campus course must also include a lab or prerequisites.

Requirements for a Minor in Biology: BIOL 0140 and BIOL 0145, and three elective courses from 0200-, 0300-, and 0400-level courses in the department, and MBBC 0324.  One of the electives must be an organismal course (BIOL 0201, 0202, 0203, or 0310), AND one of which must be at the 0300 or 0400 level.

Guidelines and Restrictions for the Minor:

Except for transfer students, BIOL 0140 and BIOL 0145 must be taken at Middlebury College.

The three electives need to be related thematically.

When a course is offered at Middlebury with a lab or prerequisites, an equivalent off-campus course must also include a lab or prerequisites.

Transfer credit for a course will be given only after the department chair reviews the course material upon a student's return to campus. (See guidelines for transfer credit.)

Joint Major: The Department of Biology does not offer a joint major other than the joint major in Biology and Environmental Studies described below.

Requirements for the Molecular Biology and Biochemistry Major: See the listing for the Program in Molecular Biology and Biochemistry for a description of this major.

Requirements for the Neuroscience Major: See the listing for the Program in Neuroscience for a description of this major.

Requirements for the Joint Major with Environmental Studies: See the listing for the conservation biology focus under the Program in Environmental Studies.

Graduate or Professional Training: Students considering graduate or professional school in the life sciences should note that many programs require a year of inorganic chemistry (CHEM 0103, 0104), a year of organic chemistry (CHEM 0241, 0242), a year of physics (PHYS 0109, 0110), and a year of calculus (MATH 0121, 0122) for admission.  Students are therefore strongly encouraged to meet with their faculty advisors early in their undergraduate career so the advantages of taking additional courses in the natural sciences can be discussed. 

Departmental Honors: Students with an average of 3.5 or higher in departmental courses other than BIOL 0500, BIOL 0700, and BIOL 0701 are eligible for departmental honors, for which successful completion of BIOL 0701 is also required (see below). The Biology Department awards two levels of honors: honors and high honors.

Criteria for Honors: Students with an average of 3.5 or higher in departmental courses (other than BIOL 0500, BIOL 0700, and BIOL 0701) and a grade of A- or above on their thesis will be awarded honors. 

Criteria for High Honors: High honors will be awarded to students who meet all of the criteria for honors and who, in addition, have completed theses of exceptionally high quality.  Determination of honors or high honors is based on a formal recommendation from the thesis committee, and requires the approval of the Biology Department faculty. 

The thesis process is described in detail in the “Student & Faculty Research” portion of the departmental website, and all students interested in conducting thesis research should read that section of the website in detail. Normally, research for thesis projects begins during the first term of a student's senior year (or during the preceding summer). Students interested in field research should talk with a faculty member by winter term of their junior year. All other prospective thesis students should consult with prospective advisors concerning possible thesis projects by spring term of their junior year. Thesis projects must be of at least two terms' duration (one term of BIOL 0500 or BIOL 0700 and one of BIOL 0701) and result in the production of a written thesis, a public presentation of the thesis research, and an oral defense of the thesis before a committee of at least three faculty members. With instructor approval, independent research conducted during the summer may be considered as a substitute for the first term of the project. In such cases, the off-campus work would satisfy the BIOL 0500 or BIOL 0700 prerequisite for enrollment in BIOL 0701, but would not itself be credit-bearing. The thesis grade reflects performance in all aspects of the thesis process.  Note that although completion of a thesis is one prerequisite for receiving honors, students may undertake a thesis regardless of whether they meet the other criteria for honors.

Advanced Placement Credit: Middlebury College grants one college credit for a score of 5 on the biology advanced placement exam. However, because the biology department does not offer any introductory course that is the equivalent of an AP biology course, advanced placement credit does not exempt a student from any of the published requirements for the major, minor, or joint majors, nor can it satisfy the college's distribution requirement.  Placement exams for BIOL 0140 and 0145 are offered before each semester.  Passing these placement exams allows students to enroll in classes for which BIOL 0140 or 0145 is a prerequisite. (NOTE: Students may only take a bypass exam once.)

International Baccalaureate (IB): Students who have or anticipate applying IB credit to completion of the Middlebury College degree and who plan to enroll in Biology courses during their undergraduate career must first take the Biology Department bypass exams (for BIOL 0140 and BIOL 0145) in order to determine proper placement.  (NOTE:  Students may only take a bypass exam once.)

Off-Campus Study: Students interested in taking biology courses off campus are strongly encouraged to discuss their plans with their advisor early in their college careers. Students should see the "Guidelines and Restrictions" section under the requirements heading for the biology major to learn more about obtaining transfer credit. Students seeking approval for biology courses taken off campus should be prepared, upon their return, to document course content with syllabi and class notes.

BIOL 0140 Ecology and Evolution (Fall 2014, Spring 2015)
In this introduction to ecology and evolutionary biology we will cover the topics of interspecific interactions (competition, predation, mutualism), demography and life-history patterns, succession and disturbance in natural communities, species diversity, stability and complexity, causes of evolutionary change, speciation, phylogenetic reconstruction, and population genetics. The laboratory component will examine lecture topics in detail (such as measuring the evolutionary response of bacteria, adaptations of stream invertebrates to life in moving water, invasive species and their patterns of spread). We will emphasize experimental design, data collection in the field and in the laboratory, data analysis, and writing skills. This course is not open to seniors and second semester juniors in the Fall. 3 hrs. lect./disc./3 hrs. lab DED, SCI (Fall 2014: D. Allen; Spring 2015: H. Young)

BIOL 0145 Cell Biology and Genetics (Fall 2014, Spring 2015)
In this introduction to modern cellular, genetic, and molecular biology we will explore life science concepts with an emphasis on their integral nature and evolutionary relationships. Topics covered will include cell membrane structure and function, metabolism, cell motility and division, genome structure and replication, the regulation of gene expression and protein production, genotype to phenotype relationship, and basic principles of inheritance. Major concepts will be illustrated using a broad range of examples from plants, animals, and microorganisms. Current topics in biology will be integrated into the course as they arise. 3 hrs. lect./disc./3 hrs. lab DED, SCI (Fall 2014: J. Ward; Spring 2015: C. Combelles)

BIOL 0201 Invertebrate Biology (Fall 2014)
The study of invertebrate animals, which comprise more than 90 percent of all animal species and represent the most diverse approaches to life on earth. A wide variety of protozoans cnidarians, echinoderms, mollusks, crustaceans, arachnids and insects are examined. Animals are studied primarily in the field for the first half of the course and the lab in the second. Emphasis is upon their ecology, evolution, behavior, and taxonomy. Specialized topics include regeneration, parasitology, sociality, and adaptations to freshwater, marine, and terrestrial habitats. Oral, written, and independent projects are required. (BIOL 0140) 3 hrs. lect./3 hrs. lab SCI (T. Root)

BIOL 0202 Comparative Vertebrate Biology (Spring 2015)
This course will explore the evolution of the vertebrate classes and the adaptations that allow them to live in almost every habitat on Earth. We will study the phylogeny, anatomy, physiology, and ecology of the major extinct and extant taxa of vertebrates and discuss how each group solves the problems of finding food, finding mates, and avoiding predators. Laboratory exercises will focus on the comparative anatomy of a cartilaginous fish (the dogfish shark) and a mammal (the cat). Students will learn to identify the anatomical structures of the vertebrate body and observe the evolutionary homologies. Occasional field trips will introduce the local vertebrate fauna in their natural habitat. (BIOL 0140 or BIOL 0145) 3 hrs. lect./3 hrs. lab SCI (M. Spritzer)

BIOL 0203 Biology of Plants (Fall 2014)
An introduction to plants, their life cycles, and their relationships to each other, as well as to the animals that pollinate them, disperse their fruits, and eat them. We will discuss morphology, physiology, evolution, and natural history of plants (mosses, ferns, gymnosperms, angiosperms). The laboratory will emphasize plant identification, various aspects of plant ecology and physiology, plant morphology, and plant use by humans. Students will complete a Community Service component, such as completing a forest inventory for a local forest, assisting with the campus tree map, or help with seed-saving measures at the College Organic Garden. Field trips will be the norm early in the semester. (BIOL 0140 and BIOL 0145) 3 hrs. lect./3 hrs. lab SCI (H. Young)

BIOL 0211 Experimental Design and Statistical Analysis (Spring 2015)
Experimental design is one of the most important parts of doing science, but it is difficult to do well. How do you randomize mice? How many replicate petri plates should be inoculated? If I am measuring temperature in a forest, where do I put the thermometer? In this course students will design experiments across the sub-areas of biology. We will run student designed experiments, and then learn ways to analyze the data, and communicate the results. Students planning to do independent research are encouraged to take this course. (This course is not open to students who have taken MATH 0116 or PSYC 0201 or ECON 0210) DED (S. Sheldon)

BIOL 0216 Animal Behavior (Spring 2015)
The behavior of animals primarily from an ethological perspective, with respect to genetics, physiology, evolution, and other biological factors. The course follows the history and methods of studying individual and social behaviors like feeding, courtship, mating, parental care, defense, predation, and migration. We examine live animals in the field and lab to illustrate such processes as instinct, learning, and communication. Discussion topics include behaviorism, intelligence, and sociobiology, analytical methods from tracking animals in the field to computerized motion analysis in the lab are utilized, and students design their own research projects. Oral, written, and independent projects are required. (BIOL 0140 or BIOL 0145) 2.5 hrs. lect./1 hr. video screen./3 hrs. lab SCI (T. Root)

BIOL 0270 Neural Disorders (Spring 2015)
Neuroscience is one of the most rapidly progressing sciences, and recent scientific and clinical studies alter how we view both the brain and ourselves. In this course we will examine the human nervous system and problems that arise when the nervous system goes awry. Readings and discussions will include popular writings as well as primary literature to focus on disorders such as multiple sclerosis, autism, Alzheimer's disease, depression, and Parkinsonism. Students read for each meeting from the current literature, and prepare in-depth class presentations on topics of their choosing. (BIOL 0145 or PSYC 0105; not open to students who have taken BIOL 0470) SCI (Staff)

BIOL 0302 Vertebrate Natural History (Fall 2014)
This course deals with the natural history of vertebrates in the context of the forests, fields, wetlands, and rivers of western Vermont. We will explore in depth the taxonomy of the local vertebrate fauna; techniques for capturing and handling live animals, particularly birds, mammals, and fish; and address experimentally specific questions about the distribution and abundance of vertebrates in a range of natural plant communities. Topics considered will include conservation biology, population and community ecology, and behavior. Field work will involve several early morning and weekend trips. (BIOL 0140) 6+ hrs. lab/field. SCI (S. Trombulak)

BIOL 0304 Aquatic Ecology (Fall 2014)
This field course will introduce students to the freshwater aquatic ecosystems of the northeastern U.S., including lakes, streams, rivers, and wetlands. We will explore the ecological processes that dominate these systems, the organisms that inhabit them, and the ecological techniques central to their study. Field exercises will include trips to many aquatic ecosystems in the region; experience with sampling techniques for measurement of physical, chemical, and biological features; and experimental design for answering questions about the relationships among species and between species and their environment. (BIOL 0140) 3 hrs. lect./3 hrs. lab. CW, SCI (S. Sheldon)

BIOL 0305 Developmental Biology (Fall 2014)
Have you ever wondered how an embryo develops from a simple fertilized egg to a complex adult? This course explores this question, examining the preparation and initiation of development (gametogenesis, fertilization, cleavages, and gastrulation), the formation of embryonic structure (morphogenesis), the creation of embryonic pattern (pattern formation), and the control of gene expression during embryogenesis. In lab, students will design and carry out experiments at the cutting edge of developmental biology, incorporating modern cellular, molecular, and genetic techniques with classical embryological approaches. Fundamental mysteries of development will be investigated in model organisms that best illustrate each process. (BIOL 0140 and BIOL 0145) 3 hrs. lect./4 hrs. lab SCI (C. Combelles)

BIOL 0314 Molecular Genetics (Fall 2014)
This course will focus on the structure and function of nucleic acids in both prokaryotes and eukaryotes. Lectures will center on molecular mechanisms of mutation, transposition, and recombination, the regulation of gene expression, and gene control in development, immune diversity and carcinogenesis. Readings from the primary literature will complement the textbook and classroom discussions. The laboratory will provide training in both classic and contemporary molecular-genetic techniques including nucleic acid isolation and purification, cloning, electroporation, nick-translation, Southern/Northern blotting, DNA sequencing, PCR and RT-PCR. (BIOL 0140 and BIOL 0145 or waiver) 3 hrs. lect./4 hrs. lab./1 hr. prelab. SCI (G. Ernstrom)

BIOL 0323 Plant Community Ecology (Spring 2015)
This course will explore the structure and dynamics of plant communities, with a particular emphasis on temperate forest communities. We will investigate patterns in community diversity and structure, explore how plant populations and plant communities respond to environmental disturbances, and investigate the effects of anthropogenic influences (climate change, introduced species, habitat conversion) on plant communities. Labs will emphasize fieldwork at local research sites, and will provide exposure to techniques of experimental design in plant ecology and basic approaches to describing plant community structure and dynamics. (BIOL 0140) 3 hrs. lect./3 hrs. lab. CW (8 spaces), SCI  (D. Allen)

BIOL 0331 The Genetics of Cancer (Spring 2015)
In this course we will examine the molecular and cellular mechanisms that serve to regulate normal cell proliferation, survival, and senescence in order to understand how alterations in these mechanisms can lead to cancer. Students will develop and propose research projects based on their own specific interests. Topics covered may include: classification of cancers, animal models, oncogenes and tumor suppressors, mitogenic signals, genetic and epigenetic alterations, external causes of cancer, and current treatment protocols. We will also examine cancer’s far-reaching influence outside the confines of molecular and cell biology. (BIOL 0140, BIOL 0145, and BIOL 0314) 3 hrs. lect./3 hrs. lab CW, DED, SCI  (J. Ward)

BIOL 0370 Animal Physiology (Fall 2014, Spring 2015)
This course examines the body functions of animals and humans using general physiological principles and a comparative approach. Lectures will cover the function of each of the major physiological systems (nervous, endocrine, muscular, etc.) and will describe how animal physiology has been shaped by evolution to allow animals to survive in a wide range of environmental conditions. Lectures will focus mainly on physiological processes occurring at the molecular, cellular, and organismal levels. Occasional journal article discussions will provide case studies of current topics in animal physiology. Laboratory exercises, reports and oral presentations emphasize experimental design, analysis and independent study using various methodological approaches including electrophysiology, neurotransmitter manipulations, nutritional analysis, and exercise physiology. (BIOL 0145 and BIOL 0140 or BIOL 0216). 3 hrs. lect./3 hrs. lab. CW (Spring, 10 spaces), SCI (Fall 2014: M. Spritzer; Spring 2015: G. Ernstrom)

BIOL 0450 Topics in Reproductive Medicine (Spring 2015)
In this course we will examine the fundamentals of human reproduction and modern reproductive intervention strategies. Rapid discoveries in medical technologies have allowed us to push the limits of the human body, and we will explore the scientific and medical challenges that surround the control of fertility and infertility, fetal life, birth, and the neonatal period. Through critical review of the primary literature, writing, and informed dialogues, students will gain an understanding of key topics in reproductive medicine. (BIOL 0140, BIOL 0145, and one other 0200 or 0300-level biology course, or by waiver) 3 hrs. sem. SCI (C. Combelles)

BIOL 0460 Plant-Animal Interactions (Fall 2014)
The mutualisms and antagonisms between plants and animals will form the focus of this seminar. We will discuss pollination, seed dispersal, insect defense of plants, and herbivory from both perspectives (the plant's and the animal's) and the evolutionary responses of these intense co-evolving entities. The format for the course will be both classroom and field based. Students will lead discussions of papers from the primary literature, perform individual or group research projects, and present results in both oral and written form. (BIOL 0140 and one other 0200- or 0300-level biology course). 3 hrs. seminar/lab SCI (H. Young)

BIOL 0500 Independent Study (Fall 2014, Spring 2015)
In this course students complete individual projects involving laboratory and/or field research or extensive library study on a topic chosen by the student and a faculty advisor. Prior to registering for BIOL 0500, a student must have discussed and agreed upon a project topic with a member of the Biology Department faculty. Additional requirements include participation in weekly meetings with disciplinary sub-groups and attending all Biology Department seminars. This course is not open to seniors; seniors should enroll in BIOL 0700, Senior Independent Study. (Approval required) 3 hrs. disc. (Staff)

BIOL 0700 Senior Independent Study (Fall 2014, Spring 2015)
In this course students complete individual projects involving laboratory and/or field research or extensive library study on a topic chosen by the student and a faculty advisor. Prior to registering for BIOL 0700, a student must have discussed and agreed upon a project topic with a member of the Biology Department faculty. Additional requirements include participation in weekly meetings with disciplinary sub-groups and attending all Biology Department seminars. (Approval required; open only to seniors) 3 hrs. disc.  (Staff)

BIOL 0701 Senior Thesis (Fall 2014, Spring 2015)
Seniors majoring in Biology who have completed one or more semesters of BIOL 0500 or BIOL 0700 and who plan to complete a thesis should register for BIOL 0701. In this course students will produce a written thesis, deliver a public presentation of the research on which it is based, and present an oral defense of the thesis before a committee of at least three faculty members. Additional requirements include participation in weekly meetings with disciplinary sub-groups and attending all Biology Department seminars. Open to Biology and joint Biology/Environmental Studies majors. (BIOL 0500 or BIOL 0700 or waiver; instructor approval required for all students) 3 hrs. disc.  (Staff)

Chemistry & Biochemistry

I. Majors: Students can elect to major in chemistry, biochemistry, environmental chemistry (joint major), or molecular biology and biochemistry.

II. Course Requirements:

Chemistry: MATH 0121*, MATH 0122*, PHYS 0109*, PHYS 0110*, CHEM 0103*, CHEM 0104 (or CHEM 0107), CHEM 0203 (or CHEM 0241), CHEM 0204 (or CHEM 0242), CHEM 0311, and either CHEM 0351 or CHEM 0355, and two electives chosen, with an advisors approval, from 0200-, 0300- or 0400- courses the Chemistry and Biochemistry Department or GEOL 0323. Independent study courses (CHEM 0400, CHEM 0500, CHEM 0700, or CHEM 0701) cannot count as electives.

     Honors in Chemistry: MATH 0121*, MATH 0122*, PHYS 0109*, PHYS 0110*, CHEM 0103*, CHEM 0104 (or CHEM 0107), CHEM 0203 (or CHEM 0241), CHEM 204 (or CHEM 0242), CHEM 0311, CHEM 0312, CHEM 0351, CHEM 0355, CHEM 0431, CHEM 0400, CHEM 0701.

     Biochemistry: MATH 0121*, MATH 0122*, PHYS 0109*, PHYS 0110*, CHEM 0103*,CHEM 0104 (or CHEM 0107), CHEM 0203 (or CHEM 0241), CHEM 204 (or CHEM 0242), CHEM 0313, CHEM 0322, and two electives chosen, with an advisors approval, from 0200-,0300- or 0400-level courses in the Chemistry and Biochemistry Department or BIOL 0314. Independent study courses (CHEM 0400, CHEM 0500, CHEM 0700, or CHEM 0701) cannot count as electives.

     Honors in Biochemistry: MATH 0121*, MATH 0122*, PHYS 0109*, PHYS 0110*, CHEM 0103*, CHEM 0104 (or CHEM 0107), CHEM 0203 (or CHEM 0241), CHEM 204 (or CHEM 0242), CHEM 0311, CHEM 0313, CHEM 0322, CHEM 0355, CHEM 0425, CHEM 0400, CHEM 0701.

     Environmental Chemistry: See the listing for the Environmental Chemistry focus under the Program in Environmental Studies.  http://www.middlebury.edu/academics/es/requirements

     Molecular Biology and Biochemistry: See Program in Molecular Biology and Biochemistry. http://www.middlebury.edu/academics/mbb

     *Students may receive credit for courses indicated by an asterisk with a satisfactory score on the advanced placement examination for that subject. Students who have scored a 4 or 5 on the advanced placement examination in chemistry are awarded a course credit for CHEM 0103 and may enroll in CHEM 0107 (strongly encouraged) or CHEM 0104. Students who do not have an AP score of 4 or 5, but have a strong background in chemistry should take the department’s online placement examination (moodle.middlebury.edu) to determine if they are prepared for CHEM 0104 or CHEM 0107. Those students who achieve a satisfactory score on the placement examination will be encouraged to register for CHEM 0104 or CHEM 0107, but will not receive credit for CHEM 0103.

III. Independent Research and Senior Thesis Program: Many students participate in independent research (CHEM 0500 or CHEM 0700) or complete senior thesis projects (CHEM 0400 and CHEM 0701). Students who are interested in completing a senior thesis project should meet with their academic advisor for guidance in seeking a research advisor no later than winter term of their junior year. Although required for departmental honors, students may also participate the senior thesis program without pursuing honors and the associated coursework.

IV. Eligibility for Honors in Chemistry or Biochemistry: Students who successfully complete the honors course work including the senior thesis program with a minimum grade point average of 3.20 are awarded departmental honors. High Honors may be awarded at the discretion of the department and the thesis committee to students who demonstrate exceptional achievement in both the thesis program and departmental course work.

V. Recommended Programs of Study: Several coursework options for students considering chemistry or biochemistry as a major are shown below. Although students may deviate from these guides, it is strongly recommended that all prospective majors complete CHEM 0104 or CHEM 0107 by the end of their first year and the calculus (MATH 0121 and 0122) and physics (PHYS 0109 and 0110) courses by the end of their second year. Completing CHEM 0203 as early as possible provides the maximum flexibility both within the major and for other academic interests, including study abroad.

Chemistry
First Year:
Fall: CHEM 0103, MATH 0121
Spring: CHEM 0104, MATH 0122

OR

Fall: CHEM 0104 or CHEM 0107, MATH 0121
Spring: MATH 0122 (consider CHEM 0203)

Sophomore Year:
Fall: CHEM 0203, PHYS 0109
Spring: CHEM 0204, PHYS 0110

Junior Year:
Fall: CHEM 0311, CHEM 0351*
Spring: *(OR CHEM 0355)

Senior Year:
Fall: elective
Spring: elective

Biochemistry
First Year:
Fall: CHEM 0103, MATH 0121
Spring: CHEM 0104, MATH 0122

OR

Fall: CHEM 0104 or CHEM 0107, MATH 0121
Spring: MATH 0122 (consider CHEM 0203)

Sophomore Year:
Fall: CHEM 0203, PHYS 0109
Spring: CHEM 0204, PHYS 0110

Junior Year:
Fall: CHEM 0322
Spring: CHEM 0313

Senior Year:
Fall: elective
Spring: elective

Chemistry with honors
First Year:
Fall: CHEM 0103, MATH 0121
Spring: CHEM 0104, MATH 0122

OR

Fall: CHEM 0104 or CHEM 0107, MATH 0121
Spring: MATH 0122 (consider CHEM 0203)

Sophomore Year:
Fall: CHEM 0203, PHYS 0109
Spring: CHEM 0204, PHYS 0110

Junior Year:
Fall: CHEM 0311, CHEM 0351
Spring: CHEM 0312, CHEM 0355

Senior Year:
Fall: CHEM 0400, CHEM 0431
Spring: CHEM 0701

Biochemistry with honors
First Year:
Fall: CHEM 0103, MATH 0121
Spring: CHEM 0104, MATH 0122

OR

Fall: CHEM 0104 or CHEM 0107, MATH 0121
Spring: MATH 0122 (consider CHEM 0203)

Sophomore Year:
Fall: CHEM 0203, PHYS 0109
Spring: CHEM 0204, PHYS 0110

Junior Year:
Fall: CHEM 0311, CHEM 0322
Spring: CHEM 0313, CHEM 0355

Senior Year:
Fall: CHEM 0400, CHEM 0425
Spring: CHEM 0701

CHEM 0102 The Chemistry of Mind-Altering Drugs (Fall 2014)
In this course we will investigate basic principles of chemical signaling in the brain and how commonly-abused drugs alter brain chemistry to distort perception. We will survey the molecular structure of drugs, principles of drug-receptor interactions, and the mechanisms of drug action in five major classes of drugs: opiates, stimulants, cannabinoids, sedatives, and hallucinogens. We will also examine chemical dependency and current research into pharmaceutical treatments for addiction. This course does not require prior experience in chemistry. 3 hrs. lect. SCI (K. Kazmier) 

CHEM 0103 General Chemistry I (Fall 2014, Spring 2015)
Major topics will include atomic theory and atomic structure; chemical bonding; stoichiometry; introduction to chemical thermodynamics. States of matter; solutions and nuclear chemistry. Laboratory work deals with testing of theories by various quantitative methods. Students with strong secondary school preparation are encouraged to consult the department chair for permission to elect CHEM 0104 or CHEM 0107 in place of this course. CHEM 0103 is also an appropriate course for a student with little or no prior preparation in chemistry who would like to learn about basic chemical principles while fulfilling the SCI or DED distribution requirement. 3 hrs. lect., 3 hrs. lab, 1 hr. disc. DED, SCI (Staff)

CHEM 0104 General Chemistry II (Fall 2014, Spring 2015)
Major topics include chemical kinetics, chemical equilibrium, acid-base equilibria, chemical thermodynamics, electrochemistry, descriptive inorganic chemistry, and coordination chemistry. Lab work includes inorganic synthesis, qualitative analysis, and quantitative analysis in kinetics, acid-base and redox chemistry. (CHEM 0103 or by waiver) 3 hrs. lect., 3 hrs. lab, 1 hr. disc. DED, SCI (Fall 2014: J. Byers; Spring 2015: A. Vasiliou)

CHEM 0107 Advanced General Chemistry (Fall 2014)
This course is a one-semester alternative to one year of general chemistry (CHEM 0103 and CHEM 0104). It is open to all students who have received a 4 or 5 on the Advanced Placement test in Chemistry. Students who have two or more years of high school chemistry without AP credit may enroll with permission of the instructor. Topics will be drawn from the traditional general chemistry curriculum, but discussed in greater detail with a more thorough mathematical treatment. Special emphasis will be placed on chemical bonding, coordination chemistry, and real world research in chemistry. (AP Chemistry or equivalent.) 3 hrs. lect., 3 hrs. lab, 1 hr. disc. DED, SCI (S. Choi)

CHEM 0203 Organic Chemistry I: Structure and Reactivity (Fall 2014, Spring 2015)
This course will provide students with an introduction to the structure and reactivity of organic molecules sufficient to continue directly to study of biochemistry (CHEM 0322). Topics covered will include models of chemical bonding, acid-base relationships, three-dimensional molecular structure (conformations and stereochemistry), reaction mechanisms and energy diagrams, substitution and elimination reactions, carbonyl reactions (additions, reductions, interconversions, and alpha-reactivity), and the fundamentals of biological molecules (carbohydrates, DNA, and RNA). Laboratory experiments will include purification techniques (recrystallization, distillation, extraction, and chromatography) as well as microscale organic reactions that complement the lecture portion of the course. (CHEM 0104 or CHEM 0107) 3 hrs. lect., 3 hrs. lab, 1 hr. prelab. SCI (Fall 2014: J. Byers, R. Bunt; Spring 2015: R. Bunt)

CHEM 0204 Organic Chemistry II: Synthesis and Spectroscopy (Spring 2015)
In this course we will explore the ways that organic molecules are made and their structures identified. The study of organic reactions will continue from CHEM 0203 with radical reactions, alkene and alkyne additions, aromatic reactions, oxidations and reductions, and additional carbonyl reactions. Emphasis in this course will be placed on using reactions in sequences to synthesize larger and more complex molecules. The theory and practice of mass spectrometry and UV-Vis, IR, and NMR spectroscopy will be studied as a means to elucidate the exact structures of organic molecules. Laboratory experiments will focus on synthetic techniques that complement the lecture portion of the course and the identification of complex unknowns via GC-MS, IR, and NMR. (CHEM 0203) 3 hrs. lect., 3 hrs. lab, 1 hr. prelab. (J. Byers)

CHEM 0270 Environmental Chemistry (Spring 2015)
In this course we will investigate fundamental physical and chemical processes within soils, natural waters, and the atmosphere that affect the fate and transport of contaminants. Processes to be studied include dissolution, volatilization, sorption, and transformation reactions. Laboratory experiments will explore laboratory, field, and computational methods for pollution monitoring, contaminant characterization, and prediction of pollution fate and transport. (CHEM 0104 or CHEM 0107) 3 hrs. lect., 3 hrs. lab SCI (M. Costanza-Robinson)

CHEM 0311 Instrumental Analysis (Fall 2014)
This course introduces fundamental concepts of analytical chemistry, instrumental analysis, and scientific writing. Lecture topics include experimental design and quality control; sample collection and preparation; calibration, error, and data analysis; statistics; and the theory and operation of chemical instrumentation. Multi-week laboratory projects provide hands-on experience in qualitative and quantitative analysis using a variety of research-quality instrumentation (e.g., graphite furnace atomic absorption spectroscopy, UV/Vis spectrometry, gas chromatography mass spectrometry, circular dichroism spectroscopy, high pressure liquid chromatography). Writing workshops promote professional scientific writing skills through guided practice in writing analysis, peer review, and revision. (CHEM 0204 or CHEM 0242) 3 hr. lect., 6 hrs. lab. CW (M. Costanza-Robinson, J. Larrabee)

CHEM 0312 Inorganic and Physical Chemistry Laboratory (Spring 2015)
In this course students will carry out experiments in the field of inorganic and physical chemistry and write journal-style reports based on their results. In the first half of the semester students will conduct a multi-step synthesis and characterization of a Mo-Mo complex with a quadruple bond. Students will learn inert atmosphere synthetic techniques and how to use a glove box. The synthesized Mo-Mo complex will be characterized by UV-Vis, IR, 1H and 31P NMR spectroscopies, and cyclic voltammetry. In the second half of the semester students will conduct two physical chemistry experiments. First students will carry out a kinetic study of the isomerization of the Mo-Mo (alpha to beta or beta to alpha) complex by UV-Vis spectroscopy. Finally, students will obtain the high-resolution IR spectra of acetylene and deuterated acetylene and analyze the rotation-vibration spectra using statistical and quantum mechanics to obtain structural data and interpret the peak intensities. In addition to the laboratory activities, there will be lectures on metal quadruple bonds, principles of UV-Vis, IR, 1H and 31P NMR spectroscopies, cyclic voltammetry, and statistical mechanics. (CHEM 0311, CHEM 0351, and CHEM 0355. CHEM 0355 can be taken concurrently.) 3 hrs. lect. 3 hrs. lab (A. Vasiliou, R. Bunt)

CHEM 0313 Biochemistry Laboratory (Spring 2015)
Experimental biochemistry emphasizing the isolation, purification and characterization of enzymes and the cloning of genes and expression of recombinant protein. Traditional biochemical techniques such as UV-VIS spectroscopy, gel filtration, ion exchange and affinity chromatography, electrophoresis, and immunoblotting will be used in the investigation of several enzymes. Specific experiments will emphasize enzyme purification, enzyme kinetics, and enzyme characterization by biochemical and immunochemical methods. Major techniques in molecular biology will be introduced through an extended experiment that will include DNA purification, polymerase chain reaction, bacterial transformation, DNA sequencing, and the expression, purification, and characterization of the recombinant protein. Class discussions emphasize the underlying principles of the biochemical and molecular techniques employed in the course, and how these experimental tools are improved for particular applications. Laboratory reports stress experimental design, data presentation, and interpretation of results. (CHEM 0322) 2 hr. lect., 6 hrs. lab. CW (R. Sandwick)

CHEM 0322 Biochemistry of Macromolecules (Fall 2014, Spring 2015)
This course is an introduction to biochemistry that focuses on the chemical and physical properties of amino acids, proteins, lipids, carbohydrates, and nucleic acids. Specific topics include the structure and function of proteins, enzyme mechanisms and kinetics, how carbohydrates and lipids contribute to vital cellular and organismal functions, and informational biochemistry (DNA, RNA, and specific enzymes and processes leading to the production of regulatory RNA and proteins). Specific topics from the primary literature will be explored to illustrate how particular techniques and experimental approaches are used to gain a new understanding of biochemistry and molecular biology. (CHEM 0203 or CHEM 0242) 3 hrs. lect., 1 hr. disc. (Fall 2014: R. Sandwick; Spring 2015: Staff)

CHEM 0351 Quantum Chemistry and Spectroscopy (Fall 2014)
Quantum theory is developed and applied to atomic structure and molecular bonding. Spectroscopy is examined as an application of quantum theory. (CHEM 0204 or CHEM 0241 co-requisite, MATH 0122 and PHYS 0110, or by waiver) 3 hrs. lect., 1 hr. disc. (S. Choi)

CHEM 0355 Thermodynamics and Kinetics for Chemical and Biological Sciences (Spring 2015)
In this course students will learn the central ideas that frame thermodynamics and kinetics. The application of these ideas to chemical, biological, and the environmental processes will be covered using examples such as refrigerators, heat pumps, fuel cells, bioenergetics, lipid membranes, and catalysts (including enzymes). (PHYS 0109, MATH 0122, CHEM 0242) 3 hrs. lect., 1 hr. disc. (S. Choi)

CHEM 0400 Seminar in Chemical Research (Fall 2014)
This seminar provides students with experiences to support the preparation of a senior thesis. As the course involves participation in a mentored laboratory project and the intent to complete a senior thesis, students must make arrangements to work with a faculty advisor prior to gaining approval for course registration. The classroom portion of this seminar focuses on reading the scientific literature, giving effective oral presentations, and writing the thesis introduction. Particular emphasis will be given to computer and technology issues related to oral and written presentations. Participation will normally be followed by registration for CHEM 0500 or CHEM 0700 (winter term and spring). (Senior standing; Approval only) 2 hrs. sem., 12 hrs. lab. (R. Bunt)

CHEM 0425 Biochemistry of Metabolism (Fall 2014)
A living organism requires thousands of coordinated individual chemical reactions for life. In this course we will survey the major integrated metabolic pathways of living cells and whole organisms, with particular attention to enzyme mechanisms, as well as the regulation, and integration of metabolism from the molecular to the whole organism level. The synthesis and degradation of carbohydrates, amino acids, lipids, and nucleotides are investigated, along with the mechanisms of energy flow and cell-to-cell communication. While common metabolic processes are emphasized, unique aspects of metabolism that permit cells to function in unusual niches will also be considered. Mechanistic and regulatory aspects of metabolic processes will be reinforced through an investigation of inborn errors and organic defects that lead to disease. (CHEM 0322) 3 hrs. lect., 1 hr. disc. (R. Sandwick)

CHEM 0431 Advanced Inorganic Chemistry (Fall 2014)
Atomic structure, bonding theories, and properties applicable to inorganic and organometallic compounds will be developed in depth. Specific topics will include valence bond theory, molecular orbital theory, ligand field theory, applications of group theory, and reaction mechanisms. (CHEM 0351) 3 hrs. lect. (J. Larrabee)

CHEM 0442 Advanced Organic Chemistry (Spring 2015)    
This course covers advanced topics in organic chemistry, with the goal of bringing students to the point where they have the knowledge necessary to become lifelong learners of organic chemistry through primary literature, rather than reliance on textbooks.  With this goal in mind, the course will cover qualitative molecular orbital theory and reactive intermediates beyond the anion and cation chemistry which form the main body of the introductory organic chemistry sequence.  More advanced techniques in NMR spectroscopy, stereochemistry, and conformational analysis will also be covered, and the course will culminate in literature examples of total synthesis of natural products, and a final project involving authoring a Wikipedia page on a topic of interest relating to organic chemistry. (CHEM 0204 or CHEM 0242) (J. Byers)

CHEM 0500 Independent Study Project (Fall 2014, Spring 2015)
Individual study for qualified students. (Approval required) (Staff)

CHEM 0700 Senior Research (Fall 2014, Spring 2015)
In this course students complete individual projects involving laboratory research on a topic chosen by the student and a faculty advisor. Prior to registering for CHEM 0700, a student must have discussed and agreed upon a project topic with a faculty member in the Chemistry and Biochemistry Department. Attendance at all Chemistry and Biochemistry Department seminars is expected. (Approval required; open only to seniors) (Staff)

CHEM 0701 Senior Thesis (Fall 2014, Spring 2015)
Students who have initiated research projects in CHEM 0400 and who plan to complete a senior thesis should register for CHEM 0701. Students are required to write a thesis, give a public presentation, and defend their thesis before a committee of at least three faculty members. The final grade will be determined by the department. Attendance at all Chemistry and Biochemistry Department seminars is expected. (CHEM 0400; approval required) (Staff)

Chinese

Full Major:

I. Required Courses:

  • CHNS 0101 through CHNS 0302 (or equivalent)
  • Four additional courses from among: CHNS 0219, CHNS 0220, CHNS/FMMC 0250, CHNS 0270, CHNS 0325, CHNS 0330, CHNS 0340, CHNS 0370 (At least one of the four must be in pre-modern literature and at least one must be in modern literature or culture. At least one of the four must be at 0300 level course in literature in translation, which ideally should be done before the thesis is completed)
  • CHNS 0411 (the equivalent may be taken in the summer at the Middlebury Chinese School or during study abroad)
  • CHNS 0425, CHNS 0426, or CHNS 0412 (the equivalent to CHNS 0412 may be taken at the Middlebury Chinese School, or during study abroad)
  • CHNS 0475
  • Either CHNS 0700 or CHNS 0701 and CHNS 0702

II. Senior Work:

Full majors in Chinese are required to complete either CHNS 0701 and CHNS 0702 (Senior Honors Thesis) or CHNS 0700 (Senior Essay or Translation Project). CHNS 0701 and CHNS 0702 is a one-semester plus J-term course that should normally be taken during the fall and J-term. CHNS 0700 is a one-semester course that may be taken during the fall or winter. The Chinese department discourages students from postponing completion of senior work until the final semester of full-time study.

Joint majors in Chinese are encouraged but not required to do a senior thesis (CHNS 0701 and CHNS 0702) or project (CHNS 0700). A joint thesis or project should, when feasible, combine the two fields of study of the joint major.

All senior work, whether CHNS 0700 or CHNS 0701 and CHNS 0702, must include a major focus on work with primary sources in Chinese. All senior work should focus on Chinese literature; qualified students may petition the Chair for permission to do senior work on other aspects of Chinese culture (e.g., film or linguistics).

     Senior Honors Thesis: To be eligible for the CHNS 0701 and CHNS 0702 Senior Honors Thesis, students majoring in Chinese (full, double or joint) must have completed language study through at least CHNS 0302 (or equivalent), taken at least two Chinese literature/culture courses, and maintained an average of B+ or better in Chinese department courses. Complete guidelines for the completion of the CHNS 0701 and CHNS 0702 thesis (and the CHNS 0700 project) are available from the Chinese Department.

     Departmental Honors: Both full and joint majors may qualify for honors. Eligibility for departmental honors in Chinese requires completion of a senior honors thesis graded B+ or better and a grade point average of B+ (3.35) or higher in all courses taken that satisfy or could potentially satisfy the requirements for the major as listed above (full) and below (joint), including courses taken in the summer in the Chinese School and/or during study abroad. Only courses that satisfy or could potentially satisfy major requirements count toward honors (i.e., courses taken abroad that do not fall into this category do not count) and all such courses count (e.g., if more than four courses toward major requirement {b} are taken, all count). The department may award honors for completion of an exceptionally impressive senior essay or translation project that is graded A if the student has an average of B+ or higher in all qualifying courses (as defined above). High honors will be awarded for a grade point average of 3.5 or higher in all qualifying courses (as define above) and a senior thesis of A- or better. Highest honors are reserved for students who earn a grade of A on the senior thesis and who have an average of 3.75 or higher in all qualifying courses (as defined above).

Joint Major:

I. Required Courses:

  • CHNS 0101 through CHNS 0302 (or equivalent);
  • Either CHNS 0411 (the equivalent may be taken in the summer at the Middlebury Chinese School or, with prior approval, during study abroad) or CHNS 0425;
  • Four additional courses from among: CHNS 0219, CHNS 0220, CHNS/FMMC 0250, CHNS 0270, CHNS 0325, CHNS 0330, CHNS 0340, CHNS 0370, CHNS 0412, CHNS 0426, CHNS 0475, at least one of which must be at the 0300 or 0400 level.

Minor:

I. Required Courses:

  • Four courses from among CHNS 0101, 0103, 0201, 0202, 0301, 0302, 0400, 0411, 0412, 0425, 426 and 475;
  • Plus three courses from among CHNS 0219, 0220, 0250, 0270, 0325, 0330, 0340, 0370, 0412, 0425, 4026 and 0475. One course must be in literature in either Chinese or English. The equivalent of 0411 and/or 0412 may be taken abroad.
  • A single course may be counted toward only one category.

     International and Global Studies Major with Chinese Language: Along with other required courses and senior work as described in the International and Global Studies major section, the Chinese language component of an IGS major requires completion of the following: 1) CHNS 0101 CHNS 0202 (strongly encouraged to attend Chinese Summer schools, or take CHNS 0301 0302); 2) one semester at one of the three C.V. Starr-Middlebury College Schools in China; 3) any two of the following: CHNS 0411, 0412, 0425, 0426, or 0475, upon return from China.
     To specialize in Chinese Literature/Culture within the International and Global Studies major: Students must take: any five of the following: CHNS 0219, CHNS 0220, CHNS/FMMC 0250, CHNS/LNGT 0270, CHNS 0325, CHNS 0330, CHNS 0340, CHNS 0370, CHNS 0412, CHNS 0475 (one literature course taken during study abroad may be counted toward this requirement).

CHNS 0101 Beginning Chinese (Fall 2014)
This course is an introduction to Mandarin (guoyu or putonghua). The course begins with simple words and phrases, the pronunciation and cadences of Mandarin, romanization, Chinese characters, and simple vocabulary items, all taught in the context of practical communication. Sentence patterns and other fundamentals of speaking, reading, and writing will be taught, including both traditional characters (used everywhere before the 1950s and still used in Taiwan and Hong Kong) and simplified characters (used in China). Students should have achieved active command of more than 600 Chinese characters and more than 800 compounds by the end of the sequence CHNS 0101, CHNS 0102, CHNS 0103. 5 hrs. lect., 2 hrs. drill LNG (T. Moran, K. Wang)

CHNS 0103 Beginning Chinese (Spring 2015)
This course is a continuation of the fall and winter terms with accelerated introduction of vocabulary, grammar, and sentence patterns designed to facilitate speaking and reading. Toward the end of this semester students will read Huarshang de meiren (Lady in the Painting), a short book written entirely in Chinese. (CHNS 0102 or equivalent) 5 hrs. lect., 2 hrs. drill LNG (T. Moran, K. Wang)

CHNS 0201 Intermediate Chinese (Fall 2014)
This course is designed to enable the student to converse in everyday Chinese and to read simple texts in Chinese (both traditional and simplified characters). Discussion of assigned readings will be conducted primarily in Chinese. Familiarity with the vocabulary and grammar introduced in CHNS 0101, CHNS 0102, and CHNS 0103 is assumed. Grammatical explanations, written exercises, dictation quizzes, sentence patterns, oral drill, and CD's will accompany assignments. By the completion of CHNS 0202, which follows CHNS 0201 directly, students should be able to read and write approximately 1,200 characters. (CHNS 0103 or equivalent) 5 hrs. lect., 1 hr. drill LNG (C. Reed, H. Yang)

CHNS 0202 Intermediate Chinese (Spring 2015)
This course is a continuation of the first term's work, with the class conducted primarily in Chinese. (CHNS 0201) 5 hrs. lect., 1 hr. drill LNG (C. Reed, Staff)

CHNS 0219 The Chinese Literary Tradition (in translation) (Fall 2014)
This course, an introduction to the works of literature that formed the basis of traditional Chinese culture, is a discussion-based seminar. It focuses first on texts written in classical Chinese from the earliest times up through the Song dynasty, including selections from early poetry and history, Daoist classics, stories of the strange, and Tang Dynasty poetry by Wang Wei, Li Bai and Du Fu. These texts shaped the traditional Chinese understanding of the world, and provided models of what was perceived to be powerful, beautiful language. In the second part of the course we will explore narratives written in the vernacular language, focusing on the literary significance and aesthetic value of drama, stories and novels long treasured by the Chinese. Students will gain a better understanding of traditional Chinese literary values, as well as Chinese society and worldviews. This class is not intended for native Chinese students who have studied Chinese literature in high school classes in China. (No background in Chinese culture or language needed.) 3 hrs. lect./disc. AAL, CW, LIT (C. Reed)

CHNS/FMMC 0250 Chinese Cinema (Spring 2015)
This course, taught in English, surveys the history of movies in China since the 1930s and also offers an in-depth look at the work of: China's fifth-generation directors of the 1980s and their successors up to the present; Taiwan's new wave; and Hong Kong popular cinema, including martial arts film. Our focus is the screening and discussion of films such as The Goddess (a 1934 silent classic), Stage Sisters (1965; directed by the influential Xie Jin), the controversial Yellow Earth (1984), In the Heat of the Sun (a 1994 break with the conventional representation of the Cultural Revolution), Yang Dechang's masterpiece A One and a Two (2000), and Still Life (Jia Zhangke's 2006 meditation on displacement near the Three Gorges Dam). The course is designed to help students understand the place of cinema in Chinese culture and develop the analytical tools necessary for the informed viewing and study of Chinese film. We will look at everything from art film, to underground film, to recent box office hits. (No prerequisites) One evening film screening per week. 3 hrs. lect./disc. AAL, ART (T. Moran)

CHNS 0301 Advanced Chinese (Modern Chinese) (Fall 2014)
This course aims at further development of overall language proficiency through extensive reading of selected texts representing a wide variety of subjects and styles. Classes will be conducted entirely in Chinese except for occasional recourse to English by the instructor to provide a quick solution to problems of definition. The main text will be All Things Considered with supplementary readings selected to help students both continue to work toward competence in conversational Chinese and also begin to master a more sophisticated register of language. (CHNS 0202 or equivalent) 4 hrs. lect. LNG (K. Wang)

CHNS 0302 Advanced Chinese (Modern Chinese) (Spring 2015)
This course is a continuation of CHNS 0301 with continued practice in conversational Chinese and a greater emphasis on reading works of a literary nature. (CHNS 0301 or equivalent) 4 hrs. lect. LNG (K. Wang)

CHNS 0325 Traditional Chinese Poetry (in translation) (Spring 2015)
Introducing the basics of Chinese poetics, this junior/sophomore discussion-based seminar explores inter-connections across a wide spectrum of Chinese poetry belonging to a vibrant tradition spanning more than two thousand years--folk songs; court rhapsodies; courtesan love poems; extended allegorical fantasies; ballads and lyric verse of love, war, friendship, loss, and separation. Landscape, travel, romantic and metaphysical poems by masters such as Qu Yuan, Tao Yuanming, Wang Wei, Li Bai, Du Fu, Su Dongpo and Li Qingzhao will be studied. We will analyze poetic expression ranging from poetic genres following strict formal conventions to relatively free-form verse. Traditional Chinese literary theories regarding poetry and its appreciation will be considered, yet students will also be encouraged to apply other critical approaches. (Either CHNS 0219 or CHNS 0220, or by waiver) 3 hrs. lect. AAL, LIT (C. Reed)

CHNS 0330 Clouds and Rain: Love and Sexuality in Traditional Chinese Literature (in translation) (Fall 2014)
This seminar explores the spectrum of traditional attitudes toward romantic love and sexuality in pre-modern China as seen through the prism of classical Chinese literature. Fiction and drama will be the focus of this course with some attention given to lyric poetry and autobiographical writing. Literary texts to be analyzed include the early ninth-century story, The Story of Yingying, the late sixteenth-century drama, The Peony Pavilion, the late seventeenth-century erotic novella, The Carnal Prayer Mat, along with selected chapters from the late sixteenth-century erotic novel, Jin Ping Mei, and the eighteenth-century masterwork, The Story of the Stone (also known as Dream of the Red Chamber), etc. Normally offered in alternate years. (Either CHNS 0219, CHNS 0220, or CHNS/FMMC 0250, or by waiver. CHNS 0219 strongly recommended) 3 hrs. lect. AAL, LIT (W. Xu)

CHNS 0340 Literature and Culture in the People's Republic of China (in translation) (Fall 2014)
The final focus of this course is what is happening in Chinese culture right now, but to understand now we must understand then, and so we will begin in the 1950s. In China from 1949 through the 1980s cultural activity was regarded as exerting, in Mao's words, an "enormous influence" on politics and was therefore placed under prescriptive guidelines. Writers and artists agreed that their work was important but chafed at restrictions. Since the 1990s constraints on cultural life have eased, but because Chinese literature and culture now answer to the market rather than ideology some ask if it still matters. We will try to answer this question as we trace fifty years of developments in Chinese culture in their surprising complexity. We will look at developments in fiction, nonfiction, poetry, feature and documentary film, stage drama, television, popular music, visual art, and internet fiction. Students will undertake research projects, and we will discuss research methodology. (One Chinese course in literature or culture, or by waiver) 3 hrs. sem. AAL, LIT (T. Moran)

CHNS 0400 Advanced Readings, Conversation, and Writing (Modern Chinese) (in Chinese) (Fall 2014)
This course is designed to improve students' competency in highly pragmatic Chinese, spoken and written. Readings and discussion will cover a wide variety of contemporary materials with an emphasis on linguistic preparation for study in China. (CHNS 0302 or equivalent) 3 hrs. lect. LNG (X. Jiang)

CHNS 0411 Classical Chinese I (in Chinese) (Fall 2014)
This course is an introduction to wenyan, the written language of traditional China. In this course we will emphasize comprehension of the literal and metaphorical meanings of short wenyan texts. Our approach will include grammatical analysis and baihua translation (i.e., from the Classical Chinese into modern Chinese); discussion will be conducted entirely in baihua. This course begins the two-semester sequence of Classical Chinese, which not only introduces students to wenyan but also provides a vital learning experience for any student seeking to attain a high level of linguistic and cultural proficiency in Chinese, including modern written discourse. (CHNS 0302 or the equivalent) 3 hrs. lect. LNG (W. Xu)

CHNS 0412 Classical Chinese II (in Chinese) (Spring 2015)
A continuation of CHNS 0411. In this course students will read a wide selection of wenyan texts that sample the classics of ancient Chinese thought, including Confucius' Analects, the Daoist texts Laozi and Zhuangzi, Mohist arguments against war, Sunzi's The Art of War, and Legalist writings on law. Students will also learn to punctuate wenyan texts (which were originally unpunctuated) and compose sentences or short paragraphs in wenyan. All class discussion will be conducted in modern Chinese. (CHNS 0411 or the equivalent) 3 hrs. lect. LNG (W. Xu)

CHNS 0425 Contemporary Social Issues in China: Advanced Readings (in Chinese) (Fall 2014)
A survey of materials written in modern expository Chinese (academic, journalistic and polemical) that focus on the cultural, political, economic, and social issues of contemporary China. This advanced readings course is designed primarily for seniors who have already spent a semester or more studying and living in China or Taiwan. Emphasis will be given to further developing students' ability to read, analyze, and discuss complex issues in Mandarin while also advancing proficiency in writing and in oral comprehension. Oral reports and written compositions will be integral to the course's requirements. (Approval Required) 3 hrs. lect. AAL, LNG (X. Jiang, H. Yang)

CHNS 0426 Politics and Business in China: Advanced Readings and Discussion (in Chinese) (Spring 2015)
The capstone course for those students who have attained a high level of Chinese language proficiency. The goal of this course is to help students improve their ability to read, write, and talk about politics and business in China. Most of this course will focus on recent and current debate and discussion in China over domestic political programs and policies, international relations, and business trends. Discussion will also touch upon the political and economic history of the People's Republic of China and Taiwan. We will read articles intended for popular audiences in the Chinese-speaking world. 3 hrs. lect. (CHNS 0425 or CHNS 0411 or study abroad in China) AAL, LNG (Staff)

CHNS 0475 Senior Seminar on Modern Chinese Literature (in Chinese) (Spring 2015)
A capstone course for all Chinese majors and for others who have attained a high level of Chinese language proficiency. Students will read and critique works by major Chinese fiction writers (and sometimes playwrights) and also see and discuss films from mainland China, Hong Kong, and/or Taiwan. All reading, discussion, and critical writing will be in Chinese. (CHNS 0412 or CHNS 0425) 3 hrs. lect. AAL, LIT, LNG (W. Xu)

CHNS 0500 Senior Essay (Fall 2014, Spring 2015)
Approval required. (Staff)

CHNS 0700 Senior Thesis (Fall 2014)
Approval required. (Staff)

CHNS 0701 Senior Thesis Proposal (Fall 2014)
Approval required. (Staff)

Classics & Classical Studies

Required for the major in Classics:

A. Ten courses in two languages: Greek and Latin (normally six in one language and four in the other) including one senior seminar (CLAS 0420).

B. CLAS 0150 Ancient Epic Poetry

C. Two additional courses in classics in translation, one from each of the following categories:

1. CLAS/HIST 0131 Archaic and Classical Greece or CLAS 0151 Introduction to Ancient Greek Literature or CLAS 0152 Greek Tragedy or CLAS 0190 Greek and Roman Comedy or CLAS/PHIL 0275 Greek Philosophy: The Problem of Socrates

2. CLAS/HIST 0132 History of Rome or CLAS 0140 Augustus and the World of Rome or CLAS 0143 The Rise and Fall of the Roman Republic or CLAS 0144 Literature of the Roman Empire or CLAS 0190 Greek and Roman Comedy or CLAS/PHIL 0276 Roman Philosophy

D. CLAS 0701 History of Classical Literature: General Examination for Classics/Classical Studies Majors

     Optional: CLAS 0700 Senior Essay (fall/winter or winter/spring), CLAS 0505 Independent Senior Project (fall or spring). (Note: Students who wish to do an optional senior essay or independent senior project must secure the sponsorship of a member of the classics department in the semester before the essay or project is to be undertaken.)

     Honors: B+ average or better in courses taken for the major (excluding senior work). B+ or better in the General Examination (CLAS 0701) and in the Senior Seminar (CLAS 0420). (Note: A student who does an optional senior essay or independent senior project may arrange with the chair, in the semester prior to undertaking the project, to offer that grade in lieu of the grade for CLAS 0420 for the calculation of departmental honors.)

     Joint Major: Students interested in a joint major in Classics and another discipline should consult the chair. The joint major in Classics typically requires ten courses in Greek and Latin (normally six in one language and four in the other); CLAS 0701, and senior work that combines Classics with the other major.

 Required for the Minor in Classics: The minor in classics may be configured in one of the following four ways:

1. Latin CLLA: Five courses in Latin

2. Greek CLGR: Five courses in Greek

3. Classical Civilization CLCC: Five courses, as follows: three or more courses chosen from CLAS/HIST 0131, CLAS/HIST 0132, CLAS 0140, CLAS 0143, CLAS 0144, CLAS 0149, CLAS0150, CLAS 0151, CLAS 0152, CLAS 0190, CLAS/LITP 0230, INTD 0250, CLAS/RELI 0262, CLAS/PHIL 0275, CLAS/PHIL 0276, CLAS/HIST 0331, CLAS/HIST 0332, or CLAS/HIST 0337; and CLAS 0420 or CLAS 0450 (or both).

4. Classical Language and Civilization CLCL: Five courses, as follows: two or more courses in Latin or Greek; one or more courses chosen from CLAS/HIST 0131, CLAS/HIST 0132, CLAS 0140, CLAS 0143, CLAS 0144, CLAS 0149, CLAS/CMLT 0150, CLAS 0151, CLAS 0152, CLAS/CMLT 0190, CLAS/LITP 0230, CLAS/RELI 0262, INTD 0250, CLAS/PHIL 0275 or CLAS 0276; and one or more courses chosen from CLAS/HIST 0331, CLAS/HIST 0332, CLAS/HIST 0337, CLAS 0420, or CLAS/CMLT 0450.

     AP credit policy: One course credit toward graduation, not toward the major or minor, will be granted for one AP exam in Latin under the following conditions: a) The student has received a grade of 4 or 5 on the AP exam, and b) The student has completed an advanced course (LATN 0201 or above) in Latin at Middlebury with a grade of B+ or above. (Note: No more than one course credit will be granted, whether the student presents one or two AP exams.)

     Study Abroad Guidelines: Study abroad in the Mediterranean can enrich our majors' experience of the ancient world, because it affords them the opportunity to see the places that they have been learning about in the classroom. Students also find it stimulating to be surrounded by people with similar interests from other institutions. Thus, while our curriculum does not in any way necessitate study abroad, the faculty is happy to work with students who wish to pursue it as part of their Middlebury degree in classics or classical studies.

For those students who want to go abroad, we strongly recommend a semester rather than a year. The three programs we endorse are the ICCS (the Inter-Collegiate Consortium for Classical Studies in Rome), CYA (College Year in Athens), and Arcadia (also in Athens), all of which offer semester-long programs. Admission to the ICCS in particular, however, is highly competitive, and students may have a compelling academic rationale for studying elsewhere. Accordingly, we have also approved students who wished to study for a semester at foreign universities with strong classics departments. These have included Trinity College Dublin, the University of Edinburgh, Cambridge University, and the University of Vienna. For some students, a rewarding alternative to study abroad during the academic year has been participation in a summertime archaeological excavation.

We discourage students from going abroad before they have had at least three semesters of whichever ancient language(s) they are learning. As part of their program of study abroad, students normally take at least one course in each ancient language of study, and select additional courses that are appropriate substitutes for courses in the major. In order to be fully prepared for senior work, however, students will need to have completed a significant portion of the courses required for the major, in particular CLAS 0150, before going abroad.

Generally speaking, we are as flexible as we can be in helping majors to identify courses in programs abroad that allow them to stay in step with their cohort in Middlebury and to be prepared for senior work. Unless we are familiar with the institution, the instruction, and the content of the courses, we rarely grant credit to non-majors for classics courses taken away from Middlebury. In all cases (majors, non-majors, potential majors, and minors), students must consult with a member of the classics department before leaving Middlebury to plan and receive approval for work done at other institutions.

Required for the major in Classical Studies (CLST):

A. The following:

  1. CLAS/CMLT 0150 Ancient Epic Poetry
  2. CLAS/HIST 0131 Archaic and Classical Greece or CLAS 0151 Introduction to Ancient Greek Literature or CLAS 0152 Greek Tragedy or CLAS/CMLT 0190 Greek and Roman Comedy or CLAS/PHIL 0275 Greek Philosophy: The Problem of Socrates
  3. CLAS/HIST 0132 History of Rome or CLAS 0140 Augustus and the World of Rome or CLAS 0143 Texts & Contexts in Republican Rome or CLAS 0144 Literature of the Roman Empire or CLAS 0190 Greek and Roman Comedy or CLAS/PHIL 0276 Roman Philosophy

B. Five additional courses in Classical Studies chosen from the following:

CLAS/HIST 0131 Archaic and Classical Greece
CLAS/HIST 0132 History of Rome
CLAS 0140 Augustus and the World of Rome
CLAS 0143 The Rise and Fall of the Roman Republic
CLAS 0144 Literature of the Roman Empire
CLAS 0149 Rhetoric and Politics from Ancient Greece and Rome to the Present
CLAS 0151 Introduction to Ancient Greek Literature
CLAS 0152 Greek Tragedy
CLAS/CMLT 0190 Greek and Roman Comedy
CLAS/LITP 0230 Myth and Contemporary Experience
CLAS/THEA 0250 Greek Drama in Performance
CLAS/HARC 0234 Ancient Roman City: Pompeii and Beyond
CLAS/HARC 0236 Cities of Vesuvius
CLAS/PHIL 0275 Greek Philosophy: The Problem of Socrates
CLAS/PHIL 0276 Roman Philosophy
CLAS/HIST 0331 Sparta and Athens
CLAS/HIST 0332 Roman Law
CLAS/HIST 0337 From Alexander to Rome
HARC 0213 Roman Art and Architecture
HARC 0221 Greek Art and Archaeology
HARC 0223 The Classical Tradition in Architecture: A History
HARC 0312 Of Gods, Mortals, and Myths: Greek and Roman Painting
HARC 0320 Hands-on Archaeology: Theory and Practice
MATH 0261 History of Mathematics
PHIL 0201 Ancient Greek Philosophy
PHIL 0302 Philosophy of Plato
PHIL 0303 Philosophy of Aristotle
PSCI 0101 Introduction to Political Science
PSCI 0262 Might and Right among Nations
PSCI 0317 Ancient and Medieval Political Philosophy
PSCI 0409 Seminar in Political Philosophy
PSCI 0462 Empire and Political Theory
RELI/CLAS 0162 The Formation of Judaism in Antiquity
RELI 0287 Greco-Roman Religions
RELI 0381/CLAS 0308 Seminar in the New Testament
RELI 0387 Seminar on the Religions of Rome

C. Four courses in Greek or four courses in Latin chosen from:

GREK 0101 Beginning Greek I
GREK 0102 Beginning Greek II
GREK 0201 Intermediate Greek: Prose
GREK 0202 Intermediate Greek: Poetry
GREK 0301 Readings in Greek Literature I
GREK 0302 Readings in Greek Literature II
GREK 0401 Advanced Readings in Greek Literature I
GREK 0402 Advanced Readings in Greek Literature II
LATN 0101 Beginning Latin I
LATN 0102 Beginning Latin II
LATN 0110 Introduction to College Latin
LATN 0201 Intermediate Latin: Prose
LATN 0202 Intermediate Latin: Poetry
LATN 0301 Readings in Latin Literature I
LATN 0302 Readings in Latin Literature II
LATN 0401 Advanced Readings in Latin I
LATN 0402 Advanced Readings in Latin II

D. CLAS 0420 Seminar in Classical Literature

E. CLAS 0701 History of Classical Literature: General Examination for

Classics/Classical Studies Majors

      Optional: CLAS 0700 Senior Essay (fall/ winter/spring); CLAS 0500 Independent Senior Project (fall/winter/spring). (Note: Students who wish to do an optional senior essay or independent senior project must secure the sponsorship of a member of the classics department in the semester before the essay or project is to be undertaken.)

For complete descriptions of the courses listed above, see listings under the appropriate departments.

     Honors: B+ average or better in courses taken for the major (excluding senior work). B+ or better in the General Examination (CLAS 0701) and in the Senior Seminar (CLAS 0420). (Note: A student who does an optional senior essay or independent senior project may arrange with the chair, in the semester prior to undertaking the project, to offer that grade in lieu of the grade for CLAS 0420 for the calculation of departmental honors.)

     Joint Major: Students interested in a joint major in Classical Studies and another discipline should consult the chair. The joint major in Classical Studies typically requires four semesters of either Greek or Latin; CLAS 0150; one course from section A2 and one course from A3 under the requirements for the major; CLAS 0701, and senior work that combines Classical Studies with the other major.

CLAS 0140 Augustus and the World of Rome (Spring 2015)
In 44 B.C., Julius Caesar was assassinated. Within two months his adoptive son, Augustus, still in his teens, traveled to Rome, soon extorted the highest office of the Roman Republic, and after 13 years of civil war became the state's first emperor. The resulting "Augustan Age" (31 B.C. to A.D. 14) produced a period of political change and cultural achievement unparalleled in Rome's long history. In this course we will examine the literature, art, history, and politics of this era, evaluate the nature of Augustus's accomplishments, and explore the Roman world. Readings include: Augustus, Vergil, Suetonius, and I, Claudius. 2 hrs. lect. EUR, HIS, LIT (R. Ganiban)

CLAS 0143 The Rise and Fall of the Roman Republic (Fall 2014)
This course is an introduction to the literature, politics, culture and history of the Roman Republic (c.509-31BCE) - a period which saw Rome grow from a small city on the Tiber to the supreme power in the Mediterranean, and also saw the development of Latin literature. Our readings cover a broad variety of literary genres and authors: comedy (Plautus and Terence), lyric (Catullus), epic (Ennius), political speeches and letters (Cicero), history (Caesar, Sallust, Polybius), and didactic philosophy (Lucretius). As we read we will be careful to investigate how these texts present different and often conflicting ideas of what it means to be Roman, as well as how different ideologies of Rome compete throughout each work. 3 hrs. lect./1 hr. disc. CW (10), EUR, HIS, LIT (C. Star)

CLAS/CMLT 0150 Greek and Roman Epic Poetry (Fall 2014)
Would Achilles and Hector have risked their lives and sacred honor had they understood human life and the Olympian gods as Homer portrays them in the Iliad? Why do those gods decide to withdraw from men altogether following the Trojan War, and why is Odysseus the man Athena chooses to help her carry out that project? And why, according to the Roman poet Vergil, do these gods command Aeneas, a defeated Trojan, to found an Italian town that will ultimately conquer the Greek cities that conquered Troy, replacing the Greek polis with a universal empire that will end all wars of human freedom? Through close study of Homer's Iliad and Odyssey, and Vergil's Aeneid, we explore how the epic tradition helped shape Greece and Rome, and define their contributions to European civilization. 3 hrs. lect./1 hr. disc. CMP, EUR, LIT, PHL (M. Witkin)

CLAS 0151 The Golden Age of Athens: History and Literature (Fall 2014)
In this course we will trace the unprecedented intellectual innovation that begins with Greece’s triumph over the Persian invasions in 490 and 480-479 BC, continues through the emergence of radical democracy and imperialism at Athens, and culminates in the Peloponnesian War and Athens’ defeat in 404 BC by her former ally, Sparta. Through intensive study of selected works of historiography (Herodotus, Thucydides), tragedy (Aeschylus, Sophocles, Euripides), comedy (Aristophanes), and philosophy (Plato), we will explore the central concerns of 5th-century Athenians: freedom and power, knowledge and virtue, law and nature, and the place of the divine in the human world. 3 hrs. lect./1 hr. disc. EUR, HIS, LIT (P. Sfyroeras)

CLAS 0152 Greek Tragedy (Spring 2015)
A survey of selected tragedies by Aeschylus, Sophocles, and Euripides, exploring the relation between tragedy and political freedom and empire in fifth century B.C. Athens. The course examines the tragic poets' use of traditional Greek myths to question not only the wisdom of contemporary Athenian imperialism but also traditional Greek views on relations between the sexes; between the family and the city; between man's presumed dignity and his belief in gods. Mythical and historical background is supplied through additional readings from Homer and Thucydides. The course asks how the tragedians managed to raise publicly, in the most solemn religious settings, the kind of questions for which Socrates was later put to death. The course culminates in a reading of Aristotle's Poetics. 3 hrs. lect./1 hr. disc. CW (8 spaces), EUR, LIT, PHL (M. Witkin)

CLAS/PHIL 0276 Roman Philosophy (Spring 2015)
In this course we will seek to answer the question of what is Roman philosophy - philosophia togata. Is it simply Greek philosophy in Roman dress? Or, while based in its Greek origins, does it grow to have a distinctive and rigorous character of its own, designed and developed to focus on uniquely "Roman" questions and problems, in particular, ethical, social, and political questions? We will investigate how some of the main schools of Hellenistic Greek thought came to be developed in Latin: Epicureanism (Lucretius), Academic Skepticism (Cicero), and Stoicism (Seneca). As we read we will investigate how each school offers different answers to crucial questions such as what is the goal of life? What is the highest good? Should one take part in politics or not? What is the nature of the soul? What is the nature of Nature itself? Is there an afterlife? Can we ever have a certain answer to any of these questions? 3 hrs. lect. EUR, PHL (C. Star)

CLAS 0420 Greek Religion (Spring 2015)
In this seminar we will examine the religious experience of the Greeks in all its complexity and variety.  Drawing on literary, epigraphical, and archaeological sources, we will study the Greek views of the gods as these emerge from various myths and cult practices, especially animal sacrifice.  We will explore Greek ideas of personal salvation, but also the importance of religious festivals for the community, most notably the Greek polis.  Finally, while looking at such ancient debates as the sophistic and Platonic critiques of the traditional gods, we will consider some similarities and differences between the sacred in Greek civilization and religion in our own society. The seminar is designed for students with some background in Greek literature and/or history. 3 hrs. sem. (P. Sfyroeras)

CLAS/CMLT 0450 History of Classical Literature (Fall 2014)
A comprehensive overview of the major literary, historical, and philosophical works of Greece and Rome. Greek authors studied include Homer, Aeschylus, Sophocles, Herodotus, Aristophanes, Thucydides, Plato, and Aristotle. Roman authors include Lucretius, Cicero, Livy, Vergil, Petronius, and Tacitus. Required of senior majors in Classics/Classical Studies (see CLAS 0701 below) and open to all interested students with some background in Greek and Roman literature, history, or philosophy. 3 hrs. lect. (R. Ganiban)

CLAS 0500 Independent Study (Fall 2014, Spring 2015)
Approval required. (Staff)

CLAS 0505 Independent Senior Project (Fall 2014, Spring 2015)
Approval required. (Staff)

CLAS 0700 Senior Essay for Classics/Classical Studies Majors (Fall 2014, Spring 2015)
Approval required. (Staff)

CLAS 0701 History of Classical Literature (Fall 2014)
A comprehensive overview of the major literary, historical, and philosophical works of Greece and Rome. Greek authors studied include Homer, Aeschylus, Sophocles, Herodotus, Aristophanes, Thucydides, Plato, and Aristotle. Roman authors include Lucretius, Cicero, Livy, Vergil, Petronius, and Tacitus. Required of senior majors in Classics/Classical Studies and open to all interested students with some background in Greek and Roman literature, history, or philosophy. 3 hrs. lect. (R. Ganiban)

GREK 0201 Intermediate Greek: Attic Prose-Lysias & Plato (Fall 2014)
Readings in major authors. 3 hrs. lect. EUR, LNG (C. Star)

GREK 0202 Intermediate Greek: Attic Drama-Sophocles' Tragic Vision (Spring 2015)
Readings in majors authors. 3 hrs. lect. EUR, LNG (P. Sfyroeras)

GREK 0401 Advanced Readings in Greek Literature: Aristotle’s Ethics & Politics (Fall 2014)
Readings in major authors. 3 hrs. lect. (C. Star)

GREK 0402 Advanced Readings in Greek Literature II (Spring 2015)
Readings in major authors. 3 hrs. lect. (M. Witkin)

LATN 0102 Beginning Latin II (Spring 2015)
This course is a continuation of the introductory winter term course (LATN 0101). After completing the fundamentals of Latin grammar, students translate selections from authors such as Cicero and Ovid. 3 hrs. lect. LNG (C. Star)

LATN 0301 Readings in Latin Literature I: Roman Epic and Empire (Fall 2014)
Readings in major authors. 3 hrs. lect. LIT, LNG (I. Sutherland)

LATN 0302 Readings Latin Literature II: Roman Satire (Spring 2015)
Readings in major authors. 3 hrs. lect. (R. Ganiban)

LATN 0502 Advanced Readings in Latin IV (Spring 2015)
Readings in major authors. 3 hrs. lect. (M. Witkin)

Comparative Literature Program

Students majoring in Comparative Literature focus on the comparative study of national literatures and receive training in at least two of these literatures in the original language along with comparative methodology. The program is designed to accommodate students at all levels of language proficiency regardless of previous language training.

Majors in Comparative Literature will put together a plan of study with the guidance of two faculty advisors with expertise in the student's chosen literatures and the Director of the Comparative Literature Program.

The basic structure of the program is as follows:

1.  One primary foreign language AND

2.  One year of a secondary foreign language OR English/American Literatures

Requirements:

1. CMLT 0101;

2. Three content classes in the primary foreign language, including two literary classes and one cultural class (e.g. cinema, politics).  The choice of particular classes requires the approval of the student’s advisors and the Program Director. Students will also need approval for inclusion of study abroad classes in this category;*

3. At least one year of study in a secondary foreign language and one course in that language to be taken during their senior year. Students with more advanced language proficiency in their second foreign language will take 3 literature courses in that language, one of them during their senior year;

OR

ENAM courses: 0201 or 0204; a second pre-1700 (Period I) elective; and two other electives. (These courses may double-count in the electives section);

4. One course in literary theory (suggested in sophomore year);

5. Study abroad required for all students studying a foreign language. Up to 4 courses in literature taken abroad may be counted toward the major, subject to the approval of the Director of the program. All students studying abroad must take one class in their foreign language after their return;

6. Two electives explicitly comparative in nature. These literature courses may be taught in English. Examples: CLAS 0150; CLAS 0190; CMLT 0230; CMLT 0460; ENAM 0305; GRMN/CMLT 0333; ITAL/CMLT 0299. Suitable classes will be cross-listed and bear the prefix CMLT;

7. Senior Seminar: One seminar in literature in the student's primary or secondary language, preferably during the senior year;

8.  Senior Work: Students will write a 35-page (article-length) comparative essay (advised independently).  Students are responsible to choose their advisor and the members of their committee no later than the last week of classes in the preceding term. To be eligible for honors students must have a departmental GPA of 3.7 and a B+ or above on their essay.

*In the case of students whose primary language is Arabic, Chinese, Russian, or Japanese, some of these three content courses MAY be taught in English, depending on the availability of suitable courses in the language. Students should be aware that policies regarding acceptance of study abroad courses to satisfy requirements vary widely from department to department.

CMLT 0101 Introduction to World Literature (Spring 2015)
This course is an introduction to the critical analysis of imaginative literature of the world, the dissemination of themes and myths, and the role of translation as the medium for reaching different cultures. Through the careful reading of selected classic texts from a range of Western and non-Western cultures, students will deepen their understanding and appreciation of the particular texts under consideration, while developing a critical vocabulary with which to discuss and write about these texts, both as unique artistic achievements of individual and empathetic imagination and as works affected by, but also transcending their historical periods. 3 hrs. lect./disc. CMP, CW, LIT (J. Berg, T. Portice)

CMLT/ENAM 0107 The Experience of Tragedy (Fall 2014)
For over two millennia tragedy has raised ethical questions and represented conflicts between the divine and the mortal, nature and culture, household and polity, individual and society. What is tragedy? What led to its production and what impact did it have, in ancient times? Why was it reborn in Shakespeare's time? How has tragedy shaped, and been shaped by, gender, class, religion, and nationality? We will address these questions and explore how tragedy continues to influence our literary expectations and experience. Authors may include Aeschylus, Sophocles, Euripides, Thucydides, Aristotle, Seneca, Marlowe, Shakespeare, Goethe, Nietzsche, O'Neill, Beckett, Kennedy, and Kushner. 3 hrs. lect. EUR, LIT (J. Berg)

CMLT/CLAS 0150 Greek and Roman Epic Poetry (Fall 2014)
Would Achilles and Hector have risked their lives and sacred honor had they understood human life and the Olympian gods as Homer portrays them in the Iliad? Why do those gods decide to withdraw from men altogether following the Trojan War, and why is Odysseus the man Athena chooses to help her carry out that project? And why, according to the Roman poet Vergil, do these gods command Aeneas, a defeated Trojan, to found an Italian town that will ultimately conquer the Greek cities that conquered Troy, replacing the Greek polis with a universal empire that will end all wars of human freedom? Through close study of Homer's Iliad and Odyssey, and Vergil's Aeneid, we explore how the epic tradition helped shape Greece and Rome, and define their contributions to European civilization. 3 hrs. lect./1 hr. disc. CMP, EUR, LIT, PHL (M. Witkin)

CMLT 0205/ENAM Introduction to Contemporary Literary Theory (Fall 2014, Spring 2015)
This course will introduce several major schools of contemporary literary theory. By reading theoretical texts in close conjunction with works of literature, we will illuminate the ways in which these theoretical stances can produce various interpretations of a given poem, novel, or play. The approaches covered will include New Criticism, Psychoanalysis, Marxism and Cultural Criticism, Feminism, and Post-Structuralism. These theories will be applied to works by Shakespeare, Wordsworth, The Brontës, Conrad, Joyce, and others. The goal will be to make students critically aware of the fundamental literary, cultural, political, and moral assumptions underlying every act of interpretation they perform. 3 hrs. lect./disc. EUR, LIT (Fall 2014: A. Losano; Spring 2015: Y. Siddiqi)

CMLT/ARBC 0221 Modern Arabic Literature (Fall 2014)
This course is a survey of the most important moments in the development of Modern Arabic Literature from the end of 19th century to the present. We will map the developments, achievements, and innovations by Arab writers against a double background of rising nationalism, decolonization, and wars on the one hand and the idea and experiences of modernity and the west on the other. We will examine works of fiction by both male and female writers including novels, short stories, and drama, as well as poetry representing several different Arab countries. Students are encouraged to read in advance Albert Hourani's A History of the Arab People. (Open to all, no previous knowledge of Arabic is required). 3 hrs. sem. AAL, LIT (S. Liebhaber)

CMLT/RELI 0238 Literature and the Mystical Experience (Spring 2015)
In this course we will explore how narrative art articulates spiritual perception by examining selected works of 20th century writers such as Miguel De Unamuno, Nikos Kazantzakis, J. D. Salinger, Charles Williams, Flannery O'Connor, Thomas Merton, Alice Munroe, Marilynne Robinson, and Annie Dillard.  Drawing on theology and philosophy as an interpretative mode, we will consider the following questions: How does literature illuminate selfhood and interiority? How do contemplation and ascetic practice guide the self to divine knowledge and cosmic unification? How do language, imagery and symbols shape the unitive experience as a tool for empathy and understanding of the other? 3 hrs. lect./1 hr. disc. LIT, NOR, PHL (M. Hatjigeorgiou)

CMLT/ENAM 0270 In Other Worlds: South Asian, African and Caribbean Fiction (Fall 2014)
In the last decades, writers from postcolonial South Asia, Africa, and the Caribbean have come into their own, winning international prizes and garnering attention because of the literary quality of their work as well as their nuanced engagement with important issues of our age--issues such as imperialism, orientalism, colonial rule, political resistance, subaltern studies, nationalism, economic development, gender and sexuality, immigration, diaspora, and globalization.  We will discuss a range of works by writers such as Chinua Achebe, Chimamanda Ngozi Adichie, J. M. Coetzee, Tsitsi Dangarembga, Assia Djebar, Frantz Fanon, Hanif Kureishi, Nadine Gordimer, C.L.R. James, Jamaica Kincaid, George Lamming, Ngugi Wa Thiong'o, Rohinton Mistry, Arundhati Roy, Salman Rushdie, Edward Said, Zadie Smith, and Wole Soyinka.  Texts will vary from semester to semester. 3 hrs. lect./disc. AAL, CMP, CW (5 spaces), LIT (Y. Siddiqi)

CMLT/ENAM 0305 Love Stories: Desire & Gender in Medieval and Early Modern Europe (Pre 1800) (Spring 2015)
Our modern conceptions of desire, self, body and gender are informed in complex and often invisible ways by earlier narratives of love. We will investigate the conflicting accounts of love written during the medieval and early modern periods, considering in particular the relationship between the idealized notion of "courtly love" and the darker, medical picture of love as a form of madness or melancholia. Reading a variety of works including lyric, drama, romance and medical texts, we will look at the construction of gender and sexuality, the relationship between desire and subjectivity, and the gendering of certain "diseases" of love (such as hysteria) during this period. Authors to be studied will include: Chaucer, Boccaccio, Petrarch, Dante, Shakespeare, and a selection of male and female lyric poets. 3 hrs. lect./disc. EUR, LIT (M. Wells)

CMLT/ENAM 0309 Contemporary Literature (Spring 2015)
In this course we will explore seminal works of the post-World War II literature written in English. In the course of our readings we will move through the cultural and social transformations beginning with the paranoia and alienation of the Cold War, and continuing with the Civil Rights era, the national crisis of Vietnam, the rise of multiculturalism and the culture wars in the 1980s, the wide ranging effects of the information revolution, the profits and perils of globalization, and the profound anxiety of the war on terror. Writers studied will include Thomas Pynchon, Vladimir Nabokov, Don DeLillo, Donald Barthelme, William S. Burroughs, Toni Morrison, Ishmael Reed, Ana Castillo, and Art Spiegelman. 3 hrs. lect. LIT (R. Cohen)

CMLT/ENAM 0317 Lost & Found in Translation (Spring 2015)
In this course we will explore the fundamental philosophical, sociological, and linguistic questions raised by translingual communication through a survey of the greatest theoretical writings on translation together with a comparative study of multiple translations of coherent sections from major works such as the Bible, the Iliad, One Thousand and One Nights, and the Tao Te Ching, as well as other shorter texts. Questions to be considered include: How much does language determine how we think? How much of language is culture? What is unique to translating sacred texts, poetry, “exotic” languages, and dead languages? How do we define the “untranslatable”? Are translators traitors, drudges, or artists? Can machines translate? 3 hrs. lect./disc. AAL, CMP, LIT (T. Billings)

CMLT/ITAL 0320 Narratives of the Fascist Past: Memory, Forgetting, and the Myth of the Good Italian (In English) (Fall 2014)
In this course we will examine a troublingly persistent trope in post-fascist Italian culture: the myth of the “Good Italian” or the belief that Italians, benevolent by nature, overwhelmingly opposed the ideals of the fascist regime, protected Jews from deportation, and regularly subverted fascist law. Students will read several key literary texts—Gadda’s That Awful Mess on the Via Merulana, Loy’s First Words, Eco’s The Mysterious Flame of Queen Loana, and Lucarelli’s Carte Blanche—alongside academic historiography, popular histories, journalism, and testimonies in order to fully grasp what is at stake in the heated public and scholarly debate over the “Good Italian”. We will consider issues such as the possibility of knowing history through literature, the ethical implications that arise from that possibility, and the narrative mechanisms through which the literary text engages or fails to engage questions of individual and collective accountability. (ENAM 0103 or CMLT 0101 or permission of the instructor) 3 hrs. sem. EUR, HIS, LIT (N. Chang)

CMLT/SPAN 0371 Don Quixote and Its Representation in Visual Culture (Fall 2014)
In this course we will read Cervantes’ masterpiece, Don Quixote. Special attention will be given to the historical, philosophical, and cultural context of the period. Emphasis will be placed on specific topics such as religion, governance, intercultural relationships, madness, parody, authorship, and love. We will also study the novel’s representation and adaption in a selection of illustrations, graphic novels, animated films, comics, children’s books, and music. Representation in contemporary global cinema, television, and advertising will also be examined. Students will study different adaptations from Europe, Latin America, Asia, and the United States. (At least two courses at the 0300-level or above or by waiver). 3 hrs. lect. /screening CMP, CW (5 spaces), EUR, LIT, LNG (P. Saldarriaga)

CMLT/PGSE 0375 Colonial Discourse and the “Lusophone World” (Spring 2015)
In this course we will analyze how European colonialism and imperial endeavors produced meaning, particularly in the interconnected realms of culture, race, language, gender, sexuality, and place. In addition to studying the colonial period, we will pay particular attention to the role and manifestations of colonial discourse more contemporarily in the contexts of nationhood, globalization, sports, and cultural consumption. In doing so, we will address the problematics of the concept of “Lusophone,” starting with the historical legacies and cultural implications of such a transnational entity. Course materials will include critical theory, literary texts, primary historical sources, visual media, and music from Brazil, Lusophone Africa, Lusophone Asia, and Portugal. (PGSE 0215 or equivalent) 3 hrs. lect./disc. AAL, CMP, LNG, SOC (D. Silva)

CMLT/ENAM 0447 The Novel and the City (Spring 2015)
In this course we will take a global and transnational approach as we examine a number of 20th and 21st century British and Anglophone novels about life in the city.  We will explore formations of urban life alongside transformations in the novel as a genre.  We will put these novels of city life in dialogue with critical theory-that is, theories of culture and society that have as their aim human emancipation (for example, Marxism, feminism, critical race studies, and postcolonial studies).  The novels we read will reflect important literary movements such as realism, modernism, and postmodernism. (Not open to students who have taken ENAM/CMLT 0373) 3 hrs. sem. CMP, LIT, SOC (Y. Siddiqi)

CMLT/CLAS 0450 History of Classical Literature (Fall 2014)
A comprehensive overview of the major literary, historical, and philosophical works of Greece and Rome. Greek authors studied include Homer, Aeschylus, Sophocles, Herodotus, Aristophanes, Thucydides, Plato, and Aristotle. Roman authors include Lucretius, Cicero, Livy, Vergil, Petronius, and Tacitus. Required of senior majors in Classics/Classical Studies (see CLAS 0701) and open to all interested students with some background in Greek and Roman literature, history, or philosophy. 3 hrs. lect. (R. Ganiban)

CMLT 0500 Independent Study (Fall 2014, Spring 2015)
Approval required. (Staff)

CMLT 0700 Senior Thesis (Fall 2014, Spring 2015)
Approval required. (Staff)

Computer Science

Computer Science is a rich and dynamic discipline that seeks to understand and use effectively the great potential of computing. The Department of Computer Science offers a wide variety of courses that integrate computer science into the liberal arts curriculum. The major can be completed through either of two tracks. The traditional track provides students with a solid background in algorithmic reasoning, problem solving, design and organization of modern computers and programming languages, and the ability to apply computational thinking to different applications and problem domains. The spatial and geometric computation track teaches students to apply computational and algorithmic approaches to spatial, geometric, and geographic problems. Students completing the major through this track will receive a solid background in computer science including algorithms and data structures, and will then practice applying this knowledge to spatial and geometric problem domains.

Required for the Major in Computer Science, traditional track (11 courses): One CSCI course at the 0100-level; CSCI 0200, CSCI 0201, CSCI 0202, CSCI 0301, CSCI 0302, CSCI 0701; two courses from among CSCI 0311, CSCI 0312, CSCI 0313, CSCI 0314; the senior seminar CSCI 0701; and two additional CSCI electives at the 0300-level or above. One elective can be substituted with MATH 0200 or PHYS 0221.

Required for the Major in Computer Science, Spatial and Geometric Computation track (11 courses): One CSCI course at the 0100-level (CSCI 0190 is recommended); CSCI 0200, CSCI 0201, CSCI 0302, CSCI 0701; one elective among CSCI 0390, CSCI 0425, CSCI 0453, CSCI 0461, CSCI 0465; two additional CSCI electives numbered 0202 or above; and three additional electives. At least two electives must come from the following list and from the same discipline: MATH 0200, MATH 0335, GEOG 0100, GEOG 0120, GEOG 0231, GEOG 0325 (formerly GEOG 0310), GEOG 0327, GEOG 0328, GEOG 0339, HARC 0130, HARC 0231. The third elective may be taken from the preceding list or from any CSCI courses numbered 0300 or above.

Departmental Honors: Required for honors are: 1. The senior thesis CSCI 0702 in addition to the 11 courses required for the major; 2. participation in department extra-curricular or service activities such as tutoring, grading, sys-admin work, student-faculty research, or programming competitions; and 3. a major GPA of at least 3.5 for honors, 3.7 for high honors, and 3.9 for highest honors.

Required for the Minor in Computer Science (6 courses): One CSCI course at the 0100-level; CSCI 0200, CSCI 0201, CSCI 0202, and two CSCI electives at the 0300-level or above.

Joint Majors: The computer science component of a joint major requires: One CSCI course at the 0100-level, CSCI 0200, CSCI 0201, CSCI 0202; one course from CSCI 0301 and CSCI 0302; two CSCI electives at the 0300-level or above; and CSCI 0701.

Advanced Placement and Waivers: First-year students whose secondary preparation indicates they can bypass one or more beginning courses should speak to a faculty member to determine the appropriate first course. College credit is given to students who achieve a score of 4 or 5 on the AP computer science A exam. CSCI 0200 may be waived for students who have completed MATH 0310 or MATH 0318 or both MATH 0200 and MATH 0247, or in consultation with the department chair.

CSCI 0101 The Computing Age (Fall 2014, Spring 2015)
In this course we will provide a broad introductory overview of the discipline of computer science, with no prerequisites or assumed prior knowledge of computers or programming. A significant component of the course is an introduction to algorithmic concepts and to programming using Python; programming assignments will explore algorithmic strategies such as selection, iteration, divide-and-conquer, and recursion, as well as introducing the Python programming language. Additional topics will include: the structure and organization of computers, the Internet and World Wide Web, abstraction as a means of managing complexity, social and ethical computing issues, and the question "What is computation?" 3 hr. lect./lab DED (Fall 2014: C. Andrews; Spring 2015: A. Briggs)

CSCI 0150 Computing for the Sciences (Fall 2014)
In this course we will provide an introduction to the field of computer science geared towards students interested in mathematics and the natural sciences. We will study problem-solving approaches and computational techniques utilized in a variety of domains including biology, chemistry, physics, and engineering. Students will learn how to program in Python and other languages, how to extract information from large data sets, and how to utilize a common technique employed in scientific computation. The course has no prerequisites and assumes no prior experience with programming or computer science. 3 hrs. lect./lab DED (D. Scharstein)

CSCI 0190 Computer Models and Multi-Agent Simulation (Spring 2015)
In this course we will explore agent-based computer models and simulations as a means of studying phenomena from both biological and social sciences. Agent-based simulation will then be used as a basis for introducing individual-based modeling and complex adaptive systems. A significant amount of time will be spent teaching the NetLogo programming language as a software tool for developing simulations. We will also introduce some of the important topics in the discipline of computer science, including algorithmic reasoning and data abstraction. No prior experience in programming is assumed. This course counts as an environmental studies lab science cognate. 3 hrs. lect./lab DED (M. Dickerson)

CSCI 0200 Mathematical Foundations of Computing (Fall 2014, Spring 2015)
In this course we will provide an introduction to the mathematical foundations of computer science, with an emphasis on formal reasoning. Topics will include propositional and predicate logic, sets, functions, and relations; basic number theory; mathematical induction and other proof methods; combinatorics, probability, and recurrence relations; graph theory; and models of computation. (One CSCI course at the 0100-level previously or concurrently) 3 hrs. lect./lab DED (P. Johnson)

CSCI 0201 Data Structures (Fall 2014, Spring 2015)
In this course we will study the ideas and structures helpful in designing algorithms and writing programs for solving large, complex problems. The Java programming language and object-oriented paradigm are introduced in the context of important abstract data types (ADTs) such as stacks, queues, trees, and graphs. We will study efficient implementations of these ADTs, and learn classic algorithms to manipulate these structures for tasks such as sorting and searching. Prior programming experience is expected, but prior familiarity with the Java programming language is not assumed. (One CSCI course at the 0100-level) 3 hrs. lect./lab DED (Fall 2014: A. Christman; Spring 2015: D. Scharstein)

CSCI 0202 Computer Architecture (Fall 2014, Spring 2015)
A detailed study of the hardware and software that make up a computer system. Topics include assembly language programming, digital logic design, microarchitecture, pipelines, caches, and RISC vs. CISC. The goal of the course is teach students how computers are built, how they work at the lowest level, and how this knowledge can be used to write better programs. (CSCI 0201 previously or concurrently) 3 hrs. lect./lab DED (Fall 2014: C. Andrews; Spring 2015: P. Johnson)

CSCI 0301 Theory of Computation (Fall 2014)
This course explores the nature of computation and what it means to compute. We study important models of computation (finite automata, push-down automata, and Turing machines) and investigate their fundamental computational power. We examine various problems and try to determine the computational power needed to solve them. Topics include deterministic versus non-deterministic computation, and a theoretical basis for the study of NP-completeness. (CSCI 0200 and CSCI 0201) 3 hrs. lect./disc. DED (A. Briggs)

CSCI 0302 Algorithms and Complexity (Spring 2015)
This course focuses on the development of correct and efficient algorithmic solutions to computational problems, and on the underlying data structures to support these algorithms. Topics include computational complexity, analysis of algorithms, proof of algorithm correctness, advanced data structures such as balanced search trees, and also important algorithmic techniques including greedy and dynamic programming. The course complements the treatment of NP-completeness in CSCI 0301. (CSCI 0200 and CSCI 0201) 3 hrs. lect./disc. DED (A. Christman)

CSCI 0311 Artificial Intelligence (Fall 2014)
Artificial Intelligence (AI) is the study of computational systems that exhibit rational behavior. Applications include strategic game playing, medical diagnosis, speech and handwriting recognition, Internet search, and robotics. Course topics include intelligent agent architectures, search, knowledge representation, logical reasoning, planning, reasoning under uncertainty, machine learning, and perception and action. (CSCI 0200 and CSCI 0201) 3 hrs. lect./lab DED (A. Christman)

CSCI 0313 Programming Languages (Spring 2015)
A systematic approach to concepts and features of programming languages. The course focuses on four major programming paradigms: procedural, object-oriented, functional, and logic programming languages. Students will program in several languages representing the different paradigms. Topics include grammars, data types, control structures, run-time organization, procedure activation, parameter passing, higher-order functions, lambda expressions, and unification. (CSCI 0200 and CSCI 0202) 3 hrs. lect./lab DED (D. Scharstein)

CSCI 0390 Spatial Agent-Based Modeling (Fall 2014)
In this course students will learn efficient data structures and design techniques for spatially-explicit agent-based modeling using the NetLogo programming language. Agent-based modeling techniques will be applied to problems in the social and natural sciences, mathematics and computational sciences, and agent-based games. In this course we will explore advanced programming features of NetLogo such as links, GIS extensions, 3D modeling, and the profiler. Students will design and implement a significant term project. (CSCI 0190 or CSCI 0201) DED (M. Dickerson)

CSCI 0433 Compiler Design (Fall 2014)
An introduction to the design and construction of compilers and translators. Topics include context-free grammars, lexical analysis, symbol tables, top-down and bottom-up parsing, parser generators, error recovery, run-time organization, declaration processing, type checking, code generation, and optimization. Through the course of the semester students will implement a complete compiler for a simple programming language. (CSCI 0202 and CSCI 0301) 3 hrs. lect./lab DED (D. Scharstein)

CSCI 0461 Computer Graphics (Spring 2015)
The mathematical techniques for creating graphics on the computer. Topics include clipping, perspective, coordinate transformations, hidden surface algorithms, and animation. (CSCI 0202 and MATH 0200) 3 hrs. lect./lab DED (C. Andrews)

CSCI 0463 Cryptology (Spring 2015)
Topics will be chosen from: classical cryptography, block ciphers and the Advanced Encryption Standard, public key cryptology, public key implementations, cryptographic hash functions, authentication techniques, digital signatures, advanced topics in mathematical cryptology. (CSCI 0301 or CSCI 0302) 3 hrs. lect./lab. DED (A. Christman)

CSCI 0500 Advanced Study (Fall 2014, Spring 2015)
Individual study for qualified students in more advanced topics in computer science theory, systems, or application areas. Particularly suited for students who enter with advanced standing. (Approval required) 3 hrs. lect. (Staff)

CSCI 0701 Senior Seminar (Fall 2014)
This senior seminar provides a capstone experience for computer science majors at Middlebury College. Through lectures, readings, and a series of two to three week individual and group assignments, we will introduce important concepts in research and experimental methods in computation. Examples will include: reading research papers; identifying research problems; dealing with big data; experimental design, testing and analysis; and technical writing in computer science. (P. Johnson)

CSCI 0702 Senior Thesis (Spring 2015)
The senior thesis is required for all CSCI majors who wish to be considered for departmental honors, and is recommended for students interested in pursuing graduate study in computer science. Students will spend the semester researching and writing, and developing and experimenting as appropriate for their topic. All students will be expected to report on their work in the form of a written thesis, a poster, and an oral presentation at the end of the semester. In addition, throughout the semester, students will meet as a group to discuss research and writing, and will be expected to attend talks in the Computer Science lecture series. Before approval to join the class is granted, students are expected to have chosen a thesis adviser from the CSCI faculty, and determined a thesis topic with the guidance and approval of that adviser. (CSCI 0701 and approval required) 3 hrs. lect./disc. (C. Andrews)

Dance

Core Courses (10) Required for the Dance Major: The Creative Process (ARDV 0116 or 0117), Dance History (DANC 0284), Anatomy and Kinesiology (DANC 0376), four terms of technique and choreography at or above the 0200-level, DANC 0700 Senior Independent Project, and two additional courses chosen from within the regular fall and spring course offerings in the dance program. Suggested are courses in cultural studies (DANC/SOAN 0272), somatics (DANC 0277), or advanced performing techniques (DANC 0380/0381).

     The Dance Joint Major: The dance joint major consists of seven courses as follows: (1) Three courses in dance technique and choreography at or above the 0200-level; (2) ARDV 0116 or 0117 The Creative Process; (3) DANC 0284 Dance History; (4) DANC 0376 Anatomy and Kinesiology; (5) DANC 0700 Senior Independent Project.

     The Dance Minor: The dance minor consists of five courses, as follows: (1) two courses in dance technique and choreography at or above the 0200-level; (2) DANC 0376 Anatomy and Kinesiology or DANC 0277 Body and Earth; (3) DANC 0284 Dance History or DANC/SOAN 0272 Performing Culture: America's Dancing Bodies; (4) one additional course from dance listings.

     Honors-Dance: Honors, high honors, or highest honors are awarded to graduating seniors in the dance program based upon a grade point average of A- or better in department and cognate courses, a grade of A- or better on the DANC 0700 Senior Independent Project, and overall distinction in the program. Normally only full majors will be eligible for highest honors.

ARDV 0116 The Creative Process (Fall 2014, Spring 2015)
In this course, students will have the opportunity to dig deeply into their own creativity and explore the processes by which ideas emerge and are given shape in the arts. The experiential nature of this course integrates cognition and action, mind and body. Students will engage a range of modes of discovering, knowing, and communicating, which are designed to push them beyond their present state of awareness and level of confidence in their creative power. Practical work will be closely accompanied by readings and journaling, culminating with the creation and performance of a short project. (First- and second-year students only; Not open to students who have taken FYSE 1364) 3 hrs. lect. ART (Staff)

DANC 0160 Introduction to Dance (Fall 2014, Spring 2015)
This entry-level dance course introduces movement techniques, improvisation/composition, performance, experiential anatomy, and history of 20th century American modern dance. Students develop flexibility, strength, coordination, rhythm, and vocabulary in the modern idiom. Concepts of time, space, energy, and choreographic form are presented through improvisation and become the basis for a final choreographic project. Readings, research, and reflective and critical writing about dance performance round out the experience. 2 hrs. lect./3 hrs. lab ART, PE (Fall 2014: T. Kassabova; Spring 2015: Staff)

DANC/MUSC 0244 African Music and Dance Performance (Fall 2014, Spring 2015)
This course will introduce students to various techniques of performing East African (primarily Ugandan) musical and dance traditions through regular rehearsals, culminating in an end-of-semester concert. As an ensemble, we will learn and master how to play and sing/dance to bow-harps, thumb-pianos, xylophones, tube-fiddles, bowl-lyres, gourd shakers, reed-box rattles, ankle bells, and various types of drums. Prior knowledge of performing African music and dance is not required. 4 hrs. lect. AAL, ART (D. Kafumbe)

DANC 0260 Advanced Beginning Dance I (Fall 2014, Spring 2015)
This is the first course in the studio sequence for students entering Middlebury with significant previous dance experience. It is also the course sequence for those continuing on from DANC 0160 or DANC 0161 and provides grounding in the craft of modern dance needed to proceed to more advanced levels. Modern dance movement techniques are strengthened to support an emerging individual vocabulary and facility with composition. Students regularly create and revise movement studies that focus on the basic elements of choreography and the relationship of music and dance. Readings, journals, and formal critiques of video and live performance contribute to the exploration of dance aesthetics and develop critical expertise. (DANC 0160 or by approval) 3 hrs. lect./3 hrs. lab ART, PE (Fall 2014: T. Kassabova; Spring 2015: Staff)

DANC 0261 Advanced Beginning Dance II (Fall 2014, Spring 2015)
A continuation of DANC 0260. (DANC 0260) 3 hrs. lect./3 hrs. lab ART, PE (Fall 2014: T. Kassabova; Spring 2015: Staff)

DANC/GSFS 0284 Modern Dance History in the United States: Early Influences to Postmodern Transformations (Fall 2014)
In this seminar we will focus on the emergence and development of 20th century American concert dance--especially modern and postmodern dance forms--from the confluence of European folk and court dance, African and Caribbean influences, and other American cultural dynamics. We will look at ways in which dance reflects, responds to, and creates its cultural milieu, with special attention to issues of gender, race/ethnicity, and class. Readings, video, and live performance illuminate the artistic products and processes of choreographers whose works mark particular periods or turning points in this unfolding story. Our study is intended to support informed critical articulations and an understanding of the complexity of dance as art. 3 hrs. lect./2 hrs. screen. ART, HIS, NOR (T. Pollard)

DANC/FMMC 0361 Movement and Media (Spring 2015)
In this course we will take an interdisciplinary look at the dynamic relationship between the body and digital media.  Students will develop skills in basic film editing, real-time software manipulation, open-source media research, project design, and collaboration.  We will address design history and theories of modern media through readings and multimedia sources.  Process and research papers and work-in-progress showings will document ongoing collaborations that will culminate in an informal showing at the end of the semester.  This course is open to students of all artistic backgrounds who are interested in significantly expanding their creative vocabularies and boundaries to include dance.  (Approval required; DANC 0261 required for dance students) 3 hrs. lect., 3 hrs. lab. ART (Staff)

DANC 0376 Anatomy and Kinesiology (Fall 2014, Spring 2015)
This course offers an in-depth experiential study of skeletal structure, and includes aspects of the muscular, organ, endocrine, nervous, and fluid systems of the human body. The goal is to enhance efficiency of movement and alignment through laboratory sessions, supported by assigned readings, exams, and written projects. (Not open to first-year students) 3 hrs. lect. ART, PE (S. Hardwig)

DANC 0380 Dance Company of Middlebury (Fall 2014)
Dancers work with the artistic director and guest choreographers as part of a dance company, learning, interpreting, rehearsing, and performing dances created for performance and tour. Those receiving credit can expect four to six rehearsals weekly. Appropriate written work, concert and film viewing, and attendance in departmental technique classes are required. Auditions for company members are held in the fall semester for the year. One credit will be given for two terms of participation. Performances and tour are scheduled in January. (Limited to sophomores through seniors, by audition) (DANC 0260; Approval required) 4 hrs. lect./4 hrs. lab ART, PE (T. Pollard)

DANC 0460 Intermediate/Advanced Dance III: The Place of Dance (Fall 2014)
In this course we will investigate three aspects of place in relation to dance: where we source movement, the relevance of dance in culture, and the effects of place on the moving dancing body. Material covered will include body systems dance technique at the intermediate/advanced level, improvisation and composition toward choreography and site specific work, readings and reflective writing, and performance viewing. The course culminates in formal and informal showings of performance work. The emergence of a personal philosophy and dance aesthetic will be engaged and formally articulated in writing. (DANC 0261; this course may be taken in any sequence with DANC 0360, DANC 0361, DANC 0461) 4.5 hrs. lect./2 hrs. lab. ART, PE (C. Brown)

DANC 0461 Intermediate/Advanced Dance IV: Advanced Dance Improvisation (Spring 2015)
Students will gain rigorous training in the simultaneous conception, composition, and performance of dance works.  This will include units in techniques such as contact improvisation, performance improvisation, site specific work, musical collaboration, and elemental integration. The body will be developed as an articulate, responsive instrument while the mind is honed toward quick, clear perception of potential form with a willingness to act and react. Personal philosophy and dance aesthetics will be cultivated and formally articulated in writing. Musicians proficient with their instrument and interested in improvisation are strongly encouraged to seek admission. (Required for dancers: DANC 0261 or by waiver; this course may be taken in any sequence with DANC 0360, DANC 0361, DANC 0460) 6 hrs lect. ART, PE (Staff)

DANC 0470 Technique Workshop (Spring 2015)
This advanced physical and theoretical study of a variety of movement techniques will further prepare dance majors and minors for the rigors of performance, technical craft, and physical research.  Exercises and discussions will revolve around increased subtlety, strength, flexibility, musicality, and dynamics with the goal of heightening the communicative range of the moving body.  Rotating movement aesthetics taught by dance faculty. (Approval required) ART, PE (C. Brown)

DANC 0500 Independent Project (Fall 2014, Spring 2015)
Approval required. (Staff)

DANC 0700 Independent Project (Fall 2014, Spring 2015)
Approval required. (Staff)

Economics

I. Required for the Major

The economics major consists of four sequences.

     Introductory Sequence: ECON 0150 and ECON 0155. Neither ECON 0150 nor ECON 0155 assumes any prior exposure to economics, but both courses presume a thorough working knowledge of algebra. Note: Students must pass ECON 0150 and ECON 0155 with at least a C- to be admitted into ECON 0250 and ECON 0255 respectively without a waiver.
     Quantitative Sequence: The quantitative sequence in economics consists of two courses. The first course can be ECON 0210, MATH 0116, or MATH 0310, PSYC 0201, or BIOL 0211. (ECON 0210 may not be taken concurrently with MATH 0116, MATH 0310, or PSYC 0201. Credit is not given for ECON 0210 if the student has taken MATH 0116, MATH 0310, PSYC 0201, or BIOL 0211.) Students with strong mathematical background wanting to take MATH 0410 (Stochastic Processes) should take MATH 0310 rather than MATH 0116 or ECON 0210, since MATH 0310 is a prerequisite for MATH 0410. The second course in the sequence is ECON 0211. Students must pass ECON 0210 with at least a C- to be admitted into ECON 0211 without a waiver. MATH 0121 (or their AP or IB equivalents) is a prerequisite for ECON 0211 and ECON 0255. (In special circumstances, students who have a strong background in high school calculus, but did not do the AP or IB equivalent, may substitute either MATH 0200 or CSCI 0101 for MATH 0121 with approval by the economics chair.)
     Intermediate Theory Sequence for students entering in Fall 2012 and earlier: ECON 0250 and ECON 0255. Credit for MATH 0121 (the equivalent or higher) is a prerequisite for ECON 0255.
     Intermediate Theory Sequence for students entering in Fall 2013 and later: ECON 0250; ECON 0255; and one of ECON 0212, ECON 0229, or ECON 0280.
Note: It is important, especially for those planning to study abroad for a full year that the above three sequences be completed by the end of the sophomore year.
     Elective Sequence: Majors are required to take at least four electives, two of which must either be at the 0400-level or a combination of one 0400-level and the ECON 0701/0702 senior workshop sequence. The other two electives may be 0200-, 0300-, or 0400-level courses. All majors must take at least six economics courses in the major at Middlebury, including one 0400-or 0701/0702 sequence. The 0400-level courses are seminars that typically enroll no more than 16 students, have intermediate theory as a prerequisite, and serve as a capstone experience for the major. Emphasis is placed on reading, writing, and discussion of economics at an advanced level. The 0701/0702 workshops are seminars that typically enroll eight students, have intermediate theory and a field course as a prerequisite, and involve writing an independent research paper. The difference between an ECON 0400-level seminar and an ECON 0701/0702 workshop is the degree of independence the student has and the level of sophistication expected in the paper. Any student wanting honors in economics must take ECON 0701and ECON 0702. Because of space constraints, ECON 0701/0702 workshops are initially reserved for straight economics majors; others, including minors and majors in programs that include economics will be admitted on a space available basis.
     Courses that do not count towards the major or minor: ECON 0205 (Economics of Investing) will not count towards the major, though ECON 0205 will count towards the minor.  Beginning Fall 2014, ECON 0240 does not count towards the major or minor requirements. Only two of the following four courses, if completed before Fall 2014, will count towards the major requirements: ECON 0316, ECON 0317, ECON 0412, and ECON 0475. ECON 0500 does not count towards the major or minor requirements . Economics electives taken during the winter term will count towards the major or the minor only if so designated in the winter term catalog.
     Honors: To be eligible for honors in economics, students must take the Senior Research sequence (ECON 0701 and ECON 0702) during their senior year. The purpose of this two-semester sequence is to foster independent student research, culminating in a research paper in the style of an economics journal article. Prior to enrolling in ECON 0701, students must have taken a minimum of six economics courses at Middlebury approved to count towards the major requirements. Each course in the sequence will have no more than eight students who will work on their projects for two semesters (either fall/winter or winter/spring) and will include both individual meetings and group meetings to develop new techniques and present and discuss research. Students who have prearranged a research topic with the professor will be given priority in admission to the seminar. Also, because of limited resources for guiding senior work, students with a single major in economics will be given priority over double majors who will do senior work in other departments. Students interested in pursuing departmental honors must take the Senior Research Workshop sequence (ECON 0701 and ECON 0702) during their senior year. To receive departmental honors the student must receive a minimum grade of A- in ECON 0701 and ECON 0702, and have a 3.5 or higher GPA in all economics courses taken at Middlebury approved to count towards the major requirements. High Honors requires a minimum grade of A in ECON 0701 and ECON 0702, and a 3.75 or higher economics GPA. Highest Honors requires a minimum grade of A in ECON 0701 and ECON 0702, and a 3.9 or higher economics GPA.
     Joint Majors: The Department of Economics does not offer a joint major.

     International Politics and Economics Major:
(1) Courses in Political Science: PSCI 0103, PSCI 0109, PSCI 0304 (PSCI 0304 must be taken at Middlebury College) and three electives in comparative politics or international relations (PSCI 0262 may also count as an elective). At least one elective should be a 0400-level senior seminar in comparative politics or international relations.
(2) Courses in Economics: For students matriculating through 2014.5, the six required economics courses are: ECON 0150, ECON 0155, ECON 0250 (though substituting ECON 0210 for ECON 0250 is encouraged), plus ECON 0240 (formerly ECON 0340) and two electives with an international orientation. One elective should be a 0400-level senior seminar. At least four economics courses meeting the major requirements must be taken at Middlebury, including the 0400-level course. For students matriculating into the classes of 2015 and after, the six required economics courses are: ECON 0150, ECON 0155, ECON 0210, plus ECON 0240 (formerly ECON 0340) and two electives with an international orientation. One elective should be a 0400-level senior seminar. At least four economics courses meeting the major requirements must be taken at Middlebury, including the 0400-level seminar.
     Please refer to the International Politics and Economics section of the catalog for more details about the major or visit the International Politics & Economics webpage for the most current information.
     International and Global Studies Major: The International and Global Studies major allows students to combine the study of a language and focus on an area with another discipline in the humanities or social sciences, linking both with an appropriate experience abroad. International and Global Studies majors are required to take the following courses: Economics: ECON 0150, ECON 0155, ECON 0250 (though substituting ECON 0210 for ECON 0250 is encouraged), ECON 0240 [formerly ECON 0340], and two departmental electives with an international focus at the 0200-, 0300- or 0400-levels. One of which must be a 0400-level course. If a non-regional seminar is taken (e.g., ECON 0425, ECON 0444, or ECON 0445), the final paper should focus on the region of study. Please refer to the International and Global Studies section of the catalog for more details about the major or visit the International and Global Studies webpage for the most current information.
     AP Credit Policy: To obtain credit, students will need to submit their official scores to the Registrar's Office and obtain approval from the department chair. Students who score a 5 on the Advanced Placement exam in Macroeconomics or Microeconomics will receive credit for  Introductory Macroeconomics (ECON 0150) or Introductory Microeconomics (ECON 0155) respectively and cannot enroll in these courses at Middlebury. Students who score a 5 on the advanced placement exam in statistics are strongly encouraged to enroll in Economic Statistics (ECON 0210) but they may choose to  use their AP credit instead. Note: Students may not receive AP credit and course credit for the same course. 
     Students who score a 4 on the advanced placement exam in Macroeconomics, Microeconomics or Statistics must earn a B- or better grade in the corresponding intermediate-level course ECON 0250, ECON 0255, or ECON 0211, respectively, to receive college credit for the AP course. Note: Students are required to complete an additional elective for each of these courses when a grade of B- or higher is not earned in the corresponding intermediate-level course.    
     International Baccalaureate/A-Levels: Students who have completed an International Baccalaureate or the equivalent of the introductory sequence abroad before coming to Middlebury and have earned a score of 7 on IB Economics or a grade of A on A-Level Economics should begin their studies of Macroeconomics and Microeconomics with ECON 0250 and ECON 0255. These students will be given one course credit toward the economics major, but will be prohibited from enrolling in ECON 0155 or ECON 0150. Students who have earned a score of 6 on IB economics or a grade of B on A-Level economics are encouraged to begin their studies of Macroeconomics and Microeconomics with ECON 0250 and ECON 0255, but they may elect to enroll in ECON 0155 or ECON 0150.  Students majoring or minoring in Economics will need to replace the other introductory course with an ECON elective. Students who have completed a statistics course with a score of 6 or higher on IB Statistics, or a grade of B or better on A-Level Statistics are exempt from ECON 0210, and may begin their course of study of economics statistics with ECON 0211 or MATH 0310. If they choose to start with ECON 0211, they will need to replace the ECON 0210 with an ECON elective. The same rules apply where ECON courses are requirements for other majors.
     Transfer of Credit: Students may take economics courses in approved programs (abroad and domestic) and have those courses count towards the major and/or the general graduation requirement. Summer school courses will generally not be given credit for the major unless there is an overriding reason to take a summer school course. Any summer school course must meet a minimum of six weeks and have at least 36 hours of class time. Students planning to take courses off-campus should discuss the proposed course(s) with their advisor and get pre-approval from the chair of the economics department. Upon completion of the course(s), students should submit their course material and a copy of their transcript along with the appropriate Application for Transfer Credit form to the department coordinator for departmental approval. After receiving departmental approval, students must submit their forms to the director of off-campus study for final approval. Courses having a BU (Business) or MGMT (Management) prefix will normally not be considered the equivalent of an economics course. No credit will be given for business courses taken over the summer. A maximum of one credit will be given for a business course taken through a junior year abroad business program. However, this credit will count as a general credit only, not as a major equivalent credit. Business courses taken in a non-business program will be considered on a case-by-case basis. Those that match the department's offerings, and have strong liberal arts content, have the best chance of receiving credit.

II. Post-Graduate Preparation
Graduate programs in economics or finance [other than a Masters of Business Administration (MBA)] generally require a high degree of mathematical sophistication. Students thinking of continuing in such a program are encouraged to: (i) take MATH 0310 in place of ECON 0210; (ii) select economics electives with significant mathematically and statistically rigorous content [recommended courses fulfilling the elective requirements of the economics major include: ECON 0229, ECON 0280 (formerly ECON 0380), ECON 0390, and ECON 0411]; (iii) take a number of additional courses in mathematics and computer science [recommended courses include: CSCI 0101, MATH 0315, MATH 0318, MATH 0323, MATH 0410, and MATH 0423]. Good training for graduate school might include being a statistics tutor or having worked as a research assistant at Middlebury College or at a Federal Reserve Bank, or as an intern at a research institute or NGO. Students thinking about this option should discuss their plans with their advisor and other faculty members.
     Masters of Business Administration (MBA) programs look for students who have taken a wide range of courses across the curriculum rather than for students who have narrowly focused on economics and math. Thus, it is not necessary for someone planning to go on in business or to an MBA program to have majored in economics. MBA programs normally expect that students have worked for a couple of years in business, government, or similar organization before they begin the MBA program. The appropriate coursework for these MBA programs is a wide range of liberal arts courses.

III. Minor in Economics

(As of Fall 2012, the Economics Department no longer offers a minor)

The economics minor consists of five courses: ECON 0150, ECON 0155, ECON 0250 or ECON 0255 (MATH 0121 is a prerequisite for ECON 0255), and two electives, one of which must be at the 0400-level or the 0701/0702 senior workshop sequence. (Minors interested in the 0701/0702 senior research workshop sequence will need to satisfy additional requirements listed in the section on Honors and will be admitted on a space available basis only.) Economics electives taken during the winter term will count towards the major or minor only if so designated in the winter term catalog. All economics minors must take at least three economics courses in the minor at Middlebury.

ECON 0150 Introductory Macroeconomics (Fall 2014, Spring 2015)
An introduction to macroeconomics: a consideration of macroeconomic problems such as unemployment and inflation. Theories and policy proposals of Keynesian and classical economists are contrasted. Topics considered include: banking, financial institutions, monetary policy, taxation, government spending, fiscal policy, tradeoffs between inflation and unemployment in both the short run and the long run, and wage-price spirals. 3 hrs. lect. SOC(Fall 2014: L. Arroyo Abad, P. Matthews; Spring 2015 L. Arroyo Abad, C. Craven)

ECON 0155 Introductory Microeconomics (Fall 2014, Spring 2015)
An introduction to the analysis of such microeconomic problems as price formation (the forces behind demand and supply), market structures from competitive to oligopolistic, distribution of income, and public policy options bearing on these problems. 3 hrs. lect. SOC (Fall 2014: N. Muller, J. Isham, S. Pecsok, D. Horlacher, C. Freedman; Spring 2015: S. Pecsok, P. Sommers)

ECON/GSFS 0207 Economics and Gender (Spring 2015)
Economics and Gender is an introduction to using the tools of economics to understand gender-related issues. In the first part of the course we will review economic models of the household, fertility, and labor supply and discuss how they help us interpret long-term trends in marriage and divorce, fertility, and women’s labor-force participation. In the second part of the course we will study economic models of wage determination and focus on explanations of, and policy remedies for, earnings differentials by gender. The final part of the course will focus on new research in economics on gender-related topics.   (ECON 0155) 3hrs. lect. SOC (T. Byker)

ECON 0210 Economic Statistics (Fall 2014, Spring 2015)
Basic methods and concepts of statistical inference with an emphasis on economic applications. Topics include probability distributions, random variables, simple linear regression, estimation, hypothesis testing, and contingency table analysis. A weekly one-hour lab is part of this course in addition to three hours of class meetings per week. (ECON 0150 or ECON 0155) Credit is not given for ECON 0210 if the student has taken MATH 0116, MATH 0310, or PSYC 0201 previously or concurrently. 3 hrs. lect., 1 hr. lab DED (Fall 2014: P. Sommers, E. Gong; Spring 2015: E. Gong)

ECON 0211 Introduction to Regression Analysis (Fall 2014, Spring 2015)
In this course regression analysis is introduced. The major focus is on quantifying relationships between economic variables. Multiple regression identifies the effect of several exogenous variables on an endogenous variable. After exploring the classical regression model, fundamental assumptions underlying this model will be relaxed, and further new techniques will be introduced. Methods for testing hypotheses about the regression coefficients are developed throughout the course. Both theoretical principles and practical applications will be emphasized. The course goal is for each student to employ regression analysis as a research tool and to justify and defend the techniques used. (MATH 0121; and ECON 0150 or ECON 0155; and ECON 0210; or by approval) 3 hrs. lect., 1 hr. lab DED (Fall 2014: T. Byker: Spring 2015: T. Byker, P. Wunnava)

ECON 0212 Empirical Research Methods in Economics (Fall 2014)
In this course we will provide students with the tools to conceptualize, design, and carry out a research project in economics. Topics will include survey design, sampling and power, experimental design (in and out of the lab), natural experiments, and other approaches to identifying causal relationships. Drawing from several sub-disciplines in economics, students will examine, replicate, and critique various studies. Emphasis will be placed on the formulation of valid, feasible research questions, and on the description and interpretation of results. (ECON 0211) 3 hrs. lect. (C. Myers)

ECON 0222 Economics of Happiness (Fall 2014)
We will explore the economics of happiness in both the micro and macro realm. We start with the neoclassical model of rational individuals who know with great precision what makes them happy. Next we explore behaviorist challenges to that model, including issues of regret, altruism, fairness, and gender. On the macro side, we investigate the puzzle of why, though most of us like more income, a growing GDP does not seem to make societies happier; we examine the impact of the macroeconomic environment on individual happiness. Finally we touch on current policy issues such as quantitative happiness indicators that have been adopted around the world, “paternalistic” policy measures to increase happiness, and the no-growth movement. (ECON 0150 or ECON 0155) 3 hrs. lect. SOC (C. Craven)

ECON 0224 Economic History of Latin America (Fall 2014)
Latin America is a region rich in resources, yet it has long struggled to achieve sustainable development. When, why, and how did Latin America fall behind other regions? In this course we will study the evolution of the Latin American economies from colonial times to the present. We will consider the role of natural resources, institutions, and international markets in shaping the region’s trajectory. Using applied economic analysis, we will explore the challenges, opportunities, and constraints the region faced across history. (ECON 0150) 3 hrs. lect. AAL, HIS, SOC (L. Arroyo Abad)

ECON 0228 Economics of Agricultural Transition (Fall 2014)
In 1860 farmers made up over half the population of this country and fed about 30 million people. Today they number 2% of the population and produce more than enough to feed 300 million people. In this course we will look at the history, causes, and results of this incredible transformation. While studying the economic forces behind the changing farming structure, we will examine farm production, resources, technology, and agricultural policy. Field trips to local farms and screenings of farm-related videos and movies will incorporate the viewpoint of those engaged in agriculture. (ECON 0150 or ECON 0155) 2 hrs. lect./2 hrs. lab NOR, SOC (S. Pecsok)

ECON 0229 Economic History and History of Economic Thought (Fall 2014, Spring 2015)
This course will provide an introduction to economic history and the history of economic thought. We will investigate and understand the causes and consequences of important historical events and trends, such as industrialization and globalization, from an economic perspective. This evaluation involves studying how prominent economists perceived and analyzed the events of their time. (ECON 0150) 3 hrs. lect. HIS, SOC (R. Prasch)

ECON 0240 International Economics: A Policy Approach (Fall 2014, Spring 2015)
This course provides an overview of international trade and finance. We will discuss why countries trade, the concepts of absolute and comparative advantage, and gains from trade. We will explore commercial policies, arguments for and against tariffs, non-tariff barriers, dumping and subsidies, the role of the WTO, as well as the pros and cons of regional free trade associations. In the second part of the course we will primarily concentrate on international macroeconomics, focusing on foreign exchange rates, balance of payments, origins of and solutions to financial crises and the history and architecture of the international monetary system. Beginning Fall 2014, ECON 0240 no longer counts towards the ECON major or minor requirements. (Formerly ECON 0340) (ECON 0150 and ECON 0155) 3 hrs. lect. (R. Moussa)

ECON 0250 Macroeconomic Theory (Fall 2014, Spring 2015)
Macroeconomic theory analyzes whether the market effectively coordinates individuals' decisions so that they lead to acceptable results. It considers the effectiveness of monetary, fiscal, and other policies in achieving desirable levels of unemployment, inflation, and growth. The theories held by various schools of economic thought such as Keynesians, monetarists, and new classicals are considered along with their proposed policies. (ECON 0150) 3 hrs. lect. (Fall 2014: P. Matthews, L. Davis; Spring 2015: L. Davis, R. Moussa)

ECON 0255 Microeconomic Theory (Fall 2014, Spring 2015)
Microeconomic theory concentrates on the study of the determination of relative prices and their importance in shaping the allocation of resources and the distribution of income in an economy. We will study the optimizing behavior of households in a variety of settings: buying goods and services, saving, and labor supply decisions. We will also examine the behavior of firms in different market structures. Together, the theories of household and firm behavior help illumine contemporary economic issues (discrimination in labor markets, mergers in the corporate world, positive and negative externalities, for example). (MATH 0121 and ECON 0155) 3 hrs. lect. (Fall 2014: A. Robbett, E. Huet-Vaughn; Spring 2015: E. Huet-Vaugn, N. Muller, A. Robbett)

ECON 0265 Environmental Economics (Fall 2014)
This course is dedicated to the proposition that economic reasoning is critical for analyzing the persistence of environmental damage and for designing cost-effective environmental policies. The objectives of the course are that each student (a) understands the economic approach to the environment; (b) can use microeconomics to illustrate the theory of environmental policy; and (c) comprehends and can critically evaluate: alternative environmental standards, benefits and costs of environmental protection, and incentive-based environmental policies. (ECON 0155) 3 hrs. lect. (N. Muller)

ECON 0275 Urban Economics (Spring 2015)
How and why do cities form? Why do people live in the suburbs and commute to the Central Business District? Why do tech industries want to locate right next to each other in Silicon Valley? Are toll roads just there to annoy us, or is there some economic rationale for them? This course combines economic theory and empirical evidence to provide an overview of the forces beyond our spatial organization as well as a survey of urban problems relating to land use, traffic, housing, and racial segregation. (ECON 0155) 3 hrs. lect. SOC ( C. Myers)

ECON 0280 Game Theory I (Spring 2015)
Game theory is general in scope and has been used to provide theoretical foundations for phenomena in most of the social and behavioral sciences. Economic examples include market organization, bargaining, and the provision of public goods. Examples from other behavioral sciences include social dilemmas and population dynamics. In this course students learn the basics of what constitutes a game and how games are solved. This course is meant to be a broad introduction; students with advanced training in economics (or math) are encouraged to enroll directly in ECON 0390. (Formerly ECON 0380) (ECON 0155 and MATH 0121 required; ECON 0255 recommended) 3 hrs. sem. (A. Robbett)

ECON 0328 Economics of Global Health (Fall 2014)
In this course we will examine global health from an economics perspective while attempting to understand it from both the demand and supply sides. We will review the current economic research relevant to these topics. Microeconomic theory will be used to explain why individuals might make what are seemingly poor health decisions. In addition, we will be using data from the Demographic Health Surveys to examine the health and well-being of individuals living in poor countries. Topics will include the effects of HIV/AIDS, malaria, and poor sanitation. (MATH 0121; and ECON 0150 or ECON 0155; and ECON 0210; or by approval) 3 hrs. lect. (E. Gong)

ECON 0375 Monetary Theory and Policy (Fall 2014, Spring 2015)
This course will cover the determination of interest rates, portfolio theory, the demand for money, and the supply of money process. Emphasis will be on the difficulties faced by the Federal Reserve in its goals of achieving a steady growth in aggregate demand while doing its best to ensure that monetary disorder, such as that which characterized the Great Depression, does not reoccur. (ECON 0150 and ECON 0155) 3 hrs. lect. (R. Prasch)

ECON 0401 Poverty, Inequality and Distributive Justice (Spring 2015)
This seminar will explore recent theoretical and empirical research on socioeconomic inequality. The definitions, causes and consequences of inequality at both the individual (micro) and national and international (macro) levels will be considered. (ECON 0211 and ECON 0255) 3 hrs. sem. (P. Matthews)

ECON 0411 Applied Econometrics (Fall 2014)
This course is designed to further students' understanding of parameter estimation, inference, and hypothesis testing for single and multiple equation systems. Emphasis will be placed on specification, estimation, and testing of micro/macro econometric models and using such models for policy analysis and forecasting. Large cross-sectional as well as panel data sets will be used for estimation purposes. (ECON 0211 and ECON 0250 and ECON 0255; or by approval) 3 hrs. sem. (P. Wunnava)

ECON 0424 Economic Prosperity in the Global Economy (Spring 2015)
The forces of globalization have powerful and controversial effects today, but this phenomenon has deep historical roots. At the center of the globalization debate is whether prosperity is delivered to developing countries. In this course we will study the transformation to the global economy by exploring commodity, labor, and capital markets from a historical perspective. We will analyze the links among the economic dimensions of globalization, development, and growth. Our objective will be to examine the characteristics and evolution of globalization and its impact on overall growth, education, health, inequality, and poverty. (ECON 0240 or ECON 0250 or ECON 0340) 3 hrs. sem. SOC (L. Arroyo Abad)

ECON 0428 Population Growth and the Global Future (Fall 2014)
This course will show how economic analysis can be used to assess the impact of rapid population growth on economic development, the environment, and economic inequality. It will analyze the rapid "graying" of the industrialized countries and their struggle to cope with international migration. It will assess the causes of urban decay in the North and the explosive growth of cities in the South. The course will consider household-level decision-making processes; the effects of changing family structures; and the need to improve the status of women. (ECON 0250 or ECON 0255) 3 hrs. sem. (D. Horlacher)

ECON 0438 The Japanese Economy (Fall 2014, Spring 2015)
The Japanese economy offers not only some interesting and idiosyncratic features, but also key insights into current economic issues in China and the United States. In this course we will start with the devastation of postwar Japan and then ask how the Japanese addressed pressing economic issues. We will analyze the Japanese fiscal, monetary, and trade policies adopted within Japan and explore how these policies reflected and influenced the financial, business, and labor sectors. We will also trace how Japan's success in constructing a low risk, middle-class society eventually precipitated the problems in the 1990’s that remain unresolved. (ECON 0250 and ECON 0255) 3 hrs. sem. AAL, SOC (C. Freedman)

ECON 0445 International Finance (Fall 2014, Spring 2015)
An analysis of the world's financial system and the consequences for open economies of macroeconomic interdependence. Particular topics include: exchange rate determination, balance of payments adjustments, and monetary and fiscal policies in open economies. Special attention is paid to the issues and problems of the European Economic Community and European integration and debt in developing countries. (ECON 0240 or ECON 0250) 3 hrs. sem. (R. Moussa)

ECON 0465 Special Topics in Environmental Economics (Spring 2015)
The objective of this seminar is that each student achieves fluency in a set of advanced concepts in environmental economics. The seminar is divided into two main sections. First, we introduce the core theory and policy implications of environmental economics. These include the theory of externalities and public goods; the Coase theorem; and policy instrument choice. Empirical methods used to measure the costs and benefits of environmental policies are also introduced. Second, we study some selected topics: the economics of local air pollution and greenhouse gases; the design of market-based environmental policies; the economics of non-renewable resources, including fossil fuels and old-growth forests; and the management of renewable resources, including fisheries and second-growth forest resources. (ECON 0255) 3 hrs. sem. (N. Muller)

ECON 0470 Public Economics (Fall 2014, Spring 2015)
In this course we will examine the role of government in modern market economies. In particular we will explore the design and impact of government expenditure programs and taxation systems on the welfare and behavior of its citizens. We will consider the following questions: When is government intervention in the economy appropriate? What is the most effective form of intervention? What effects do government policies have on incentives for firms, individuals, and others in the private sector? The course will cover a wide range of issues in public economics with a primary focus on current policy debates in the United States, employing standard empirical and theoretical tools used in public economic research. Attention will be given to classic works in public economics and recent work at the intersection of behavioral/experimental economics and public economics. (ECON 0255) 3 hrs. sem. (E. Huet-Vaughn)

ECON 0475 Monetary Theory and Financial Markets (Fall 2014, Spring 2015)
This seminar is concerned with financial markets and their relationship to the broader macroeconomy, with a particular focus on recent developments, including, but not limited to, financialization."  (ECON 0250) 3 hrs. sem. (L. Davis)

ECON 0485 The Economics of Sports (Spring 2015)
This is a survey course of topics illustrating how microeconomic principles apply to the sports industry. Topics covered will include the industrial organization of the sports industry (notably, issues of competitive balance and the implications of monopoly power), the public finance of sports (notably, the impact teams have on host municipalities), and labor issues related to sports (including player worth and discrimination). The prerequisites for this course are meant to ensure that students can both understand fundamental economic concepts and present the results of econometric research as they apply to the sports industry. (ECON 0210 and ECON 0211 and ECON 0255) 3 hrs. sem. (P. Sommers)

ECON 0499 Topics in Behavioral and Experimental Economics (Fall 2014)
In this seminar we will consider current research topics in behavioral and experimental economics. Although the theme for the course is likely to change from semester to semester, all students will design their own study, gather decision-making data, and write a research paper summarizing their main findings. (ECON 0255 and one of the following: ECON 0280, ECON 0390, or ECON 0399) 3 hrs. sem. (A. Robbett)

ECON 0500 Individual Special Project (Fall 2014, Spring 2015)
If you choose to pursue an area that we do not offer or go in depth in an area already covered, we recommend the Individual Special Project option. These ECON 0500 proposals MUST be passed by the entire department and are to be submitted to the chair by the first Friday of fall and spring semester, respectively. The proposals should contain a specific description of the course contents, its goals, and the mechanisms by which goals are to be realized. It should also include a bibliography. According to the College Handbook, ECON 0500 projects are a privilege open to those students with advanced preparation and superior records in their fields. A student needs to have a 3.5 or higher G.P.A. in Economics courses taken at Middlebury in order to pursue an Individual Special Project. ECON 0500 does not count towards the major or minor requirements. (Staff)

ECON 0701 Senior Research Workshop I (Fall 2014, Spring 2015)
In this first semester, students will design and begin their projects. Emphasis will be on designing a novel research question (while making the case for its importance) and an appropriate strategy for answering it. This requires immersion in the academic literature on the topic. General research principles and tools will be taught in class, as a group, while those specific to individual projects will be covered in one-on-one meetings. By the end of the term, students will outline their plan for completing the project, including demonstrating that it is a feasible research question for which the necessary information (e.g., data or source materials) is available or can be generated by the student (e.g., lab or other experiment). (Approval required) (Fall 2014: P. Wunnava; Spring 2015: E. Gong, C. Myers)

ECON 0702 Senior Research Workshop II (Spring 2015)
In this second semester of the senior research workshop sequence, the focus is on the execution of the research plan developed in ECON 0701. Most instruction is now one-on-one but the workshop will still meet as a group to discuss and practice the presentation of results in various formats (seminars, poster sessions, et cetera) to the rest of the workshop and others in the college and broader communities. Feedback and critiques from such presentations will be incorporated into the project, which will culminate in a research paper in the style of an economics journal article. (ECON 0701; Approval required) (E. Gong, C. Myers)

Education Studies           

Requirements for the Minor in Education Studies [EDGW]: Education Studies is an interdisciplinary program. To earn a minor in Education Studies students must complete five courses structured in the following manner:

  1. A foundations course in education, either EDST 0115 or SOAN 0215.
  2. Any three courses in Education Studies (see course listing). Students who are interested in attaining a Vermont teaching license must complete either an elementary or secondary minor (see below).
  3. One elective determined in consultation with the student's faculty advisor in Education Studies. This elective course may include any course in Education Studies or a Winter Term elective, a 0500-level independent study, or in special cases, pre-approved study abroad experiences or internships with substantive academic work. PSYC 0327 (Educational Psychology), PSYC 0225 (Child Development) and PSYC 0216 (Adolescence) may fulfill the elective requirement for the minor. Students must secure prior approval from Education Studies faculty for any other course to count as an elective.

Students may choose to focus their five courses in either elementary or secondary education or they may choose to take a broad approach and select courses from across the curriculum. Each student declaring a minor in Education Studies will be assigned to a faculty member in Education Studies who will serve as his or her advisor.

     Vermont Licensure Option: Students who want to attain a teaching license must meet the licensure requirements established by the state of Vermont. There are two licensure options: Elementary [EDEL] (grades K-6) and Secondary [EDSL] (grades 7-12).

     Requirements for the minor in elementary education with licensure [EDEL] (grades K-6): In order to meet the requirements set by the state of Vermont, there are six courses required for the minor in elementary education as well as the professional semester:

a. EDST 0115, 0305, 0315, 0317 (Winter Term)

b. PSYC 0225 & PSYC 0327. [Note: PSYC 0105 is a prerequisite for all Psychology courses.]

c. Successful completion of the professional semester (student teaching) listed in the catalog as EDST 0410 & 0405-0407 with satisfactory review of the professional semester by the Professional Semester Review Committee and with satisfactory review of the student's teacher licensure portfolio. [Note: This is a 4 credit experience as it involves full-time teaching for one semester as well as a weekly, 3 hour seminar during the same semester.]

d. Students seeking a teaching license in elementary education may major in any subject offered at Middlebury College. Prior to the granting of the license, students must also complete both the SCI and DED distribution requirements.

     Requirements for the minor in secondary education with licensure [EDSL] (grades 7-12): Middlebury College is authorized to recommend licensure in the following subject areas for secondary education: Art, (prek-12); Modern and Classical Languages: Spanish (7-12), German (7-12), Russian (7-12) and French (7-12); Mathematics (7-12); Science (7-12); English (7-12); Social Studies (7-12); and Computer Science (7-12). Students should consult with the Education Studies faculty to determine particular recommended major courses that will align with state endorsement requirements. Generally, for the secondary teaching license, students should major in the content area they wish to teach.

Note: Students majoring in history, economics, geography, or political science can be recommended for licensure in social studies, but such students must also complete a course dealing with geography, a course dealing with a culture or society outside North America, and the two United States history courses, to be determined in conjunction with the History Department.

In order to meet the requirements set by the state of Vermont, there are six courses required for the minor in secondary education as well as the professional semester:

     a. EDST 0115, 0318, 0320, 0327 (Winter Term).

     b. PSYC 0216 & PSYC 0327. [Note: PSYC 0105 is a prerequisite for all Psychology courses.]

     c. Successful completion of the professional semester (student teaching) listed in the catalog as EDST 0410 & 0415-0417 with satisfactory review of the professional semester by the Professional Semester Review Committee and with satisfactory review of the student's teacher licensure portfolio. [Note: This is a 4 credit experience as it involves full-time teaching for one semester as well as a weekly, 3 hour seminar during the same semester.]

     Professional Semester: Students who elect to pursue licensure either in Elementary or Secondary education must apply to the Education Studies program for acceptance into the Professional Semester. Upon acceptance, students complete EDST 0410 (the student teaching seminar), and either EDST 0405-0407 or EDST 0415-0417, the student teaching practicum in a local school. These four course credits constitute the Professional Semester. Students may elect to complete the Professional Semester either as seniors or post-graduation in a ninth semester. Satisfactory review of the Professional Semester by the Professional Semester Review Committee and of the required licensure portfolio result in recommendation for initial licensure for teaching in Vermont, reciprocated by 48 states.

     Thus, all students seeking licensure complete a full semester of student teaching under the supervision of a master teacher. Education Studies faculty in consultation with the student and prospective master teacher make the final decision regarding where and with whom a student is placed for the Professional Semester.

EDST 0115 Education in the USA (Fall 2014, Spring 2015)
What are schools for? What makes education in a democracy unique? What counts as evidence of that uniqueness? What roles do schools play in educating citizens in a democracy for a democracy? In this course, we will engage these questions while investigating education as a social, cultural, political, and economic process. We will develop new understandings of current policy disputes regarding a broad range or educational issues by examining the familiar through different ideological and disciplinary lenses. 3 hrs. lect./1 hr. disc. NOR, SOC (Fall 2014: J. Miller-Lane; Spring 2015: T. Affolter , T. Weston)

EDST 0185 Writing for Children and Young Adults (Fall 2014)
This course is an introduction to writing for children and young adults through analysis of model short fiction and novels, and regular discussion of student writing. We will focus on craft and form with particular attention to the demands of writing for a young audience. Emphasis will be on composition and revision. 3 hrs. lect. ART (C. Cooper)

EDST/ENAM 0203 Taboos and Trends in Literature for Children and Young Adults (Spring 2015)
In this course we will examine groundbreaking works of literature for children and young adults. From Mark Twain to contemporary authors such as Lowry, Myers, and Farmer, writers for young people have pressed hard on societal notions about what is acceptable for young readers. We will look at taboos that have existed and been broken, as well as current trends in the field. We will pay particular attention to developmental issues in youth and sociocultural mores, including censorship. LIT (C. Cooper)

EDST/INTD 0210 Sophomore Seminar in the Liberal Arts (Fall 2014, Spring 2015)
This course is designed for sophomores who are interested in exploring the meaning and the purpose of a liberal arts education. To frame this investigation, we will use the question "What is the good life and how shall I live it?" Through an interdisciplinary and multicultural array of readings and films we will engage our course question through intellectual discussion, written reflection, and personal practice. There will be significant opportunities for public speaking and oral presentation, as well as regular writing assignments, including a formal poster presentation. Readings will include reflections on a liberal arts education in the U.S. (Emerson, Brann, Nussbaum, Oakeshott, Ladsen-Billings, bell hooks); on "the good life" (excerpts from Aristotle, sacred texts of different traditions); on social science analyses of contemporary life; texts on the neuroscience of happiness; as well as literary and cinematic representations of lives well-lived. CMP, CW (Spring) (Fall 2014: D. Evans, J. Miller-Lane; Spring 2015: P. Zupan, B. Millier)

EDST 0305 Teaching of Literacy and Social Studies in the Elementary School (Fall 2014)
This course is designed to provide prospective elementary teachers with an understanding of literacy and social studies instruction for all learners in K-6 classrooms. In addition to the classes, students will participate in a field experience of observing and helping out in elementary school classes in the Middlebury area (approximately 24 hours) and design an individual education studies website. The course will view literacy development (reading, writing, speaking, listening, and viewing) in such a way that assessing and planning instruction fits naturally into everyday classroom activities. We will explore a variety of topics and issues related to social studies: Vermont and National Standards, interdisciplinary approaches, and assessment. 3 hrs. lect./1 hr. disc. (T. Weston)

EDST 0315 Teaching of Mathematics and Science in the Elementary School (Spring 2015)
This course is an examination of current theory, research, methods, and materials of elementary school mathematics and science. In addition to the classes and lab, students will participate in a field experience of observing and helping out in elementary school classes in the Middlebury area (approximately 24 hours). Development of an individual education studies website will also be required. Students will construct a working knowledge of assessment and the scope and sequence of mathematics and science skills, concepts, and dispositions; how children learn mathematics and science; effective teaching skills and strategies; and the role of the national and Vermont standards in teaching and learning mathematics and science. 3 hrs. lect./3 hrs. lab (T. Weston)

EDST 0318 Teaching and Learning in Secondary Schools (Spring 2015)
This course emphasizes the knowledge and skills necessary for effective teaching at the secondary level. Starting from a foundation in the liberal arts, students will develop lesson and unit plans based on instructional models that reflect "best practice" and that are grounded in key concepts from their respective disciplines. Concerns regarding "classroom management" will be addressed as opportunities to design challenging and engaging curriculum. Students will be required to integrate technology into meaningful, academic inquiry. This course requires 3 hrs./week of observation in local schools. 3 hrs. lect. (J. Miller-Lane)

EDST 0320 Literacy Across the Secondary Curriculum (Fall 2014)
This course will acquaint prospective teachers with pedagogies that use literacy to help students learn subject matter, strategies, and skills in various secondary content areas. We will consider both the theory and practice of literacy through analysis of the nature of reading, writing, discussion, interpretation, and critical processes and practices. We will also consider the politics of literacy and the importance of socio-economic, linguistic, and cultural factors in making appropriate choices about methods and materials for diverse populations. Students will spend at least two hours per week observing and tutoring in secondary schools in the Middlebury area. 3 hrs. lect. (C. Cooper)

EDST 0375 International and Cross Cultural Education (Spring 2015)
Who gets to own knowledge? Who can acquire it? How do we construct advantage and disadvantage? Comparative and international education examines the intersection of culture and education and the ways they are inextricably related through history, politics, and literature. In this course we will explore major concepts, trends, and methodologies across disciplines, focusing on the effects of globalization, the maintenance and dissolution of borders, the commodification of knowledge, the social creation of meaning, and the consequences of those constructions. We will examine global educational traditions and realities on the ground in case studies of Western and developing nations. CMP, SOC (C. Cooper)

EDST 0405 Student Teaching in the Elementary School (Fall 2014)
A semester-long practicum in a local elementary school under the direct supervision of an experienced cooperating teacher. (Corequisite: EDST 0410) (Approval required) (T. Weston)

EDST 0406 Student Teaching in Elementary School (Fall 2014)
See EDST 0405. (Approval required) (T. Weston)

EDST 0407 Student Teaching in the Elementary School (Fall 2014)
See EDST 0405. (Approval required) (T. Weston)

EDST 0410 Student Teaching Seminar (Fall 2014)
Concurrent with student teaching, this course is designed to provide guidance in curriculum development and its implementation in the classroom, and to explore issues related to the teaching process and the profession. Students will construct a Teaching Licensure Portfolio as well as exchange ideas about their student teaching experiences. Topics including technology, classroom management, special education, and assessment will be featured. The Vermont Framework of Standards and Learning Opportunities, the five Standards for Vermont Educators, the Principles for Vermont Educators, and ROPA-R will guide the development of the Teacher Licensure Portfolio. (Corequisite: EDST 0405, EDST 0406, EDST 0407 or EDST 0415, EDST 0416 EDST 0417) (Approval required) 3 hrs. lect. (T. Weston)

EDST 0415 Student Teaching in the Middle School/High School (Fall 2014)
A semester-long practicum in a local middle or high school under the direct supervision of an experienced cooperating teacher. (Corequisite: EDST 0410) (Approval required) (C. Cooper)

EDST 0416 Student Teaching in the Middle School/High School (Fall 2014)
See EDST 0415. (Approval required) (C. Cooper)

EDST 0417 Student Teaching in the Middle School/High School (Fall 2014)
See EDST 0415. (Approval required) (C. Cooper)

EDST 0500 Independent Project (Fall 2014, Spring 2015)
Approval required. (Staff)

English & American Literatures

Requirements for the Major: Twelve courses are required of all students majoring in English and American Literatures. 1) ENAM 0103 or CMLT 0101; 2) ENAM 0201 or 0204; 3) ENAM 0205; 4-5) two courses concerning literature written prior to the year 1700 (Period I); 6-7) two courses concerning literature written between 1700 and 1910 (Period II), at least one of which must concern American Literature (AL); 8-10) three ENAM electives; 11) an ENAM Junior Seminar (4xx); and 12) a senior thesis. In addition, students wishing to write a creative senior thesis must complete three workshop courses (one at the 0100-level and two at the advanced level) prior to beginning the senior project. Creative writing workshops may NOT be used to fulfill other ENAM major requirements. LITS 0705, Senior Colloquium in Literary Studies can also be used to fulfill the Junior Seminar requirement in ENAM. Students should complete a Junior Seminar prior to beginning a critical senior thesis project.

     Joint Major: A joint major in English and American Literatures requires a minimum of seven ENAM courses, including the following: 1) ENAM 0103 or CMLT 0101; 2) ENAM 0201 or 0204; 3) one ENAM course concerning literature written prior to the year 1700 (Period I); 4) one ENAM course concerning literature written between 1700 and 1910 (Period II); 5) one ENAM elective; and 6) an ENAM junior seminar (4xx). Of 3-6 above, at least one course must concern American literature (AL). Joint majors must also design a senior thesis project that brings together aspects of the two majors. Joint majors must be approved by the chairs of both departments or programs involved.
     Students wishing to undertake a joint major in ENAM and Theatre should be advised that senior work will normally comprise two full-credit classes, ENAM 0708 and THEA 0708.  We strongly recommend that these classes be taken in the same semester, with the understanding that a central goal of the joint major is the thorough integration of both aspects of the joint major. A single-credit, single-semester joint project remains an option for those who wish to pursue a joint thesis that does not include a practical component such as acting or directing, and also for all students graduating in March 2015 or in May 2015, regardless of the kind of project, under the former requirements.

     Minor: A minor in English and American Literatures requires six courses: 1) ENAM 0103 or CMLT 0101; 2) ENAM 0201 or 0204; 3) Four ENAM courses, at least one of which must concern literature written prior to the year 1700 (Period I), and one must concern American literature (AL).

     Senior Program: The ENAM senior program consists of a required one-semester creative or critical thesis of 30-35 pages in length (ENAM 0700, CRWR 0701). CRWR 0701 requires the prior completion of one 0100-level CRWR workshop and two 0300-level CRWR workshops and a grade of at least B+ in both 0300-level courses before undertaking a thesis.  Students writing a critical thesis must enroll concurrently in the thesis workshop (ENAM 0710 or CRWR 0711). All students will participate in an oral defense of their work with the adviser and second reader of the project. Students are encouraged to complete their Junior Seminar requirement before embarking on their senior work.    
     
     Honors
: Departmental honors will be awarded to those students who achieve a departmental GPA of 3.85 and above. In determining the numerical average of course grades, all courses designated ENAM will be counted, as will all other courses that fulfill requirements for the major. Joint majors are eligible to receive honors. In determining joint honors, all courses that fulfill requirements for both majors will be counted.

     Courses for Non-Majors: The Department of English and American Literatures offers a wide variety of courses in literature that are open without prerequisite to all students in the college. These include most 0100 and 0200-level courses and some 0300-level courses. The ENAM 0103/CMLT 0101, 0201/0204 sequence is intended for declared or potential majors and minors. The 0100 level courses are recommended for students, primarily in their first or second years, with interests in comparative, thematic, and theoretical approaches to literature. They are especially suitable for meeting the colleges Literature (LIT) distribution requirement.

ENAM/GSFS 0102 Introduction to Gender, Sexuality and Literature (Spring 2015)
This course offers an introduction to the ways in which literature reflects, influences, creates, and reveals cultural beliefs about gender and sexuality. We will read a wide range of novels, poems, and plays from a diversity of eras and national traditions; we will also study seminal works in feminist theory, queer studies, and the history of sexuality, from early thinkers to today's cutting-edge theorists. Throughout the course, we will explore the ways in which gender intersects with other crucial cultural issues such as race, nationhood, globalization, and class. 3 hrs. lect./disc. CMP, LIT (A. Losano)

ENAM 0103 Reading Literature (Fall 2014, Spring 2015)
This course seeks to develop skills for the close reading of literature through discussion of and writing about selected poems, plays, and short stories. A basic vocabulary of literary terms and an introductory palette of critical methods will also be covered, and the course's ultimate goal will be to enable students to attain the literary-critical sensibility vital to further course work in the major. At the instructor's discretion, the texts employed in this class may share a particular thematic concern or historical kinship. 3 hrs. lect./disc. CW, LIT (Fall 2014: T. Billings, A. Losano, Y. Siddiqi; Spring 2015:  J. Bertolini, D. Brayton, D. Price, M. Wells)

ENAM/CMLT 0107 The Experience of Tragedy (Fall 2014)
For over two millennia tragedy has raised ethical questions and represented conflicts between the divine and the mortal, nature and culture, household and polity, individual and society. What is tragedy? What led to its production and what impact did it have, in ancient times? Why was it reborn in Shakespeare's time? How has tragedy shaped, and been shaped by, gender, class, religion, and nationality? We will address these questions and explore how tragedy continues to influence our literary expectations and experience. Authors may include Aeschylus, Sophocles, Euripides, Thucydides, Aristotle, Seneca, Marlowe, Shakespeare, Goethe, Nietzsche, O'Neill, Beckett, Kennedy, and Kushner. 3 hrs. lect. EUR, LIT (J. Berg)

ENAM/THEA 0136 Dramatizing the Black Experience for the American Stage (Fall 2014)
In this course we will explore how influential contemporary African American dramatists bring to the American stage different aspects of the black experience.  From William Branch’s A Medal For Willie (1951) to Dominique Morriseau’s Detroit ’67 (2013), readings will provide students the opportunity to investigate how plays are interpreted by actors and directors, and wrestle with topics such as voting rights, cultural appropriation, housing discrimination, gender inequality, and equal access to education.  Beyond dramatic texts and critical readings, students will hear some of the playwrights (via video conferencing) offer their views on topics and issues we will discuss in class. ART, CMP, LIT, NOR (N. Nesmith)

ENAM/RELI 0180 An Introduction to Biblical Literature (I) (Spring 2015)
This course is a general introduction to biblical history, literature, and interpretation. It aims to acquaint students with the major characters, narratives, and poetry of the Jewish and Christian scriptures, with special emphasis on the ways scripture has been used and interpreted in Western culture. Students interested in more detailed analysis of the material should enroll in RELI 0280 and RELI 0281. 3 hrs. lect./1 hr. disc. LIT, PHL (L. Yarbrough)

ENAM 0201 British Literature and Culture: The Court and the Wild (I) (Fall 2014)
This course will offer a broad overview of the rich and varied British literature written roughly between 1400 and 1700.  Reading a diverse body of material (romance, epic, lyric), we will explore competing notions of subjectivity within the courtly context.  As we interrogate the relationship between the court and the social/mythical concept of “wilderness,” we will consider ways in which the apparent opposition between the refined courtier/knight and the “wild man” often belies a complex mutual dependence.  Within this context we will also examine the ways in which notions of sexuality and gender contribute to polarized readings of female conduct as “chaste” or “wild.” Texts may include: Beowulf, Gawain and the Green Knight, Lais of Marie de France, Chaucer’s Canterbury Tales, Spenser’s The Faerie Queene, and Shakespeare’s As You Like It.   EUR, LIT (M. Wells)

ENAM/EDST 0203 Taboos and Trends in Literature for Children and Young Adults (Spring 2015)
In this course we will examine groundbreaking works of literature for children and young adults. From Mark Twain to contemporary authors such as Lowry, Myers, and Farmer, writers for young people have pressed hard on societal notions about what is acceptable for young readers. We will look at taboos that have existed and been broken, as well as current trends in the field. We will pay particular attention to developmental issues in youth and sociocultural mores, including censorship. LIT (C. Cooper)

ENAM 0204 Foundations of English Literature (I) (Fall 2014, Spring 2015)
Students will study Chaucer's Canterbury Tales and Milton's Paradise Lost, as well as other foundational works of English literature that may include Shakespeare, non-Shakespearean Elizabethan drama, the poetry of Donne, and other 16th and 17th century poetry. 3 hrs. lect./disc. EUR, LIT (Fall 2014: J. Bertolini; Spring 2015:  J. Berg, E. Napier)

ENAM/CMLT 0205 Introduction to Contemporary Literary Theory (Fall 2014, Spring 2015)
This course will introduce several major schools of contemporary literary theory. By reading theoretical texts in close conjunction with works of literature, we will illuminate the ways in which these theoretical stances can produce various interpretations of a given poem, novel, or play. The approaches covered will include New Criticism, Psychoanalysis, Marxism and Cultural Criticism, Feminism, and Post-Structuralism. These theories will be applied to works by Shakespeare, Wordsworth, The Brontës, Conrad, Joyce, and others. The goal will be to make students critically aware of the fundamental literary, cultural, political, and moral assumptions underlying every act of interpretation they perform. 3 hrs. lect./disc. EUR, LIT (Fall 2014: A. Losano; Spring 2015:  Y. Siddiqi)

ENAM/AMST 0206 Nineteenth-Century American Literature (II, AL) (Spring 2015)
This course will examine major developments in the literary world of 19th century America. Specific topics to be addressed might include the transition from Romanticism to Regionalism and Realism, the origins and evolution of the novel in the United States, and the tensions arising from the emergence of a commercial marketplace for literature. Attention will also be paid to the rise of women as literary professionals in America and the persistent problematizing of race and slavery. Among others, authors may include J. F. Cooper, Emerson, Melville, Douglass, Chopin, Whitman, Dickinson, Twain, Hawthorne, Stowe, Alcott, Wharton, and James. 3 hrs. lect./disc. LIT, NOR (B. Millier)

ENAM/AMST 0209 American Literature and Culture: Origins-1830 (II, AL) (Fall 2014)
A study of literary and other cultural forms in early America, including gravestones, architecture, furniture and visual art. We will consider how writing and these other forms gave life to ideas about religion, diversity, civic obligation and individual rights that dominated not only colonial life but that continue to influence notions of "Americanness" into the present day. 3 hrs. lect./disc. LIT, NOR (M. Newbury)

ENAM 0210 The American Modernists (AL) (Fall 2014)
American writers at the turn of the 20th century faced social, intellectual, and technological change on an unprecedented scale. Individually and collectively they worked to answer William Carlos Williams’s pressing question: “How can I be a mirror to this modernity?” In this course we will read, discuss, and write about poetry by writers such as Williams, T.S. Eliot, Ezra Pound, and Wallace Stevens; and prose by Henry Adams, Edith Wharton, Hemingway, Faulkner, Fitzgerald, Nella Larsen, Richard Wright, and others. (Not open to students who have taken ENAM 0207) LIT, NOR (B. Millier)

ENAM/ENVS 0215 Nature's Meanings: The American Experience (AL) (Spring 2015)
What we think of as "nature" today is the result of a complex and fascinating history. The many meanings of nature emerge from Americans' experiences of the physical world and their understandings of, and contests over, their place in that world. This course will investigate how American meanings of nature have changed from European-Native contact to the present. How have changing meanings reshaped American culture and the natural environment? These questions will be addressed from historical, literary, religious, and philosophical perspectives. Readings may include: Emerson, Thoreau, Marsh, Muir, Leopold, and Carson, as well as other Euro-American and Native American writers. 3 hrs. lect. LIT, NOR (D. Brayton)

ENAM 0216 The Tragedy of Revenge (I) (Fall 2014)
In this course we will explore the vogue for mutilation, murder, madness (real and feigned), torture, vengeful ghosts, plot twists, and meta-plays within plays, all combined with macabre humor and plenty of blood for an afternoon’s entertainment on the English stage circa 1600. Why must revenge be so ghastly and so utterly irresistible? Readings include masterpieces of dramatic literature by Thomas Kyd, George Chapman, Christopher Marlowe, John Marston, William Shakespeare, Thomas Middleton, and John Webster. In addition to examining the moral, ethical, historical, and social implications of the genre in its own day, we will compare them with how fictional narratives of vengeance and vigilantism seem to function for popular audiences today. 3 hrs. lect./disc. EUR, LIT (T. Billings)

ENAM 0220 Castaways, Courtesans, and Criminals: The Early English Novel (II) (Spring 2015)
The novel was a young and scandalous literary genre in the 18th century. The reading public found the novel to be confusing, unpredictable, racy, morally dangerous--and of course very exciting. In this course we will examine the rise of the novel as a controversial literary genre, tracing its development from Defoe’s Robinson Crusoe and Moll Flanders in the early part of the century, through Richardson’s didactic Pamela and Clarissa and Fielding’s lively Tom Jones in mid-century, to Sterne’s wildly experimental Tristram Shandy and the more familiar world of Jane Austen at the century’s end. We will also consider the ways in which this history has shaped the fiction of today by reading a 21st century novel, to be determined by the course participants. EUR, LIT (E. Napier)

ENAM/THEA 0228 Contemporary British Playwrights (Fall 2014)
This course will explore Great Britain's controversial theatrical movement, beginning in the late sixties, which came to be known as "The Fringe." Plays by David Hare, Howard Brenton, Stephan Poliakoff, Howard Barker, David Edgar, Caryl Churchill, Snoo Wilson, Trevor Griffiths, and others will be discussed. Particular focus will be on the plays' dramaturgical and theatrical values, as well as their impact on the overall development of the Fringe theatre movement and its influence on the more traditional theatrical establishment. 3 hrs. lect. ART, EUR, LIT (R. Romagnoli)

ENAM 0229 Neoclassic, Romantic, Victorian: Changes in English Poetry, 1700-1900 (II) (Fall 2014)
In this course we will examine important shifts of style and sensibility in English poetry of the neoclassic, romantic, and Victorian periods. We will consider issues of poetic genre, structure, and diction, as well as transforming notions of knowledge, nature, and the self. Major poets will include Pope, Swift, Wordsworth, Keats, Tennyson, and Hardy. 3 hrs. lect. EUR, LIT (E. Napier)

ENAM/AMST 0237 Emergence of Black Modernism, 1900-1938 (Fall 2014)
The modern period stands as one of the landmarks of African American literary, artistic, political, and intellectual history. At the crossroads of rebellion and experimentation that defined modernism, black writers—American and immigrants—forged new genres to express the complexity of the black experience. In this course we will track their creations by closely reading key texts like those of W.E.B. Du Bois, Langston Hughes, Zora Neale Hurston, Nella Larsen, and Jean Toomer. At the same time, we will examine the broader intellectual and cultural terrain that influenced these authors such as film, music, and visual arts.  3 hrs. lect. HIS, LIT, NOR (A. Henry)

ENAM/FMMC 0239 The Cinema of Alfred Hitchcock (Spring 2015)
The cinematic artistry of Alfred Hitchcock in a dozen of his major films (mainly from the 1950s, including North by Northwest, Psycho, Rear Window, The Trouble with Harry, Vertigo) with attention to Hitchcock's style and technique, his obsessive images (such as dangling over the abyss), and his characteristic themes (the transfer of guilt, the double, etc.) and with a focus on the figure of the artist in Hitchcock's work. Issues such as the relationship of film to narrative fiction and to dramatic literature will also be explored. 3 hrs. lect./disc./screening ART, LIT, NOR (J. Bertolini)

ENAM/AMST 0240 Captivity Narratives (Spring 2015)
Captivity narratives—first-person accounts of people's experiences of being forcibly taken and held against their will by an "other"—were immensely popular and important in early America; the captivity motif has been perpetuated and transformed throughout later American literature and film. In this course we will explore what these types of tales reveal about how Americans have handled the issues of race and racism, religion, gender, violence and sexuality that experiences of captivity entail. Beginning with classic Puritan narratives (Mary Rowlandson) and moving forward through the 19th and 20th centuries, we will consider the ways that novels (The Last of the Mohicans), autobiographies (Patty Hearst, Iraqi captivity of Pvt. Jessica Lynch) and films (The Searchers, Little Big Man, Dances with Wolves) do cultural work in shaping and challenging images of American national identity. 3 hrs. lect. ART, LIT, NOR (D. Evans)

ENAM 0241 From Austen to Dracula: The Transformation of 19th Century English Literature (II) (Spring 2015)
In this course we will trace the development of 19th century literature from the polite and decorous world of Austen in the early decades to the blood-thirsty depravity of Dracula and his kin in the fin de siecle. Far from merely reflecting the society that created it, 19th century literature played an active part in constructing its readers' ideas of gender and sexuality, imperialism and colonialism, class, religion, and technology. We will read novels by Austen, the Brontës, Dickens, George Eliot, Thomas Hardy, and Stoker; poetry by Wordsworth, Tennyson, Browning, Arnold, and Christina Rossetti; and works by Oscar Wilde and others that defy classification. We will pay special attention to authors' efforts to make literature relevant and revelatory in a time of swift and sometimes frightening social and intellectual innovation. 3 hrs. lect./disc. EUR, LIT (A. Losano)

ENAM 0243 Maritime Literature and Culture (II) (Fall 2014)
Writers have long found the sea to be a cause of wonder and reflection. A mirror for some and a desert for others, the sea has influenced the imaginations of writers throughout history in vastly different ways. In this course we will read a variety of literary works, both fiction and non-fiction, in which the sea acts as the setting, a body of symbolism, an epistemological challenge, and a reason to reflect on the human relationship to nature. Readings will be drawn from the Bible, Homer's Odyssey, Old English Poetry, Shakespeare, Tennyson, Kipling, Conrad, Melville, Hemingway, Walcott, O'Brian, and others. 3 hrs. lect./disc. LIT (D. Brayton)

ENAM/AMST 0249 Literary Form and the Experience of Race (AL) (Spring 2015)
What does it mean to be a person of color in America? In this course we will look at how African American, Asian American, Chicana, Latina, and Native American writers have dealt with this question in fiction, autobiography, poetry, and film.  We will analyze the differences and similarities between the literatures of these cultural groups. We will also look at how these writers have used the distinctly literary nature of their texts in grappling with race in America.  Authors may include Julia Alvarez, Octavia Butler, Lorraine Hansberry, Maxine Hong Kingston, Malcolm X, Richard Rodriguez, Leslie Silko, and Amy Tan.  3 hrs. lect./disc. CMP, LIT, NOR, SOC (A. Henry)

ENAM/AMST 0252 African American Literature (AL) (Spring 2015)
This course surveys developments in African American fiction, drama, poetry, and essays during the 20th century. Reading texts in their social, historical, and cultural contexts—and often in conjunction with other African American art forms like music and visual art—we will explore the evolution and deployment of various visions of black being and black artistry, from the Harlem Renaissance through social realism and the Black Arts Movement, to the contemporary post-soul aesthetic. Authors may include Langston Hughes, Zora Neale Hurston, Gwendolyn Brooks, Ralph Ellison, Lorraine Hansberry, Amiri Baraka, Ishmael Reed, Toni Morrison, Charles Johnson, and Octavia Butler. 3 hrs. lect./disc. LIT, NOR (W. Nash)

ENAM/CMLT 0270 In Other Worlds: South Asian, African, and Caribbean Fiction (Fall 2014)
In the last decades, writers from postcolonial South Asia, Africa, and the Caribbean have come into their own, winning international prizes and garnering attention because of the literary quality of their work as well as their nuanced engagement with important issues of our age--issues such as imperialism, orientalism, colonial rule, political resistance, subaltern studies, nationalism, economic development, gender and sexuality, immigration, diaspora, and globalization.  We will discuss a range of works by writers such as Chinua Achebe, Chimamanda Ngozi Adichie, J. M. Coetzee, Tsitsi Dangarembga, Assia Djebar, Frantz Fanon, Hanif Kureishi, Nadine Gordimer, C.L.R. James, Jamaica Kincaid, George Lamming, Ngugi Wa Thiong'o, Rohinton Mistry, Arundhati Roy, Salman Rushdie, Edward Said, Zadie Smith, and Wole Soyinka.  Texts will vary from semester to semester. 3 hrs. lect./disc. AAL, CMP, CW (5 spaces), LIT (Y. Siddiqi)

ENAM 0275 Multi-Ethnic British Literatures (Spring 2015)
"My name is Karim Amir," announces the protagonist of a Hanif Kureishi novel, "and I am an Englishman born and bred, almost." In this course we will investigate the complex subject of ethnic and national identity in the writing of British authors of Asian, African, and Caribbean descent. We will trace the shifting meanings of "black" and "British" as we move from 1950s migrant fictions to more recent reckonings with British multiculturalism. Topics to be considered will include diaspora and the work of memory; race and religion after 9/11; the representation of urban space; and the experience of asylum-seekers and refugees. 3 hrs. lect./disc. CMP, EUR, LIT (B. Graves)

ENAM/RELI 0279 The Bible and American Literature (AL) (II) (Fall 2014)
In this course we will study American literary responses to the spiritual and social demands of Christianity as expressed in select Biblical passages and narratives. We will examine how writers of different times and regions responded to this tradition, raising and exploring such questions as: How is Christian conduct to be defined in a political democracy? In an increasingly secular society, can a life lived “in imitation of Christ” result in more than victimization? How can a minister, serving a worldly congregation, know the degree to which his words are sacred or profane? Writers will include Stowe, Melville, Eliot, West, Baldwin, and Robinson. 3 hrs. lect./disc. LIT, NOR, PHL (J. McWilliams)

ENAM/CMLT 0305 Love Stories: Desire & Gender in Medieval and Early Modern Europe (I) (Spring 2015)
Our modern conceptions of desire, self, body and gender are informed in complex and often invisible ways by earlier narratives of love. We will investigate the conflicting accounts of love written during the medieval and early modern periods, considering in particular the relationship between the idealized notion of "courtly love" and the darker, medical picture of love as a form of madness or melancholia. Reading a variety of works including lyric, drama, romance and medical texts, we will look at the construction of gender and sexuality, the relationship between desire and subjectivity, and the gendering of certain "diseases" of love (such as hysteria) during this period. Authors to be studied will include: Chaucer, Boccaccio, Petrarch, Dante, Shakespeare, and a selection of male and female lyric poets. 3 hrs. lect./disc. EUR, LIT (M. Wells)

ENAM/CMLT 0309 Contemporary Literature (Spring 2015)
In this course we will explore seminal works of the post-World War II literature written in English. In the course of our readings we will move through the cultural and social transformations beginning with the paranoia and alienation of the Cold War, and continuing with the Civil Rights era, the national crisis of Vietnam, the rise of multiculturalism and the culture wars in the 1980s, the wide ranging effects of the information revolution, the profits and perils of globalization, and the profound anxiety of the war on terror. Writers studied will include Thomas Pynchon, Vladimir Nabokov, Don DeLillo, Donald Barthelme, William S. Burroughs, Toni Morrison, Ishmael Reed, Ana Castillo, and Art Spiegelman. 3 hrs. lect. LIT (R. Cohen)

ENAM 0312 Modern Poetry (Fall 2014)
This course will examine the nature and achievement of the major modern poets of Britain and America during the modern period, beginning with the origins of poetic modernism in the work of Gerard Manley Hopkins, Emily Dickinson, and Walt Whitman. The central figures to be studied are William Butler Yeats, T.S. Eliot, Robert Frost, Wallace Stevens, and W.H. Auden. The course will conclude with a look at some after-echoes of modernism in the work of Elizabeth Bishop and others. Two papers, one exam, with occasional oral presentations in class. 3 hrs. lect./disc. LIT (J. Parini)

ENAM 0316 Poetry and the Spiritual Tradition (Spring 2015)
In this course we will examine the long and intimate connection between poetry and spirituality, looking especially at the influence of Christian thinking on such English and American poets as John Donne, George Herbert, Gerard Manley Hopkins, and T.S. Eliot. The course will begin with a study of the King James Version of the Book of Psalms, which deeply affected later British and American poetry. We will also read early Taoist and Islamic poets, including Lao Tse and Rumi. The course will conclude with a look at the work of several contemporary poets: Charles Wright, Louis Glück, and Mary Oliver. CMP, LIT, PHL (J. Parini)

ENAM/CMLT 0317 Lost & Found in Translation (Spring 2015)
In this course we will explore the fundamental philosophical, sociological, and linguistic questions raised by translingual communication through a survey of the greatest theoretical writings on translation together with a comparative study of multiple translations of coherent sections from major works such as the Bible, the Iliad, One Thousand and One Nights, and the Tao Te Ching, as well as other shorter texts. Questions to be considered include: How much does language determine how we think? How much of language is culture? What is unique to translating sacred texts, poetry, “exotic” languages, and dead languages? How do we define the “untranslatable”? Are translators traitors, drudges, or artists? Can machines translate? 3 hrs. lect./disc. AAL, CMP, LIT (T. Billings)

ENAM 0330 Shakespeare and Contexts (I) (Spring 2015)
This course is designed to sample the breadth of Shakespeare's dramatic art, from Titus Andronicus to The Tempest, with an eye to understanding both how the plays may have resonated for his first audiences on stage and how subsequent readers have drawn their own meanings from the published texts. We will therefore pay particular attention to such dramaturgical issues as the construction of character and of plot, the reworking of sources, spectacle, meta-theatricality, and versification, as well as consider what political and commercial implications these plays might have had during Shakespeare's life and what meaning they hold for us today. 3 hrs. lect./3 hr. disc./3 hrs. screen. EUR, LIT (T. Billings)

ENAM 0332 Shakespeare's Tragedies and Histories (Fall 2014)
An intensive consideration of language, style, character, and structure, first in Shakespeare's epic history-play cycle, Richard II, Henry IV, and Henry V, and then in the major tragedies, Hamlet, King Lear, and Anthony and Cleopatra. 3 hrs. lect./disc./ screening EUR, LIT (J. Bertolini)

ENAM/AMST 0342 Literature of the American South (AL) (Spring 2015)
In William Faulkner's Absolom, Absolom! Canadian Shreve McCannon commands his roommate, Mississippian Quentin Compson, "Tell about the South. What's it like there. What do they do there. Why do they live there. Why do they live at all?" Our course will take on writers who want to "tell about the South" in the post-Civil War era and beyond, as they seek to help re-define and revitalize their region. We will focus our regional exploration on the "Southern Renascence," when writers and theorists like the Agrarians re-examined Southern history and reconsidered their role in relation to their regional community. Authors including William Faulkner, Zora Neale Hurston, Robert Penn Warren, Eudora Welty, and Tennessee Williams developed a new awareness of the restrictions of racial and gender roles, an interest in literary experimentation, and an increasingly realistic presentation of social conditions in the south. We will consider the legacy of these writers in later 20th century texts by authors such as Flannery O'Connor, Walker Percy, Alice Walker, Cormac McCarthy, Ernest Gaines, Randall Kenan and even relative newcomers such as Jackson Tippett McCrea. (Not open to students who have taken FYSE 1336) 3 hrs. lect./disc.  LIT, NOR (D. Evans)

ENAM/AMST 0358 Reading, Slavery, and Abolition (II, AL) (Fall 2014)
In this course we will study both black and white writers' psychological responses to, and their verbal onslaughts on, the "peculiar institution" of chattel slavery. We will work chronologically and across genres to understand how and by whom the written word was deployed in pursuit of physical and mental freedom and racial and socioeconomic justice. As the course progresses, we will deepen our study of historical context drawing on the substantial resources of Middlebury's special collections, students will have the opportunity to engage in archival work if they wish. Authors will include Emerson, Douglass, Jacobs, Thoreau, Stowe, Walker, and Garrison. 3 hrs. sem. HIS, LIT, NOR (W. Nash)

ENAM/RUSS 0359 The Art of Vladimir Nabokov (in English) (Spring 2015)
A study of the "perverse" aesthetics of this Russian-American writer. We will expose the hidden plots under the surface of his fiction, follow and arbitrate the ongoing contest between the author and his fictional heroes, and search for the roots of Nabokov's poetics in Western and Russian literary traditions. An attempt will be made to show the continuity between the Russian and English works of this bilingual and bicultural writer. 3 hrs. lect. LIT, NOR (T. Beyer)

ENAM 0408 D.H. Lawrence (Spring 2015)
We will explore the ways in which Lawrence’s dynamic literary style dramatizes his vision of how the destructive forces of the will, linked with consciousness, industrialization, and the collective mass, are in mortal conflict with the redemptive and salvific forces of sexual passion, linked to the unconscious, nature and natural processes, and the absolute integrity and otherness of the individual. We will also consider how Lawrence’s literary representation has diminished in recent years in America (though much less so in England and elsewhere), and why he is now so infrequently taught in American colleges and universities. Works to be studied include the collected short stories, Sons and Lovers, The Rainbow, Women in Love, St. Mawr, Lady Chatterley’s Lover, selected essays, and poems 3 hrs. lect. (D. Price)

ENAM 0423 Return of the Screw: Tangled Texts (Fall 2014)
In this course we will explore the ambiguous and incomplete in fiction, and where these qualities take readers. We will start out by reading Henry James's The Turn of the Screw, the most mind-blowing, sinister, and perplexing ghost story in literature. (Or maybe it's not a ghost story.) By looking at the ways in which several generations of readers and critics have grappled with the story's essential ambiguity, we will ask questions about the complicated issue of authorial intent in fiction, the relevance of biography, and the limits of interpretation. Besides criticism and biographical excerpts we will read other fictions that have reimagined the novella, such as A.N. Wilson's A Jealous Ghost. We will then look at other literary pairings (such as Bronte's Jane Eyre and Rhys's Wide Sargasso Sea) and self-contradictory texts by one author (such as Salinger's Seymour and A Perfect Day for Bananafish) to consider other ways in which texts have responded to each other. We will end by considering some contemporary works (online and off) that break down the boundaries between author and reader. In the course of the readings we will be investigating such concepts as originality and plagiarism, intertextuality, and authenticity. LIT (K. Kramer)

ENAM/CMLT 0447 The Novel and the City (Spring 2015)
In this course we will take a global and transnational approach as we examine a number of 20th and 21st century British and Anglophone novels about life in the city.  We will explore formations of urban life alongside transformations in the novel as a genre.  We will put these novels of city life in dialogue with critical theory-that is, theories of culture and society that have as their aim human emancipation (for example, Marxism, feminism, critical race studies, and postcolonial studies).  The novels we read will reflect important literary movements such as realism, modernism, and postmodernism. (Not open to students who have taken ENAM/CMLT 0373) 3 hrs. sem. CMP, LIT, SOC (Y. Siddiqi)

ENAM 0458 Merchants of Venice (Spring 2015)
In this course we will read Shakespeare's The Merchant of Venice from different perspectives, including those of race, religion, gender, staging, and form. We will engage the play at the level of rhetorical analysis, textual history, character analysis, source analysis, and stage history. We will also study contemporary dramas resembling The Merchant of Venice (e.g., Three Ladies of London, Jew of Malta, Othello), and examine its legacy in film adaptations and in works by such authors as Charles Dickens, Philip Roth, Wladislaw Szpilman, and Christopher Moore.  At every point, we will consider critical reception and theoretical implications. 3 hrs. sem. EUR, LIT(J. Berg)

ENAM 0460 Affect, Emotion, and Structures of Feeling (Fall 2014)
What is the role of emotion in the shaping of identities, communities, and political cultures? How have narratives of shame, love, melancholy, anger, and “muddle” allowed writers to address experiences of injury and stigmatization? In this seminar we will explore the growing body of interdisciplinary scholarship on affect. Readings will include theoretical approaches (Deleuze, Berlant, Ngai, Hardt/Negri, Williams, Love) and literary works drawn mostly from queer and postcolonial archives. Topics considered will include affective citizenship; embodiment and touch; antisocial behavior; empathy, hospitality, and conviviality; care-giving and affective labor; and the recent embrace of tragedy in postcolonial studies. 3 hrs. sem. LIT, SOC (B. Graves)

ENAM 0500 Special Project: Literature (Fall 2014, Spring 2015)
Approval required. (Staff)

ENAM 0700 Senior Thesis: Critical Writing (Fall 2014, Spring 2015)
Individual guidance and seminar (discussions, workshops, tutorials) for those undertaking one-term projects in literary criticism or analysis. All critical thesis writers also take the thesis workshop (ENAM 700Z) in either Fall or Spring Term. (Staff)

ENAM/LITS 0705 Senior Colloquium in Literary Studies (Fall 2014)
In this course we will study, discuss, and analyze great works of world literature from the perspective of their achievement in thought and literary art. We will further consider them as part of a vital literary tradition in which the works enter into dialogue with one another. Among the authors to be appreciated this term are: Homer, Tolstoy, Dostoevsky, Mann, Proust, Joyce. (Open to non-majors with approval of instructor). 3 hrs. sem. (S. Donadio)

ENAM 0708 Senior Work: Joint Majors in English & American Literatures and Theatre (Fall 2014, Spring 2015)
Approval required. (Staff)

CRWR/ENAM 0106 Writing for the Screen I (Fall 2014)
In this course we will examine the fundamental elements of dramatic narrative as they relate to visual storytelling. We will emphasize the process of generating original story material and learning the craft of screenwriting, including topics such as story, outline, scene structure, subtext, character objectives, formatting standards, and narrative strategies. Weekly writing assignments will emphasize visual storytelling techniques, tone and atmosphere, character relationships, and dialogue. Students will be required to complete two short screenplays. Required readings will inform and accompany close study of selected screenplays and films. (FMMC 0101 OR CRWR 0170 or approval of instructor) (Formerly FMMC/ENAM 0106) 3 hrs. sem. ART (I. Uricaru)

CRWR 0170 Writing: Poetry, Fiction, NonFiction (Fall 2014, Spring 2015)
An introduction to the writing of poetry, short fiction, and nonfiction through analysis of writings by modern and contemporary poets and prose writers and regular discussion of student writing. Different instructors may choose to emphasize one literary form or another in a given semester. Workshops will focus on composition and revision, with particular attention to the basics of form and craft. This course is a prerequisite to CRWR 0380, CRWR 0385, CRWR 0370, and CRWR 0375. (This course is not a college writing course.) (Formerly ENAM 0170) 3 hrs. sem. ART (Fall 2014: K. Kramer; Spring 2015: D. Bain, R. Cohen, K. Kramer)

CRWR 0173 Environmental Literature: Reading & Writing Workshop (Fall 2014)
This course is an introduction to the reading and writing of environmental literature. We will analyze classic and contemporary model works in prose and poetry, in nonfiction and fiction, all directed at human interaction with the natural world. Our writing assignments will explore this theme in personal essays, poems, literary reportage, poetry, and fiction. Workshops will focus on inspiration, form, craft, and thematic issues associated with the environment. This course is a prerequisite to CRWR 0370, CRWR 0375, CRWR 0380, and CRWR 0385. ART, LIT (D. Bain)

CRWR 0175 The Structure of Poetry (Fall 2014, Spring 2015)
This course is an introduction to the reading and writing of poetry with a focus on its structural aspects. We will look closely at a range of exemplary poems in English to explore how a poem is built through form, image, figurative language, and other poetic tools. Among the poets we shall read are Seamus Heaney and Elizabeth Bishop. Students will write their own poems and give oral presentations on contemporary poets. (Formerly ENAM 0175) ART (Fall 2014: K. Gottshall; Spring 2015: J. Parini)

CRWR 0185 Writing for Children and Young Adults (Fall 2014)
This course is an introduction to writing for children and young adults through analysis of model short fiction and novels, and regular discussion of student writing. We will focus on craft and form with particular attention to the demands of writing for a young audience. Emphasis will be on composition and revision. 3 hrs. lect. ART (C. Cooper)

CRWR/THEA 0218 Playwriting I: Beginning (Fall 2014)
The purpose of the course is to gain a theoretical and practical understanding of writing for the stage. Students will read, watch, and analyze published plays, as well as work by their peers, but the focus throughout will remain on the writing and development of original work. (Formerly THEA/ENAM 0218) 2 1/2 hrs. lect./individual labs ART, CW (D. Yeaton)

CRWR/GSFS 0225 Feminist Blogging (Spring 2015)
Blogging is a genre that lends itself to both feminist theory and practice because it involves writing from a particular place and a particular embodiment, about how power operates in our social worlds. Feminist theory demands intersectionality: an ability to weave race, class, gender, sexuality and other forms of power into a single theoretical approach. Feminist blogging transforms intersectionality into a single narrative arc. In this course we will think about blogging as a genre and how feminist theory can infuse that genre into a more vibrant, complex, and even transformative site. Throughout the course we will read feminist theory, analyze feminist blogs, and produce our own feminist blogs. 3 hrs. lect. CMP, LIT, NOR, SOC (L. Essig)

CRWR/THEA 0318 Playwriting II: Advanced (Spring 2015)
For students with experience writing short scripts or stories, this workshop will provide a support structure in which to write a full-length stage play. We will begin with extended free and guided writing exercises intended to help students write spontaneously and with commitment. Class discussions will explore scene construction, story structure, and the development of character arc. (ENAM 0170 or THEA 0218 or ENAM/THEA 0240; by approval) 2 1/2 hrs. lect./individual labs ART, CW (D. Yeaton)

CRWR/FMMC 0341 Writing for the Screen II (Spring 2015)
Building on the skills acquired in Writing for the Screen I, students will complete the first drafts of their feature-length screenplay. Class discussion will focus on feature screenplay structure and theme development using feature films and screenplays. Each participant in the class will practice pitching, writing coverage, and outlining, culminating in a draft of a feature length script. (Approval required, obtain application on the FMMC website and submit prior to spring registration) 3 hrs. sem./3 hrs. screen. ART (I. Uricaru)

CRWR 0370 Workshop: Fiction (Fall 2014, Spring 2015)
Study and practice in techniques of fiction writing through workshops and readings in short fiction and novels. Class discussions will be based on student manuscripts and published model works. Emphasis will be placed on composition and revision. (ENAM/CRWR 0170, ENAM/CRWR 0175, or ENAM/CRWR 0185) (Approval required; please apply online at http://www.middlebury.edu/academics/enam/resources/forms or at the Department office) (Formerly ENAM 0370) (This course is not a college writing course) 3 hrs. sem. ART (Fall 2014: R. Cohen;  Spring 2015: K. Kramer)

CRWR 0375 Workshop: Poetry (Fall 2014, Spring 2015)
This course will involve the reading and writing of contemporary poetry. It is designed for students who already possess some familiarity with poetry and its traditions and who want to concentrate especially on contemporary work as an adjunct to their own development as poets. Students will read a good deal of poetry, including such writers as Elizabeth Bishop, Seamus Heaney, and Charles Simic. Assignments will include the keeping of a daily notebook, writing poems on a regular basis, and giving oral reports. Close attention will be paid to poetic form and the conventions of poetry. A final portfolio will include revisions of poems and critical writing. (ENAM/CRWR 0170, ENAM/CRWR 0175, or ENAM/CRWR 0185) (Approval required; please apply online at http://www.middlebury.edu/academics/enam/resources/forms or at the Department office.) (Formerly ENAM 0375) (This course is not a college writing course.) 3 hrs. sem. ART (Fall 2014: J. Parini; Spring 2015: K. Gottshall)

CRWR 0380 Workshop: Nonfiction (Fall 2014)
In this course we will study and practice techniques of nonfiction writing through contemporary essay and narrative nonfiction workshops and readings in the contemporary essay. Class discussions will be based on student manuscripts and published model works. Emphasis will be placed on composition and revision. (ENAM 0170, 0175, or 0185) (Approval required; please apply at the department office in Axinn) (formerly ENAM 0380) ART (D. Bain)

CRWR 0386 Writing the Journey (Spring 2015)
In this course we will write personal journey narratives that fuse objective observation and exposition with strong narrative and subjective experience. Readings will include works of literary travel writing including The Song Lines and The Snow Leopard, as well as the picaresque novel On the Road. We will also practice the travel article. For the final project students must write about a journey they plan and take during the semester, preferably during Spring Break. (Approval required; please apply online at http://www.middlebury.edu/academics/enam/resources/forms or at the Department office.) ART, CW, LIT (P. Lourie)

CRWR 0560 Special Project: Creative Writing (Fall 2014, Spring 2015)
Approval required. (Staff)

CRWR 0701 Senior Thesis: Creative Writing (Fall 2014, Spring 2015)
Discussions, workshops, tutorials for those undertaking one-term projects in the writing of fiction, poetry, or creative nonfiction. (Formerly ENAM 0701) (Staff)

Environmental Studies

Required for the Major in Environmental Studies: The environmental studies major is composed of course work in four areas: (1) a set of core courses to be completed by the end of the junior year, (2) an in-depth focus, (3) cognate courses that supplement the breadth gained in the core courses, and (4) the senior-level seminar.

     Except for transfer students, the core courses must be taken at Middlebury College. A maximum of three courses taken off campus may be credited toward completion of the major. The student's advisor must approve all such off-campus courses.

     Joint Majors: Students may pursue a joint major with environmental studies and other majors. The other major usually overlaps the student's focus. Those who focus in architecture and the environment, conservation biology, environmental chemistry, environmental geology, geography, or human ecology automatically qualify as joint majors. Students in other foci should consult with the director about joint majors. Due to the interdisciplinary nature of the environmental studies major, there is no reduction in course requirements for the environmental studies component of a joint major.

     Minor in Environmental Studies: The minor in environmental studies consists of five courses from across the humanities, natural sciences, and social sciences: ENVS 0112; ENVS or ENVS/PSCI 0211; ENVS or ENVS/ENAM 0215 (these three to be completed by the end of the sixth semester); one course from among DANC 0277, ECON 0265, ENAM 0227, ENAM 0315, ENVS 0209, ENVS 0210, ENVS 0395, GEOG 0207, HIST 0222, PHIL 0356, PSCI 0212, PSCI 0214, PSYC 0233, RELI 0295, or SOAN 0211; one course from among BIOL 0140, ENVS 0240, ENVS/CHEM 0270, GEOL 0112, or GEOL 0323. Except for transfer students, ENVS 0112, ENVS or ENVS/PSCI 211; and ENVS 0215 must be taken at Middlebury College. However, students receiving a score of 5 on the Advanced Placement Examination in environmental science will receive credit for ENVS 0112. With the approval of the director of the Environmental Studies program director, a maximum of one course taken off campus (not including AP Environmental Science) may be credited toward completion of minor requirements other than 0112, 0211, and 0215.

     ENVS Program Honors: Program honors will be awarded to students who do an environmentally-oriented thesis that is of superior quality (B+ or higher) and presented in a public forum, and whose average in courses taken toward the major is also B+ or higher. Seniors may pursue an independent honors project by taking one or two semesters of ENVS 0500 followed by one semester of ENVS 0700. With prior approval from the director, an environmentally-oriented thesis in another department may also qualify as an ENVS joint major for program honors in environmental studies. Students who are joint majors should discuss their honors requirements with their advisors.

     International Environmental Studies: The program offers no formal or official major, minor, or focus in international environmental studies For students interested in international environmental studies, we recommend the following approach: (1) select the existing focus that most closely meets your academic goals (for example, environmental economics or environmental policy or human ecology); (2) undertake language training, if relevant, for the areas of the world in which you plan to study; (3) study abroad for a semester to gain a deeper understanding of the issues and areas that most interest you; and (4) weave some of the following courses, which explicitly deal with international and comparative environmental issues, into your academic career: ENVS 0240, ENVS 0380, ENVS 0390, FREN 0315, GEOG 0207, GEOG 0210, GEOG 225, HARC 264, HIST 0419, PSCI 0209, PSCI 0210, PSCI 0214, PSCI 0452, RELI 0395, SOAN 0211, SOAN 0333, SPAN 0384.

I. Core Courses: All Environmental Studies majors are required to complete these four 0100-level to 0200-level core courses plus the ENVS 0401 senior seminar. The 0100-level to 0200-level core classes provide an introduction to perspectives on environmental issues from the humanities, natural sciences, and social sciences, as well as basic approaches critical to understanding human interactions with the environment. The 0100-level to 0200-level core courses must be completed by the end of the junior year, and ENVS 0112 in particular should be completed by the end of the sophomore year.

ENVS 0112 Natural Science and the Environment
ENVS 0211 Conservation and Environmental Policy
ENVS 0215 Nature's Meanings: American Experiences
GEOG 0120 Fundamentals of Geographic Information Systems
     **Note: Only those students who have completed all four of the above-listed core courses are eligible to enroll in ENVS 0401 or to sign up for ENVS 0700.

     **Note: Students receiving a score of 5 on the Advanced Placement Examination in environmental science will receive credit for ENVS 0112.

II. Foci: Students must complete all of the requirements for one of the following foci. Courses taken within the focus that are not specified must be approved by the student's advisor. Some foci qualify the student for joint major status. Note that each focus falls into one of three broad groupings.

Environmental Science

     Conservation Biology: (This focus requires nine courses). BIOL 0140; BIOL 0145; BIOL 0392; BIOL 0211 (or MATH 0116 or PSYC 0201); two research methods courses chosen from BIOL 0302, BIOL 0304, BIOL 0323, and ENVS 0360; one organismal course chosen from among BIOL 0201, BIOL 0202, BIOL 0203, and BIOL 0310; and two BIOL electives chosen from the 0200-0700 level (only one of which can be BIOL 0500 or higher). Note: Winter Term courses offered through the Biology Department can be used to satisfy one of the elective courses. (This focus qualifies students for joint major status.)

     Environmental Chemistry: (This focus requires seven or eight courses depending on senior work). CHEM 0103; CHEM 0104 or 0107; [CHEM 0203, CHEM 0204]; CHEM 0270; CHEM 0311; and at least one semester of formal senior-level research focusing on chemistry and the environment chosen from: independent study (ENVS 0500 or CHEM 0700), or the senior thesis sequence (CHEM 0400/0700/0701 or ENVS 0500/0700). Students wishing to pursue graduate study in environmental chemistry are advised to take additional courses, in the appropriate field of science, and should consult with their advisor. (This focus qualifies students for joint major status.)

     Environmental Geology: (This focus requires eight courses). One introductory course from among GEOL 0112 (preferred), GEOL 0161, and GEOL 0170; one course from among GEOL/GEOG 0251, GEOL/GEOG 0255, and GEOL/GEOG 0257; one course from among GEOL 0201, GEOL 0211, and GEOL 0281; three electives, one of which can be ENVS 0360, and two of which must be at the GEOL 0300-level; and two courses of senior work, GEOL 0400 and GEOL 0700. These are considered minimum requirements. Please note that geology graduate programs require additional courses in the cognate sciences of biology, chemistry, computer science, mathematics, and physics. Students should consult with their advisors regarding additional cognates. (This focus qualifies students for joint major status.)

Environmental Policy and Analysis

     Conservation Psychology: (This focus requires seven courses). PSYC 0105; PSYC 0201; PSYC 0202; PSYC 0233; PSYC 0416; two additional courses to be determined in consultation with the student's advisor.

     Environmental Economics: (This focus requires seven courses). MATH 0121 or MATH 0122; ECON 0155; ECON 0210; ECON 0255; ECON 0265; ECON 0465; one course from among ECON 0328, ENVS 0380, ECON 0425, ECON 0428, and ECON 0444.

     Environmental Policy: (This focus requires seven courses). ECON 0155; ECON 0265; ECON 0210 or MATH 0116 or PSYC 0201; GEOG 0207 or PSCI 0209 or PSCI 0212 or PSCI 0214; PSCI 0421 or PSCI 0452; two courses from among ENVS 0209, ENVS 0380, ENVS 390, and any Political Science courses at the 0200-0300 level.

     Geography: (This focus requires seven courses). GEOG 0100; GEOG 0120; three courses at the 0200-level (none of which may be numbered 0250 or above); one course at the 0300-level; and one 0400-level seminar. All joint majors must complete joint senior work in Geography or an equivalent, approved by the advisor. The electives, the seminar, and the joint senior work must be selected in consultation with, and approved by, the students Geography advisor.

     Human Ecology: (This focus requires eight or nine courses depending on senior work). SOAN 0103; SOAN 0105; SOAN 0211; SOAN 0301 or SOAN 0302; SOAN 0305 or SOAN 0306; two electives related to the topic of human ecology (to be selected in consultation with your advisor) from among Sociology-Anthropology offerings, or ENVS 0210. In addition, students will take either SOAN 0700 (one-semester senior project) or SOAN 0710 (multi-semester senior project). (This focus qualifies students for joint major status.) No more than one course may be taken outside of the regular fall and spring semesters at Middlebury (e.g., as a Winter Term course or transfer credit).

Environmental Perspectives

Joint Major, Architectural Studies/Environmental Studies "Architecture and the Environment": (This focus requires eight courses) HARC 0100; HARC 0130; HARC 0230; HARC 0231 (prerequisite for HARC 0731); HARC 0330 (or approved substitute); one additional course that deals with architectural history, urbanism, or contemporary visual culture; HARC 0731 and HARC 0732, to be taken sequentially. Advisory:This joint major track does not result in a professional degree in architecture. Many graduate architecture schools expect applicants to have taken a survey of modern architecture as well as college-level courses in calculus and physics.

     Creative Arts: (This focus requires eight courses) Students proposing a Creative Arts focus will submit to the arts advisor and ES chair a 1-2 page statement articulating their proposed connection between art and the environment, specifically linking their creative work with environmental perspectives.

     For students emphasizing Dance, Studio Art, or Theater: ARDV 0116 or ART 0157 or ART 0158 or ART 0159; ENVS/DANC 0277 or ENVS/DANC 0377; three courses in the student's arts department at the 0100-0400 level that are best suited to enrich their approach to questions of human interactions with the environment (chosen in consultation with the appropriate arts advisor); two studio courses in one discipline which must be above the 0200-level, selected in consultation with the student's advisor; senior independent project or advanced studio course in the discipline of the selected art form. Public showing of artistic work is required, along with an artist's written statement linking environmental studies and the artistic emphasis in question.

     For students emphasizing Film and Media Culture: FMMC 0105; ENVS/DANC 0277 or ENVS/DANC 0377; FMMC 0101 and two critical studies courses that are best suited to enrich the student's approach to questions of human interactions with the environment (chosen in consultation with the FMMC advisor); two production oriented classes selected in consultation with the student's FMMC advisor; senior independent project or advanced studio course in the discipline of the selected art form. Public showing of artistic work is required, along with an artist's written statement linking environmental studies and the artistic emphasis in question. The guidelines, prerequisites, expectations, and forms for applying to do an independent project are detailed on the Film and Media Culture website.

     Environmental History: (This focus requires seven courses).HIST 0222; three HIST courses in students' area of interest at the 0100-0300 level; one 0400-level HIST readings course (preferably, but not necessarily HIST 0406 or HIST 0419); HIST 0600;one course from among AMST 0245, HARC 0218, PHIL 0356, RELI 0110, RELI 0120, RELI 0130, RELI 0140, RELI 0150, RELI 0160, RELI 0220, RELI 0225, RELI/AMST 0274, RELI 0295, RELI 0395, or one literature course at 0200-0300 level in chosen area of study.

     Environmental Nonfiction: (This focus requires seven or eight courses depending on senior work).ENAM 0170; ENAM 0103; or CRWR 0175; ENAM 0201 0206 or 0208; ENAM 0243 or ENAM 0227; two semesters of Level Two writing workshops, with either ENAM 0380 or ENAM 0385 repeatable by permission of the instructor; one term of ENAM 0701 or two terms of ENAM 0711.

     Literature: (This focus requires eight courses).ENAM 0103 or CRWR 0175; ENAM 0201 or 0204; ENAM 0206 or 0208; two courses from among ENAM/AMST 0207, ENAM/AMST 0209, ENAM 0250, ENAM 0311, FREN 0315, and SPAN 0384; ENAM 0330, ENAM 0331, or ENAM 0332; ENAM 0243 or ENAM 0227; and an upper level seminar approved in writing by the advisor for the literature focus.

     Religion, Philosophy, and the Environment: (This focus requires eight or nine courses depending on senior work). RELI 0295; ENVS 0395 or PHIL 0356; at least one introductory level course from among RELI 0110, RELI 0120, RELI 0190, PHIL 0150, or any additional 0100 or 0200-level RELI or PHIL course with approval of the advisor; an additional four courses from among PHIL 0205, PHIL 0206, GEOG 0207, and any 0300-0400-level course in philosophy or religion with approval of the advisor; at least one semester of independent study related to the focus (ENVS 0500).

III. Cognate Courses

Two of the following courses are required, with the restrictions that: (1) students focusing in an environmental science (biology, chemistry, or geology) must take both of their cognates outside of the natural sciences; (2) students focusing in an area other than environmental science must take both cognates as science courses with laboratory (these courses are in addition to ENVS 0112); and (3) courses in a student's focus or focus department cannot count as cognates. Not all of these courses are offered each year; check with the relevant department to determine course offerings.

Natural Science Courses
Any winter term course explicitly labeled ENVS and explicitly described in the Winter Term Catalogue as counting as a natural science lab cognate for Environmental Studies majors with a focus outside of the natural sciences.

BIOL 0140 Ecology and Evolution
BIOL 0302 Vertebrate Natural History
BIOL 0304 Aquatic Ecology
BIOL 0323 Plant Community Ecology
BIOL 0392 Conservation Biology
CSCI 0190 Computer Models and Environmental Simulation
ENVS 0240 Global Climate Change
ENVS/CHEM 0270 Environmental Chemistry
GEOL 0112 Environmental Geology
GEOL 0161 Elements of Oceanography
GEOL 0201 Bedrock Geology of Vermont
GEOL 0205 Energy and Mineral Resources
GEOL 0221 Geology of Climate Change
GEOL 0250 Arctic and Alpine Environments
GEOL 0251 Geomorphic Processes
GEOL 0255 Surface and Ground Water
GEOL 0257 Soils, Geology, and the Environment

Arts, Humanities, and Social Science Courses
Any winter term course explicitly labeled ENVS and explicitly described in the Winter Term Catalogue as counting as a cognate for Environmental Studies majors with a focus in the environmental sciences.

AMST 0214 Mastodons, Mermaids, and Dioramas: Capturing Nature in America
AMST 0245 American Landscape
AMST 0315 Fast Food/Slow Food
ARBC 0431 The Environmental Middle East: Forests, Rivers, and Peoples
DANC 0277 Body and Earth
ECON 0265 Environmental Economics
ECON 0465 Special Topics in Environmental Economics
EDST 0420 Environmental Education in Action
ENAM 0227 Encounters with the Wild: Nature, Culture, Poetry
ENAM 0243 Maritime Literature and Culture
ENAM 0311 Nature's Renaissance
ENAM 0315 Visions of Nature
ENAM 0385 Workshop for Nature Writers
ENVS 0209 Gender Health and the Environment
ENVS 0210 Social Class & the Environment
ENVS 0330 Conserving Endangered Species
ENVS 0380 Global Challenges of the 21st Century
ENVS 0390 Environmental Negotiation and Dispute Resolution
FMMC 0285 Sustainable TV: Producing Environmental Media
FREN 0315 Beyond Versailles: Encounters with Nature in French Literature
GEOG 0207 Resource Wars: A Geopolitical Perspective
GEOG 0210 Geographic Perspectives on International Development
GEOG 0213 Population Geography
GEOG 0216 Rural Geography
GRMN 0445 Contemporary Germany and Sustainability
HARC 0231 Architecture and the Environment
HARC 0264 Art, Change, and the Global Environment
HARC 0327 Photography and the Environmental Ethos
HIST 0222 Introduction to Environmental History
HIST 0411 Readings in U.S. History: American Environmental History (formerly HIST 0406)
HIST 0441 Readings in African History: Environmental History (formerly HIST 0419)
IGST 0402 World Rivers, Transboundary Stories: Global Literature and Environmental Policy
PHIL 0356 Philosophy and the Environment
PSCI 0209 Local Green Politics
PSCI 0212 Comparative Environmental Politics
PSCI 0214 International Environmental Politics
PSCI 0421 Seminar in American Environmental Politics
PSCI 0452 Global Environmental Justice
PSYC 0233 Environmental Psychology
PSYC 0416 Environmental Problems and Human Behavior
RELI 0295 Faith, Freedom, and Ecology
RELI 0395 Religion, Ethics, and the Environment
SOAN 0159 Human Origins, Culture, and Biodiversity
SOAN 0211 Human Ecology
SOAN 0308 Environmental Sociology
SOAN 0321 Native Peoples of the Americas
SOAN 0333 Africa: Environment and Society
SPAN 0384 Place and the Environment in Spanish American Fiction

IV. Senior Experience
All seniors are required to take ENVS 0401, the ENVS senior seminar devoted to community-connected learning and requiring significant interdisciplinary work. Note that some ENVS foci require independent work during the senior year. Students who are not required to do independent senior work in their focus may elect to do independent work in ENVS, which may be carried out as a one or more semester ENVS 0500 project, or as an ENVS thesis (at least one semester of ENVS 0500 followed by one semester of ENVS 0700). For further details, please visit http://www.middlebury.edu/academics/es/requirements/seniorwork.
     Students must carry out this work under the supervision of a faculty member whose expertise is in the area that best characterizes the project. Students planning to conduct independent work are strongly encouraged to speak with their advisor and the director well in advance of enrolling in ENVS 0500.

ENVS 0112 Natural Science and the Environment (Fall 2014, Spring 2015)
We will explore in detail a series of current environmental issues in order to learn how principles of biology, chemistry, geology, and physics, as well as interdisciplinary scientific approaches, help us to identify and understand challenges to environmental sustainability. In lecture, we will examine global environmental issues, including climate change, water and energy resources, biodiversity and ecosystem services, human population growth, and world food production, as well as the application of science in forging effective, sustainable solutions. In the laboratory and field, we will explore local manifestations of global issues via experiential and hands-on approaches. 3 hrs. lect./3 hrs. lab. SCI (Fall 2014: M. Costanza-Robinson; Spring 2015: M. Lapin)

ENVS/GSFS 0209 Gender Health and the Environment (Spring 2015)
Growing concern for the protection of the environment and human health has led policy makers and scholars to consider ways in which gender, class, and race mediate human-environment interactions.  In this course we will explore how access to, control over, and distribution of resources influence environmental and health outcomes both in terms of social inequities and ecological decline.  Specific issues we will cover include: ecofeminism, food security, population, gendered conservation, environmental toxics, climate change, food justice, and the green revolution. We will examine these topics at multiple scales within the United States and internationally. SOC (M. Baker-Médard)

ENVS 0210 Social Class and the Environment (Spring 2015)
In this course we will explore the consequence of growth, technological development, and the evolution of ecological sacrifice zones. Texts will serve as the theoretical framework for in-the-field investigations, classroom work, and real-world experience. The Struggle for Environmental Justice outlines resistance models; Shadow Cities provides lessons from the squatters movement; Ben Hewitt's The Town that Food Saved describes economy of scale solutions, and David Owen's The Conundrum challenges environmentalism. Texts will guide discussions, serve as the basis for writing, and used as lenses for investigating our local communities. Not open to students who have taken ENVS/WRPR 1014) CW, NOR, SOC (H. Vila)

ENVS/PSCI 0211 Conservation and Environmental Policy (Fall 2014)
This course examines conservation and environmental policy in the United States. In order to better understand the current nature of the conservation and environmental policy process, we will begin by tracing the development of past ideas, institutions, and policies related to this policy arena. We will then focus on contemporary conservation and environmental politics and policy making—gridlock in Congress, interest group pressure, the role of the courts and the president, and a move away from national policy making—toward the states, collaboration, and civil society. 3 hrs. lect./disc. NOR, SOC (C. Klyza)

ENVS 0211 Conservation and Environmental Policy (Spring 2015)
In this course we will examine conversation and environmental policy in the United States. We will begin by motivating the need for conservation and environmental policy and providing a brief history of environmental policy in the U.S. Next we will focus on the issue of local versus national control in governing environmental and conservation issues. We will then cover the process of policy design, implementation, and enforcement. Finally, we will explore benefit-cost analysis and the evaluation of public policies. The course will consist of lectures and classroom discussions related to the assigned readings and current environmental policy issues. 3 hrs. lect. NOR, SOC (J. Isham, M. Baker-Medard)

ENVS 0215 Nature's Meanings: American Experiences (Fall 2014)
What we think of as "nature" today is the result of a complex and fascinating history. The many meanings of nature emerge from Americans' experiences of the physical world and their understandings of, and contests over, their place in that world. This course will investigate how American meanings of nature have changed from European-Native contact to the present. How have changing meanings reshaped American culture and the natural environment? These questions will be addressed from historical, literary, religious, and philosophical perspectives. Readings may include: Emerson, Thoreau, Marsh, Muir, Leopold, and Carson, as well as other Euro-American and Native American writers. 3 hrs. lect. NOR (K. Morse)

ENVS/ENAM 0215 Nature's Meanings: American Experiences (Spring 2015)
Today’s ideas about "nature" have emerged from a complex history of diverse experiences, perceptions, and understandings of the bio-physical world, and of contests over that world. In this course we will investigate how American meanings of nature have changed from European-Native contact to the present. These questions will be addressed from multi-disciplinary perspectives in the humanities and will include attention to race, class, gender, and environmental justice. Topics and readings may include: Native American authors, Emerson, Thoreau, Marsh, Muir, Leopold, and Carson, as well as rural, urban, pastoral, and marine ecological contexts. 3 hrs. lect. LIT, NOR (D. Brayton)

ENVS 0240 The Science of Climate Change (Fall 2014)
In its 2013 report, the Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change declared that "warming of the climate system is unequivocal” and that "human influence on the climate system is clear.” Why do human activities affect climate? What future climatic changes can we expect, and what will be their impacts? Answers to these questions lie in processes that govern the flows of energy to and from Earth and its atmosphere, in changing atmospheric composition, and in cycling of materials among Earth, atmosphere, and oceans. In this course we will explore these processes and their implications for human-induced climate change, giving students solid grounding in climate science. We will also explore the latest IPCC report and other current literature, work with climate data, and develop simple climate models for exploring future scenarios. The climate-modeling workshop of ENVS 0240 qualifies it for the lab science requirement of the ENVS major. (MATH 0121 or waiver for high-school calculus) 3 hrs. lect. and workshop DED, SCI (R. Wolfson)

ENVS/HARC 0327 Photography and the Environmental Ethos (Spring 2015)
Since the invention of photography in 1839, photographers have turned their gaze toward the world around them. Working on the land, they have considered issues of land management and natural resources in a variety of ways. In this course we will explore the question of how American photographers from the 19th century to the present have used their photographs as a way of raising awareness about a variety of environmental questions. Artists to be considered may include: Timothy O'Sullivan, William Henry Jackson, Carleton Watkins, Annie Brigman, Ansel Adams, Laura Gilpin, Richard Misrach, and Edward Burtynsky. 3 hrs. lect./disc. ART, HIS, NOR (K. Hoving)

ENVS 0330 Conserving Endangered Species (Fall 2014)
The planet is in the midst of the sixth mass extinction event. In this course we will examine the science of species endangerment and recovery and how human society, through its political and legal systems, seeks to conserve endangered species. We will explore several case studies, primarily focused on species recovery efforts in the United States. The course will culminate in a student group project. (BIOL 0140 or ENVS 0112 or ENVS 0211) 3 hrs. sem. (C. Klyza, S. Trombulak)

ENVS 0380 Global Challenges of the 21st Century (Fall 2014)
In this course we will begin by studying theories of social and political change, and then we will analyze the systematic causes of poverty and environmental degradation around the world. We will then study prospective solutions, focusing on the role of selective members of global civil society, including social entrepreneurs, in achieving these solutions. Over the course of the semester, each student will prepare a comprehensive analysis on how to tackle and overcome a specific global challenge. (ENVS 0211 or PSCI 0214) 3 hrs. sem. (International Relations and Foreign Policy) SOC (M.Baker-Medard)

ENVS/RELI 0395 Religion, Ethics, and the Environment  (Spring 2015)
We will explore the relationship between religion and ecology through two general approaches. Firstly, we will examine what religious traditions (especially, Jewish and Christian, but also Hindu and Buddhist) have had to say about the human-nature relationship by studying such dominant themes as: doctrines of creation and stewardship, restraints on human impact, concepts of interdependence, and ideas of sacred space. Secondly, we will turn our attention to contemporary religiously-based environmental activism, examining the possibilities and problems that emerge when religious traditions are mobilized on behalf of the environment. Students may write research papers using one or both of these approaches. (RELI 0110 or RELI 0130 or RELI 0160 or RELI 0190 or RELI 0295 or ENVS 0215) 3 hrs. sem. PHL (R. Gould)

ENVS 0401 Environmental Studies Senior Seminar (Fall 2014, Spring 2015)
A single environmental topic will be explored through reading, discussion, and individual research. Topics will vary from semester to semester, but will focus on issues with relevance to the local region and with interdisciplinary dimensions, such as temperate forests, lake ecosystems, or public lands policy. The class involves extensive reading, student-led discussions, and a collaborative research project. (Senior standing; ENVS 0112, ENVS 0211, ENVS 0215, and GEOG 0120) 3 hrs. sem./3 hrs. lab (Fall 2014: R. Gould, M. Baker-Medard; Spring 2015: P. Ryan, N. Mueller)

ENVS 0500 Independent Study (Fall 2014, Spring 2015)
A one- or two-semester research project on a topic that relates to the relationship between humans and the environment. The project, carried out under the supervision of a faculty member with related expertise, must involve a significant amount of independent research and analysis. Students may enroll in ENVS 0500 no more than twice for a given project. (Approval only) (Staff)

ENVS 0700 Senior Honors Work (Fall 2014, Spring 2015)
The final semester of a multi-semester research project on a topic pertinent to the relationship between humans and the environment. Students may enroll in ENVS 0700 only once. (Previous work would have been conducted as one or two semesters of an ENVS 0500 Independent Study project.) The project, carried out under the supervision of a faculty member, will result in a substantial piece of writing, and will be presented to other ENVS faculty and students in a public forum. (Senior standing; ENVS 0112, ENVS 0211, ENVS 0215, GEOG 0120, and ENVS 0500; Approval only) (Staff)

Film & Media Culture

Major Requirements: Students must complete ten courses to satisfy the requirements for a major in Film and Media Culture. Before declaring a Film and Media Culture major, the student must have completed or be currently enrolled in one of the basic core courses. Those courses are as follows:

     Basic Core Course Requirements: FMMC 0101 Aesthetics of the Moving Image; FMMC 0102 Film History; FMMC 0104 TV and American Culture; and one production course - either FMMC 0105 Sight and Sound or FMMC 0106 Writing for the Screen I. The basic core courses must be completed by the end of the junior year.

     Required Advanced Courses: One 0300 level course in theory -- FMMC 0354, FMMC 0355, FMMC 0357, FMMC/GSFS 0358, FMMC 0360, or another approved 0300 level course -- to be completed during junior year; and FMMC 0700 Film and Media Senior Tutorial.

     Electives: Four additional FMMC courses, with no more than two of these being production or screenwriting courses. With the prior permission of a student's academic advisor, one winter term FMMC course may be counted as an elective. Students taking courses focused on film and media taught in a foreign language, either at Middlebury or abroad, may request major elective credit from the FMMC chair. Note that courses may not count toward both FMMC and another department's major or minor. Courses transferred from other institutions will normally count only as an elective toward the FMMC major, not to fulfill core requirements.

     Minor: Three required courses - FMMC 0101 Aesthetics of the Moving Image, FMMC 0102 Film History, FMMC 0104 TV and American Culture. In addition, minors must take three additional courses that are listed or cross-listed as FMMC. At least one of the three electives must be at the 0300 or 0400 level. Only one of the three electives may be from the production/screenwriting area.

     Joint Major: The joint major with FMMC is a combination of two disciplines, culminating in a joint senior project; the plan for joint majors is negotiated between the student and the two departments in which the joint program of study is pursued at the time of declaring the joint major. The senior project must combine aspects of both majors and in most cases will require approval, supervision, and evaluation from either departments or programs. The Film and Media Culture part of the joint major requires a minimum of seven courses, including the FMMC core requirements, FMMC 0700 Film and Media Senior Tutorial, and any courses required or appropriate prior to undertaking the joint senior project. FMMC supports concentrations in American Studies and Environmental Studies, as detailed on their respective pages.

    Honors: The faculty of Film and Media Culture will award honors to select students based on their overall excellence in film and media coursework with a minimum GPA of 3.7, and on the merit of their senior project.

FMMC 0101 Aesthetics of the Moving Image (Fall 2014, Spring 2015)
How do films convey meaning, generate emotions, and work as an art form? What aspects of film are shared by television and videogames? This course is designed to improve your ability to watch, reflect on, and write about moving images. The course will be grounded in the analysis of cinema (feature films, documentaries, avant-garde, and animation) with special focus on film style and storytelling techniques. Study will extend to new audio-visual media as well, and will be considered from formal, cultural, and theoretical perspectives. 3 hrs. lect./3 hrs. screen ART (Fall 2014: N. Dobreva, C. Keathley; Spring 2015: C. Keathley)

FMMC 0102 Film History (Fall 2014)
This course will survey the development of the cinema from 1895 to present. Our study will emphasize film as an evolving art, while bearing in mind the influence of technology, economic institutions, and the political and social contexts in which the films were produced and received. Screenings will include celebrated works from Hollywood and international cinema. 3 hrs. lect./3 hrs. screen ART, HIS (A. Grindon)

FMMC/AMST 0104 Television and American Culture (Fall 2014, Spring 2015)
This course explores American life in the last six decades through an analysis of our central medium: television. Spanning a history of television from its origins in radio to its future in digital convergence, we will consider television's role in both reflecting and constituting American society through a variety of approaches. Our topical exploration will consider the economics of the television industry, television's role within American democracy, the formal attributes of a variety of television genres, television as a site of gender and racial identity formation, television's role in everyday life, and the medium's technological and social impacts. 2 hrs. lect./3 hrs. screen NOR, SOC (Fall 2014: J. Mittell; Spring 2015: L. Stein)

FMMC 0105 Sight and Sound I (Fall 2014, Spring 2015)
In this course students will gain a theoretical understanding of the ways moving images and sounds communicate, as well as practical experience creating time-based work. We will study examples of moving images as we use cameras, sound recorders, and non-linear editing software to produce our own series of short works. Emphasis will be placed on understanding the possibilities of the medium through experimentation, analysis, and detailed feedback while exploring different facets of cinematic communication. (FMMC 0101, or FMMC 0102, or approval of instructor) 3 hrs. lect./3 hrs. lab ART (Fall 2014: I. Uricaru; Spring 2015: D. Miranda-Hardy)

FMMC/CRWR 0106 Writing for the Screen I (Fall 2014)
In this course we will examine the fundamental elements of dramatic narrative as they relate to visual storytelling. We will emphasize the process of generating original story material and learning the craft of screenwriting, including topics such as story, outline, scene structure, subtext, character objectives, formatting standards, and narrative strategies. Weekly writing assignments will emphasize visual storytelling techniques, tone and atmosphere, character relationships, and dialogue. Students will be required to complete two short screenplays. Required readings will inform and accompany close study of selected screenplays and films. (FMMC 0101 OR CRWR 0170 or approval of instructor) (Formerly FMMC/ENAM 0106) 3 hrs. sem. ART (I. Uricaru)

FMMC/JAPN 0212 The Age of Young Media: Japanese Popular Culture from Anime to JDrama (in English) (Spring 2015)
In this course we will examine how Japanese popular culture has historically co-opted young performers and audiences to present itself as “young media.” We will draw upon examples from anime, television dramas, and elsewhere to reflect upon what it means to live in an age of young media— an age in which media culture presents itself as eternally young and without history. In order to explore this and other issues within their local and global context, we will read essays on media theory and Japanese popular culture, including those of Azuma Hiroki, Marc Steinberg, and Ian Condry. 3 hrs. lect. AAL, ART (D. Humphrey)

FMMC/AMST 0225 Gothic and Horror (Spring 2015)
This course examines the forms and meanings of the Gothic and horror over the last 250 years in the West. How have effects of fright, terror, or awe been achieved over this span and why do audiences find such effects attractive? Our purpose will be to understand the generic structures of horror and their evolution in tandem with broader cultural changes. Course materials will include fiction, film, readings in the theory of horror, architecture, visual arts, and electronic media. 3 hrs. lect./disc. HIS, NOR (M. Newbury)

FMMC 0232 Documentary: Art of the Nonfiction Film (Fall 2014)
Documentary film combines nonfiction with an aesthetic aspiration. This course will explore the achievement in the documentary, raising issues about the influence of documentary upon political persuasion, historical memory, the status of film as evidence, and its utility as a means of investigation. Questions will be posed, such as: Can documentary achieve a distinctive understanding of a phenomenon? How does nonfiction address/guide the relationship between sound, image, and subject? The course will offer a historical perspective, as well as study contemporary works, with the aim of preparing students to both understand and produce documentary films. 3 hrs. lect./3 hrs. screen. ART (A. Grindon)

FMMC/AMST 0238 Film Noir (Spring 2015)
A series of urban crime films and melodramas made in Hollywood between 1940-1960, but concentrated in the decade immediately after World War II, have been understood by critics to constitute the movement of film noir. This course will study prominent films from this group as well as contemporary films influenced by them, and the critical literature they have elicited in order to understand the cultural sources, the stylistic attributes, the social significance, and the long-term influence attributed to film noir. 3 hrs. lect./3 hrs. screen. ART, NOR (L. Grindon)

FMMC/ENAM 0239 The Cinema of Alfred Hitchcock (Spring 2015)
The cinematic artistry of Alfred Hitchcock in a dozen of his major films (mainly from the 1950s, including North by Northwest, Psycho, Rear Window, The Trouble with Harry, Vertigo) with attention to Hitchcock's style and technique, his obsessive images (such as dangling over the abyss), and his characteristic themes (the transfer of guilt, the double, etc.) and with a focus on the figure of the artist in Hitchcock's work. Issues such as the relationship of film to narrative fiction and to dramatic literature will also be explored. 3 hrs. lect./disc./screening ART, NOR (J. Bertolini)

FMMC/CHNS 0250 Chinese Cinema (Spring 2015)
This course, taught in English, surveys the history of movies in China since the 1930s and also offers an in-depth look at the work of: China's fifth-generation directors of the 1980s and their successors up to the present; Taiwan's new wave; and Hong Kong popular cinema, including martial arts film. Our focus is the screening and discussion of films such as The Goddess (a 1934 silent classic), Stage Sisters (1965; directed by the influential Xie Jin), the controversial Yellow Earth (1984), In the Heat of the Sun (a 1994 break with the conventional representation of the Cultural Revolution), Yang Dechang's masterpiece A One and a Two (2000), and Still Life (Jia Zhangke's 2006 meditation on displacement near the Three Gorges Dam). The course is designed to help students understand the place of cinema in Chinese culture and develop the analytical tools necessary for the informed viewing and study of Chinese film. We will look at everything from art film, to underground film, to recent box office hits. (No prerequisites) One evening film screening per week. 3 hrs. lect./disc. AAL, ART (T. Moran)

FMMC 0252 Authorship and Cinema: Auteur Cinema in the New Century
(Spring 2015)
In the digital era, the future of cinema seems uncertain , and yet the last fifteen years have seen the rise of strong new artistic voices throughout world cinema. In this course we will look at the auteur approach in contemporary cinema and examine its various modes of expression, comparing American independent filmmakers and European auteurs. We will focus on authorship as influenced and determined not only by the filmmaker’s agency, but also by its financial, social, and historical contexts. We will also conduct a detailed case study of contemporary Romanian cinema and its most important auteurs: Cristian Mungiu (4 Months 3 Weeks and 2 Days), Cristi Puiu (The Death of Mr. Lazarescu), Corneliu Porumboiu (Police, Adjective), and Radu Muntean (Tuesday After Christmas). (FMMC 0101 or FMMC 0102) ART (I. Uricaru)

FMMC/JAPN 0260 Kurosawa (Spring 2015)
Akira Kurosawa is internationally recognized as one of the great auteurs of cinema. His visually stunning samurai films made him famous worldwide, but some of his most compelling works deal with crime and corruption in modern society. Whether set in the past or the present, each of his films tells a story about an unlikely hero who finds himself grappling with an enduring human question: What personal sacrifices must we make for the good of others? What is bravery and where does it come from? How do we achieve our own identity? Is goodness possible in an evil world? Students will explore and debate these issues as we analyze Kurosawa’s storytelling style and cinematic techniques in a dozen films spanning his fifty-year career, including Drunken Angel, Seven Samurai, Ikiru and Kagemusha. 3 hrs. lect./ 3 hrs. screen. AAL, ART (C. Cavanaugh)

FMMC/GSFS 0267 Gender and Sexuality in Media (Spring 2015)
In this course, we will explore the intersecting roles played by gender and sexuality in our media, focusing specifically on film, television, and digital culture. We will examine the multiple ways in which popular media texts construct and communicate gender and sexuality, and we will analyze the role of gender and sexuality in the processes of spectatorship and meaning-making. We will study a wide range of theories of gender and sexuality in media including feminist film theory, queer media theory, and literature on gender and sexuality in video game history and culture. 3 hrs. lect./3 hrs. screen. SOC (L. Stein)

FMMC 0285 Sustainable Television: Producing Environmental Media (Spring 2015)
In this project-based course, we will collaborate to produce a nonfiction television program that addresses sustainability and environmental issues with the goal of showing the final program on local cable, online, and possibly on the PBS series /Planet Forward/. Students will collectively serve all roles in the project, from research and writing, to shooting and editing, creating a team-based environment, with screening and readings focused on the rhetoric of environmental media. Students will be selected by application to create a team with a range of experience and expertise. Prior video production or environmental studies experience is preferred but not required. (FMMC 0105 or ENVS 0211 or ENVS 0215 or approval of instructor; Not open to students who have taken FMMC 1019) 3 hrs. lect./lab ART (J. Mittell)

FMMC 0335 Sight and Sound II (Fall 2014)
In this course we will explore non-fiction, narrative, and experimental modes of production. We will emphasize thorough pre-production planning, expanded understanding of image and sound, and editing. The critical dialogue established in Sight and Sound I will be extended and augmented with readings and screenings of outstanding independently produced work. (Approval-required; FMMC 0101 or FMMC 0105). Obtain application on FMMC website online and submit prior to the start of registration. Priority given to FMMC majors. 3 hrs. lect./3 hrs. lab. ART (D. Houghton)

FMMC/CRWR 0341 Writing for the Screen II (Spring 2015)
Building on the skills acquired in Writing for the Screen I, students will complete the first drafts of their feature-length screenplay. Class discussion will focus on feature screenplay structure and theme development using feature films and screenplays. Each participant in the class will practice pitching, writing coverage, and outlining, culminating in a draft of a feature length script. (Approval required, obtain application on the FMMC website and submit prior to spring registration) 3 hrs. sem./3 hrs. screen. ART (I. Uricaru)

FMMC 0346 Special Topics in Media Production: Sound Aesthetics and Production (Spring 2015)
Ever since the invention of recording, sound has increasingly been incorporated into all forms of contemporary art. In this course we will investigate the aesthetic power of sound as an expressive medium, while reviewing the rich history of sound art and its influence in a wide range of audiovisual practices. Through creative projects, lectures, auditions, and readings, we will develop students’ sensibilities and imagination concerning the use of sound, while improving their critical thinking and listening skills. We will cover basic concepts of acoustics, sound technology, audiovisual analysis, and sound production for film/video. (FMMC 0105 or by approval) 3 hrs. lect./3 hrs. lab. (D. Miranda-Hardy)

FMMC 0348 3D Computer Animation (Fall 2014)
3D computer animation has revolutionized animation, graphics, and special effects. In this course students will explore basic 3D modeling techniques, virtual material and texture creation, digital lighting, rendering, and animation. Every workshop will be hands on and fully immersed in this rapidly evolving technology. Students will leave with a strong conceptual understanding of the 3D graphics pipeline, a fundamental 3D skill set, options for further study, and an independent final animation project. 3 hrs. workshop ART (D. Houghton)

FMMC 0354 Film Theory (Fall 2014)
This course surveys the issues that have sparked the greatest curiosity among film scholars throughout cinema's first century, such as: What is the specificity of the film image? What constitutes cinema as an art? How is authorship in the cinema to be accounted for? Is the cinema a language, or does it depart significantly from linguistic coordinates? How does one begin to construct a history of the cinema? What constitutes valid or useful film research? Readings will include Epstein, Eisenstein, Bazin, Truffaut, Wollen, Mulvey, Benjamin, Kracauer, and others. (Formerly FMMC 0344) (FMMC 0101 or FMMC 0102 or instructor approval) 3 hrs. lect./3 hrs. screen. ART (C. Keathley)

FMMC/AMST 0355 Theories of Popular Culture (Spring 2015)
This course introduces a range of theoretical approaches to study popular culture, exploring the intersection between everyday life, mass media, and broader political and historical contexts within the United States. We will consider key theoretical readings and approaches to studying culture, including ideology and hegemony theory, political economy, audience studies, subcultural analysis, the politics of taste, and cultural representations of identity. Using these theoretical tools, we will examine a range of popular media and sites of cultural expression, from television to toys, technology to music, to understand popular culture as a site of ongoing political and social struggle. (Formerly AMST/FMMC 0275) (FMMC 0102 or FMMC 0104 or FMMC 0236 or AMST 0211) 3 hrs. lect./disc./3 hrs. screen. CW, SOC (J. Mittell)

FMMC/DANC 0361 Movement and Media (Spring 2015)
In this course we will take an interdisciplinary look at the dynamic relationship between the body and digital media.  Students will develop skills in basic film editing, real-time software manipulation, open-source media research, project design, and collaboration.  We will address design history and theories of modern media through readings and multimedia sources.  Process and research papers and work-in-progress showings will document ongoing collaborations that will culminate in an informal showing at the end of the semester.  This course is open to students of all artistic backgrounds who are interested in significantly expanding their creative vocabularies and boundaries to include dance.  (Approval required; DANC 0261 required for dance students) 3 hrs. lect., 3 hrs. lab. ART (Staff)

FMMC 0507 Advanced Independent work in Film and Media Culture (Fall 2014, Spring 2015)
Guidelines for submitting proposals are available on the Film & Media Culture web site along with a list of prerequisites. (Staff)

FMMC 0700 Film and Media Senior Tutorial (Spring 2015)
All FMMC majors must complete this course, in which they undertake a critical essay, a screenplay, or a video. The following prerequisite courses are required: for a video project: FMMC 0105, FMMC 0335, FMMC/CRWR 0106; for a screenwriting project: FMMC 0105, FMMC/CRWR 0106, FMMC/CRWR 0341; for a research essay: demonstrated knowledge in the topic of the essay, as determined in consultation with the project advisor, and coursework relevant to the topic as available. (Staff)

French

Required for the Major in French: Total of no fewer than 10 courses.

I. Two introductions to French literature: FREN 0210, FREN 0221, or specified courses in Paris, Poitiers, Bordeaux, or Cameroon; or equivalent in the Middlebury summer French School when offered.
II. One course in contemporary French or Francophone civilization: FREN 0230, courses on contemporary France, or specified French or Francophone civilization in Paris, Poitiers, Bordeaux, or Cameroon; or equivalent in the Middlebury summer French School when offered.
III. One course in French, Cameroonian, or Francophone Africa history: In Paris, FREN 2333 (Histoire de la France), FREN 2350 (Architecture et urbanisme), or other equivalent.
IV. Three advanced courses in French or Francophone literature or civilization.
V.  One senior seminar FREN 0400-level (literature or civilization).

During their senior year, majors must take at least one advanced literature or civilization course in French at Middlebury in addition to the senior seminar.

     Other courses counting for the major include:

(1) At the Vermont campus: FREN 0205, FREN 0255, among others; certain advanced courses offered during the winter term (with permission of the chair); certain summer courses at the 0300 (intermediate) or 0400 (advanced) level; and,

(2) In France and Cameroon: language and linguistics courses; comparative literature (with a major French or Francophone component); French or Francophone arts, theatre, cinema, television, or politics.

     All majors study abroad for a semester or a year in a French-speaking country. The year program carries nine units of credit; the semester program carries four or five units of credit. In order to ensure that students are exposed to a variety of disciplines, no more than five units (full-year program) or three units (semester program) may be counted toward a Middlebury French major. Most courses in France will be at the advanced level.

     Required for a Joint Major: The French Department does not offer a joint major.

     Required for a Minor in French: Minimum of five courses, FREN 0205 and above, including at least two introductory courses (FREN 0210, FREN 0221, FREN 0230) and at least one course in literature or civilization at the advanced level. The minor may include courses taken at the School in France (maximum of two from the semester program, three from the full-year program).

     Students with a College Board AP score of 4 or 5 will receive one unit of credit toward graduation if the first course successfully completed at Middlebury is FREN 0210 or above in accordance with placement and departmental advising. AP credits may not be counted toward the major or minor.

     Senior Work: Upon completing at least two 0300-level courses in French or Francophone literature or civilization, majors will be required in their senior year to complete senior work consisting of a significant research paper in the context of a senior seminar (0400-level).

     Honors: Exceptional students with a grade point average in French of 3.8 or higher may petition the department to pursue an independent project for honors in French. Candidates for honors may propose a one-semester senior honors essay (FREN 0700) or a senior honors thesis (FREN 0701, one semester and winter term). Eligible students should consult the departmental guidelines and present their proposals well in advance of registration for the term in which the work is to be started. The department will determine whether to award honors, high honors, or highest honors on the basis of a student's work in the department and performance on the senior honors project.
       International and Global Studies Major with French Language: Along with other required courses and senior work as described in the International and Global Studies Major section, completion of the French language component requires: (1) proficiency in French (a minimum of two of FREN 0210, 0221, 0230, or work in the French summer school at the 0300 level or above); (2) at least one semester, and preferably a year, at the Middlebury College School in France, or in Cameroon, or in another French-speaking country; and (3) one or more courses at the 0300 or 0400-level upon return from abroad.

     International and Global Studies Major, European Studies Track: (1) Language proficiency: see above; (2) regional specialization: choose from FREN 0230 and courses at the 0300-level, or others (Vermont campus), in consultation with the track director; courses in French or Francophone civilization at Middlebury in France or in another French-speaking country; (3) disciplinary specialization: two courses from FREN 0210, 0221, 0230; three French or Francophone literature or civilization courses at the advanced level at Middlebury or at Middlebury College School in France, or in another French-speaking European country; (4) at least one semester, and preferably a year, at the Middlebury College School in France or in another French-speaking country; and (5) one or more courses at the 0300 or 0400 level, or senior independent work in French, upon return from abroad.

     Study Abroad in France and in Cameroon: Middlebury offers both year and semester programs in Paris, Poitiers, Bordeaux, and Cameroon. Students may count three courses from the semester program, five from the full-year program, toward a major in French, two courses from the semester program and three from the full-year program toward a minor in French. They should, in any event, contact the Office of Off-Campus Study before registering for their sophomore year.

It should be noted that while students wishing to attend one of our programs in France or in Cameroon must demonstrate a level of proficiency in the language that will allow them to function successfully in the French or Cameroonian university setting, they need not be French majors: the C.V. Starr-Middlebury School in France (Paris, Poitiers, Bordeaux) offers students the opportunity to take courses in history, history of art, economics, cinema, political science, psychology, sociology, studio art, the natural sciences, and the environment, among other disciplines, in addition to courses in languages and literature.

     Students planning to study in France or Cameroon for the entire academic year must have completed two full years of college credit by the time they undertake their study abroad; they must have successfully completed at least one course beyond FREN 0205 by the time they arrive abroad; and they must have an average in French of at least B. Students applying for one semester only are required to take FREN 0221 or 0230 before study abroad. We expect all applicants to demonstrate their commitment to French and maintain their fluency by continuous study of French from the time of their enrollment at Middlebury, and to maintain their academic level if they are accepted to study abroad. They are required to take a French course in the semester before study abroad.

     Students interested in studying abroad should speak to someone in the Office of International Programs & Off-Campus Study, Sunderland Language Center, well in advance of applying. They will need to seek prior approval of School in France and School in Cameroon courses from the appropriate department chairs if they wish course work to count toward a specific minor or major. The Office of Off-Campus Study will provide information about the program and application forms.

FREN 0101 Intensive Beginning French (Fall 2014)
For students who have not previously studied French, an introduction to listening, speaking, reading, and writing in French, providing the syntactic and semantic foundation of the French language in a concentrated program of grammar presentation, drills, laboratory work, and discussion. Primary emphasis will be placed on the student's active use of the language, and weekly attendance at the French language table will be required. This course does not fulfill the foreign language distribution requirement. Students are expected to continue with FREN 0102 in the winter term after successfully completing FREN 0101, and with FREN 0103 in the spring. 6 hrs. lect./disc. (E. LaBrada, B. Humbert)

FREN 0103 Beginning French (Spring 2015)
Emphasis on increased control and proficiency in the language through audiovisual, conversational, and drill methods. Readings and film enlarge the student's view of French life and culture. (FREN 0101 and FREN 0102) 5 hrs. lect./disc. LNG (C. Nunley, W. Poulin-Deltour)

FREN 0105 Accelerated Beginning French (Spring 2015)
This intensive course is a condensation of FREN 0101 and 0102 for students who have never before studied French. We will focus on the development of all four communicative skills in an immersion-style environment. Primary emphasis will be placed on increased oral proficiency through audiovisual, conversational, and drill methods. Upon successful completion of this course students will be prepared for second-year French in the fall. Weekly attendance at the French language table will be required. 6 hrs. lect./disc./1 hr. drill (A. Crouzieres-Ingenthron)

FREN 0203 Intensive Intermediate French (Fall 2014, Spring 2015)
An active and intensive review of French grammar for students having had good beginning-level training in French. We will work not only to perfect mastery of the structures of the language with practice of writing and reading, but also to develop oral comprehension and production skills. (FREN 0103 or placement) 5 hrs. lect./disc. LNG (Fall 2014: B. Humbert, M. Barbaud-McWilliams; Spring 2015: C. Nunley)

FREN 0205 Toward Liberated Expression (Fall 2014, Spring 2015)
A course designed to increase and perfect the ability to express oneself in spoken and written French. Emphasis on precision, variety, and vocabulary acquisition. Sections limited to 15 students. (FREN 0203 or placement) This requirement for the major and the minor may be satisfied by placement at a higher level. 3 hrs. lect./disc. LNG (Fall 2014: C. Nunley, P. Schwartz, A. Crouzieres-Ingenthron; Spring 2015: A. Crouzieres-Ingenthron, P. Schwartz)

FREN 0210 Identity in French Literature (Fall 2014, Spring 2015)
Exploration of differing views of the self, society, and the world in major works of French poetry, drama, and prose. This course is designed to develop students' ability to read and critique literature in French, as a transition from FREN 0205 to more advanced literature courses. (FREN 0205 or by placement) 3 hrs. lect./disc. EUR, LIT, LNG (Fall 2014: M. Barbaud-McWilliams, A. Crouzieres-Ingenthron; Spring 2015: B. Humbert)

FREN 0221 From Romanticism to Modernism (Fall 2014, Spring 2015)
The 19th and 20th centuries were marked by social and political revolutions and by literary and artistic movements that changed our attitudes to art and to ourselves, including romanticism, realism, symbolism, surrealism, and existentialism. We will study literary texts, artistic and philosophical movements, and the social circumstances that conditioned them. Close readings of the texts (including prose, drama, and poetry) will develop critical vocabulary and writing skills. Authors may include Hugo, Balzac, Flaubert, Baudelaire, Gide, Camus, Sartre, and Francophone writers. (FREN 0210 or placement) 3 hrs. lect./disc. (1 additional hour for CW, Fall). CW (Fall, 8 spaces) EUR, LIT, LNG (Fall 2014: C. Nunley; Spring 2015: M. Barbaud-McWilliams)

FREN 0230 Introduction to Contemporary France (Fall 2014, Spring 2015)
In this interdisciplinary course we will examine the evolving social and political landscape of France in the 21st century. How is French society reconciling contemporary challenges with deeply entrenched institutions and values? How does everyday life reflect the evolution of long-term trends? How are immigration, growing inequalities, and membership in the European Union challenging French identity and the notion of “Frenchness”? We will focus our attention on demography and the family, the educational system, politics, and the French social model or welfare state. Emphasis will be on oral expression and the acquisition of specialized vocabulary. Sources will include articles from the French and American press, documents, and film. This course is recommended for all students planning to study in France. (FREN 0210 or FREN 0221; open to first-semester first-year students with permission.) EUR, LNG, SOC (Fall 2014: W. Poulin-Deltour; Spring 2015: W. Poulin-Deltour, P. Schwartz)

FREN 0343 Paris on Film (Spring 2015)
In this course we will focus on the representation of Paris in French cinema. In the first part of the course we will study different time periods and cinematic styles: the Poetic Realism of the 1930s (Marcel Carné’s Hotel du Nord), the New Wave of the late 1950s and early 1960s (Agnès Varda’s Cléo de 5 à 7), and the banlieue films of the 1990s (Mathieu Kassovitz’s La Haine). In the second part of the course we will look at influences and novelties in 21st century films, including Jean-Pierre Jeunet’s Amélie, Cédric Klapisch’s Paris, and Julie Delpy’s 2 Days in Paris. We will also examine a few representations of Paris in American cinema, such as Minelli’s An American in Paris (1951) and Woody Allen's Midnight in Pari/s (2011). (FREN 0221 or FREN 0230, or by waiver) 3 hrs. lect./disc. + 2 hrs. screenings ART, EUR, LNG (B. Humbert)

FREN 0346 "I eat - therefore I am", Food and Culture in France (Fall 2014)
What's in a meal? Historians and anthropologists have long shown food and eating practices to be a function of culture. In France in particular, food and cuisine are fundamental elements of national heritage and cultural identity. What does the organization of the eating ritual say about the French? What do food and eating have to do with class and gender, time and space? How are eating and drinking unique forms of political expression? Works from a range of interdisciplinary perspectives will inform our study of French society through its singular approach to the culture of the table. Readings will include works by Brillat-Savarin, Barthes, Zola, and others. (FREN 0221 or FREN 0230 or by waiver). 3 hrs. lect./disc. EUR, LNG, SOC (P. Schwartz)

FREN 0352 From Citizenship to Social Mobility: The Shifting Role of Public Education in France (Fall 2014)
Since the establishment of a free, compulsory, and secular school system in the early 1880s, the position of public education in French society has evolved significantly. Designed originally to create an "educated" citizenry, its function has increasingly been interpreted as one of promoting social mobility and "equal opportunity" within that citizenry. Over the course of this shift, education has become a site of fierce debate in France. We will take a historical and sociological approach to explore the contours of this debate, covering such topics as: primary school teachers' role in forging national identity during the Third Republic; efforts after World War II to democratize the system; and current attempts to diversify elite institutions of higher education. Authors will include Baudelot, Bourdieu, Dubet, Ozouf, and Prost. (FREN 0230 or by waiver) 3 hrs. lect./disc. EUR, LNG (W. Poulin-Deltour)

FREN 0379 Poetry and Painting in France: 1850-1950 (Spring 2015)
In this course we will study the relationship between poetry and painting from about 1850 to 1950. Romanticism brings the arts together in redefining the role of the artist and of the creative process. We will examine poets who paint (Hugo, Gautier) and see how their art influences their poetry, before focusing on Baudelaire (his fascination with Delacroix, the visual aspect of his poetry, Manet's resemblance to him). Surrealism will introduce us to poets and painters working together toward a complementary creative expression (for example, Eluard and Man Ray) in which the metaphor is experienced similarly in poetry and in painting. (FREN 0221 or by waiver). 3 hrs. lect./disc. ART, EUR, LIT, LNG (M. Barbaud-McWilliams)

FREN/PHIL 0389 Passion and Pain, Love and Lust: The World of the Senses in Early Modern France (Fall 2014)
In this course we will examine early modern theories of emotion—“passion,” “affect,” and “sentiment”—as they are discussed in philosophy and represented in fiction. Seventeenth and 18th-century philosophers and other thinkers confronted questions that continue to haunt contemporary thinking: What is “feeling”? Does language promote or frustrate the expression of emotion? How do the senses relate to other experiences like cognition, memory, and imagination? We will look at texts that transformed how we talk, think, and feel about “feeling.” Readings include short works by Gournay, Lafayette, Descartes, Élisabeth of Bohemia, Du Plaisir, Bernard, Leibniz, Condillac, Rousseau, Condorcet, and Diderot.  (FREN 0221 or equivalent) 3 hrs. lect./disc. EUR, LIT, PHL (E. LaBrada)

FREN 0398 Children and Civil War in Francophone African Literature (Spring 2015)
In this course we will study the repercussions of civil war on child soldiers and children as depicted in contemporary Francophone African literatures. How does one become a child soldier and murderer? How do orphans survive war? Authors use literary fiction written from a child’s perspective to reflect upon and to denounce a tragic historical reality as well as to defy censorship. We will analyze their writing strategies and techniques, and assess both the literary and humanistic impact of the novels. Readings will include novels by Ivorian Ahmadou Kourouma, Congolese Emmanuel Dongala, Guinean Tierno Monémembo, and by Djiboutian Abdourahman Waberi. (FREN 0221 or by waiver). 3 hrs. lect./disc. AAL, CMP, LIT, LNG (A. Crouzieres-Ingenthron)

FREN 0452 From Citizenship to Social Mobility: The Shifting Role of Public Education in France (Fall 2014)
Since the establishment of a free, compulsory, and secular school system in the early 1880s, the position of public education in French society has evolved significantly. Designed originally to create an "educated" citizenry, its function has increasingly been interpreted as one of promoting social mobility and "equal opportunity" within that citizenry. Over the course of this shift, education has become a site of fierce debate in France. We will take a historical and sociological approach to explore the contours of this debate, covering such topics as: primary school teachers' role in forging national identity during the Third Republic; efforts after World War II to democratize the system; and current attempts to diversify elite institutions of higher education. Authors will include Baudelot, Bourdieu, Dubet, Ozouf, and Prost. (Open to French Senior Majors) 3 hrs. lect./disc. EUR, LNG (W. Poulin-Deltour)

FREN 0500 Independent Project (Fall 2014, Spring 2015)
Qualified students may be permitted to undertake a special project in reading and research under the direction of a member of the department. Students should seek an advisor and submit a proposal to the department well in advance of registration for the term in which the work is to be undertaken. (See requirements above.) (Staff)

FREN 0700 Senior Honors Essay (Fall 2014, Spring 2015)
Approval Required. (Staff)

FREN 0701 Senior Honors Thesis (Fall 2014, Spring 2015)
Senior Majors who qualify and choose to be candidates for Honors in French must submit a proposal well in advance of registration for the term in which the work is to be undertaken. (Approval required by the department as a whole. See requirements above.) (Staff)

Gender, Sexuality, and Feminist Studies

The major requires a minimum of ten courses and comprises several discrete aspects, as outlined below. Some of the courses can be double-counted if they fulfill different requirements within the major.

Major requirements (10 courses):

SOAN/GSFS 0191

One introductory course from the humanities, such as GSFS 0102, or GSFS 0234, or approved by the director

GSFS 0200
GSFS 0320

Two courses to fulfill the Breadth Requirements (explained below)

Three electives bearing the GSFS prefix, one of which must be at the 0300-level or higher and one that must be at the 0400-level or higher

Senior Work (one-semester senior essay or multi-semester thesis)

     Breadth Requirements (two courses): To ensure that students are conversant with and have some in-depth knowledge of the key concerns animating the field, they must take at least one course each from two of three breadth requirements. Courses meeting the breadth requirement can be found on the Gender, Sexuality, and Feminist Studies webpage.

  • Intersectionality/Critical Race
  • Critical Sexuality Studies
  • Gender in National/Transnational Contexts

     Senior Work: Majors are required to complete an independent project based in the core field that applies feminist theory and methodology. The project may be either a one-semester senior essay or other creative work (GSFS 0700), or a multi-semester senior thesis (GSFS 0710).

     Minor Requirements: The minor comprises five courses including: one introductory course from among SOAN/GSFS 0191, ENAM/GSFS 0102, or PHIL/GSFS 0234

GSFS 0200
GSFS 0320
two electives bearing the GSFS prefix

GSFS/ENAM 0102 Introduction to Gender, Sexuality and Literature (Spring 2015)
This course offers an introduction to the ways in which literature reflects, influences, creates, and reveals cultural beliefs about gender and sexuality. We will read a wide range of novels, poems, and plays from a diversity of eras and national traditions; we will also study seminal works in feminist theory, queer studies, and the history of sexuality, from early thinkers to today's cutting-edge theorists. Throughout the course, we will explore the ways in which gender intersects with other crucial cultural issues such as race, nationhood, globalization, and class. 3 hrs. lect./disc. CMP, LIT (A. Losano)

GSFS/SOAN 0191 Introduction to Sociology of Gender (Fall 2014)
What is gender and what would a sociology of it look like? When did gender become a category of inquiry and more importantly why? We will look at how the meaning and performance of gender changed over time, from Classical Greece to Victorian England, to the contemporary U.S. We will also look at how gender changes depending on one’s position in social space, e.g. one’s race, class, sexuality, and nationality. Finally, we will consider how the need to look at gender is the result of a variety of discourses, from psychoanalysis to capitalism to movements of liberation such as feminism. 3 hrs. lect. CMP, SOC (L. Essig)

GSFS 0200 Foundations in Women's and Gender Studies (Fall 2014, Spring 2015)
This course provides an introduction to the interdisciplinary field of gender, sexuality, and feminist studies. Examining gender and sexuality always in conjunction with the categories of race and class, the course foregrounds how inequalities are perpetuated in different fields of human activity and the creative ways in which groups have resisted these processes. The course is organized in sections to illuminate the effects of particular social institutions and structures on individual lives. Each section will introduce a broad overview of feminist interventions in different fields of inquiry. Cumulatively, the course reveals the importance of gender and sexuality as analytical categories to understand social reality and to comprehend important areas of culture. 3 hrs. lect. CMP, SOC (Fall 2014: A. Koch-Rein; Spring 2015: Staff)

GSFS/AMST 0208 Unruly Bodies: Black Womanhood in Popular Culture (Spring 2015)
In this course we will examine representations of black womanhood in popular culture, analyzing the processes by which bodies and identities are constructed as dangerous, deviant, and unruly. For example, materials will include the work of bell hooks and Patricia Hill Collins to analyze the imagery of black womanhood propagated by the television shows The Jerry Springer Show and Bad Girls Club. By contrast, we will also read Saidiya Hartman’s Scenes of Subjection as a lens through which to view “bad” black womanhood as a radically stylized means of redress in the Blaxploitation-era film Foxy Brown. 3 hrs. lect. CMP, NOR (J. Finley)

GSFS/ENVS 0209 Gender Health and the Environment (Spring 2015)
Growing concern for the protection of the environment and human health has led policy makers and scholars to consider ways in which gender, class, and race mediate human-environment interactions.  In this course we will explore how access to, control over, and distribution of resources influence environmental and health outcomes both in terms of social inequities and ecological decline.  Specific issues we will cover include: ecofeminism, food security, population, gendered conservation, environmental toxics, climate change, food justice, and the green revolution. We will examine these topics at multiple scales within the United States and internationally. SOC (M. Baker-Médard)

GSFS/SOAN 0212 The Family in Contemporary Society (Fall 2014)
This course will investigate the social, economic, and political forces that have brought about changes in family life in the beginning of the 21st century. We will begin by looking at various attempts to define "the family," and we will then explore a range of topics, including the webs of family relationships (e.g., mothering, fathering, kin networks), labor and family intersections (e.g., mediating between work and family; the household division of labor), gay and lesbian family life, and domestic violence. Although the focus will be on contemporary United States, we will also examine some cross-cultural and historical material. 3 hrs. lect./disc. CMP, NOR, SOC (M. Nelson)

GSFS/CRWR 0225 Feminist Blogging (Spring 2015)
Blogging is a genre that lends itself to both feminist theory and practice because it involves writing from a particular place and a particular embodiment, about how power operates in our social worlds. Feminist theory demands intersectionality: an ability to weave race, class, gender, sexuality and other forms of power into a single theoretical approach. Feminist blogging transforms intersectionality into a single narrative arc. In this course we will think about blogging as a genre and how feminist theory can infuse that genre into a more vibrant, complex, and even transformative site. Throughout the course we will read feminist theory, analyze feminist blogs, and produce our own feminist blogs. 3 hrs. lect. CMP, LIT, NOR, SOC (L. Essig)

GSFS/AMST 0241 Sexuality in the United States: Histories and Identities (Fall 2014)
What does sexuality mean? In the United States the meanings of sexuality are highly contested, historically and in the present. Working from an interdisciplinary perspective, we will look at different historical and theoretical approaches to thinking about issues of sexuality and to writing its histories. Drawing from feminist scholarship, queer theory, and lesbian, gay, and transgender studies, we will discuss sexual identities, representations of sexuality, and sexual cultures, and examine how intersecting categories such as race, class, disability, and gender influence how sexuality is understood. 3 hrs. lect. CMP, HIS, NOR, SOC (A. Koch-Rein)

GSFS/JAPN 0245 Josei Undo: Women’s Activism in Contemporary Japan (Fall 2014)
In this course we will critically evaluate Japanese feminism since the late nineteenth century. We will focus on the following themes within Japanese feminism, namely, the structure of work and family life, the relationship between the state, women, and the military, and the politics of reproduction and women's bodies. In addition, we will consider the role of feminism in Japanese society and the connections between global feminisms and Japanese local political struggles. This course will help students develop a deeper understanding of Japanese society and the position of women in society. It will also help students contextualize gender relations and feminist activism cross culturally. 3 hr. lect./disc. AAL, SOC (L. White)

GSFS/RELI 0258 The Qur’an and the Feminist Subject WT (Fall 2014)
How was the Qur’an compiled, and who was involved in that process? What does the Qur’an say about Muhammad and the early community of believers? Why is it so difficult to approach? While considering the answers to these questions, we will explore the socio-cultural context in which the Qur’an was revealed and its similarities and differences with the Bible. We will also discuss major themes and concepts of the Qur’an and the various ways they have been interpreted by different Muslim communities throughout history. 3 hrs. lect. AAL, PHL (A. Anzali)

GSFS/FMMC 0267 Gender and Sexuality in Media (Spring 2015)
In this course, we will explore the intersecting roles played by gender and sexuality in our media, focusing specifically on film, television, and digital culture. We will examine the multiple ways in which popular media texts construct and communicate gender and sexuality, and we will analyze the role of gender and sexuality in the processes of spectatorship and meaning-making. We will study a wide range of theories of gender and sexuality in media including feminist film theory, queer media theory, and literature on gender and sexuality in video game history and culture. 3 hrs. lect./3 hrs. screen. SOC (L. Stein)

GSFS/DANC 0284 Modern Dance History in the United States: Early Influences to Postmodern Transformations (Fall 2014)
In this seminar we will focus on the emergence and development of 20th century American concert dance--especially modern and postmodern dance forms--from the confluence of European folk and court dance, African and Caribbean influences, and other American cultural dynamics. We will look at ways in which dance reflects, responds to, and creates its cultural milieu, with special attention to issues of gender, race/ethnicity, and class. Readings, video, and live performance illuminate the artistic products and processes of choreographers whose works mark particular periods or turning points in this unfolding story. Our study is intended to support informed critical articulations and an understanding of the complexity of dance as art. 3 hrs. lect./2 hrs. screen. ART, HIS, NOR (T. Pollard)

GSFS/RELI 0290 Women's Religious Life and Thought: The Female Pursuit of God in Late Antiquity and Byzantium WT (Fall 2014)
This course will explore the female religious experience in Greco-Roman antiquity and Early Christianity. We shall trace the transition from the mystery religions of Demeter and Isis in the Eastern Mediterranean to the cult of Mary the Mother of God (Theotokos) and the worship of female saints. Drawing on a wide range of sources (hymns, saints' Lives, Apocryphal Gospels, Patristic texts, and icons), we shall study the varieties of female devotion and examine the roles available to women in the early Church: deaconesses and desert mothers, monastics and martyrs, poets and rulers. Different theoretical approaches will enable us to ask a series of questions: were women in the early Church considered capable of holiness? To what extent did the female 'gifts of the spirit' challenge church authority? What is distinct about the feminine experience of the divine? Finally, we shall consider the vision and poetics of female spirituality in select modern poets. 3 hrs. lect./disc.  EUR, HIS, PHL (M. Hatjigeorgiou)

GSFS/WRPR 0303 Outlaw Women (Spring 2015)
In this course we will read and discuss literary novels that feature women who defy social norms: daring survivors, scholars, “whores,” queers, artists, “madwomen,” servants, revolutionaries. We will take a critical and transnational approach to issues of race, class, gender, sexuality, ability, and religion. Texts will include Toni Morrison’s Sula, Audre Lorde’s Zami, Marguerite Duras’ The Lover, Jamaica Kincaid’s Lucy, Patricia Powell’s The Pagoda, and Azar Nafisi's Reading Lolita in Tehran. Students will write formal literary analysis,and narrative criticism. Together we will engage in some contemplative practice and study selected films. CMP, CW, LIT, SOC (C. Wright)

GSFS/SOAN 0315 Sociology of Freakishness (Fall 2014)
P.T. Barnum taught us that freaks are always made, not born. A freak is a performance of otherness for fun and profit. In this course we will explore how the freak show gave birth to American culture and how American culture continues to organize itself around the display of freakishness. We will ask what configurations of power are at play in the performance of freaks. How do gender, race, nation, sexuality, and class come into play, and how are those forms of power translated into a performance of otherness that forces us to watch it over and over again? 3 hrs. lect./disc. (Sociology) NOR, SOC (L. Essig)

GSFS 0320 Topics in Feminist Theory (Spring 2015)
The course offers an overview of some key feminist texts and theories that have shaped the analysis of gender and sexuality. Each semester the instructor will choose a particular topical lens through which to examine some of the foundational theoretical texts that have animated the field of gender, sexuality, and feminist studies. Working within a transnational perspective, the course encompasses texts which fall under the categories of critical race and critical sexuality studies. (GSFS 0200 or SOAN 0191) 3 hr. lect. CMP, SOC (A. Koch-Rein)

GSFS/HARC 0338 Gender and the Making of Space (Fall 2014)
In this course we will investigate the complex relationship between gender and architecture, examining how the design of the built environment (buildings, urban spaces, etc.) can reinforce or undermine ideas about the respective roles of women and men in society, from the creation of masculine and feminine spaces to the gendered nature of the architectural profession. By looking at both visual evidence and textual sources we will also uncover how the social construction of gender roles and gendered spaces are, and continue to be, inflected by race, class, and sexuality. Not open to students who have taken FYSE 1407. 3 hrs. sem. ART, CMP, HIS (E. Sassin)

GSFS/HIST 0373 History of American Women: 1869-1999 (Fall 2014)
This course will examine women's social, political, cultural, and economic position in American society from 1869 through the late 20th century. We will explore the shifting ideological basis for gender roles, as well as the effects of race, class, ethnicity, and region on women's lives. Topics covered will include: women's political identity, women's work, sexuality, access to education, the limits of "sisterhood" across racial and economic boundaries, and the opportunities women used to expand their sphere of influence. 3 hrs. lect./disc. CMP, HIS, NOR (A. Morsman)

GSFS/RELI 0383 Storied Women (Fall 2014)
In this course we will read and analyze stories about women in the Jewish Bible, its Greek translations, and the New Testament, using various historical, literary, and gendered approaches to the study of ancient texts. Though student interests will help determine the final list of the characters we will consider, contenders include Eve, Hagar, Rebekah, Tamar, Deborah, Ruth, Judith, Mary, the women of Paul’s letters, and Revelation’s great whore of Babylon. In addition to recent academic treatments of the stories, we will also consider some of the ways they have been retold through time and in contemporary literature and film. 3 hrs. sem. LIT, PHL (L. Yarbrough)

GSFS/RELI 0391 Seminar on Women and Religion: Goddesses in South Asia (Fall 2014)
In this course we will examine the multiple portrayals of the divine in feminine form in the Hindu and Buddhist traditions of India and Tibet. We will first raise questions about the role and significance of goddesses from a comparative perspective, before examining the large variety of South Asian feminine divinities within their historical, mythological,  iconographic, and theological contexts. We will also examine sociological and psychological perspectives on these traditions, opening a way for dialogue between indigenous and modern theoretical frameworks. 3 hrs. sem. AAL, PHL (J. Pierce)

GSFS/HIST 0393 A History of Gender in Early America (Spring 2015)
Exploration, conquest, settlement, revolution, and nation-building: no course in early American history should ignore such traditional topics. In this course, though, we will examine the various ways that gender shaped these historical processes. How, for example, did colonials’ assumptions about manhood and womanhood affect the development of slavery in America? Or how did the Founding Fathers’ identities as men inform their attitudes about democracy and citizenship? We will scrutinize historical documents, of both a private and public nature, and discuss several recent scholarly works on gender from 1600-1850 to consider these kinds of questions. Pre-1800. 2 hrs. lect./1 hr. disc. CMP, HIS, NOR (A. Morsman)

GSFS/SOAN 0402 Sex and Society (Spring 2015)
In this seminar we will explore the pleasures, power, and problems of sex and will place sexuality in dynamic interaction with larger social issues. It is impossible to understand sexuality as separate from other dimensions of the human condition such as economics, politics, work, family, race, and gender. In particular, we will examine questions related to the science of sex, morality, monogamy, sex work, power and domination, desire and fantasy, and sexual politics. Overall, students will gain an understanding of sexuality as a social phenomenon. 3 hrs. sem. (J. McCallum)

GSFS 0413 White People (Spring 2015)
White people are often invisible when it comes to having a race. In this course we will begin by considering the formation of whiteness in post-Civil War America. We will read histories of whiteness, such as Grace Elizabeth Hale's Making Whiteness, as well as consider important milestones in whiteness, from the films Birth of a Nation and Gone With The Wind to the blog "What White People Like." Finally we will use essays, blogs, photographs, and videos to make white people at Middlebury visible by documenting how they represent themselves through language, dress, and rituals. (Not open to students who have taken FYSE 1357) 3 hrs. sem. (Sociology) NOR, SOC (L. Essig)

GSFS/PHIL 0434 Feminist Epistemologies (Fall 2014)
In recent years, feminist epistemologies, such as feminist standpoint theories and feminist empiricisms, have been extremely influential in developing social theories of knowledge. They have also served as a crucial intellectual tool for feminist theorists trying to understand the connections between social relations of gender and the production of knowledge and ignorance. In this course we will investigate some of the major themes and challenges of feminist epistemologies and feminist philosophies of science: How is knowledge socially situated? What does it mean to look at knowledge through a gendered lens? How is objective knowledge possible according to feminist epistemologies? We will work to understand the influence of feminist epistemologies in contemporary philosophy. We will also consider how feminist epistemologies have guided research on gendered and raced relations. (Approval required; Open to philosophy and GSFS senior and junior majors. GSFS majors must have previously taken GSFS 0320, or permission.) 3 hrs. sem. CMP, PHL (H. Grasswick)

GSFS 0500 Independent Study (Fall 2014, Spring 2015)
Approval required. (Staff)

GSFS 0700 Senior Essay (Fall 2014, Spring 2015)
Approval required. (Staff)

GSFS 0710 Senior Thesis (Fall 2014, Spring 2015)
Approval required. (Staff)

Geography

Required for the Major: The geography major consists of 10 courses. All students who elect to major in geography must complete: GEOG 0100; GEOG 0120; five elective courses at the 0200-level; one course at the 0300-level; one 0400-level seminar; and GEOL 0112 or GEOL 0170. Only one of the 0200-level courses may be numbered 0250 or above. An additional 0300-level course can be used as a substitute for a 0200-level elective. The electives and the seminar must be selected in consultation with, and approved by, the major advisor.

     Required for a Joint Major: The Geography Department offers joint majors with Environmental Studies, Computer Science, and the History of Art and Architecture. Students wishing to pursue a joint major with any other department must submit a formal proposal to their intended Geography advisor for departmental approval. The proposal must describe the proposed program of study, including educational rationale and specific courses to be taken.

     The Geography/Environmental Studies joint major requires GEOG 0100; GEOG 0120; three courses at the 0200-level (none of which may be numbered 0250 or above); one course at the 0300-level; and one 0400-level seminar. All joint majors must complete joint senior work in Geography or an equivalent, approved by the advisor. The electives, the seminar, and the joint senior work must be selected in consultation with, and approved by, the students Geography advisor.

     The Geography/Computer Science and the Geography/History of Art & Architecture joint majors require GEOG 0100; GEOG 0120; three courses at the 0200-level (none of which may be numbered 0250 or above); one course at the 0300-level; one 0400-level seminar; and senior work at the 700 or 701-702 level in Geography that demonstrates connections between the two disciplines. The electives, the seminar, and senior work must be selected in consultation with, and approved by, the students Geography advisor.

     Required for a Minor: GEOG 0100, GEOG 0120, and three additional courses.

     Advanced Placement: One course credit will be awarded for an advanced placement (AP) score of 5 in human geography. Geography majors who receive a 5 on the AP exam may count this course credit as one 0200-level equivalent toward their major requirements, but are still required to complete GEOG 0100. The AP credit may not be used to satisfy joint major or minor requirements.

     Geography Specialization in International Studies: GEOG 0100; GEOG 0120; three courses from GEOG 0207, GEOG 0210, GEOG 0214, GEOG 0215, GEOG 0220, GEOG 0223, GEOG 0225; and one GEOG 0400-level seminar. Students writing a thesis must also take GEOG 0325 (formerly GEOG 0310) or GEOG 0339.

     Departmental Honors: Students who seek to earn honors are required to write a two-credit honors thesis. They must have at least a 3.3 GPA in the major when they propose the thesis and must have a 3.5 GPA in the major, not including the thesis grade, to be considered for honors upon graduation. In order to complete a senior thesis, students must have a proposal approved by a primary thesis advisor and a secondary departmental reader prior to registering for the first 0701 credit. Upon completion of the thesis, thesis students will present their work in a public lecture and defend the thesis in front of the departmental faculty. Thesis presentations and defenses will typically take place during the final week of classes or the examination period. Upon completion of the presentation and defense, the primary advisor and secondary departmental reader will be responsible for evaluating and grading the thesis. It is strongly encouraged that students considering a thesis discuss their ideas with an advisor during the semester prior to registering for formal thesis credits. Honors will be conferred or denied on the basis of an evaluation of the thesis by the faculty and the student’s GPA in the major, as explained above.

GEOG 0100 Place and Society: Local to Global (Fall 2014, Spring 2015)
This course is an introduction to how geographers view the world and contribute to our understanding of it. Where do the phenomena of human experience occur? Why are they there? What is the significance? These questions are fundamental for explaining the world at different scales from the global to the local. Throughout, we will focus on the spatial basis of society, its continual reorganization through time, and how various human and environmental problems can be usefully analyzed from a geographic perspective. (Open only to first-year students and sophomores) 3 hrs. lect./3 hrs. lab DED, SOC (Fall 2014: A. Knowles; Spring 2015: G. Herb)

GEOG 0120 Fundamentals of Geographic Information Systems (Fall 2014, Spring 2015)
This course introduces fundamental concepts and methods of geographic information systems (GIS): computer systems for processing location-based data. Through a sequence of applied problems, students will practice how to conceive, gather, manage, analyze, and visualize geographic datasets. Major topics will include raster and vector data structures and operations, geographic frameworks, and principles of cartographic design. (First semester first year students and second semester seniors by waiver) 3 hrs. lect./3 hrs. lab. DED, SOC (Fall 2014: J. Howarth; Spring 2015: J. Holler, J. Immich)

GEOG 0200 Food Geographies (Fall 2014)
How do food and eating shape our social relationships and our understandings of environment and place? Where does our food come from, and what does it take to get it to us? These questions are fundamentally geographic. Exploring how food is produced, distributed, and consumed leads to a deeper understanding of the complex relationships between societies and environment. The understanding, interpretation, and analysis of these relationships define the discipline of human geography. In this course we will take a critical approach to the study of food across multiple scales, from food systems in Vermont to the global political economy of food. We will explore the political, social, cultural, and economic dimensions of food in particular spaces, places, environments, contexts, and regions, providing an advanced introduction to key concepts and modes of analysis in human geography. 3 hrs. lect./1 hr. disc. SOC (K. McKinney)

GEOG 0205 Geographic Perspectives on Political Ecology (Spring 2015)
This course will provide an introduction to political ecology, an important area of human geography since the 1980s. Political ecology offers a framework for understanding, critically analyzing, and rethinking explanations of human impacts on the environment. For political ecologists, environmental change results from uneven access to resources, and hence from power relations. In this course we will use the framework of political ecology and key concepts from human geography (scale, context, space, place, situated knowledge, spatial diffusion) to write about the production and spread of knowledge, discourse, and explanations of environmental issues and conflicts over resources. 3 hr. sem. CW, SOC (K. McKinney)

GEOG 0210 Geographic Perspectives on International Development (Fall 2014)
This class is an exploration of some of the key concepts, theories, ideologies, and practices of international development as they relate to issues of environmental and social change. We will approach these “ways of knowing” about development and the environment through three topics: (1) “natural” disasters; (2) oil; and (3) waste. For each of these topics we will draw on multiple case studies across the world including Haiti, New Orleans, Pakistan, India, Nigeria, and South Africa. These case studies will help us to more fully discuss and understand the dynamics of who does development, how, where, why, and with what results. With each of the themes we will examine different practices of international development, including post-disaster international aid, the shipping and dumping of waste, and environmental conflicts in the everyday lives of people in oil-rich areas of the world. This approach will allow us to break down mainstream discourses of development and “sustainability,” critically examine development practice, and imagine alternative approaches to development. 3 hrs. lect. AAL, CMP, SOC (T. Mayer)

GEOG 0213 Population Geography (Spring 2015)
Through a combination of lectures, readings, and exercises, this course provides background and analytical experience in the spatial dimensions of population dynamics. Students will theoretically and empirically examine geographic variations in natural increase, domestic and international migration, infant mortality, disease, and hunger. Topics will include the intersection of settlement-environment-disease, circular migration systems, cultural influences on demographic processes, and linkages between international and domestic migration flows. We will also assess various policy options and their effectiveness in addressing important demographic issues. The exercises will expose students to the vast amount of population data publicly available and introduce them to techniques used to examine and assess population related issues. DED, NOR, SOC (P. Nelson)

GEOG 0215 Political Geography (Spring 2015)
Political relations within and between states do not occur in a vacuum. Rather, they are rooted in a specific and tangible geographic context. Political geography examines the interactions between this context and political processes at various geographic scales, ranging from the local to the global level. This course will focus primarily on the state and international level and will address issues such as the territorial exercise of power, state formation, nationalism, geopolitics, and international conflicts and cooperation. 3 hrs. lect. SOC (J. Rodd)

GEOG 0226 Geopolitics of Sub-Saharan Africa (Spring 2015)
In this course students will be introduced to geographies of Sub-Saharan Africa, a vast region containing dozens of states and extraordinary ecological, cultural, and political diversity. Students will learn about the basic physical and human geography of Africa and discover the historical and contemporary political geography of Sub-Saharan Africa. Following a regional orientation, we will compare and contrast case studies to explore key themes: 1) Borders, territories, and populations; 2) Land and identity; 3) Resource politics; 4) Aid, trade, and development; and 5) Cities and power. Drawing these themes together, we will conclude with a group exercise simulating negotiation over natural resources in East Africa.  3 hrs, lect. AAL, CMP, SOC (J. Rasplica Rodd)

GEOG 0230 Geography of South Asia: Youth (Spring 2015)
In this course we will explore the idea of regions through the representations and history of the area of the world referred to as South Asia, viewed through the lens of Geographies of Youth. Geographies of Youth is the study of how social and economic transformations, operating from the global scale to everyday local activities, are altering young people’s lives. We will use key concepts from geography, such as scale, space, place, identity, and context to explore everyday experiences of young people in Pakistan, India, Bhutan, Sri Lanka, Bangladesh, and Nepal. Focusing on the themes of politics, education, and work, we will consider connections among young people in these places and students at Middlebury. 3 hrs. lect. AAL, SOC (K. McKinney)

GEOG 0239 History of Cartography (Spring 2015)
This course introduces students to the history of maps as historical documents, records of social values and worldviews, instruments of power, and artistic productions of the cultures and historical periods in which they were created. Course topics will include indigenous mapping, the pegging out of empires, how cartography has served the interests of nation states, scientific revolutions in mapping technologies, maps in art, and mapping as a metaphor and expression of human experience. The overall goal is for students to learn to read maps deeply and understand how they have influenced, and how they reflect, major social trends and culture. (Not open to students who have taken GEOG 1004) 3 hrs. lect. ART, HIS (A. Knowles)

GEOG 0240 Health & Medical Geography (Fall 2014)
In this course we will explore three major geographic approaches to studying health, morbidity, health care, and human wellbeing using a variety of approaches: 1) ecological, in which the relationship between human and environment is analyzed; 2) social, including socio-behavioral and political economy approaches; and 3) spatial analytic, which draw on mapping, geospatial, and spatial statistical techniques to identify patterns. We will apply these approaches to case studies from North America, South East Asia, Sub-Saharan Afric,a and elsewhere. We will also consider spatial variation of pandemics and trans-world connections and processes relevant to global health. 3 hrs. lect. CMP, SOC (J. Rodd)

GEOG 0328 GIS for the Developing World (Spring 2015)
In this course we will explore the opportunities and challenges of using geographic information systems (GIS) to study population and environmental change in least developed countries. Students will learn techniques to overcome the digital divide in countries with scarce data and low technological capacity, drawing on examples from Africa. In labs and independent projects, we will use open source software and data, learn how to control for data errors and quality, digitize and classify satellite images, analyze change over time, and practice participatory GIS. Throughout the course, we will critically reflect on how GIS affects our understanding and governance of society and the environment. (GEOG 0120 or GEOG 0320) 3 hrs. lect./disc./3 hrs. lab AAL, DED, SOC (J. Holler)

GEOG 0329 GIS for Historical Landscape Studies (Spring 2015)
This project and laboratory based course connects the classroom, GIS models, and field methods to study and share stories of post-settlement land-use and landscape change in New England. Drawing on case studies and literature, we will use GIS to explore the complex histories of landscape change. We will study the theoretical foundations of historical geography, as well as landscape analysis using advanced GIS tools (spatial statistics, cost surfaces, viewsheds). Then we move into the field-based component focusing on Addison County, Vermont, learning hands-on surveying techniques used to create GIS data. A web-mapping based project will conclude the course. (GEOG 0120 or GEOG 0320, or by waiver) DED, NOR (J. Immich)

GEOG 0339 Practicing Human Geography (Fall 2014)
Asking and answering geographical questions often invokes a variety of specific spatial-analytical techniques and methodologies. In Practicing Human Geography, students will employ a variety of both quantitative and qualitative methodologies in specific research contexts. Through lectures, examples, and readings, students will learn the types of questions each technique is designed to answer, how it works, and how to interpret the results. During weekly discussion sections, students will gain hands on experience with various software packages and employ these techniques to complete a series of research exercises. These research exercises, participation, and a final exam will form the basis for evaluation. (GEOG 0100, and at least one 0200 level course in geography; open to second-semester junior majors and senior majors only; others by waiver) 3 hrs. lect./3 hrs. lab DED (J. Rodd)

GSFS/PSCI 0372 Gender and International Relations (Spring 2015)
Many issues facing international society affect, and are affected by, gender.  Global poverty, for example, is gendered, since 70% of the world's population living below $1.25 per day is female. Women are far more vulnerable to rape in war and water scarcity, and they are moreover globally politically underrepresented.  In this course we will use theories of international relations, including realism, neoliberalism, and feminism, to study how international society addresses (or fails to address) these challenges through bodies such as the UN and treaties such as the Elimination of Violence Against Women. 3 hrs. lect./disc. (International Relations and Foreign Policy) CMP, SOC (K. George)

GEOG 0413 Seminar in Population Geography: Migration in the Twenty-first Century (Fall 2014)
On average, 20 percent of the U.S. population changes residence in any given year, yet the scale, geography, motivations, and impacts of these movements are highly variable, making migration an incredibly pervasive and complex phenomenon. Furthermore, international immigration continues to attract considerable academic, political, and media attention. This course will explore contemporary approaches to migration studies emphasizing the important insights and contributions of geographers. How have geographers examined migration, and how have geographical approaches changed over time? In what ways has technology influenced the motivations, frequency, and implications of migration behavior? What are the different impacts of migration on individuals, households, and communities? And, what are the new innovations in scholarly approaches to migration? Through a combination of readings from contemporary migration literature, discussions, and analyses, students in this seminar will gain an appreciation for and understanding of this incredibly rich and complex phenomena of migration. (Open to second semester juniors and seniors only; others by waiver) 3 hrs. sem. (P. Nelson)

GEOG 0420 Seminar in GIS: Innovations in Teaching and Learning GIS (Fall 2014)
How can technological innovations – open-source GIS, multimedia production and online publishing – change how people learn GIS and other spatial technologies? In this seminar we will critically investigate empirical research on how people learn to solve problems and think spatially, how the design of instruction can influence this learning, and how technological innovations can potentially transform teaching practices. Students will then independently develop and assess multimedia modules that are designed to help people learn to use GIS and other spatial methods.  Potential target audiences for these modules may include high school students, college students in a particular discipline, non-profit and grassroots organizations, or other social groups who can apply GIS and spatial tools to solve practical or academic problems. The modules will be published online, contributing to a web-based educational resource for teaching GIS. (GEOG 0120) 3 hrs. sem. (J. Howarth)

GEOG 0436 Terrorism (Spring 2015)
Terrorism, the act of violent resistance against real or perceived oppression, has taken on new dimensions in an age dominated by mass media and technology. Can we make reliable distinctions between terrorism, anarchism, guerrilla warfare and random mass murder? What are the political, social, and cultural conditions that favor terrorism? What makes an individual a terrorist? How have governments coped with terrorist movements? What is "state terrorism"? Looking at terrorist movements across the globe, as well as the historical evolution of terrorism, this course will examine explanations for this disintegrative phenomenon given by social scientists, historians, writers, and filmmakers. Students interested in the possibility of receiving German credit for this course should contact Michael Geisler. This course is equivalent to IGST 0436. 3 hrs. sem. (T. Mayer)

GEOG 0500 Independent Study (Fall 2014, Spring 2015)
A one-credit intensive research project developed under the direction of a faculty member. Junior majors only. (Approval Required) (Staff)

GEOG 0700 Senior Research (Fall 2014, Spring 2015)
A one-credit intensive research project developed under the direction of a faculty member. Senior majors only. (Approval Required) (Staff)

GEOG 0701 Senior Thesis (Fall 2014, Spring 2015)
Students with a departmental GPA of 3.3 or higher are eligible to complete a two-credit senior thesis. In order to complete a senior thesis, students must have a proposal approved by a primary thesis advisor and a secondary departmental reader prior to registering for the first 0701 credit. Upon completion of the thesis, thesis students will present their work in a public seminar and defend the thesis in front of the departmental faculty. Thesis presentations and defenses will typically take place during the final week of classes or the examination period. Upon completion of the presentation and defense, the primary advisor and secondary departmental reader will be responsible for evaluating and grading the thesis. It is strongly encouraged that students considering a thesis discuss their ideas with an advisor during the semester prior to registering for formal thesis credits. (Approval only) (Staff)

Geology

Required for the Major: The program for a geology major consists of 11 courses within the department and two additional cognate courses. These courses must include:

     (1) One 0100-level course (we strongly recommend Environmental Geology (GEOL 0112), Elements of Oceanography (GEOL 0161) or Dynamic Earth (GEOL 0170)).

     (2) Four core courses: Bedrock Geology of Vermont (GEOL 0201), Mineralogy (GEOL 0211), and Structural Geology (GEOL 0281) are required, plus either Geomorphic Processes (GEOL 0251) or Surface and Ground Water (GEOL 0255).

     (3) Four elective courses (0200-level or higher) chosen from the Middlebury geology curriculum, at least two of which must be at the 0300-level. One additional off-campus geology course can be substituted for electives.

     (4) Two cognate courses (any Biology, Chemistry, or Physics laboratory course, or Math 0116 or higher).

     (5) Two Credits of Senior Work (GEOL 0400 and GEOL 0700)

     The two course senior sequence (GEOL 0400 and 0700) is the culmination of the geology major and consists of original research based on field and/or laboratory investigations by the student. The requirements for the major listed above are considered to be minimal. We suggest students planning a career in geology or the earth sciences take additional courses in other sciences and mathematics, as well as additional geology courses. The requirements for the major allow for considerable flexibility and thus students should consult regularly with their geology department advisors for the selection of specific courses.

     Geology Minor: A total of five courses is required. The minor shall consist of one introductory course (either GEOL 0112 or GEOL 0161 or GEOL 0170), plus four higher-level courses, which must include GEOL 0201 or GEOL 0211, and at least one 0300-level course. After completing an introductory geology course, students who intend to minor in geology should arrange specific 0200- and 0300-level courses with the geology chair or designate.

     Departmental Honors in geology are based primarily on outstanding work in original research (GEOL 0700), and are related to course grades only in the context of guidelines in the College Handbook.

GEOL 0104 Earthquakes and Volcanoes (Spring 2015)
Earthquakes and volcanic eruptions, despite being labeled as "natural disasters," are normal, natural geologic processes that have been occurring for billions of years on this planet. Unfortunately, these processes claim tens of thousands of lives and billions of dollars in property damage annually (on average). This course will focus on the fundamental causes of earthquakes and volcanic eruptions and the wide range of secondary effects (e.g., landslides, tsunami, etc.) that accompany these natural disasters. (Students who have completed GEOL 0170 are not permitted to register for GEOL 0104) 3 hrs. lect./1 hr. disc. SCI (R. Coish, D. West)

GEOL 0112 Environmental Geology (Spring 2015)
Geological processes form the physical framework on which ecosystems operate. We require an understanding of the geological environment in order to minimize disruption of natural systems by human development and to avoid hazards such as floods and landslides. This course is an overview of basic tectonic, volcanic, and landscape-forming processes and systems, including earthquakes, rivers, soils, and groundwater. Environmental effects of energy, mineral, and water resource use, and waste disposal are also examined. Weekly field labs after spring break. Registration priority for first and second-year students. 3 hrs. lect./disc., 3 hrs. lab/field trips SCI (J. Munroe)

GEOL 0142 The Ocean Floor (Spring 2015)
Have you wanted to view the ocean floor from a submersible? It is a dark but dynamic place. The constant interchange between water and sediments has created sedimentary drifts and mudwaves over 500 feet high! Earthquakes cause underwater mud avalanches that travel over 60 m.p.h. Hydrothermal vents along the ocean ridges host a variety of unusual plant and animal life. This course will explore the ocean depths via the classroom and will introduce the development of ocean basins, their evolution, and processes occurring within them (Students who have completed GEOL 0170 are not permitted to register for GEOL 0142.) 3 hrs. lect./1 hr. disc. SCI (P. Manley)

GEOL 0161 Elements of Oceanography (Fall 2014)
Oceanographic exploration is introduced through study of ocean basins and continental margins. The multidisciplinary nature of oceanography is emphasized by using principles of marine geology, geophysics, geochemistry, and biology to address contemporary problems. Techniques of data collection and analysis are taught aboard the College's research vessel, R/V Folger, located on Lake Champlain. 3 hrs. lect./3 hrs. lab/field trips DED, SCI (T. Manley)

GEOL 0170 The Dynamic Earth (Fall 2014)
Sea-floor spreading and continental drift, earthquakes and volcanoes, origin and evolution of mountain systems, and concepts of plate tectonics are viewed in light of the geology of ocean basins and continents. Modern processes such as river, coastal, wind, and glaciers will be studied and their effect on shaping the geologic landscape. Laboratory: field problems in Vermont geology; interpretation of geologic maps, regional tectonic synthesis. 3 hrs. lect./3 hrs. lab/field trips SCI (J. Munroe, D. West)

GEOL 0201 Bedrock Geology of Vermont (Fall 2014)
This course explores the fascinating geology of Vermont. Students learn the geology through six field problems, involving extended trips around western Vermont. Lectures on the meaning of rocks support the fieldwork. The last few indoor labs are devoted to understanding the geologic map of Vermont. Emphasis is on descriptive writing and on use of data to interpret origin of rocks. Culminates in a written report on the geologic and plate tectonic evolution of Vermont. (One geology course) 3 hrs. lect., 3 hrs. lab/field trips CW, SCI (R. Coish)

GEOL 0211 Mineralogy (Spring 2015)
This course covers the nature, identification, composition, and meaning of minerals and mineral assemblages. Introduction to crystallography, hand-specimen identification, optical mineralogy, x-ray analysis, and electron microbeam analysis. Laboratory: study of minerals in hand-specimen and under the polarizing microscope; use of x-ray diffraction and electron microscopy in mineral analysis. (One geology course) 3 hrs. lect./3 hrs. lab SCI (R. Coish)

GEOL 0241 Sedimentary Rocks (Spring 2015)
This course will provide an overview of the tools used in determining depositional environments and tectonic settings of sedimentary rocks. Lectures will cover depositional systems and facies relationships, stratigraphic principles, origin of sedimentary structures and textures. Labs and field trips will include methods in sedimentary basin analysis, and sedimentary petrology. (formerly GEOL 0321) (Any 0100-level geology course or by waiver) 3 hrs. lect., 3 hrs. lab/field trips SCI (P. Manley)

GEOL 0257 Soils, Geology, and the Environment (Fall 2014)
Soils constitute the fundamental link between atmosphere, water, biota, and rock. Knowledge of the physical, chemical, and biological processes operating in soils is essential when assessing natural cycles as well as anthropogenic alterations to those natural cycles. In this course, we will analyze a wide range of issues, including soil formation, soil mineralogy, soil fertility and nutrient cycling, sediment pollution, soil contamination, water pollution, sediment erosion and deposition, and implications for land-use planning. Labs will be project-oriented and will consist of a combination of fieldwork and instrumental analysis. (ENVS 0112, any GEOL course, or waiver) SCI (J. Munroe, P. Ryan)

GEOL 0281 Structural Geology (Fall 2014)
Plate tectonics and mountain building processes result in deformation of the Earth's crust. Structural geology is the study of this deformation, and this course will examine the many types of structures found in crustal rocks (folds, faults, etc.) and explore the forces responsible for their formation. Laboratory exercises will emphasize the hands-on description and analysis of structures in the field, as well as the practical aspects of map interpretation and computer analysis of structural data. (A geology course or by waiver) 3 hrs. lect., 3 hrs. lab/field trips CW, SCI (D. West)

GEOL 0300 Introduction to Petrology (Fall 2014)
An introduction to processes involved in the formation of igneous and metamorphic rocks. The first half of the course includes inquiry into the classification, plate tectonic setting, and evolution of volcanic and plutonic igneous rocks. The second half includes study of progressive metamorphism, the pressure-temperature- time history of metamorphic rocks, and the relation between metamorphism and plate tectonics. Labs will include thin section studies of igneous and metamorphic rocks, as well as field trips in Vermont and the Adirondacks. (GEOL 0211) 3 hrs. lect., 3 hrs. lab/field trips (R. Coish)

GEOL 0301 Plate Tectonics and World Geology (Spring 2015)
Tectonics refers to the many processes associated with development of regional-scale geologic features. These features include the origin and evolution of mountain belts, the growth of continents and ocean basins, and the causes of earthquakes and volcanic eruptions. The challenge of tectonic analysis lies in the accumulation and synthesis of a wide range of geologic information in an attempt to reconstruct the tectonic history of a particular region. An overnight weekend field trip towards the end of the semester will introduce students firsthand to the tectonic elements of the Appalachians. 3 hrs. lect. SCI (D. West)

GEOL 0342 Marine Geology (Fall 2014)
The oceans cover over 70 percent of the Earth's surface, but only in the last few decades has extensive investigation of the geology of the Earth beneath the sea been possible. This course will present the results of these continuing investigations. Although the whole field of marine geology will be reviewed, the emphasis will be on marine sediments and sedimentary processes and paleoceangraphy. Laboratory: synthesis of geological and geophysical data concerning a selected region of the ocean, with special emphasis on the results of the Deep Sea Drilling Project. (GEOL 0161 or GEOL 0170) 3 hrs. lect., 3 hrs. lab (P. Manley)

GEOL 0400 Senior Thesis Research Seminar (Fall 2014)
This seminar will focus on methods and strategies for completing advanced geological research and provides a springboard for senior thesis research. Topics will include field and laboratory techniques, primary literature review, and scientific writing. Students taking this course are expected to be simultaneously working on the early stages of their senior thesis research. During the semester students will present a thesis proposal and the seminar will culminate with each student completing a draft of the first chapter of their senior thesis. GEOL 0400 is required of all geology majors. 3 hrs. disc. or lab (P. Ryan)

GEOL 0500 Readings and Research (Fall 2014, Spring 2015)
Individual or group independent study, laboratory or field research projects, readings and discussion of timely topics in earth and environmental science. (Approval only) (Staff)

GEOL 0700 Senior Thesis Research (Fall 2014, Spring 2015)
Upon completion of GEOL 0400, all senior geology majors will continue their independent senior thesis research by taking one unit of GEOL 0700. This research will culminate in a written thesis which must be orally defended. (Approval only) (Staff)

German

Requirements for the Major: Students are normally required to complete eight courses in German, above GRMN 0299, including at least one advanced level seminar (above GRMN 0399) or a 0700 level honors thesis during the senior year. Where appropriate, one course may be taken in English. At the beginning of each term a placement test is administered for incoming students to determine which course would be most suitable for their level of competence. The department expects that majors will spend at least one semester of study in a German-speaking country before graduating. Normally, they will spend one or two semesters at the Freie Universität in Berlin and/or the Johannes-Gutenberg Universität in Mainz. Before enrolling in one of our Schools in Germany, students must complete two courses at the 0300-level. For more information, please consult Study in Germany.

     Honors: To be a candidate for honors, students must have an average of at least B+ in German. Honors work (a senior thesis or project) is normally done during a student's last year at Middlebury.

     Minor in German: The German minor consists of a sequence of five courses, taught in German, starting at or above the 0200-level. At least three of those courses must be at the 0300-level or higher. First-year students who place above the 0200-level in the placement test must take at least one 0400-level course as part of their minor. One course may be satisfied through advanced placement (AP) credit in combination with a departmental placement test. Students who receive AP credit start their minor on the 0300-level.

     Credit for Advanced Placement is given for scores of 4 or 5, a high score on the departmental placement test, and a placement conference with the student. In addition, the student must successfully complete at least one course above the 0200-level in the department, taught in German, to qualify for AP credit.

     Germany: The Middlebury School in Germany has sites located in Berlin and Mainz.

GRMN 0101 Beginning German (Fall 2014)
Geared toward quick and early proficiency in comprehension and free expression. Grammatical structures are practiced through group activities and situational exercises (e.g., role-playing games and partner interviews). Active class participation by students is required and will be counted toward the final grade. Since this is an integrated approach, there will be laboratory assignments but no special drill sections. Classes meet five times a week. Students take GRMN 0102 as their winter term course. 5 hrs. lect. LNG (N. Eppelsheimer, F. Feiereisen)

GRMN 0103 Beginning German Continued (Spring 2015)
This course is a continuation of GRMN 0101 and 0102. Increased emphasis on communicative competence through short oral presentations and the use of authentic German language materials (videos, songs, slides). Introduction to short prose writings and other documents relating to contemporary German culture. Five class meetings per week. (GRMN 0101 plus winter term GRMN 0102, or equivalent) 5 hrs. lect. LNG (N. Eppelsheimer, R. Russi)

GRMN 0111 Accelerated Beginning German (Spring 2015)
This class is aimed at students who wish to begin the study of German on the fast lane. In one semester, we will cover a year's material, the equivalent of GRMN 0101, 0102, and 0103. We will develop all four skills in an intensive, immersion-style environment, allowing students to continue German in the regular second-year classes in the fall. Classes meet five times per week, including two 75-minute meetings on Tuesdays and Thursdays, and an additional drill session. Students are expected to fully participate in all departmental activities. No prerequisites. 6 hr. lect./disc./1 hr. drill LNG (B. Matthias)

GRMN 0201 Intermediate German (Fall 2014)
GRMN 0201/0202 is a culture-based intermediate language sequence that focuses students' attention on intercultural aspects of language acquisition, vocabulary expansion, reading and writing strategies, and a review of grammar. It moves from a focus on issues of individual identity and personal experiences to a discussion of Germany today (GRMN 0201), explores national identity in Germany, Austria, and Switzerland, and supplies an overview of cultural history, literary achievements, and philosophical traditions in the German-speaking world (GRMN 0103 or equivalent) 4 hrs. lect. LNG (R. Russi, B. Matthias)

GRMN 0202 Intermediate German Continued (Spring 2015)
GRMN 0201/0202 is a culture-based intermediate language sequence that focuses students' attention on intercultural aspects of language acquisition, vocabulary expansion, reading and writing strategies, and a review of grammar. It moves from a focus on issues of individual identity and personal experiences to a discussion of Germany today (GRMN 0201), explores national identity in Germany, Austria, and Switzerland, and supplies an overview of cultural history, literary achievements, and philosophical traditions in the German-speaking world (GRMN 0201) 4 hrs. lect. LNG (F. Feiereisen, R. Russi)

GRMN/HARC 0341 Faust’s Metropolis: History, Architecture, and Urbanism in Berlin (in English) (Fall 2014)
In this course we will investigate the rich and complicated built environment of Berlin. By looking at both visual evidence and textual sources we will uncover how the city has been transformed from a cultural backwater during the early modern period to the current capital of a reunified Germany. By the conclusion of this course, you will be comfortable “reading” buildings and spaces and will be able to navigate both the physical city of Berlin and the many layers of history buried within. 3 hrs. sem. ART, EUR, HIS (E. Sassin)

GRMN/HARC 0344 Naked Truth: Approaches to the Body in Early 20th Century German-Austrian Art (in English) (Spring 2015)
In this team-taught course we will examine conceptions of the human body and the manner of its visualization in Germany and Austria in the period leading up to and following the First World War. Part of our inquiry will involve the planning of an exhibition of original artworks from the holdings of the Sabarsky Foundation (New York City), provisionally entitled Naked Truth, at the Middlebury College Museum in the fall semester of 2015. With the help of primary source readings from the period, and secondary readings in philosophy, critical and literary theory, and art history, we will consider how German and Austrian artists turned to the nude body as the site through which questions of personal and political freedom, desire, beauty, nature, culture, and their antonyms could be negotiated and represented. Taking these ideas as one critical point of departure, the class will work with select drawings, paintings, and etchings by Gustav Klimt, Egon Schiele, Otto Dix, and Käthe Kollwitz, among others. 3 hrs. sem. ART, EUR, PHL (B. Matthias, E. Garrison)

GRMN 0350 Advanced Writing Workshop (Fall 2014)
With its emphasis on grammatical structures, this course is designed to develop students' writing skills, bridging the 0200-level courses and the advanced 0300 and 0400 levels. From initial sentences and short paragraphs to a final term paper the course tries to assist individual students with their specific problems with German compositions. In addition to frequent written assignments, students also read excerpts from several German papers and magazines in order to familiarize themselves with a variety of narrative styles. (Formerly GRMN 0304) 3 hrs. lect. CW (5 spaces), LNG (R. Russi)

GRMN/LNGT 0370 German Linguistics (Fall 2014)
This course simultaneously presents an overview of the major subfields of linguistics as they apply to the German language and a discussion of how today's Standard German evolved. We will pay attention to important concepts in phonetics/phonology, morphology, syntax, semantics, and pragmatics. In addition to these theoretical and descriptive aspects, we will discuss sociolinguistic issues such as language and gender and regional variations within Germany, Austria, Switzerland, and Luxemburg. Lectures and discussions will be conducted in German. (Formerly GRMN 0340) 3 hrs. sem. EUR, LNG (F. Feiereisen)

GRMN 0420 Escape to Life: Exile and Refugee Experiences 1933-1945 (Fall 2014)
In this course we will explore the experiences of those who fled persecution from Nazi Germany after 1933. Using literary texts, autobiographies, documentaries, photographs, and letters, we will follow escape routes through Europe and to overseas and will learn about international refugee politics, the “Kindertransporte,” and American journalist Varian Fry’s rescue network. Of special interest will be centers of exile culture in New York and Los Angeles/Hollywood, where famous intellectuals and artists such as Thomas and Heinrich Mann, Hannah Arendt , Bertolt Brecht, Marlene Dietrich, Billy Wilder, and many more found new or temporary homes and where many engaged in anti-Nazi advocacy writing. 3 hrs. lect./disc. EUR, LIT, LNG (N. Eppelsheimer)

GRMN 0445 Contemporary Germany & Sustainability (In German) (Spring 2015)
Already known as the country of poets and thinkers, Germany is becoming a land of ideas for sustainability and environmental innovation. In this course we will take a closer look at the origins of the German environmental movement and explore the three major components of sustainability–economy, society, and environment–in contemporary Germany. We will draw on political, literary, and scientific texts, films, works of art, and online resources while making frequent comparisons with global developments. Texts include Quaschning's Trash Sorters, Muesli Eaters, and Climate Protectors: We Germans and our Environment, and Wagenhofer’s We Feed the World. 3 hrs. lect./disc. EUR, LIT, LNG (N. Eppelsheimer)

GRMN 0475 Sounds and the City: German Urban Cultural History of the 20th and 21st Century (Spring 2015)
In this course, we will seek to understand the cultural history of 20th and 21st century Germany by examining its soundscapes. Analyzing recordings of selected events, we will discuss how history can be portrayed as an acoustic experience. Sound profiles of city spaces before, during, and after World War II and the Cold War will illustrate sound's impact on German society and its ability to create utopian/dystopian spaces. This line of inquiry invites us to rethink noise, silence, language, identity, power, and-considering the history of recording technologies-the nature of knowledge itself. We will consider works by literary scholars, historians, anthropologists, and musicologists. (Formerly GRMN 0410) 3 hrs. sem. EUR, LNG (F. Feiereisen)

GRMN 0500 Independent Study (Fall 2014, Spring 2015)
Approval required. (Staff)

GRMN 0700 Honors Project (Fall 2014, Spring 2015)
Approval required. (Staff)

Global Health

The study of Global Health originates with an understanding of the reasons for the steep inequalities that characterize health worldwide (why, for example, life-expectancy in Switzerland is twice that of Swaziland). Many people are drawn to this field because they hope to assist in improving health, an endeavor that requires not only an understanding of disease epidemiology but also a grasp of the social and political complexity of population-level interventions as well as international aid. The study of Global Health, then, is inherently interdisciplinary, drawing on theory and method from fields including political science, biology, economics, geography, mathematics, and anthropology.
     The Global Health minor at Middlebury is not intended to be a pre-professional program covering all the skills necessary for a career in public health. Rather, the goal is to draw on the strength of a liberal arts curriculum to give students a breadth of understanding and a depth of critical thought that complements the nuts-and-bolts education provided by most master’s in public health programs. Minors in Global Health at Middlebury will draw on a number of disciplines to appreciate the deep complexity of global health problems, and use that knowledge to think about these problems in innovative ways.
     The minor in Global Health is available to students who complete the courses listed below. The purpose of this minor is to encourage students to take an interdisciplinary perspective when thinking about global health problems. No course for the minor may also count towards a student’s major.

All students must take the core course:

SOAN 0267 Global Health or INTD 0257 Global Health

One of the following methods courses (if the methods requirement is met through coursework for a major, students may substitute an additional elective in place of a methods class):

BIOL 0211 Experimental Design and Statistical Analysis
ECON 0210 Economic Statistics
GEOG 0120 Fundamentals of Geographic Information Systems
MATH 0116 Introduction to Statistical Science
PSCI 1130 Statistics for Social Sciences
PSYC 0201 Psychological Statistics
SOAN 0302 The Research Process: Ethnography and Qualitative Methods
AP credit for Statistics

Three additional courses chosen from any of the following (no more than two courses taken from the same department may count towards the minor):

BIOL 0140 Ecology and Evolution or BIOL 0145 Cell Biology and Genetics
ECON 0150 Introductory Macroeconomics or ECON 0155 Introductory Microeconomics
ENVS 0112 Natural Science and the Environment
GEOG 0100 Place and Society: Local to Global
GEOG 0207 Resource Wars
GEOG 0210 Geographic Perspectives on International Development
GEOL 0255 Surface and Ground Water
HIST 0114 History of Modern Africa
IGST 0101 Introduction to International Studies
PSCI 0109 International Politics
PSCI 0202 African Politics
PSCI 0258 The Politics of International Humanitarian Action
PSCI 0304 International Political Economy
SOAN 0211 Human Ecology
SOAN 0340 The Anthropology of Human Rights
SOAN 0387 Medical Anthropology

Other appropriate courses may be substituted for the methods or elective courses with the approval of the program director. Approval requires submission of a petition form available at http://www.middlebury.edu/academics/catalog/depts/globalhealth.

     In addition, students minoring in Global Health are strongly encouraged to take advantage of Middlebury’s resources by studying abroad, preferably in a resource-poor setting, and by becoming proficient in a foreign language.

Hebrew

Middlebury offers courses in both Classical and Modern Hebrew, and students may focus on one or the other in the Minor in Hebrew. (Knowledge of one stage in the history of Hebrew may complement the other; students may therefore combine the study of Classical and Modern Hebrew, within the guidelines below.) Courses taken in the summer at the Brandeis University-Middlebury School of Hebrew will be granted credit toward the minor. Courses taken elsewhere may be granted credit with the permission of the Hebrew faculty.

Students should plan the minor with following limitations in mind:

a. Beginning Modern Hebrew is offered every fall term.

b. Beginning Classical Hebrew is normally offered in alternate years with the next sequence beginning in the 2014-2015 academic year.

Requirements for the Minor

Modern Track:

(I) Four semesters of Modern Hebrew starting at the level of HEBM 0102 or higher; plus (II) a fifth course in Modern Hebrew, or a course taken abroad in Hebrew, or a course on Hebrew literature in translation (e.g. HEBR 0220), or a course in Classical Hebrew beyond the introductory level (HEBR 0102 or higher). When appropriate, students may also register for independent study (HEBM 0500) to fulfill requirements for a course in Modern Hebrew.

Classical Track:

(I) Three semesters of Classical Hebrew (HEBR 0101-0102-0201 or higher); (II) either CLAS/RELI 0262 The Formation of Judaism in Antiquity or RELI 0280 Hebrew Bible/Old Testament; plus (III) either a fourth semester of Classical Hebrew (HEBR 0301 or higher) or a course in Modern Hebrew beyond the introductory level (HEBM 0102 or higher).

Classical Hebrew Courses

HEBR 0101 Beginning Classical Hebrew I (Fall 2014)
The goal of the Hebrew sequence is to develop students' ability to read the Jewish Bible (Old Testament) and later Hebrew literature. An introduction to classical Hebrew, this course presupposes nothing, begins with mastery of the Hebrew alphabet, and leads students through the noun and the basic structure of the Hebrew verbal system. By the end of the course, students will be reading and translating brief biblical narratives with the use of a lexicon. LNG (R. Schine)

HEBR 0102 Beginning Classical Hebrew II (Spring 2015)
This course continues the introductory sequence (HEBR 0101) offered in Winter Term and will conclude by reading a single biblical text such as Jonah or Ruth in its entirety. Selections of biblical poetry and narrative will be read throughout the semester. 3 hrs. lect. LNG (R. Schine)

HEBR 0500 Independent Study (Fall 2014)
Approval required.

Modern Hebrew Courses

HEBM 0101 Introductory Modern Hebrew I (Fall 2014)
In this course students will become acquainted with the basic grammatical and formal concepts necessary for the comprehension of the Modern Hebrew language. We will focus on the fundamentals of reading, writing, listening, and speaking, with a particular emphasis placed on the acquisition of conversational ability. We will also make use of audiovisual, situational, and cultural exercises, and give attention to the elements of Classical form and style that provided a foundation for Modern Hebrew, which was revived as a vernacular in the late 19th century. No previous knowledge of Hebrew is required. 6 hrs. LNG (O. Zakai)

HEBM 0103 Introductory Modern Hebrew III (Spring 2015)
This course is a continuation of Modern Hebrew 0102 which will be offered during winter term. Students will further develop their skills in written and oral communication, and will expand their knowledge of the cultures of modern Israel through both audio and visual media. (HEBM 0102 or equivalent) 5 hrs. lect. LNG (O. Zakai)

HEBM 0201 Intermediate Modern Hebrew I (Fall 2014)
This course is a continuation of HEBM 0103. Using authentic audio and visual materials, we will place emphasis on developing the skills required for intermediate-level written and communicative competence. In addition, students will gain a deeper understanding of the forms and style of Classical Hebrew, both of which are necessary for formal composition, interaction, and reading comprehension in Modern Hebrew. (HEBM 0103 or equivalent) 5 hrs. lect/disc. LNG (S. Hascal, T. Levi)

HEBM 0230 Israeli Authors: Survey of Contemporary Hebrew Literature (Fall 2014)
In this course we will explore contemporary Israeli literature. Closely reading texts by influential Israeli authors in their cultural, political, and historical contexts, we will devote each week to one author, providing students with solid grasp of the diverse poetic and ideological positions that comprise the Israeli literary map. Reading materials will include novels, short stories, poetry, and drama by authors such as Amos Oz, A.B. Yehoshua, David Grossman, Hanokh Levin, Amalia Kahana Karmon, Yehuda Amichai, Anton Shammas, and Orly Kastel-Bloom. All texts will be read in English translation. 3 hrs. lect./disc. AAL, LIT (O. Zakai)

HEBM/SOAN 0234 State and Society in Contemporary Israel (Fall 2014)
In this course we will examine Israeli society and politics in a period of rapid and profound transformation. We will begin with an introductory unit on Zionism, Palestinian nationalism, and the history of the state. Subsequent units will examine the social, cultural, and political characteristics of Israel’s main population sectors (European, Middle Eastern, Russian, and Ethiopian Jews and Palestinian citizens of the state) and religious groupings (Muslims and Jews, including secular, traditional, national-religious, and ultra-Orthodox). The final units will examine ongoing political struggles that will shape the future of the state, including struggles over the role of religion in public life; civil rights and democracy; and West Bank settlements and the Palestinian-Israeli peace process. Most readings assignments will be social scientific or historical in nature, but will also include some journalism and literature. 3 hrs. lect. AAL, SOC (T. Sasson)

HEBM 0236 Israel from the Margins: Culture and Politics (Spring 2015)
How does Israeli culture negotiate the diversity of Israeli society? How does it represent the internal tensions complicating this society? And how do marginal subjects claim their place in Israeli culture? In this course we will explore the literary and cinematic production of Israeli women, LGBT people, Mizrahim, and Palestinians. Course materials (in translation) will range from the provocative poetry of Yona Volach, to the work of Palestinian Hebrew authors Anton Shammas and Sayed Kashua, and Mizrahi authors Ronit Matalon, Amira Hess, and Albert Swissa. We will also watch several Israeli and Palestinian films that foreground question of nationality, ethnicity, gender, and sexuality. 3 hrs lect./disc. AAL, CMP, LIT (O. Zakai)

HEBM 0301 Advanced Intermediate Hebrew (Fall 2014)
This course will reinforce the acquired skills of speaking, listening comprehension,reading, and writing at the intermediate to mid/high level. We will focus primarily on contemporary cultural aspects, conversational Hebrew, reading of selections from Modern Literature: prose and poetry, skits,  and newspaper articles. 3 hrs. lect./disc. AAL, LNG (S. Hascal, T. Levi)

HEBM 0500 Independent Project (Fall 2014, Spring 2015)
Approval required. (Staff)

History

Required for the Major in History: Each major must take 11 history courses before graduation, including: (1) at least one but no more than three courses numbered 0100 to 0199; (2) at least one course in European history (which may include Russia/Soviet Union); (3) at least one course in United States history; (4) and at least one course in the history of Asia, Africa, Latin America, the Middle East, or Russia/Soviet Union, all to be taken at the 0200-level or higher. (A course in Russia/Soviet Union may not be used for more than one geographical area); (5) a reading seminar; (6) HIST 0600; (7) a two-term senior thesis, which counts as two of the required 11 courses.

     Two of the courses required for the major must deal primarily with the period before 1800. Courses which qualify for the pre-1800 requirement are identified in the course descriptions (see below) and a list is available from the department. In addition to winter term senior thesis study, one other winter term history course may be counted toward the eleven courses necessary for a major in history. With permission of the department, up to two cognate courses in historical aspects of other disciplines may be counted toward a major in history.

     Students planning to spend all or part of the junior year abroad should consult with the department before the second semester of the sophomore year.

     Advanced Placement: An advanced placement (AP) grade of 4 or 5 in a history subject supplies one college credit and counts for one course towards the history major requirement of 11 history courses. However, an AP grade of 4 or 5 cannot replace any other specific requirement for the major (see Required for the Major in History, above). In addition, a student wishing to apply an AP grade of 4 or 5 in European history toward the major cannot also count HIST 0103 or HIST 0104 toward the major. Such a student must take a different 0100-level course, and at least one course in European history at the 0200-level or higher. Furthermore, a student wishing to apply an AP grade of 4 or 5 in United States history toward the major cannot also count HIST 0203 or HIST 0204 and must take a different course in United States history to complete the major.

     Joint Major: A student who is a joint major in history and another department must take a total of at least eight courses in history, chosen in consultation with a faculty advisor. Cognates are not allowed. A student must take at least one course in two of three sub-fields: Europe, North America, and AAL (Asia, Africa, Latin America, Middle East, Russia/Soviet Union), and one course in the period before 1800. The choice of courses should depend upon the need to achieve an intellectual coherence and integrity in the student's program. Joint majors must take a reading seminar and HIST 0600 and must write a two-term thesis combining the skills of both major disciplines.

     International and Global Studies Majors with Disciplinary Focus in History: Students must complete a 0100-level course and five other courses, including a 0400-level seminar normally taken in the senior year. The seminar and at least two other courses should be within the regional focus, and at least one course should be outside the regional focus. With the permission of the History Department Chair, up to two of these courses can be taken abroad.

     Minors in History: Ending with the Class of 2015, students may choose to minor in history following the old or the new requirements. Beginning with the Class of 2016, all students who minor in history must follow the new requirements. The new requirements are as follows: a total of five courses, including one 0100-level course, one 0200-level course and one 0400-level course. No more than two courses may be taken abroad or at another undergraduate institution. Cognate courses from other disciplines will not normally be permitted. AP and IB credit cannot be counted towards a minor in history.

     Honors: To earn departmental honors, high honors*, or highest honors** a student must have at least a 3.4, 3.5*, or 3.67** average or above in history department courses other than the senior thesis, have an oral examination on the senior thesis, and receive a grade of at least B+, A-*, or A** on the thesis (HIST 0700).

HIST 0100-Level Courses
The 0100-level courses (0100-0199) deal with events and processes that affect human societies over long periods of time and across broad geographical areas not confined to national boundaries. These courses include components that act as introductions to the field of history.

HIST 0200-Level Courses
These are lecture courses that deal with a single cultural or national entity, or a clearly related group of such entities, over a substantial period of time (usually a century or more).

HIST 0300-Level Courses
These courses, for the most part, are topically focused courses. Many of them are lecture courses and some are taught in a seminar format. These are not, however, seminars that fulfill the reading seminar requirement.

HIST 0400-0450 Reading Seminars
Unlike the courses below the 0400 level, which are primarily lecture courses, these courses are reading seminars on particular periods or topics. They are open to all students, although in cases of overcrowding, history majors will be given priority. First-year students are admitted only by waiver.

HIST 0600 Research Seminar
All history majors are required to take HIST 0600 their junior fall or, if abroad at that time, their senior fall semester. In this course students will conceive, research, and write a work of history based on primary source material. After reading and discussion on historical methods and research strategies, students will pursue a paper topic as approved by the course professors.

International and Global Studies Seminars
These seminars are "capstone" courses required for the International and Global Studies major. They are thematic, interdisciplinary, cross-regional, and team-taught. Students who are not International and Global Studies majors may take these courses for departmental credit, but they will not normally fulfill the History Department major requirement of a 0400-level seminar.

HIST 0700 Senior Independent Study
All senior history majors will write a two-term thesis under an advisor in the area of their choosing. The department encourages students to do their theses during the fall and winter terms. Fall/spring theses are also acceptable and, with permission of the chair, winter/spring. On rare occasions, with departmental approval given for compelling reasons, a thesis may be initiated in the spring of an academic year and finished in the fall of the following year. All students beginning their thesis in a given academic year must attend the Thesis Writers' Workshops held in the fall and winter of that year. Further information about the thesis is available from the department.

HIST 0103 The Making of Europe (Fall 2014)
This course covers the history of Western Europe from the death of Caesar in 44 B.C. to the Peace of Westphalia in A.D. 1648. We will examine three interrelated themes: political authority within European society, the development of the religious culture of the West and the challenges to that culture, and the ways in which the development of a European economy contributed to the making of Europe itself. While examining these questions from the Roman Empire to early modern Europe, students will focus on the use of original sources, and on how historians interpret the past. Pre-1800. Not open to seniors. 2 hrs. lect./1 hr. disc. EUR, HIS, SOC (L. Burnham)

HIST 0105 The Atlantic World, 1492-1900 (Spring 2015)
Linking the Americas with Europe and Africa, the Atlantic has been a major conduit for the movement of peoples, goods, diseases, and cultures. This course will explore specific examples of transatlantic interchange, from imperialism and slave trade to religious movements, consumerism, and the rise of national consciousness. It will adopt a broad comparative perspective, ranging across regional, national, and ethnic boundaries. We will consider the varied experiences of Native Americans, Africans, and Europeans as they struggled to establish their own identities within a rapidly changing Atlantic world. Pre-1800. 2 hrs. lect./1 hr. disc. CMP, HIS, SOC (W. Hart)

HIST 0112 Modern East Asia (Spring 2015)
In this course we will examine East Asian history from 1800 to the present. We will study the “Chinese World Order,” the patterns of European imperialism that led to this order’s demise, the rise of Japan as an imperialist power, and 20th century wars and revolutions. We will concentrate on the emergence of Japan, China, and Korea as distinct national entities and on the socio-historical forces that have bound them together and pried them apart. We will seek a broader understanding of imperialism, patterns of nationalism and revolution, and Cold War configurations of power in East Asia. 2 hrs. lect./1 hr. disc. AAL, CMP, CW (17 spaces), HIS, SOC (M. Clinton)

HIST 0114 History of Modern Africa (Fall 2014)
We begin looking at revolutions in the early 19th century and the transformations surrounding the slave trade. Next we examine the European colonization of the continent, exploring how diverse interventions into Africans' lives had complex effects on political authority, class and generational dynamics, gender relations, ethnic and cultural identities, and rural and urban livelihoods. After exploring Africans' struggles against colonial rule in day-to-day practices and mass political movements, the last few weeks cover Africa's transition to independence and the postcolonial era, including the experience of neo-colonialism, ethnic conflict, poverty, and demographic crisis. (formerly HIST 0226) 2 hrs. lect./1 hr. disc. AAL, HIS, SOC (J. Tropp)

HIST/RELI 0170 Religion in America (Fall 2014)
America often has been defined paradoxically as both the "most religious" and "least religious" of nations. This course, a historical survey of American religious life, will trace the unique story of American religion from colonial times to the present. Guiding our exploration will be the ideas of "contact," "conflict," and "combination." Along the way, we will examine the varieties of religious experiences and traditions that have shaped and been shaped by American culture such as, Native American traditions, Puritan life and thought, evangelicalism, immigration, African-American religious experience, women's movements, and the on-going challenges of religious diversity. Readings include sermons, essays, diaries and fiction, as well as secondary source material. 2 hrs. lect./1 hr. disc. HIS, NOR, PHL (E. Rochford)

HIST/AMST 0202 The American Mind (Fall 2014)
We will consider the history of influential American ideas, and ideas about America, from the Revolution to the present, with particular regard to changing cultural contexts. A continuing question will be whether such a consensus concept as “the American Mind” has the validity long claimed for it. Among many writers we will read are Thomas Jefferson, Alexis de Tocqueville, William James, Martin Luther King, Reinhold Niebuhr and Betty Friedan. (Previously taught as HIST/AMST 0426) HIS, NOR (J. McWilliams)

HIST 0203 United States History: 1492-1861 (Fall 2014)
A survey of American political, social and intellectual developments from the colonial period to the Civil War. Students receiving AP credit in American history may not take HIST 0203 for credit. Pre-1800. 3 hrs. lect./disc. HIS, NOR, SOC (W. Hart)

HIST 0206 The United States and the World Since 1898 (Spring 2015)
This course serves as an introduction to the history of American foreign relations from the Spanish-American War of 1898 to the turn of the 21st century. Through lectures, discussions, and a variety of readings, we will explore the multi-dimensional nature of the nation's rise to power within the global community, as well as the impact of international affairs upon American society. In addition to formal diplomacy and foreign policy, this course addresses topics such as immigration, cultural exchange, transnationalism, and globalization. 2 hrs. lect./1 hr. disc. HIS, NOR (J. Mao)

HIST 0207 The Southwest Borderlands: Cultural Encounters in a Changing Environment (Fall 2014)
In the wake of the US-Mexican War in 1848, Anglo-settlers, Native Americans, and Mexicans struggled over competing visions of an American future that would take root in the Southwest Borderlands. In this course we will examine how cross-cultural encounters shaped policy, changed the landscape, and heightened racial tensions. Using a variety of texts—documentary and feature films, magazines and newspapers, travelers' accounts and popular literature—we will explore a wide range of topics: territorial expansion, Native dispossession, racial formation and anxiety, the creation of the sunbelt, Mexican migration and labor, and the rise of the information economy. Drawing on these items, we will ultimately reflect on how past and present collide on the American borderlands, shaping the United States in countless ways. 3 hrs. lect. HIS, NOR (M. Mendoza)

HIST 0212 Civil War and Reconstruction: 1845-1890 (Spring 2015)
This course explores the era of the American Civil War with an emphasis on the period 1861-1865. It combines lectures, readings, class discussion, and film to address such questions as why the war came, why the Confederacy lost, and how the war affected various elements of society. We will also explore what was left unresolved at the end of the war, how Americans responded to Reconstruction, and how subsequent generations have understood the meaning of the conflict and its legacy. We will make a special effort to tie military and political events to life on the home front. (formerly HIST 0364) 2 hrs. lect./1 hr. disc. HIS, NOR (A. Morsman)

HIST 0215 Twentieth-Century America, 1960-2000 (Fall 2014)
This course concentrates on the history of the United States from the emergence of JFK's New Frontier until the eve of September 11, 2001. In particular, we will focus on the ways in which domestic development shaped America's place within the international community, and vice versa. Topics to be considered include: the rise and fall of the post-1945 social welfare state, decolonization and the Vietnam War, increasing American investment in the Middle East, the emergence of the "New Right," the end of the Cold War, and globalization and its contexts. (formerly HIST 0368) 2 hrs. lect./1 hr. disc. HIS, NOR (J. Mao)

HIST 0222 Introduction to Environmental History (Spring 2015)
This introduction to the history of human interactions with the physical environment focuses on case studies, including European settlement of the New World, industrialization, fire, warfare, and the modern environmental movement, both in the United States and beyond its borders. In this course we will explore several themes, including the consequences of European expansion for human communities and their environments; shifting understandings of nature; cities and their hinterlands as different ways that humans organize nature; and class and race as factors in the human experience of nature and of environmentalism. HIS, NOR, SOC (K. Morse)

HIST 0225 African American History (Spring 2015)
This course will explore the history of the African American people from the slave trade to the present. It will examine the process of enslavement, the nature of American slavery, the meaning of emancipation, the response to the rise of legalized segregation, and the modern struggle for equality. Special attention will be given to placing the African American story within the context of the developing American nation, its institutions, and its culture. (formerly HIST0371) 3 hrs. lect./disc. HIS, NOR (W. Hart)

HIST 0231 Imperial China (Spring 2015)
China’s is the world’s oldest continuous civilization, and we will survey the history of the Chinese empire from its cultural beginnings until the conflicts with the West in the 1840s and the internal unrest of the 1850s and 1860s. Our study of China’s political progression through successive dynasties will reveal archetypal patterns of historical disruption amidst continuity. We will also examine those perennial social, institutional, and intellectual forces — such as the stratification of the classes, the absolutist tendencies of monarchy, and the civilly-focused yet competitive atmosphere fostered by a state-sponsored examination culture — that proved determinative in shaping China’s traditional development. AAL, HIS, SOC (D. Wyatt)

HIST 0232 Modern China (Fall 2014)
In this course we will examine the history of China from the early 19th century through the end of the Maoist period. Readings, lectures, and discussions will familiarize students with the cultural and social structures of the late Qing Empire, patterns of semi-colonialism, the rise of nationalist, feminist, and Marxist movements, and key events in the People’s Republic of China. Students will emerge from the class with a broader understanding of forms of empire and imperialism, anti-colonial nationalism, non-Western Marxism, and the tendencies of a post-socialist state. 2 hrs. lect./1 hr. disc. AAL, HIS, SOC (M. Clinton)

HIST/JAPN 0235 History of Pre-Modern Japan (Fall 2014)
In this course we will explore the social, cultural, and institutional history of Japan from the eighth century up through the rise of the Tokugawa shogunate in the 17th century. The course is organized thematically to illuminate the different periods of Japanese history, including the imperial origin myth and Heian culture, the frontier and the rise of samurai government, localism and the warring states period, and finally the Tokugawa settlement and the paradoxes of centralized feudalism. Pre-1800. 3 hrs. lect./disc. AAL, CW (10 spaces), HIS, SOC (M. Ward)

HIST/JAPN 0236 The History of Modern Japan (Spring 2015)
In this course we will review the major themes and events of modern Japanese history from the Meiji Restoration (1868) to the present. Through reading a variety of primary texts, historical analyses, and literature, as well as watching films, we will explore the formation of the modern Japanese nation-state, Japan’s colonial project in East Asia, 1920s mass culture, the question of Showa fascism, and Japan’s unique postwar experience, from occupation to high-growth and the “lost decade” of the 1990s. We will pay particular attention to the relationship between changes within Japan and larger global trends. 3 hrs. lect./disc. AAL, HIS, SOC (M. Ward)

HIST/PHIL 0237 Chinese Philosophy (Fall 2014)
A survey of the dominant philosophies of China, beginning with the establishment of the earliest intellectual orientations, moving to the emergence of the competing schools of the fifth century B.C., and concluding with the modern adoption and adaptation of Marxist thought. Early native alternatives to Confucian philosophy (such as Mohism, Daoism, and Legalism) and later foreign ones (such as Buddhism and Marxism) will be stressed. We will scrutinize individual thinkers with reference to their philosophical contributions and assess the implications of their ideas with reference to their historical contexts and comparative significance. Pre-1800. 3 hrs. lect./disc. AAL, HIS, PHL (D. Wyatt)

HIST 0242 Europe in the High Middle Ages (Spring 2015)
This course covers the development and expansion of Western European civilization from approximately 1050 to 1300. This period witnessed the rise of towns, commerce, universities, and cathedrals, as well as important developments in the areas of politics, philosophy, and Western culture. Together, these achievements represent a fundamental shift in Western Europe from an impoverished, besieged society to a dynamic civilization that established the institutions and assumptions on which the modern West is based. The goal of this class is to view these achievements of medieval Europe in their own context, with appreciation of the methodological problems presented by medieval sources. Pre-1800. EUR, HIS, SOC (L. Burnham)

HIST 0243 The Mediterranean World, 400-1600 (Spring 2015)
The Mediterranean has long been a crossroads between East and West and North and South, a meeting point of the Middle East, Northern Africa, and Southern Europe. Merchants and armies have plied the seaways carrying with them their religions and cultures. The pre-modern Mediterranean offered an exhilarating but, at times uncomfortable, mix of Jewish, Christian, and Muslim cultures. Starting from Fernand Braudel's conceit, we will consider the Mediterranean itself as an important character in the narrative of history. We will study the geography of the Mediterranean as well as its religious, economic, environmental, and cultural history with a view to bringing together different understandings of Mare Nostrum (our sea). Pre-1800. 2 hrs. lect./1 hr. disc. CMP, HIS (L. Burnham)

HIST 0249 Germany in the Long Nineteenth Century (Spring 2015)
This chronologically-organized course will examine Germany's development over the long nineteenth century. Pivotal moments in the formation of Germany will be explored, including but not limited to the following topics: the impact of French revolutionary ideas and the Napoleonic Wars on political organization, the revolutions of 1848-9, the industrial revolution, the wars of unification and 1871, the Kulturkampf, and the efforts at colonization in Africa. Beyond politics and economics, however, this course will also attempt to view the developments in high culture and daily life that were intimately tied up with the larger events. This will include themes like the "Catholic ghetto," urban culture, and Marxist philosophy. 3 hrs. lect./disc. CW (5 spaces), EUR, HIS (R. Bennette)

HIST 0257 The Holocaust (Spring 2015)
Why did the Holocaust happen? How could the Holocaust happen? In this course we will consider several aspects of the Holocaust, including the long-term conditions and events leading up to it, the measures employed in undertaking it, and the aftermath of the atrocities. Beyond a general survey, this course introduces students to the many varying interpretations and historical arguments scholars of the Holocaust have proposed and invites them to discuss and debate these issues in class. 3 hrs. lect./disc. EUR, HIS (R. Bennette)

HIST/PHIL 0319 Readings in the Philosophy of History (Spring 2015)
Even before the appearance of Georg W. F. Hegel's classic study The Philosophy of History, a heated debate was being waged concerning the nature and substance of history. Is history, like science, expressible in predictable patterns or subject to irrevocable laws? What factors distinguish true history from the mere random succession of events? What should we assume to be the fundamental nature of historical truth, and are we to determine it objectively or subjectively? Is it possible to be human and yet be somehow "outside of" history? These are among the questions we will examine as we read and deliberate on a variety of philosophies of history, while concentrating on the most influential versions developed by Hegel and Karl Marx. 3 hrs. sem. CW (5 seats), EUR, HIS, PHL (D. Wyatt)

HIST/AMST 0372 The Civil Rights Revolution (Fall 2014)
A study of the quest for a more inclusive American polity in the twentieth century. The modern civil rights movement is the central focus, but this course offers more than a survey of events from Montgomery to Memphis. It explores the pre-World War II roots of the modern black freedom struggle, the impact of the heroic phase of the civil rights movement, and the ambiguous developments since 1970. This course employs a "race relations" perspective, stressing the linkages among the experiences of African Americans, whites, and other groups. 2 hrs. lect./1 hr. disc. CMP, HIS, NOR (J. Ralph)

HIST/GSFS 0373 History of American Women: 1869-1999 (Fall 2014)
This course will examine women's social, political, cultural, and economic position in American society from 1869 through the late 20th century. We will explore the shifting ideological basis for gender roles, as well as the effects of race, class, ethnicity, and region on women's lives. Topics covered will include: women's political identity, women's work, sexuality, access to education, the limits of "sisterhood" across racial and economic boundaries, and the opportunities women used to expand their sphere of influence. 3 hrs. lect./disc. CMP, HIS, NOR (A. Morsman)

HIST 0375 Struggles for Change in Southern Africa (Spring 2015)
In this course we will examine the tumultuous period of social struggle in southern Africa in the decades following World War II. Major topics to be covered include the rise of apartheid and the mobilization of anti-apartheid resistance in South Africa and Namibia; the liberation struggle against white settler rule in Zimbabwe; the fight for freedom from Portuguese colonialism in Mozambique; and Mozambique's protracted civil war following independence. A central purpose of this course is to explore how these different arenas of struggle transformed individual lives and social relations in complex and diverse ways, generating enduring impacts and challenges within the region. AAL, CW (10 spaces), HIS, SOC (J. Tropp)

HIST/GSFS 0393 A History of Gender in Early America (Spring 2015)
Exploration, conquest, settlement, revolution, and nation-building: no course in early American history should ignore such traditional topics. In this course, though, we will examine the various ways that gender shaped these historical processes. How, for example, did colonials’ assumptions about manhood and womanhood affect the development of slavery in America? Or how did the Founding Fathers’ identities as men inform their attitudes about democracy and citizenship? We will scrutinize historical documents, of both a private and public nature, and discuss several recent scholarly works on gender from 1600-1850 to consider these kinds of questions. Pre-1800. 2 hrs. lect./1 hr. disc. CMP, HIS, NOR (A. Morsman)

HIST 0397 America and the Pacific (Spring 2015)
If the 20th century was "America's Century," then it could also be deemed "America's Pacific Century" as interaction with Asia fundamentally shaped the United States' political, social, and diplomatic development. In this course we will examine American foreign relations on the Pacific Rim from the Philippine-American War to the Los Angeles riots of 1992. Topics to be covered include: America's imperial project in Asia, the annexation of Hawaii, Wilsonian diplomacy, the reconstruction of Japan after World War II, the Korean and Vietnam Wars, Richard Nixon's visit to Communist China, and the immigrant experience. 3 hrs. sem. HIS, NOR (J. Mao)

HIST 0412 Readings in American History: Cultures in Contact (Fall 2014)
In this course we will examine the dimensions of cultural contact among Native Americans, Europeans, African Americans, and Euro Americans in the eastern half of the United States, from early encounters at Roanoke, to Cherokee removal to Oklahoma. Themes of investigation include: encounter vs. invasion; Indian depopulation by men, microbes, and munitions; religious conversion; cultural persistence, change, and revitalization; slavery by and of Indians; and the changeable image of the Indian. (formerly HIST 0407) 3 hrs. sem. HIS, NOR (W. Hart)

HIST/JAPN 0436 Readings in Japanese History: Modernism and Fascism between the World Wars (Spring 2015)
The 1920s in Japan is typically understood as a period of political and cultural experimentation, as witnessed by the rise of avant-garde cultural groups and radicalized social movements. In contrast, the 1930s is portrayed as Japan's "dark valley", in which this sense of experimentation was suppressed or co-opted by the state. In this course, we will revisit these tumultuous decades by engaging with a range of historical assessments, novels, and critical essays. We will begin by examining theories of modernism and fascism, and then explore the changing socio-cultural milieu in interwar Japan, including mass-culture, modernization, romanticism, imperialism, and utopianism. (formerly HIST 0418) AAL, HIS (M. Ward)

HIST 0443 Readings in African History: Women and Gender in Africa (Spring 2015)
This course takes up the challenge of understanding women's experiences and the role of gender in Africa's past. We will read from a wide variety of disciplinary perspectives and literary forms, including ethnographies, life histories, and fiction, in order to explore different methodological and interpretive approaches to these subjects. Themes will include: changes in the structure of patriarchy and women's status in the pre-colonial period, the gendered impact of colonial rule on African economies and ecologies, historical identities of masculinity and femininity, and gendered experience of postcolonial "development." Prior experience in African history is not required. (formerly HIST/WAGS 0421) 3 hrs. sem. AAL, HIS (J. Tropp)

HIST 0460 Expansion and Environment: Readings in U.S. and Latin American Environmental History (Spring 2015)
In the nineteenth century, the U.S. stretched westward and into Latin America. Investors and politicians looked south and west to control land and extract resources. Paying equal attention to U.S. territorial expansion and the nation’s growing political and economic influence in Latin America, we will explore U.S.-Latin American relations from an environmental perspective. Surveying recent scholarship in U.S. Western and Latin American environmental history, we will cover: independence, territorial claims and mapping, resource extraction, epidemics, environmental degradation, conservation, and environmental justice. We will reflect on how power and influence in the western hemisphere are inextricably bound to the natural environment. 3 hrs. sem. CMP, HIS, NOR  (M. Mendoza)

HIST 0475 Imperialism and Anti-Imperialism in Asia (Spring 2015)
In this seminar we will examine patterns of Euro-American and Japanese imperialism in South, East, and Southeast Asia during the 19th and 20th centuries. We will focus on the ways in which scholars and revolutionaries have made sense of the workings of colonial power and formulated strategies for resistance. By engaging with novels, films, and political manifestos, students will gain a broad understanding of how imperialism transformed lifeworlds, how its cultural, social, and economic dimensions have been critiqued, and the formation of nationalist, Marxist, and Pan-Asianist movements. Readings will include works by V.I. Lenin , Mao Zedong, Ho Chi Minh, Pramoedya Ananta Toer, and Ranajit Guha. This course is equivalent to IGST 0475. 3 hrs. sem. AAL, CMP, HIS, SOC (M. Clinton)

HIST 0500 Special Research Projects (Fall 2014, Spring 2015)
Special research projects during the junior year may be used to fulfill the research seminar requirements in some cases. Approval of department chair and project advisor is required. (Staff)

HIST 0600 History Research Seminar (Fall 2014)
All history majors who have not taken a writing and research seminar are required to take HIST 0600 in their junior fall or, if abroad at that time, their senior fall semester. In this course, students will conceive, research, and write a work of history based on primary source material to the degree possible. After reading and discussion on historical methods and research strategies, students will pursue a paper topic as approved by the course professors. HIST 0600 is also open to International Studies and Environmental Studies majors with a disciplinary focus in history. 3 hr. sem. CW (21 spaces) (J. Mao, K. Morse, M. Ward)

HIST 0700 Senior Independent Study (Fall 2014, Spring 2015)
The History Senior Thesis is required of all majors. It is written over two terms, with the final grade applying to both terms. The project is generally begun in the fall and completed during winter or spring. Approval is required to begin the thesis in winter or spring, and such students must still attend the Thesis Writer's Workshops that take place in fall and winter. (Staff)

History of Art & Architecture

Required for the Major, History of Art Track (11 courses): HARC 0100 (Monuments and Ideas in Western Art); HARC 0102 (Monuments and Ideas in Asian Art) or another course in non-Western art and architecture; one course in studio art; HARC 0301 (Ways of Seeing; sophomore or junior year; prerequisite for HARC 0710 and HARC 0711); at least five additional courses in the history of art or architecture distributed among several historical periods or traditions, with at least one being at the 0300-level or above; HARC 0710 (Qualifying Paper Research Seminar, fall of senior year); HARC 0711/0761 (Qualifying Paper, winter term senior year). Advisory: Graduate programs in the history of art and classical archaeology require students to pass reading examinations in at least two foreign languages.

     Joint Major, History of Art Track (eight courses): HARC 0100 (Monuments and Ideas in Western Art ); HARC 0102 (Monuments and Ideas in Asian Art) or another course in non-Western art and architecture; HARC 0301 (Ways of Seeing; sophomore or junior year; prerequisite for HARC 0710 and HARC 0711); three additional courses in the history of art or architecture distributed among several historical periods or traditions, one of which should be at the 0300-level or above; HARC 0710 (Qualifying Paper Research Seminar, fall of senior year); HARC 0711/0761 (Qualifying Paper, winter term of senior year). A proposed program of study, including educational rationale and specific courses to be taken, must be submitted to the department for approval before registering as a joint major.

     Minor, History of Art Track (six courses): HARC 0100 (Monuments and Ideas in Western Art); HARC 0102 (Monuments and Ideas in Asian Art) or another course in non-Western art and architecture; four additional courses in the history of art or architecture distributed among several historical periods or traditions.

     Required for the Major, Architectural Studies Track (11 courses): HARC 0100 (Monuments and Ideas in Western Art); HARC 0102 (Monuments and Ideas in Asian Art) or another course in non-Western art and architecture; ART 0159 (Studio Art I) or another approved course in studio art, theatre set or lighting design, or dance; HARC 0130 (Introduction to Architectural Design); HARC 0230 (Modern Architecture; prerequisite for HARC 0731); HARC 0330 (Intermediate Architectural Design) or an approved substitute; three additional courses that deal with architectural history, urbanism, or contemporary visual culture; and HARC 0731 (Thesis in Architectural Studies: Research) and HARC 0732 (Thesis in Architectural Studies: Design), to be taken sequentially. Advisory: This major track does not result in a professional degree in architecture. Many graduate architecture schools expect applicants to have taken a survey of modern architecture as well as college-level courses in calculus and physics.

     Joint Major, Architectural Studies Track (eight courses): HARC 0100 (Monuments and Ideas in Western Art); HARC 0102 (Monuments and Ideas in Asian Art) or another course in non-Western art and architecture; HARC 0130 (Introduction to Architectural Design); HARC 0230 (Modern Architecture; prerequisite for HARC 0731); HARC 0330 (Intermediate Architectural Design) or an approved substitute; ); one additional course that deals with architectural history, urbanism, or contemporary visual culture; and HARC 0731 (Thesis in Architectural Studies: Research) and HARC 0732 (Thesis in Architectural Studies: Design), to be taken sequentially. A proposed program of study, including educational rationale and specific courses to be taken, must be submitted to the department for approval before registering as a joint major. Advisory: This joint major track does not result in a professional degree in architecture. Many graduate architecture schools expect applicants to have taken a survey of modern architecture as well as college-level courses in calculus and physics.

Joint Major, Architectural Studies/ Environmental Studies "Architecture and the Environment" (15 courses): ENVS 0112, ENVS 0211, ENVS 0215, and GEOG 0120, all to be taken before the end of junior year; two ES Cognate Courses (both science courses with labs, listed under Environmental Studies); HARC 0100; HARC 0130; HARC 0230; HARC 0231 (prerequisite for HARC 0731); HARC 0330 or an approved substitute; one additional course that deals with architectural history, urbanism, or contemporary visual culture; ENVS 0401; and HARC 0731 and HARC 0732, to be taken sequentially. Advisory: This joint major track does not result in a professional degree in architecture. Many graduate architecture schools expect applicants to have taken a survey of modern architecture as well as college-level courses in calculus and physics.

     Minor, Architectural Studies (five courses): HARC 0100 (Monuments and Ideas in Western Art); HARC 0102 (Monuments and Ideas in Asian Art) or another course in non-Western art and architecture; HARC 0130 (Introduction to Architectural Design); HARC 0230 (Modern Architecture); and HARC 330 (Intermediate Architectural Design) or an approved substitute. Advisory: many graduate architecture schools expect applicants to have taken calculus, physics, and a survey of modern architecture.

Museum Studies Track (12 courses):
1. HARC 0100
2. HARC 0102
3. HARC 0248
4. HARC 0301 (CW)
5. HARC 0540 or MAP Participation or an approved internship
6. HARC 0710
7. HARC 0761
8-12. Five electives in HARC to be selected in consultation with the advisor (at least one of which at the 0300 level or higher)

Joint Major, Museum Studies Track (eight courses):
1. HARC 0100 or HARC 0102
2. HARC 0248
3. HARC0 0301 (CW)
4. HARC 0540 or an approved internship
5. HARC 0710
6. HARC 0761
7-8. Two electives in HARC to be selected in consultation with the advisor

Minor, Museum Studies Track (six courses):
1. HARC 0100 or HARC 0102
2. HARC 0248
3. HARC 0301 (CW)
4. HARC 0540 or an approved internship
5-6.Two HARC electives

     Honors: Honors are awarded to students with a GPA** of 3.5 and a thesis grade of B+ or higher; high honors to students with a GPA of 3.7 and a thesis grade of A- or A; and highest honors to students with a GPA of 3.8 and a thesis grade of A.

** The History of Art + Architecture GPA is calculated on the basis of those courses that satisfy or could potentially satisfy the requirements for the major. Only courses taken on the Middlebury College campus and applied towards the major will be used in the calculation of GPA for purposes of determining honors. Study abroad and transfer courses will not be used.

     Please note: Courses offered by other departments and programs may, by prior departmental approval, be used to satisfy elective requirements, including, but not limited to, RELI 0185 Art and the Bible, AMST 0244 Knickerbocker New York, AMST 0245 American Landscape 1825-1865, and AMST 0408 American Art in Context: The Art and Life of Winslow Homer.

HARC 0100 Monuments and Ideas in Western Art (Fall 2014, Spring 2015)
This course is an introduction to the study of Western art history through an investigation of selected art works, considered individually and in broader contexts. The course chronicles the evolution in painting, sculpture, and architecture of the western world. It is designed for those who wish to build a broad acquaintance with the major works and ideas of Western art in their historical settings and to develop tools for understanding these works of art as aesthetic objects and bearers of meaning for the societies, groups, or individuals that produced them. Registration priority will be given to first and second year students. 2 hrs. lect./1 hr. disc. ART, EUR, HIS (Fall 2014: P. Broucke; Spring 2015: C. Anderson)

HARC 0102 Monuments and Ideas in Asian Art (Fall 2014)
This course is an introduction to the study of Asian art history through an investigation of selected art works, considered individually and in broader contexts. This course chronicles the evolution in painting, sculpture, and architecture, and other media of Asia. It is designed for those who wish to build a broad acquaintance with the major works and ideas of Asian art in their historical settings and to develop tools for understanding these works of art as aesthetic objects and bearers of meaning for the societies, group, or individuals that produced them. Registration priority given to first and second year students. 2 hrs. lect./1 hr. disc.. AAL, ART, CMP, HIS (C. Packert)

HARC 0120 DesignLab: Creating Innovation (Fall 2014)
In this course students will explore the fundamental principles of design thinking and creative innovation. We will pursue all aspects of the design process, from discerning opportunities and researching solutions to developing concepts and generating prototypes. We will explore design approaches from the renowned Bauhaus to those offered today by digital development and fabrication, including 3-D printing. Students will participate in workshops, conduct individual projects, work in teams, and make presentations on implementing their designs. We will also engage in discussions of how their designs affect the environmental and ethical aspects of our increasingly global and digital world. 3 hrs. lect. ART (S. Lopez Barrara)

HARC 0130 Introduction to Architectural Design (Fall 2014, Spring 2015)
This is a studio course that introduces its members to the values and methods used in the practice of architecture, landscape architecture, and environmental art. A daily journal and intensive group and individual work within the studio space are requirements. This course demands an exceptionally high commitment of time and energy. The course's goals are to use the process of design to gain insight regarding individual and community value systems, and to provide basic experience in the design professions. It is recommended for anyone wishing to improve his or her appreciation for the built environment. Students should anticipate that substantial additional time will be required in the studio in addition to the scheduled class time. 6 hrs. lect./lab ART (S. Lopez Barrara)

HARC 0201 Italian Renaissance Art: 1350-1550 (Fall 2014)
This course will focus on the art produced in Italy during the late fourteenth through the early sixteenth centuries. In addition to studying the chronological development of painting, sculpture, and architecture, we will consider such issues as artistic training, patronage, domestic life, and the literary achievements of this period of "rebirth." Focusing on urban environments such as Florence, Siena, Padua, Venice, Rome, and Urbino, we will give special attention to the manner in which artistic production was shaped by place. 3 hrs. lect. ART, EUR, HIS (K. Smith Abbott)

HARC 0202 Modern Art (Fall 2014)
In this course we will survey the major movements and artists in the history of modern art in Europe and the United States, from Impressionism to the postwar period. We will focus on the development of style, aesthetic concerns, and social contexts. Topics will include individual artists, such as Picasso and Matisse, as well as the development of styles, such as Abstract Expressionism and Pop Art. 3 hrs. lect. ART, EUR, HIS (E. Vazquez)

HARC 0211 American Design (Spring 2015)
A historical survey of architecture and related design (especially furniture) in the United States from its colonization through the mid-twentieth century as a manifestation of colonial inheritances, foreign fashions, national outlooks, changing technologies, social and economic patterns, and native materials. 3 hrs. lect. ART, HIS, NOR (G. Andres)

HARC 0214 Northern Renaissance Art: The Rhetoric of the Real (Spring 2015)
This course will provide students with an overview of art objects created in a variety of media in Northern Europe between the 15th and 16th centuries. We will analyze the changing uses of art in cultures where people defined themselves and the depths of their piety in relation to their material wealth and social standing. During the last few weeks of the semester, the class will look at the emergence of genre painting and the representation of peasant life. We will consider how these phenomena were tied to the histories and careers of individual artists and their workshops. General questions will include: How does the convincing representation of "reality" make for a persuasive image? What are the benefits of fusing secular and religious subject matter? Is it valid to speak of a new artistic self-awareness? 3 hrs. lect. ART, EUR, HIS (E. Garrison)

HARC 0218 History of Photography (Spring 2015)
In this course we will consider the history of photography as a medium from its inception in 1839 to the present. We will focus on technological advances in photography, aesthetic developments, and the evolution of acceptance of photography as an art form. We will examine the use of photography in different genres, such as landscape, portraiture, and documentation. To illustrate our study, we will rely on examples of photographs available in the Middlebury College Museum of Art. 3 hrs. lect. ART, NOR (K. Hoving)

HARC 0220 The Art of the City (Spring 2015)
A study of humanity's most complex and critical physical monument, from ancient agoras to edge cities. City form in general (historical and ideal) and great cities, urban environments, and city designers in particular will be surveyed from antiquity to the present in an investigation of changing purposes, elements, and organization. 3 hrs. lect. ART, HIS (G. Andres)

HARC 0227 Poetry, Piety and Power: Indian Painting 1200-Present (Spring 2015)
This course considers the history, context, style, and significance of a broad spectrum of Indian painting traditions. We will look closely at Jaina and Hindu religious illustrations, the evocative courtly and religious imagery from the Rajput and other regional kingdoms, the extraordinarily refined and naturalistic Mughal imagery, the influence of colonialism, and the development of modern and contemporary works. 3 hrs. lect. AAL, ART, HIS (C. Packert)

HARC 0230 Modern Architecture (Spring 2015)
Rotating skyscrapers, green roofs, and avant-garde museums: how did we arrive in the architectural world of the early 21st century? In this course we will survey the major stylistic developments, new building types, and new technologies that have shaped European and American architecture since the late 18th century. Students will learn about the work of major architects as well as key architectural theories and debates. Special emphasis will be placed on the cultural and political contexts in which buildings are designed. 2 hrs. lect./1 hr. disc. ART, HIS (E. Sassin)

HARC 0231 Architecture and the Environment (Spring 2015)
Architecture has a dynamic relationship with the natural and cultural environments in which it operates. As a cultural phenomenon it impacts the physical landscape and uses natural resources while it also frames human interaction, harbors community, and organizes much of public life. We will investigate those relationships and explore strategies to optimize them, in order to seek out environmentally responsive architectural solutions. Topics to be covered include: analysis of a building's site as both natural and cultural contexts, passive and active energy systems, principles of sustainable construction, and environmental impact. Our lab will allow us to study on site, "off-the-grid" dwellings, hay-bale houses, passive solar constructions and alternative communities, meet with "green" designers, architects, and builders, and do hands-on projects. 3 hrs. lect./3 hrs. lab. ART (A. Murray)

HARC 0247 Impressionism and Post-Impressionism (Fall 2014)
In this course we will examine the Impressionist and Post-Impressionist movements that evolved in France during the second half of the 19th century. Looking at artists such as Manet, Degas, Cassatt, and Monet, as well as Cézanne, Van Gogh, Seurat, and Gauguin, we will place their work in social and historical contexts that include the rise of the city, new opportunities for leisure, demographic change, and the breakdown of artistic establishments. When appropriate we will compare visual artistic production to parallel developments in literature and music. 3 hrs. lect. ART, EUR, HIS (K. Hoving)

HARC 0248 Gold, Sex, and Death at the Museum (Fall 2014)
Most visitors to museums notice the architecture, carefully chosen collections, and meticulously curated special exhibitions. However, behind this façade is a busy network of museum professionals coordinating every aspect of the institution’s life. Through readings and guest lectures, we will explore how directors, curators, and staff navigate the challenges facing the modern museum, such as establishing acquisitions policies in an increasingly uncertain art market, defining ethical standards for conservation, and addressing audiences with ever-changing needs. Speakers such as a curator, art critic, and conservator will contribute to our discussion, and attendance at a series of public talks is required. 3 hrs. lect./disc. NOR (S. Laursen)

HARC 0254 Art in the Dutch Golden Age (Fall 2014)
In this course we will examine the art made in the Northern Netherlands during the 17th century, the so-called “Golden Age” of the Dutch Republic. We will consider the effects of politics, patronage, religion, and warfare on the paintings and practices of such artists as Hals, Rembrandt, and Vermeer, as well as many other lesser-known professionals, who specialized in still life, landscapes, seascapes, cityscapes, church interiors, portraits, and tavern scenes. We will also consider the history of printmaking in the early modern Dutch Republic. 3 hrs. lect. ART, EUR, HIS (C. Anderson)

HARC 0260 Contemporary Art: From Postmodernism to Globalization (Spring 2015)
In this course we will survey major developments in international art practice since 1960. We will discuss artists and movements from North and South America, Asia, Eastern and Western Europe, and the Middle East. We will explore debates in traditional media, as well as the emergence of new conceptual paradigms, video and film, land art, installation and institutional critique, and strategies of appropriation. In addition to a focus on formal concerns, students will also discuss broader debates active in various spheres of postwar art and culture. Readings will include artist statements, critical and historical texts, as well as important theoretical material. ART, CMP, HIS (E. Vazquez)

HARC 0270 Chinese Art (Spring 2015)
This course is an introductory survey of the arts of China from the Neolithic period to the 20th century. Considering works in their original context and in museum collections, we will investigate how art objects and monuments reflect the religious beliefs, political agendas, and aesthetic preferences of their creators. At the same time, we will pay particular attention to the local development of artistic technologies, the role of ethnic and national identity in art production, and China's place in the larger histories of the Silk Road and modern international commerce and diplomacy. 3 hrs. lect. AAL, ART, HIS (S. Laursen)

HARC 0301 Ways of Seeing (Fall 2014)
In this course we will focus on the various methods and theories that can enrich and deepen our understanding of art, architecture, and visual culture. In this course students will hone their analytical skills, both verbal and written, often with recourse to objects from the College Museum and the campus at large. In general, this seminar will develop students’ awareness of objects of culture broadly construed, and sharpen their understanding of the scope and intellectual history of the field. To be taken during the sophomore or junior year as a prerequisite for HARC 0710 and HARC 0711. 3 hrs. sem. (E. Vazquez)

HARC 0306 Materiality and Meaning in Medieval Manuscripts (Fall 2014)
Before the invention of the printing press in the middle of the fifteenth century, all books were written by hand, a manual process that informed the term “manuscript.” The most luxurious of medieval manuscripts were illuminated with all manner of images, and these, along with the books themselves, were often understood as embodiments of divine wisdom. In this seminar we will consider medieval manuscripts as artworks and study the history of medieval manuscript illumination. Along the way, we will analyze the functions of various types of texts, learn about the rich relationships between text and image, consider the emergence of silent reading, and study the diverse audiences for medieval books. Over the course of the roughly one thousand years that we will cover in this course, we will see the book change from a mysterious receptacle of sacred wisdom to a commodity created for a mass market. 3 hrs. sem. ART, EUR (E. Garrison)

HARC 0309 Global Baroque (Fall 2014)
The Baroque style of art and architecture that flourished in 17th century Europe and spread throughout the rest of the world is often referred to as the first truly global style. In this course we will examine the spread of the Baroque throughout Europe, the Americas, Asia, and Africa in the 17th and 18th centuries. We will focus not only on the forces that contributed to the broad reach of the Baroque—such as trade, exploration, colonization, missionary work, and artistic exchange—but also on the persistence of local artistic styles in the context of the Baroque. 3 hrs. sem. ART, CMP, EUR, HIS (C. Anderson)

HARC 0311 Artists & their Patrons in the Seventeenth-Century Europe (Spring 2015)
In this course we will explore the nature of artistic patronage in 17th century Europe.  Not only will we examine artists who negotiated the complexities of early modern patronage with great success, such as Bernini, Velazquez, Van Dyck, and Rubens, but we will also consider artists whose efforts met with failure, such as Caravaggio, whose Death of the Virgin was famously rejected.  Other topics will include the role of gender and patronage, the circumvention of traditional forms of patronage, and artistic patronage and the state. 3 hrs. sem. ART, EUR, HIS (C. Anderson)

HARC 0318 Imperial Splendor: the Art and Architecture of India's Mughal Empire (Spring 2015)
The Mughal empire, founded by a new dynasty of Muslim rulers, claimed control over much of north India in the 16th century. Under their dominance, new forms of art and architecture flourished. In this seminar we will critically explore such topics as: the style and symbolism of Mughal art and architecture; the influence of Persian and Indian Rajput visual forms; the biographies and ambitions of the Mughal rulers; the role of women in the Mughal court; and the interactions between Muslim and Hindu visual cultures, as well as the important contributions made by European art. We will pay special attention to how art and architecture played a central role in imperial self-definition and the construction of a specialized Mughal history, placing those works in their political, social, and cultural contexts. 3 hrs. lect. AAL, ART, HIS (C. Packert)

HARC/RELI 0321 The Art of Tibetan Buddhism (Fall 2014)
In this course we will explore the fascinating imagery of Tibetan Buddhist art, with special attention paid to the rich visual language of tangkas—devotional paintings on cloth of Buddhas, Buddhist deities, spiritual teachers (lamas), and cosmic diagrams (mandalas)— which were used as aids for visualization and meditation. Topics will include the history of Tibet, the growth of Tibetan Buddhist sects, and the development of distinctive stylistic and iconographic characteristics as seen in tangkas, religious sculpture, ritual implements, and monastic architecture. This course will be offered in conjunction with a visiting exhibition of Tibetan tangkas at the Middlebury College Art Museum. 3 hrs. sem./3 hrs. screening. AAL, ART, HIS (C. Packert)

HARC/AMST 0324 The American Civil War in Art and Visual Culture, Present  (Spring 2015)
We will examine the art, artifacts, and material culture of the “War Between the States,” from flag and uniform design, periodical illustrations, and photography, to Sanitary Fairs, fundraisers, and keepsakes. History and genre paintings by Winslow Homer and Lilly Martin Spencer will illuminate both battlefield and homefront. We will also explore the legacy of the Civil War, analyzing monuments and memorials, anniversary commemorations (especially the 1960s Centennial and the Civil Rights Movement), reenactments, and contemporary artists’ engagement with the War’s visual imagery (Kara Walker, Glenn Ligon, Matthew Day Jackson). Several sessions will meet at the Middlebury College Museum of Art. ART, HIS, NOR (E. Foutch)

HARC/ENVS 0327 Photography and the Environmental Ethos (Spring 2015)
Since the invention of photography in 1839, photographers have turned their gaze toward the world around them. Working on the land, they have considered issues of land management and natural resources in a variety of ways. In this course we will explore the question of how American photographers from the 19th century to the present have used their photographs as a way of raising awareness about a variety of environmental questions. Artists to be considered may include: Timothy O'Sullivan, William Henry Jackson, Carleton Watkins, Annie Brigman, Ansel Adams, Laura Gilpin, Richard Misrach, and Edward Burtynsky. 3 hrs. lect./disc. ART, HIS, NOR (K. Hoving)

HARC 0330 Intermediate Architectural Design (Fall 2014, Spring 2015)
This studio course emphasizes the thought and method of architectural design. Members of this studio will be involved in developing their insights towards cultural value systems and their expression in the environments they create. Participants work primarily in the studio space and rely heavily on individual instruction and group review of their work. The course provides a foundation for more advanced study in the areas of architecture, landscape architecture, and other fields related to the design of the built environment, and an opportunity to work with the Cameron Visiting Architect. An introduction to computer aided drawing is integrated into this course. (HARC 0130) 3 hrs. lect./3 hrs. lab ART (Fall 2014: A. Kerz-Murray; Spring 2015: Staff)

HARC/GSFS 0338 Gender and the Making of Space (Fall 2014)
In this course we will investigate the complex relationship between gender and architecture, examining how the design of the built environment (buildings, urban spaces, etc.) can reinforce or undermine ideas about the respective roles of women and men in society, from the creation of masculine and feminine spaces to the gendered nature of the architectural profession. By looking at both visual evidence and textual sources we will also uncover how the social construction of gender roles and gendered spaces are, and continue to be, inflected by race, class, and sexuality. Not open to students who have taken FYSE 1407. 3 hrs. sem. ART, CMP, HIS (E. Sassin)

HARC/AMST 0339 Home: The Why Behind the Way We Live (Spring 2015)
In this course we will examine the development of numerous housing types in America (with references to Europe). The prevalence of the single-family home today and its importance as the symbol of the “American dream” was never a forgone conclusion. In fact, the American home has been the focus of and battleground for cooperative movements, feminism, municipal socialism, benevolent capitalism, and government interventions on a national scale. 3 hrs. sem. ART, HIS, NOR (E. Sassin)

HARC/GRMN 0341 Faust’s Metropolis: History, Architecture, and Urbanism in Berlin (Fall 2014)
In this course we will investigate the rich and complicated built environment of Berlin. By looking at both visual evidence and textual sources we will uncover how the city has been transformed from a cultural backwater during the early modern period to the current capital of a reunified Germany. By the conclusion of this course, you will be comfortable “reading” buildings and spaces and will be able to navigate both the physical city of Berlin and the many layers of history buried within. 3 hrs. sem. ART, EUR, HIS (E. Sassin)

HARC/GRMN 0344 Naked Truth: Approaches to the Body in Early 20th Century German-Austrian Art (Spring 2015)
In this team-taught course we will examine conceptions of the human body and the manner of its visualization in Germany and Austria in the period leading up to and following the First World War. Part of our inquiry will involve the planning of an exhibition of original artworks from the holdings of the Sabarsky Foundation (New York City), provisionally entitled Naked Truth, at the Middlebury College Museum in the fall semester of 2015. With the help of primary source readings from the period, and secondary readings in philosophy, critical and literary theory, and art history, we will consider how German and Austrian artists turned to the nude body as the site through which questions of personal and political freedom, desire, beauty, nature, culture, and their antonyms could be negotiated and represented. Taking these ideas as one critical point of departure, the class will work with select drawings, paintings, and etchings by Gustav Klimt, Egon Schiele, Otto Dix, and Käthe Kollwitz, among others. 3 hrs. sem. ART, EUR, PHL (E. Garrison, B. Matthias)

HARC 0370 Potter, Painter, and Goldsmith: How Asian Art is Made (Spring 2015)
In this seminar we will explore the manner in which the distinctive artistic traditions of China, Korea, and Japan were shaped by the materials and techniques available to ancient craftsmen. Some of these technologies remained localized, while others—like porcelain and silk—went on to transform world history by fueling major export markets. Through observation of objects from the Middlebury Museum of Art, we will explore such questions as: How was Asian art made; Why was it made that way? What was its historical impact? Topics will include jade and other hardstones, bronze, textiles, ceramics, painting, lacquer, glass, and gold. AAL, ART, CW, HIS (S. Laursen)

HARC 0510 Advanced Studies (Fall 2014, Spring 2015)
Supervised independent work in art history. (Approval Required) (Staff)

HARC 0530 Independent Architect. Design (Fall 2014, Spring 2015)
Supervised independent work in architectural analysis and design. (Approval Required)

HARC 0540 Supervised Independent Work in Museum Studies (Fall 2014, Spring 2015)
This practicum builds upon the Museum Assistants Program (MAP), the hands-on museum education program at the Middlebury College Museum of Art. In MAP, the Curator of Education trains students to conduct tours of the Museum’s permanent collection and of special exhibitions for audiences of peers, school groups, and the general public. Combining service learning with the opportunity to both support and learn more about the arts, students gain expertise in public speaking, art history, and public programming. To register for this course students have completed two semesters of MAP. The class will culminate with a public presentation on a museum-related topic evaluated by a faculty member of the Department of History of Art & Architecture. (Approval required; HARC 0100 or HARC 0102, and two semesters of MAP) (Staff)

HARC 0710 Qualifying Paper Research Seminar (Fall 2014)
In this course students will conceive, undertake research, and plan the organization of their senior qualifying papers in art history or senior museum studies projects. Seminar discussions and workshops will focus on research strategies, conventions in art historical writing, project design, and public presentation skills. (HARC 0301; Approval Required) 3 hrs. sem. (E. Garrison)

HARC 0731 Thesis in Architectural Studies: Research (Fall 2014)
This studio course constitutes the first part of the two-term senior design project in Architectural Studies. Pre-design research includes precedent study, programming, site analysis, and formulation of a thesis to be investigated through the design process. Preliminary design work begins with conceptual studies, and culminates in a coherent schematic design, to be developed further in Senior Architectural Design, Part II. Students present their work in graphic, oral, and written formats. (HARC 0330 or equivalent) 6 hrs. sem. (J. McLeod)

HARC 0732 Thesis in Architectural Studies: Design (Spring 2015)
This studio course constitutes the second part of the two-term senior design project in Architectural Studies. Building upon the architectural research, analysis, and preliminary design work conducted during the fall semester, students develop their thesis projects to a higher level of understanding and refinement. Students also engage in intense peer review and work with visiting design critics, concluding with public presentations of the final projects, and a project portfolio describing all aspects of the completed design. (HARC 0731) 6 hrs. sem. (J. McLeod)

Interdepartmental Courses

INTD/MATH 0100 A World of Mathematics (Fall 2014)
How long will oil last? What is the fairest voting system? How can we harvest food and other resources sustainably? To explore such real-world questions we will study a variety of mathematical ideas and methods, including modeling, logical analysis, discrete dynamical systems, and elementary statistics. This is an alternative first mathematics course for students not pursuing the calculus sequence in their first semester. The only prerequisite is an interest in exploring contemporary issues using the mathematics that lies within those issues. (Approval required; This course is not open to students who have had a prior course in calculus or statistics.) 3 hrs. lect./disc. DED (J. Albert)

INTD 0105 Introduction to Public Health Policy (Fall 2014)
This course will provide an introduction to the range and impact of public health problems, as well as the tools used by policy-makers to describe and analyze them.  In this course we will discuss the philosophical, economic, and political drivers of domestic and international public health policy, as well as demonstrate the potential and limitations of analytic tools (economics, decision science, epidemiology, risk assessment) using specific public health topics as examples (e.g. vaccine-preventable diseases, hunger, chronic disease risk factors, pandemic influenza, health care reform, bioterrorism). Current events and examples in the media, as well as classic case studies, will provide the basis for discussions and readings.  (Not open to students who have taken INTD 1094). 3 hrs. lect. SOC (P. Berenbaum)

INTD/EDST 0210 Sophomore Seminar in the Liberal Arts (Fall 2014, Spring 2015)
This course is designed for sophomores who are interested in exploring the meaning and the purpose of a liberal arts education. To frame this investigation, we will use the question "What is the good life and how shall I live it?" Through an interdisciplinary and multicultural array of readings and films we will engage our course question through intellectual discussion, written reflection, and personal practice. There will be significant opportunities for public speaking and oral presentation, as well as regular writing assignments, including a formal poster presentation. Readings will include reflections on a liberal arts education in the U.S. (Emerson, Brann, Nussbaum, Oakeshott, Ladsen-Billings, bell hooks); on "the good life" (excerpts from Aristotle, sacred texts of different traditions); on social science analyses of contemporary life; texts on the neuroscience of happiness; as well as literary and cinematic representations of lives well-lived. CMP (J. Miller-Lane; P. Zupan) CMP, CW (Spring) (Fall 2014: D. Evans, J. Miller-Lane; Spring 2015: P. Zupan, B. Millier)

INTD 0220 Management, Enterprise, and Business (Fall 2014)
An organization, be it a business, a social enterprise, a school or a country, must be managed. In this course we will explore management theory and its practical applications. The course will focus on several highly relevant and timely management issues, giving students both a sound basis for understanding management and also experience with real-world management situations. The course will consist of two components. One component surveys the history and development of management theory, management functions, management roles and skills, and management organization, structures and behavior. The second component focuses on practical management techniques and skills including problem solving, teamwork, and communications. 3 hrs. lect. (A. Biswas, D. Colander)

INTD 0221 Enterprise, Social Entrepreneurship, and the Liberal Arts (Fall 2014)
In this course we will explore how to translate the skills and knowledge learned in liberal arts courses to the skills and knowledge used in various forms of enterprises. The course will consist of three parts. In the first part we will discuss the role and nature of college education and how it relates, or does not relate, to getting a job. In the second part we will discuss the nature of enterprise, business, and entrepreneurship, considering how social entrepreneurship and entrepreneurship relate. Finally, in the third part students will complete a set of self-directed exercises to gain an overview of the introduction to the specific skills they will need in the future. (D. Colander)

INTD 0316 Corporate Finance and Accounting (Fall 2014)
Finance has become an integral part of economics, as shown by the number of Nobel Prizes awarded in recent years to scholars who have made contributions to the field. This course will focus on the financial side of the modern corporation, for the stakeholders as well as the shareholders. We will start with financial accounting as a means of measuring the health of a company and of discerning the transparency and accuracy of its financial statements. (As Enron and other companies showed, it pays to be skeptical.) We will then move to strategic planning and the growth of the firm, and to decisions on how to finance that growth as between equity and debt. We will conclude with valuation models based on cash flow. At the end we will hold a buy-side sell-side competition, in which students work in teams to value real companies and present them to the class as attractive investments. (ECON 0150 and ECON 0155) 3 hrs. lect., 1 hr. lab (S. Pardee, D. Colander)

INTD 0317 Investments and Financial Markets (Spring 2015)
In this course we will consider the role that the investment process plays in society and will explore the recent growth in financial markets. We will also analyze the internal workings of markets for equities, bonds, commodities, derivatives, and foreign exchange, and discuss both their positive and negative aspects. We will employ a wide range of techniques to analyze markets, such as: valuation models and portfolio diversification in equities; the yield curve and concepts such as duration and convexity in bonds; fundamental analysis and technical analysis in commodities; interest rate parity and purchasing power parity in the foreign exchange; and options pricing model in derivatives. The course will conclude with a discussion of whether these markets are helping or hurting society, and how they might be modified. (ECON 0150 and ECON 0155 and ECON 0210) 3 hrs. lect., 1 hr. lab (S. Pardee, D. Colander)

Independent Scholar Program

The Independent Scholar Program is designed to meet the needs of outstanding students who have clearly defined disciplinary interests that cannot be fulfilled within the framework of a normal departmental or interdisciplinary major. Independent Scholars plan their own curricular programs with the assistance of a faculty advisor. Independent Scholars cannot propose two majors, but can pursue an independent scholar major and one minor. For the 2014-15 academic year, application materials are due to the Curriculum Committee by Monday, October 6, 2014, for fall review; and Monday, February 16, 2015, for spring review.

     Eligibility: For an application to be considered, a student must be in their sophomore year and have a GPA of 3.5 or higher. If approved, students must fulfill all requirements for the degree using their approved Independent Scholar plan as their major course of study. Proposed Independent Scholar proposals will be evaluated in light of feasibility, academic disciplinary integrity, and demonstrated ability of the student. A successful proposal must articulate a fully developed program of study, must include a methods course, and must demonstrate compellingly that the student’s academic goals cannot be met through existing majors.

     Application Process: To be designated an Independent Scholar, a student must undergo a rigorous approval process overseen by the Curriculum Committee. The process begins with an interview with the Dean of Curriculum. The student must subsequently prepare and submit a well-defined program to the Curriculum Committee, covering a description of the aim of the program, the independent work, and the courses he or she proposes to comprise the major. The proposal must be accompanied by a written endorsement of a faculty member who is willing and qualified to supervise the student, as well as a statement of support from an alternate faculty member. The Curriculum Committee will review all submitted materials, and if warranted, convene a meeting with the candidate and advisers. Final approval rests with the Curriculum Committee.  An applicant whose proposal is denied is entitled to meet with the Dean of Curriculum or the Curriculum Committee.

     Oversight: The Curriculum Committee will solicit updates from each Independent Scholar twice a year. Changes to the program must also be submitted to the Curriculum Committee, and the faculty supervisor will cosign all registration materials. The Major Declaration form and Degree Audit forms will be signed by both the faculty adviser and Dean of Curriculum. Students who elect to withdraw from the Independent Scholar Program, or who have their independent scholar status withdrawn, may be allowed, at the discretion of the committee, to graduate in general studies, without a formal major in any department.

     Senior Work: The INDE 0800 is a culminating experience for this program of study. This project brings together the course work the student has completed and incorporates all aspects of the study into one final project. Students applying to be independent scholars are asked to provide an indication of possible INDE 0800 projects at the time that they submit their proposals. Students are able, however, to change the topic of their INDE 0800 project in order to respond to new interests and information acquired during the course of their study.

     The INDE 0800 project is undertaken for one or two terms. Students who wish to be considered for honors must work with a thesis committee. Thesis work most typically follows the procedures for the department most closely related to the project. Others may choose to work with an individual faculty member, usually the student's adviser. The choice of senior project is flexible. For example, with permission from the adviser, a student in the performing arts might want to incorporate a dance performance, musical composition, or some other feature as part of his or her course of study.

     Honors: In order to be considered for honors, independent scholars normally must meet two criteria: a minimum average of B+ in courses taken towards the major and a minimum grade of B+ on the senior work component. The Registrar's Office oversees the first requirement and will inform the adviser of the student's eligibility. The senior work component must be evaluated by a committee of three faculty members (one of whom, at the adviser's request, may be a faculty member on the Curriculum Committee). Minimum thesis grades for each level of honors are B+ (Honors), A- (High Honors), and A (Highest Honors), but the determination of the appropriate level will be made by the thesis committee.

     For more information about this program, please contact the Dean of Curriculum.

International Politics & Economics

(1) Courses in Political Science: PSCI 0103, PSCI 0109, PSCI 0304 (PSCI 0304 must be taken at Middlebury College) and three electives in comparative politics or international relations (PSCI 0262 may also count as an elective). At least one elective should be a 0400-level senior seminar in comparative politics or international relations.
(2) Courses in Economics: For students matriculating through 2014.5, the six required economics courses are: ECON 0150, ECON 0155, ECON 0250 (though substituting ECON 0210 for ECON 0250 is encouraged), plus ECON 0240 (formerly ECON 0340) and two electives with an international orientation. One elective should be a 0400-level senior seminar. At least four economics courses meeting the major requirements must be taken at Middlebury, including the 0400-level course. For students matriculating into the classes of 2015 and after, the six required economics courses are: ECON 0150, ECON 0155, ECON 0210, plus ECON 0240 (formerly ECON 0340) and two electives with an international orientation. One elective should be a 0400-level senior seminar. At least four economics courses meeting the major requirements must be taken at Middlebury, including the 0400-level seminar.
(3) Language Study: Students in International Politics & Economics must achieve the language department's standard of linguistic competence before going abroad or must demonstrate equivalent competence in a language taught at Middlebury College through a language placement exam. Foreign language study while at Middlebury is strongly encouraged.
(4) Term or Year Abroad: Under normal circumstances, this will be completed at one of the Middlebury schools abroad. At a minimum, majors should complete PSCI 0103, PSCI 0109, ECON 0150, ECON 0155, and ECON 0210 (or ECON 0250 for students in the classes of 2014.5 or earlier) before going abroad for a semester. Students who will be abroad for a full year should also complete PSCI 0304 before leaving Middlebury.
(5) Advanced Placement: Students must take a minimum of 5 courses in each discipline. See the Advanced Placement policy for detailed information.
     Winter Term Courses:Winter Term courses count towards the major only if they are listed on the IPEC Courses web page prior to winter term registration.
     Double Majors and Minors:Because of the complex and interdisciplinary nature of the International Politics & Economics major, IPEC students are strongly advised not to pursue an additional major. In addition, IPEC majors may not minor in either economics or political science and may not major or minor in their primary language of focus.
     Declaring a Major: To declare a major, students need to fill out both a major declaration form and an advising wizard form. Discuss your plan for completing the major (outlined on the advising wizard form) with your advisor who can be from either the political science or economics department. Have both your advisor and the Director of International Politics & Economics sign the major declaration form. Turn in one copy of both forms to the coordinator of International Politics & Economics. Turn in one copy of the major declaration form to the Registrar's Office.
     First semester of senior year: Early in the first semester of your senior year, fill out both a degree audit sheet and an advising wizard form. Print out a copy of your unofficial transcript and evidence that any courses from abroad have been approved for IPEC major credit (such as an email approval from a chair or director, or information from the programs abroad office). Bring these items to the Director of International Politics & Economics no later than a week before registration for classes for your final semester. Once signed, turn in one copy of the advising wizard form and the degree audit sheet to the coordinator of International Politics & Economics. Turn in one copy of the degree audit sheet to the Registrar's Office.
     Honors:In addition to their 12 required courses, qualifying students can choose to write a senior thesis. To launch a thesis project, students must obtain a thesis advisor in both political science and economics, and submit to their advisors a thesis prospectus for formal approval. To identify suitable thesis topics, it is highly recommended that IPEC thesis candidates begin consulting with the potential advisors during their junior year. For details, deadlines, and a timetable, see the Honors Thesis page (http://www.middlebury.edu/academics/ipe/thesis2014.
     Honors Thesis Requirements:The determination of honors, high honors, and highest honors is based on (1) the level of the grade achieved on the thesis; and (2) the level of the average grade received in all Middlebury College courses that count toward the IPEC major. Honors candidates must have an IPEC course average of 3.3 and a thesis grade of B+ to attain honors; an IPEC course average of at least 3.5 and a thesis grade of A- to attain high honors; and an IPEC course average of at least 3.7 and a thesis grade of A to attain highest honors. Note: Thesis grades do not count in the calculation of the GPA for honors, and a thesis cannot be pursued as a fifth course during any term

IPEC 0500 Independent Project (Fall 2014, Spring 2015)
Approval required. (Staff)

IPEC 0700 Senior Thesis (Fall 2014, Spring 2015)
Approval required. (Staff)

International and Global Studies

Courses and Requirements: All students who major in international and global studies (IGS) must specialize in one of the seven tracks that make up the major: African studies, East Asian studies, European studies, Latin American studies, Middle East studies, Russian and East European studies, and South Asian studies. Students who will graduate in 2015 must complete IGST 0101, an IGST senior seminar, and three regional courses; they must also specialize in one of the liberal arts disciplines, achieve proficiency in one of the languages taught at Middlebury, study abroad for at least one semester, and complete at least one advanced language course upon return from abroad. IGS majors may not double-count any courses towards the discipline, region, and language requirements.
     Students who will graduate in 2016 have a choice between the existing requirements and the new ones listed below.
     Beginning with 2017 graduates, IGS majors* are required to complete: IGST 0101; five regional courses in at least three disciplines and in at least two divisions (to be selected in consultation with their advisor); and three global courses (from an existing list, only one of which may be at the 0100 level and none at the 0400 level). They also must: achieve language proficiency; study abroad for at least one semester; complete at least one language course at the advanced level upon return from abroad; and take a senior seminar either in one of the departments or in IGS. The departmental senior seminar must be either regional or global (thematic).
     *South Asian studies majors must study a language when abroad, but are neither expected to achieve language proficiency nor complete a language course once they return from abroad. In lieu of the language requirement after returning from abroad, these students should take one additional regional or global course.
     Because of the complex nature of the international and global studies major, students pursuing it are strongly encouraged not to have an additional major. Any course counted towards the IGS major cannot count for any other major or minor. IGS majors may not major or minor in their discipline or primary language of focus. The minimum requirements for the major in International and Global Studies are as follows:
     International and Global Studies Core: Students are required to take IGST 0101 as their sole core course requirement, and are expected to take this course before studying abroad. IGST 0101 is not open to seniors except for students who declared their major in their sophomore year and spent their entire junior year abroad. Students who declare their major in their sophomore year, who have not yet taken IGST 0101, and who plan to study abroad for one semester only, must take it in the fall of their junior year prior to going abroad.
     Language Study: Students must become proficient in one of the languages that Middlebury teaches. Individual language departments determine what level of study constitutes proficiency, and students are expected to do advanced work in the language that they study. All majors must take at least one advanced course in the language of study upon returning from abroad and are encouraged to take more than one advanced course.
     For East Asian Studies: A student who already has native proficiency in Chinese must fulfill the language requirements for Japanese. A student who already has native proficiency in Japanese must fulfill the language requirements for Chinese. The Chairs of the Chinese and Japanese departments or their designees determine what constitutes native proficiency by evaluating students individually through interviews or tests.
     For Latin American Studies: Students who place into Spanish 0220 or above must take at least two semesters of Portuguese (0210 and above) to fulfill the language requirement. Students who place into Portuguese 0215 or above must take at least two semesters of Spanish (0105 and above) to fulfill the language requirement.
     International and Global Studies Major with Chinese Language: Along with other required courses and senior work as described in the International and Global Studies major section, the Chinese language component of an IGS major requires the completion of the following: 1) CHNS 0101-CHNS 0202 (strongly encouraged to attend Middlebury Chinese Summer School, or take CHNS 03010302); 2) one semester at one of the three C.V. Starr-Middlebury College Schools in China; 3) any two of the following: CHNS 0411, 0412, 0426, OR 0475 upon return from study abroad in China.
     Regional Specialization: For 2015 graduates (and for 2016 graduates who choose the old requirements), this requirement consists of three courses with content exclusively or primarily on the region, in at least two different disciplines other than the language of study and the disciplinary specialization. For a list of courses that fulfill this requirement go to: http://www.middlebury.edu/academics/igs/wizard.For students in East Asian studies who elect to learn the Japanese language: three courses on East Asia (two courses having content exclusively or primarily on Japan and one on China or East Asia), in at least two different disciplines. For those students who elect to learn the Chinese language: three courses on East Asia (two courses with content exclusively or primarily on China and one on Japan or East Asia), in at least two different disciplines. Students who have native or near-native proficiency in one language and achieve proficiency in the other may choose a regional specialization in either China or Japan.
     Beginning with the class of 2017, this requirement consists of five courses, in at least three departments spread across at least two divisions [Students must consult with their advisors about the divisional requirement]. At least three regional courses must be taken in Middlebury.
     Disciplinary Specialization only for students under the old rules, class of 2015 (2016): Students must take at least five courses within a single discipline among the following list: economics; film and media culture; geography; history; history of art and architecture; literature/civilization; philosophy; political science; religion; and sociology/anthropology (see "Disciplinary Specializations by Department" below). Within a student's disciplinary specialization, at least one of the courses must be an upper-level course, and at least two of the courses should have substantial content on the geographical area of specialization. Where possible, such regional courses should be taken on the Middlebury campus, and IGS majors should take at least two of their disciplinary courses before going abroad.
     Beginning with the class of 2017 (2016) the disciplinary specialization is no longer a requirement.
     Global Courses: Beginning with the class of 2017 (2016), students will be required to take three global courses, (only one of which may be at the 0100 level and none at the 0400 level). These will be selected in consultation with the advisor, based on a list of courses designated as global courses by the IGS program. Global courses are thematic, trans-regional, and comparative. http://www.middlebury.edu/academics/igs/courses/globalcourses
     Study Abroad: Students must study abroad for at least one semester (and preferably for a year) on a Middlebury-approved study abroad program in their region of focus. Study abroad must be in the language of study at Middlebury. Students must receive the approval of the relevant departments and/or, as appropriate, the program director to receive major credit for courses taken abroad. Students studying abroad for one semester may count up to two regional courses taken abroad. Students studying abroad for the full academic year may count up to two regional courses and one global course. Students must provide course syllabi of all courses taken abroad for which credit is requested.     
      Advanced Placement
: Advanced Placement credit will not count toward the major.
     Senior Program: For 2015 or 2016 graduates, the IGS senior program consists of: (1) A senior international and global studies seminar that is thematic, team-taught, interdisciplinary, or cross-regional (see seminar courses under International and Global Studies Courses below); and (2) an upper-level course, preferably two, in the language of emphasis that will be taken after returning from abroad. The language departments will determine which courses can be taken to fulfill this requirement, in consultation with the program director. Students may also elect to write an honors thesis (IGST 070X, two semesters) during their senior year. Students writing a thesis may choose to waive the IGS seminar requirement. Students are eligible to write a senior honors thesis if they have a 3.5 GPA* or better in all courses that count for the major. Writing a thesis is required to graduate with honors. Thesis guidelines and procedures can be found at go/igsthesis.
     Beginning with the class of 2017 (2016), the IGS senior program consists of: (1) a senior departmental seminar either regional or global in the Humanities or Social Sciences, or an IGST seminar; and (2) an upper-level course, preferably two, in the language of emphasis that will be taken after returning from abroad. The language departments will determine which courses can be taken to fulfill this requirement, in consultation with the program director.
     Students who plan to enroll in a departmental senior seminar must be aware that many such seminars have prerequisites. Students, therefore, should plan in advance to complete these requirements no later than their junior year. South Asian Studies majors need not take an upper-level language course but should take one additional course either regional or on a global theme.
     Beginning with the class of 2017 (2016) students may elect to write a two-term senior thesis but cannot substitute it for the required senior seminar. Students are eligible to write a senior honors thesis if they have a 3.5 GPA** or better in all courses that count for the major. Writing a thesis is required to graduate with honors. Thesis guidelines and procedures can be found at go/igsthesis.
     Honors: Honors are awarded to students with a GPA** of 3.5 and a thesis grade of B+; high honors to students with a GPA of 3.7 and a thesis grade of A- or A; and highest honors to students with a GPA of 3.8 and a thesis grade of A.
     *The International and Global Studies GPA is calculated on the basis of those courses that satisfy or could potentially satisfy the requirements for the major. All courses that could count for the major will be used in the calculation of GPA for purposes of determining honors, and include all language courses, all disciplinary courses, all regional courses, all courses taken abroad, and all courses with an IGST/INTL designation.
     Note: Thesis grades do not count in the calculation of the GPA for honors.
     Winter Term Course: A winter term course taken at Middlebury may count towards the regional and/or disciplinary requirements only with the approval of the track director. Students wishing to count a winter term course must provide the track director with a copy of the course syllabus. No more than one winter term course may count towards the program requirements.

Area Specializations
African Studies
Language/Culture:
Language competency in French or Swahili; satisfactory completion of at least one advanced French course or one independent study in Swahili upon students return from abroad. If French is the language of emphasis, students must study an appropriate indigenous African language to a level of reasonable competence while abroad. The French Department will specify which courses fulfill the French requirement. The African Studies director will specify which courses fulfill the Swahili requirement.
     Regional Specialization: see Courses and Requirements above
     Disciplinary Specialization: see Disciplinary Specializations by Department below
     Study Abroad: see Courses and Requirements above
     Senior Program: see Courses and Requirements above

East Asian Studies
Language/Culture:
Satisfactory completion of advanced work in either Chinese or Japanese. The Chinese and Japanese departments will specify which courses fulfill this requirement.
     A student who already has native or near-native proficiency in Japanese must fulfill the language requirements for Chinese. A student who already has native or near-native proficiency in Chinese must fulfill the language requirements for Japanese.
     Regional Specialization: see Courses and Requirements above
     Disciplinary Specialization:
see Disciplinary Specializations by Department below
     Study Abroad: see Courses and Requirements above
     Senior Program:
see Courses and Requirements above

European Studies
Language/Culture:
Language competency; satisfactory completion of at least one advanced course taught in the language of emphasis (French, German, Italian, or Spanish). Individual departments will specify which courses fulfill these requirement.
     Regional Specialization: see Courses and Requirements above
     Disciplinary Specialization:
see Disciplinary Specialization by Department below
     Study Abroad: see Courses and Requirements above
     Senior Program: see Courses and Requirements above

Latin American Studies
Language/Culture:
Satisfactory completion of advanced work in either Portuguese or Spanish. Students who place into Spanish 0220 or above must take at least two semesters of Portuguese (0210 and above) to fulfill the language requirement. Students who place into Portuguese 0215 or above must take at least two semesters of Spanish (0105 and above) to fulfill the language requirement.
      Regional Specialization: see Courses and Requirements above
     Disciplinary Specialization:
see Disciplinary Specializations by Department below
     Study Abroad:
see Courses and Requirements above
     Senior Program:
see Courses and Requirements above

Middle East Studies
Language/Culture:
Successful completion of three years of Arabic or Modern Hebrew (or the equivalent as determined by the Arabic or Hebrew program). Students who choose Modern Hebrew must be willing to pursue language study beyond Middlebury, if the Colleges Hebrew program is not able to offer a full range of advanced courses.
     Regional Specialization: see Courses and Requirements above
     Disciplinary Specialization:
see Disciplinary Specializations by Department below
     Study Abroad: see Courses and Requirements above
     Senior Program:
see Courses and Requirements above

Russian and East European Studies
Language/Culture:
Language competency: satisfactory completion of at least second- and preferably third-level Russian or the Russian School equivalent
     Regional Specialization: see Courses and Requirements above
     Disciplinary Specialization: see Disciplinary Specializations by Department below
     Study Abroad:
see Courses and Requirements above
     Senior Program: see Courses and Requirements above

South Asian Studies
Language/Culture:
Students must pursue a formal course of study of a South Asian language while abroad
     Regional Specialization: see Courses and Requirements above
     Disciplinary Specialization:
see Disciplinary Specializations by Department below
     Study Abroad:
Students must study in South Asia for at least one semester, preferably two. The C.V. Starr Middlebury School in India is recommended
     Senior Program:
see Courses and Requirements above; however, because Middlebury does not offer a South Asian language, students are not required to take an additional language course on their return from South Asia.

     Disciplinary Specializations by Department (only for students graduating in  2015 [2016])
Disciplinary requirements are listed below. Students are required to take two courses within their disciplinary specialization that have substantial content in their region of focus. If these regional courses cannot be taken at Middlebury, students may take them while abroad. Area program directors will determine which courses fulfill this regional requirement in consultation with individual departments.
     Economics
:
For students matriculating in the classes through 2014.5, ECON 0150, ECON 0155, ECON 0210 or ECON 0250, ECON 0240 (formerly ECON 0340), and two departmental electives with an international focus at the 0200-, 0300-, or 0400-levels. One of them must be a 0400-level course. For students matriculating with the class of 2015 and after, ECON 0150, ECON 0155, ECON 0210, ECON 0240 (formerly 0340), and two departmental electives with an international focus at the 0200-, 0300- or 0400-levels. One of them must be a 0400-level seminar.
     Film and Media Culture: Three required courses FMMC 0101, FMMC 0102, FMMC 0104 plus three additional courses that are listed or cross-listed as FMMC. At least one of the three electives must be at the 0300- or 0400-level, and at least one must be international in focus (preferably should have substantial content on the geographical area of specialization). Students wishing to do a senior project will be required to follow the relevant guidelines and prerequisites listed on the FMMC website.
     Geography: GEOG 0100, GEOG 0120, 3 courses from GEOG 0207, GEOG 0210, GEOG 0214, GEOG 0215, GEOG 0220, GEOG 0223, GEOG 0225; and one GEOG 0400-level seminar. Students writing a thesis must also take GEOG 0325 or GEOG 0339.
     History: A 0100-level course and five other courses, including a 0400-level reading seminar normally taken in the senior year. The reading seminar and at least two other courses should be within the regional focus, and at least one course should be outside the regional focus. With the permission of the history department chair, up to two of these courses can be taken abroad.
     History of Art and Architecture: HARC 0100, HARC 0102 (or another pre-approved course in the history of non-western art and/or architecture); four electives at the 0200-level or above, two of which must be in region of specialization; students writing a thesis must take HARC 0301 in lieu of one of the four electives at the 0200-level.

Literature and Culture:
Chinese:
To specialize in Chinese Literature/Culture within the International and Global Studies major, in addition to language proficiency, students must take any five of the following: CHNS 0219, CHNS 0220,CHNS/FMMC 0250, CHNS/LNGT 0270, CHNS 0325, CHNS 0330, CHNS 0340, CHNS 0370, CHNS 0412, CHNS 0475 (one literature course taken during study abroad may be counted toward this requirement).
     French:
(1) proficiency in French (a minimum of two of FREN 0210, FREN 0221, FREN 0230 or work in the French Summer School at the 0400-level or above); (2) at least one semester, and preferably a year, at one of the C.V. Starr-Middlebury Schools in France, Cameroon, or in another French-speaking country; (3) three courses at the advanced level (taken at of our schools in France, Cameroon, or in another French-speaking country); and (4) one or more courses at the 0300- or 0400-level upon return from abroad.
     German: Any five courses at the 0300-level, up to four of which may be taken at one of our schools in Germany, plus GRMN 0700 or a course at the 0400-level.
     Italian: In addition to language proficiency, four 0300-level courses, including ITAL 0355 or its equivalent at one of our schools in Italy, plus one 0400-level seminar
     Japanese: In addition to language courses, five courses on literature, film, or culture offered by the Department of Japanese Studies.
     Portuguese:
In addition to PGSE 0202 or its equivalent, four upper level courses on literature or culture taken at Middlebury or in Brazil, and PGSE 0500 during the senior year.
     Russian: RUSS 0151, RUSS 0152, three others taken either at Middlebury or at one of our schools in Russia, and RUSS 0704.
     Spanish: Six courses at the 0300-level or above, including SPAN 0300, at least one literature course in the area of interest, at least one culture course in the area of interest, and one 0400-level seminar during the senior year.
     Philosophy:
PHIL 0150 or 0151; PHIL 0180; one course in history of philosophy (PHL 0201, PHIL/CLAS 0175, or PHIL 0250); one 0400-level seminar to be taken in the last three semesters; and one course from each of the following areas: (1) ethics and social and political philosophy (ESP); (2) epistemology, language, metaphysics, mind and science (ELMMS)
     Political Science: PSCI 0103 or PSCI 0109; one course from PSCI 0101, PSCI 0102, PSCI 0104; PSCI 0107; four other courses from either the comparative politics or international relations and foreign policy categories, including one 0400-level seminar taken at Middlebury College in Vermont. IGST seminars co-taught by PSCI faculty cannot substitute for 0400-level PSCI seminars, but will count toward the six required courses in political science. In addition, it is highly recommended that IGST thesis candidates enroll in PSCI 0368 or PSCI 0347 before their senior year.
     Religion: Six courses on religious traditions with a major presence in the region of study, at least two of which must be at the 0300-level. Two of the courses may treat the religious traditions of the region as practiced in other parts of the world. IGS senior seminars co-taught by RELI faculty will count toward the required six classes. In some cases, RELI 0400 may also be counted toward the six courses.
     Sociology/Anthropology: To specialize in sociology/anthropology within the international and global studies major, students must take: SOAN 0103, SOAN 0105, SOAN 0305 or SOAN 0306, plus three other sociology/anthropology electives. For students who plan on writing a senior thesis, one of the electives must be SOAN 0301 or SOAN 0302 before their senior year.

IGST 0101 Introduction to International and Global Studies (Fall 2014)
This is the core course of the International and Global Studies major. It is an introduction to key international issues and problems that will likely feature prominently in their courses at Middlebury and study abroad. Issues covered will differ from year to year, but they may include war, globalization, immigration, racism, imperialism, nationalism, world organizations, non-governmental organizations, the European Union, the rise of East Asia, politics and society in Latin America, and anti-Americanism. 3 hrs. lect./disc. CMP (M. Fernandez, G. Herb)

IGST/PSCI 0251 Identity and Conflict in South Asia (Spring 2015)
In this course we will examine political development and conflict in South Asia through the concept of identity. South Asians take on a variety of identities -- ethnic, religious, linguistic, caste, national, etc. These identities often form the basis of political mobilization and both inter- and intrastate conflict. We will study the general concept of identity, including how identities are constructed and used, and then specific manifestations in South Asia. We will also examine the question of whether these identities were constructed during colonial or post-colonial times, or have an earlier basis. AAL, SOC (J. Lunstead)

IGST/SOAN 0273 Diasporas and Homelands (Fall 2014)
War, mass migration, and globalization have spurred development of diaspora communities and heightened scholarly interest in the phenomenon. In contrast to other groups of exiles and immigrants, diaspora communities seek integration within host countries as well as ongoing political, economic, and cultural ties to their homelands. A number of questions arise from these complex and dynamic relationships: How do diaspora communities maintain cultural distinctiveness within host countries? How do they maintain and reproduce cultural ties with homelands and other centers of diaspora life? What influence do diaspora communities have on political relationships between host countries and homelands? What influence do they have on internal homeland politics? Finally, what are the implications of the diaspora phenomenon for the future of the nation state and globalization? Case studies will be drawn from a variety of diaspora communities, including Armenians, Nigerians, Jews, Palestinians, Dominicans, and South Asians. 3 hrs. lect. CMP, SOC (T. Sasson)

IGST 0420 Visual Cultures of the Americas (Fall 2014)
From murals to monuments and telenovelas to veladoras, this bilingual [Spanish/English] seminar will explore the role of visual expression in the history of cultural formation throughout the Americas. We will take a hemispheric and transnational approach to our studies. As such, two related premises inform the material we will examine: images traverse the boundaries of nation-states, and they are intrinsically tied to the developments of modern history. We will combine theoretical works with a variety of still and moving images (artifacts of mass culture, photography, artwork, film, mixed media, and performance) to study the relationship between "visuality" and flows of culture throughout Latin and Anglo Americas. This course is equivalent to AMST 0420. 3 hrs. sem. ART, CMP (R. Lint)

IGST 0436 Terrorism (Spring 2015)
Terrorism, the act of violent resistance against real or perceived oppression, has taken on new dimensions in an age dominated by mass media and technology. Can we make reliable distinctions between terrorism, anarchism, guerrilla warfare and random mass murder? What are the political, social, and cultural conditions that favor terrorism? What makes an individual a terrorist? How have governments coped with terrorist movements? What is "state terrorism"? Looking at terrorist movements across the globe, as well as the historical evolution of terrorism, this course will examine explanations for this disintegrative phenomenon given by social scientists, historians, writers, and filmmakers. Students interested in the possibility of receiving German credit for this course should contact Michael Geisler. This course is equivalent to GEOG 0436. 3 hrs. sem. (M. Geisler, T. Mayer)

IGST 0475 Imperialism and Anti-Imperialism in Asia (Spring 2015)
In this seminar we will examine patterns of Euro-American and Japanese imperialism in South, East, and Southeast Asia during the 19th and 20th centuries. We will focus on the ways in which scholars and revolutionaries have made sense of the workings of colonial power and formulated strategies for resistance. By engaging with novels, films, and political manifestos, students will gain a broad understanding of how imperialism transformed lifeworlds, how its cultural, social, and economic dimensions have been critiqued, and the formation of nationalist, Marxist, and Pan-Asianist movements. Readings will include works by V.I. Lenin, Mao Zedong, Ho Chi Minh, Pramoedya Ananta Toer, and Ranajit Guha. This course is equivalent to HIST 0475. 3 hrs sem. AAL, CMP, HIS, SOC (M. Clinton)

IGST 0476 Disability in a Global Context (Spring 2015)
Approximately 650 million people currently live with a disability, making this population the largest minority in the world. In this seminar we will explore the meaning of disability (as a condition) as well as the lived experience of people with disabilities in global, continental, and national contexts. Using an integrated perspective that applies knowledge about disability from diverse disciplines and methodologies, we will assess core models of disability: social, medical, linguistic, historical, political, institutional, educational, technological, attitudinal, and economic. Using the term disability within an analytical framework, we will examine the meaning of such fundamental concepts as identity, community, citizenship, and "normalcy." (Approval required) 3 hrs. sem. CMP (S. Burch)

IGST 0482 Private and Public Governance in an Era of Globalization (Fall 2014)
Although the study of international affairs has traditionally focused on states, other actors play important roles in governance. Working alongside the public sector, private actors bring innovative approaches and substantial resources to social problems, but effective collaboration between public and private actors remains elusive. In this seminar we will examine general theories of private and public governance, followed by specific discussion of issues such as economic development, environmental protection, and public health. This course is equivalent to PSCI 0482. CMP, SOC (C. MacCormack, S. Stroup)

IGST 0483 The Rise of Asia and US Policy (Fall 2014)
In this course we will study what is arguably the most important strategic development of the 21st century: how the rise of Asia presents security challenges to the region and the United States. Drawing from international relations scholarship, the course will focus on foreign policy challenges and potential responses. These challenges include both traditional security and nontraditional areas such as water and the environment. We will integrate the analysis of these issues in South, East, and Southeast Asia with study of the policy process, in part through simulations and role-playing exercises. This course is equivalent to PSCI 0483. 3 hrs. sem. AAL, CMP, SOC (O. Lewis, J. Lunstead)

IGST 0500 East Asian Studies Independent Project (Fall 2014, Spring 2015)
Approval required. (Staff)

IGST 0501 Latin American Studies Independent Project (Fall 2014, Spring 2015)
Approval required. (Staff)

IGST 0502 Middle East Studies Independent Project (Fall 2014, Spring 2015)
Approval required. (Staff)

IGST 0503 African Studies Independent Project (Fall 2014, Spring 2015)
Approval required. (Staff)

IGST 0504 South Asian Studies Independent Project (Fall 2014, Spring 2015)
Approval required. (Staff)

IGST 0505 European Studies Independent Project (Fall 2014, Spring 2015)
Approval required. (Staff)

IGST 0700 Senior Thesis (Fall 2014)
Approval required. (Staff)

IGST 0701 Russian and East European Studies Senior Thesis (Fall 2014, Spring 2015)
Approval required. (Staff)

IGST 0702 European Studies Senior Thesis (Fall 2014, Spring 2015)
Approval required. (Staff)

IGST 0703 Latin American Studies Senior Thesis (Fall 2014, Spring 2015)
Approval required. (Staff)

IGST 0704 Latin American Studies Senior Thesis (Fall 2014, Spring 2015)
Approval required. (Staff)

IGST 0705 African Studies Senior Thesis (Fall 2014, Spring 2015)
Approval required. (Staff)

IGST 0706 Middle East Studies Senior Thesis (Fall 2014, Spring 2015)
Approval required. (Staff)

IGST 0707 South Asian Studies Senior Thesis (Fall 2014, Spring 2015)
Approval required. (Staff)

Italian

Our programs offer students the opportunity to achieve high competence in written and spoken Italian, in understanding Italian literature and culture, and in applying this linguistic, literary, and cultural knowledge to the study of other disciplines. During the academic year our program emphasizes the study of literature and culture in the context of language acquisition. The other integral components of Italian at Middlebury are the Italian School (summer on the Middlebury College campus or at our satellite campus at Mills College, in Oakland, California), and the C. V. Starr-Middlebury College School in Italy (junior year or semester), where students can take courses in our magnificent Sede in Florence (in the Renaissance Palazzo Giugni), or can direct-enroll in our programs at the University of Firenze, the University of Ferrara, or the University of Rome, La Sapienza. These rich programs encourage students to deepen and broaden their study of Italian literature, cinema, history, art history, political science, and many other disciplines. During the academic year in Middlebury, all four levels of courses in Italian are available every semester, and — for qualified students — faculty members are also available to direct independent research projects (ITAL 0550).
     Major in Italian:
For a full or double major in Italian, students must complete nine credits beyond ITAL 0103, including senior work: two courses at the 0400 level, but only one 0400 course for students who spend a whole year in Italy (Please note: ITAL 0101, 0102, and 0103 do not count for the major). Majors are normally expected to study at least one semester at the C.V. Starr-Middlebury College School in Italy (Florence), or at the Universities of Firenze, Ferrara or Rome, and upon their return from Italy they must normally take an Italian course each semester. A student can complete a major with courses at the Italian School in the summer. No more than three credits per semester from Study Abroad in Italy are applicable to the major. One credit towards the Major can be fulfilled by successfully taking a course in English with an approved section in Italian (History of the Italian Language; Italian Cinema; Italy Through Sicily).
     Joint Major in Italian: For the joint major in Italian, students must complete seven credits beginning with ITAL 0251, including one course at the 0400 level. Students must also complete a joint project credited in either of the two disciplines, as well as fulfill the requirements in the second discipline. Students are normally expected to complete one semester at either the C.V. Starr-Middlebury College School in Florence, the University of Firenze, the University of Ferrara, or the University of Rome, La Sapienza. No more than three credits per semester from coursework in Italy are applicable to the Italian part of the major.
     International and Global Studies Major with Italian (European Studies Track):
Along with other required courses and senior work as described in the International and Global Studies major section, the Italian language component of an International and Global Studies major requires completion of the following: 1) Italian courses required for study in Italy (see below); 2) one semester, and preferably a full year, at the C.V. Starr-Middlebury College School in Florence, the University of Ferrara, or the University of Rome; 3) at least one 0400-level course in Italian upon return from Italy. Regional specialization requirements for the International and Global Studies major may include ITAL 0290-level courses (in English) as well as 0300-level courses taught at Middlebury or in Italy.
     Minor in Italian: The Italian minor consists of six courses: ITAL 0251, ITAL 0252 (or two courses counted from ITAL 3251-3252-3253 in the Italian Summer School) and four courses at the 0300-level or higher. Students entering the program with a standing beyond the ITAL 0252-level are required to take at least one 0400-level course as part of the Italian minor. All courses at the 0300-level can be completed during the academic year at Middlebury, at the Italian School, or at one of the affiliated Middlebury programs in Italy (Florence, Ferrara, or Rome).
     Senior Work: Students who major in Italian are required to complete a senior project (ITAL 0755).
     Honors
: To earn departmental honors, high honors*, or highest honors** a student must have at least a 3.6, 3.7*, or 3.8** average or above in Italian courses other than the senior project, have a project defense, and receive a grade of at least B+, A-*, or A** on the thesis (ITAL 0755).
     Fulfilling The Middlebury College Writing Requirement: All Italian majors, joint majors, minors, and International and Global Studies majors with literature and culture focus in Italian are strongly encouraged to fulfill their college writing requirement by enrolling in CMLT 0101 Introduction to World Literature.
     Requirements for Junior Year/Semester Abroad: The Italian language proficiency requirements for participation in study abroad in Italy can be completed with any combination of courses at the Middlebury campus (summer or academic year) that culminates with the successful completion of ITAL 0252 during the academic year or ITAL 3253 at the Summer School. Students must also have an overall academic average of at least B-, an average of B in Italian (or additional course work), and be enrolled in an Italian course the semester before departure. Because of the demanding and intensive nature of our programs in Middlebury, and because of the difficulty of finding equivalent programs in the United States or in Italy, we do not accept alternative programs for the fulfillment of study abroad requirements.
     C.V. Starr-Middlebury School in Italy-Florence:
Students may study for a semester or for a full year in Italy. Fall and spring term students enroll for language, literature, and civilization courses in September and January. For examples of recent courses, please refer to the course database: http://www.middlebury.edu/international/sa/cid.  Students studying in Florence are also expected to enroll in at least two elective courses at the Università degli Studi di Firenze. Subject areas generally offered there include archeology, philology, Italian literature, linguistics, international relations, political science, comparative politics, sociology, history, art history, and history of economics.
     C.V. Starr-Middlebury School in Italy-Ferrara/Rome: Students who apply to the programs at the University of Ferrara or the University of Rome must contact the department chair to discuss their plans. Important: All students studying at the University of Ferrara or the University of Rome must take a literature course, in consultation with the department chair. Subject areas often offered include Italian literature, comparative literature, history, linguistics, philosophy, geography, art history, architecture, theater history, sociology, and international economics as well as other disciplines.

ITAL 0101 Beginning Italian (Fall 2014)
This course is an introduction to the Italian language that provides a foundation in both spoken and written Italian. Focus on the spoken language encourages rapid mastery of the basic structures and vocabulary of contemporary Italian. The exclusive use of Italian in dialogue situations and vocabulary building encourages the student to develop skills in a personalized context. Conversation and drill are stimulated and fostered through active reference to popular Italian music, authentic props, and slides of Italian everyday life and culture. Students are required to participate in the Italian table. 6 hrs. disc./perf.; 2 hrs. screen LNG (F. Sarti, I. Brancoli Busdraghi)

ITAL 0103 Beginning Italian III (Spring 2015)
This course emphasizes increased control and proficiency in the language through audiovisual, conversational, and drill methods. Italian life and culture continue to be revealed through the use of realia. Short reading selections on contemporary Italy and discussions enlarge the student's view of Italian life and culture. Students continue to participate in the Italian table. (ITAL 0102 or equivalent) 6 hrs. disc./perf.; 2 hrs. screen. LNG (A. Barashkov, I. Brancoli Brusdraghi)

ITAL 0123 Accelerated Beginning Italian (Spring 2015)
This course is an intensive introduction to the Italian language that condenses the material normally covered in ITAL 0101 and 0102. We will focus on the spoken language and encourage rapid mastery of the basic structures and vocabulary. Conversation and drill will be stimulated and fostered through active reference to popular Italian culture, film, and music. We will meet 5 times a week including two 75-minutes meetings and an additional drill session. After completing this course students will be fully prepared for second-year Italian. 6 hr. lect./disc./1.5 hr drill LNG (T. VanOrder)

ITAL 0251 An Introduction to Contemporary Italy (Fall 2014)
Intended for students at the intermediate level, this course will afford the opportunity to expand conversation, writing, and reading skills while consolidating knowledge of the more difficult points of grammar. The contextual focus of the course is contemporary Italian culture, including contemporary history and politics, the economy, the division between North and South, immigration from developing countries, environmental issues, and popular music, among others. Italian films, music, and articles from newspapers and news magazines will enhance and complete the learning experience. (ITAL 0250, waiver, or equivalent) EUR, LNG, SOC (T. Van Order, F. Sarti)

ITAL 0252 Italian Culture II: From the Sixties to the Present Day (Spring 2015)
To deepen the historical knowledge gained in ITAL 0251, we will discuss and analyze modern and contemporary Italian literature of various genres, as well as essays, art, and film. In the context of reading, critical viewing, textual analysis, and discussion, we will continue to develop both historical and linguistic competence. Discussion and the writing process, along with selected exercises, will continue to refine grammatical competence. (ITAL 0251) 3 hrs. lect./disc. LIT, LNG (I. Brancoli Busdraghi, P. Zupan)

ITAL/LITS 0290 Dante (in English) (Fall 2014)
An introduction to Dante's major literary works, La Vita Nuova (The New Life) and the Divine Comedy. Close readings of the text will seek to give students an appreciation of Dante's place in world literature. Dante's masterpieces will also be discussed in a historical and philosophical perspective, and supplementary readings will acquaint the reader with the medieval view of life and literature. EUR, LIT (P. Zupan)

ITAL/CMLT 0320 Narratives of the Fascist Past: Memory, Forgetting, and the Myth of the Good Italian (In English) (Fall 2014)
In this course we will examine a troublingly persistent trope in post-fascist Italian culture: the myth of the “Good Italian” or the belief that Italians, benevolent by nature, overwhelmingly opposed the ideals of the fascist regime, protected Jews from deportation, and regularly subverted fascist law. Students will read several key literary texts—Gadda’s That Awful Mess on the Via Merulana, Loy’s First Words, Eco’s The Mysterious Flame of Queen Loana, and Lucarelli’s Carte Blanche—alongside academic historiography, popular histories, journalism, and testimonies in order to fully grasp what is at stake in the heated public and scholarly debate over the “Good Italian”. We will consider issues such as the possibility of knowing history through literature, the ethical implications that arise from that possibility, and the narrative mechanisms through which the literary text engages or fails to engage questions of individual and collective accountability. (ENAM 0103 or CMLT 0101 or permission of the instructor) 3 hrs. sem. HIS, LIT, NOR (N. Chang)

ITAL 0354 Italian Identity through History, Literature, and Music (Fall 2014)
What does it mean to be “Italian”? What is “campanilismo”? What role do languages and dialects play, and how important is music, from Opera to contemporary songs, in the construction of Italian identity? This course acquaints students with the major 19th to 21st century debates on Italy and Italian Identity, and develops students' linguistic, critical, and analytical skills. Readings will introduce literary genres within their historical framework. Special emphasis will be placed on the skill of writing in Italian. (ITAL 0252 or equivalent) 3 hrs. lect./disc., 2 hrs. screen.  EUR, LIT (S. Mula)

ITAL 0355 Love, Laughter, and Desire in Medieval and Renaissance Italian Literature (Spring 2015)
Through a careful reading of excerpts from the literary masterpieces of the Italian Middle Ages and the Renaissance, we will explore artistic representations of some of the most enduring facets of human experience: love, humor, and desire. How do Medieval and Renaissance texts still communicate with our deepest feelings and emotions, and, in particular, with our perception of love and sexuality? From spiritual to carnal love, from Dante to Boccaccio, we will explore how Italians from the Middle Ages to the Renaissance wrote, talked, and laughed about their loves and desires. (ITAL 0354 or equivalent) 3 hrs. lect./disc. 2 hrs. screen. EUR, LIT (T. VanOrder)

ITAL 0425 Il cinema d’autore: 1945-2010 (Fall 2014)
In this course we will critically analyze films of great Italian directors from post-war Neorealism to the present. We will examine films by Roberto Rossellini, Vittorio De Sica, Federico Fellini, Michelangelo Antonioni, Lina Wertmüller, Pier Paolo Pasolini, Bernardo Bertolucci, and Marco Bellocchio. After mastering the film terminology and learning formal film critique, students will engage in independent research that will culminate in the screening and analysis of an Italian film of their choice. Taught in Italian. 3 hrs. sem. (Two 0300-level courses in Italian) ART, EUR, LNG (M. Van Order)

ITAL 0490 Dante in Italian (Spring 2015)
This course concentrates on a close reading of the whole of Dante's Inferno. Students will learn about the historical and literary context of the work, read excerpts from the Purgatorio and the Paradiso, get acquainted with the long tradition of Dante commentaries, and contribute twice a week to an on-line discussion on the weekly readings. After two short papers that will analyze specific aspects of a canto, students will prepare as a final project a Lectura Dantis: a detailed analysis of a canto of the Inferno that will include critical material. (ITAL 0355 or equivalent) 3 hrs. disc. EUR, LIT (S. Mula)

ITAL 0550 Independent Study (Fall 2014, Spring 2015)
Italian faculty as a group will consider and approve requests by qualified juniors and seniors to engage in independent work. Students must submit a prospectus that includes a bibliography of no less than five sources. Interested students should contact members of the Italian faculty before the end of the preceding term to discuss their project and to see if they are available to direct the Independent Study. Students must submit a prospectus with the department chair by the end of the first week of classes for fall and spring term approvals, by the end the last week of fall semester for winter term approvals. Prior to submission, sufficient advance consultation with project directors is required. Junior students are strongly encouraged to consider independent study as preparation for senior honors thesis work. (Staff)

ITAL 0755 Senior Honors (Fall 2014, Spring 2015)
Students majoring in Italian must complete an independent senior project. Italian faculty as a group will consider and approve the proposals, which should be submitted before the last week of the preceding semester. The senior project will be advised by one member of the Italian department, but will be presented to the whole department. Italian honors will be awarded to eligible students depending on the final grade. (Staff)

Japanese

Required for the Major: Students are expected to achieve proficiency in Japanese language at the advanced level, requiring the equivalent of three years of language study and the completion of a senior seminar at the 0400 level. Students are strongly encouraged to begin the study of Japanese in their first academic year. Students who begin study of Japanese in the sophomore year must attend the summer Japanese School before study abroad in Japan. Students are required to spend one semester, usually in the junior year, studying in Japan but are strongly encouraged to spend the full year. Students studying in Japan are expected to take a combination of language and culture courses. In addition to the completion of Japanese language at the 0400 level or equivalent, four culture courses offered in the Japanese Studies department are required. At least two departmental culture courses must be taken before approval for study in Japan.
     Seniors are required to take at least one seminar in the Japanese Studies department at the 0400 level: JAPN 0430, JAPN 0435, JAPN 0450, JAPN 0451, or JAPN 0475.
     In addition to required departmental courses, students are strongly encouraged to take courses on Japan offered abroad and on the Middlebury campus in History, Religion, History of Art and Architecture, or other departments. These additional courses allow students the opportunity to enhance Japanese language and culture study according to individual interests, but do not count towards the major.
     Honors: Successful completion of one advanced language course and JAPN 0700 Senior Thesis with a grade of B+ or above are required for graduation with departmental honors. Departmental honors will be awarded according to the grade point average of courses taken in the department, in the summer Middlebury Japanese School, and in Japan. A grade point average of 3.3 in these courses is required for graduation with honors. A grade point average of 3.75 and a grade of A on the thesis are required for High Honors.
     Required for the Minor: Courses required for the minor in Japanese are completion of language courses to the level of JAPN 0202, or the equivalent, and two additional courses offered by the Japanese Studies department in culture, literature, or film. Cross-listed courses may not count toward the Japanese minor.
     Middlebury's Summer Language School: Intensive language courses are available each summer at Middlebury's Japanese School. During the eight-week session, students and faculty live in the same Japanese language dormitory, take their meals together, and communicate exclusively in Japanese, whether in the classroom or outside of class. For all students pursuing the study of Japanese language and culture, and especially prior to study abroad in Japan, a summer of concentrated study at the second-, third,- or fourth-year level in Middlebury's intensive Japanese School is strongly recommended. Students who are unable to begin the study of Japanese in their first year at Middlebury are strongly encouraged to begin or accelerate their study by taking a course in the intensive summer program.
     Study in Japan: Majors in Japanese Studies are required to spend at least one semester studying abroad in Japan. The C.V. Starr-Middlebury School in Japan, located in Tokyo, offers intensive language courses and topics courses in Japanese. Students have residential options in dormitories or in home-stays arranged by the program.
     Language Technology and Resources:Japanese courses incorporate a variety of computer-driven teaching and learning strategies. Video and audio materials for first- and second-year levels are available on any computer, so that students can view and listen to authentic materials at any time in their dorm rooms or in labs. Japanese films, scripts, and anime in advanced-language courses are also available on the Web to students enrolled in those courses. Many Japanese literature and culture offerings are Web-based multimedia courses. Instructors often make use of conferencing and other electronic tools to extend learning beyond regular class hours. The Middlebury College Library contains an extensive collection of works in English on most aspects of Japan; in addition, there are 1,700 works in Japanese, with special strengths in literature and linguistics.

JAPN 0101 First-Year Japanese (Fall 2014)
This course is an introduction to the modern Japanese language aimed at acquisition of the four basic skills speaking, listening comprehension, reading, and writing. The emphasis is on thorough mastery of the basic structures of Japanese through intensive oral-aural practice and extensive use of audiovisual materials. The two kana syllabaries and kanji (characters) will be introduced toward the goals of developing reading skills and reinforcing grammar and vocabulary acquisition. 3 hrs. lect./3 hrs. drill LNG (K. Davis)

JAPN 0103 First-Year Japanese (Spring 2015)
This course is a continuation of the fall and winter terms with the introduction of more advanced grammatical structures, vocabulary, and characters. The continuing emphasis of the beginning Japanese course will be upon acquisition of well-balanced language skills based on an understanding of the actual use of the language in the Japanese sociocultural context. (JAPN 0101, JAPN 0102) 3 hrs. lect./3 hrs. drill LNG (K. Davis)

JAPN/SOAN 0110 Current Social Issues in Japan (in English) (Spring 2015)
In this course we will use ethnography, fiction, and historical studies to examine some of the underlying themes of Japanese culture. Japan is a highly developed, post-industrial society renowned across the globe for economic success in the post-World War II period. What historical and social factors have shaped Japan’s contemporary culture, and how have interactions with other countries influenced Japanese society? We will study a number of different spheres of Japanese life including the family and the workplace to better understand contemporary society. We will pay special attention to Japan’s global position and its relationship to the United States. 3 hrs. lect./disc. AAL, SOC (L. White)

JAPN 0201 Second-Year Japanese (Fall 2014)
The goals of the intermediate course are to develop the ability to understand conversational Japanese at natural speed, to express oneself accurately and smoothly in various situations, to read nontechnical materials at reasonable speed with the use of the dictionary, and to express oneself in writing with relative ease. Understanding of Japanese culture will be broadened and deepened through mastery of the course materials. (JAPN 0103 or equivalent) 3 hrs. lect./3 hrs. drill LNG (K. Davis)

JAPN 0202 Second-Year Japanese (Spring 2015)
This course is a continuation of JAPN 0201. (JAPN 0201 or equivalent) 3 hrs. lect./3 hrs. drill LNG (K. Davis)

JAPN/LNGT 0210 Introduction to Japanese Linguistics (in English) (Fall 2014)
This course will provide an introduction to linguistics theories as applied to the study of Japanese. Through the exploration of a language that is very different from Indo-European languages, students will gain a better understanding of how human languages work and are structured. The relationship of language to culture will be a central theme in the course. Topics covered will include key concepts in linguistics, Japanese linguistics, culture, and pedagogy. This course will be taught in English; no Japanese language or linguistics knowledge required. 3 hrs. lect./disc. AAL (S. Abe)

JAPN/FMMC 0212 The Age of Young Media: Japanese Popular Culture from Anime to JDrama (in English) (Spring 2015)
In this course we will examine how Japanese popular culture has historically co-opted young performers and audiences to present itself as “young media.” We will draw upon examples from anime, television dramas, and elsewhere to reflect upon what it means to live in an age of young media— an age in which media culture presents itself as eternally young and without history. In order to explore this and other issues within their local and global context, we will read essays on media theory and Japanese popular culture, including those of Azuma Hiroki, Marc Steinberg, and Ian Condry. 3 hrs. lect. AAL, ART (D. Humphrey)

JAPN 0215 Modern Japanese Fiction (in English) (Fall 2014)
In this course we will examine the development of Japanese literature from the Meiji restoration (1868) through WWII. During this period of rapid and often tumultuous modernization, fiction played a crucial role in the creation of the nation-state and in the formation of the individual's sense of self. We will read works by writers who participated actively in the imagination of modernity and those who resisted it, including Kunikida Doppo, Higuchi Ichiyo, Natsume Soseki, and Mori Ogai. 3 hrs. lect./disc. AAL, LIT (D. Humphrey)

JAPN 0217 Contemporary Japanese Fiction: Haruki Murakami and His Generation (in English) (Spring 2015)
Contemporary Japanese literature is dominated by the work of Haruki Murakami and writers who have been influenced by him. We will examine Murakami's work in detail, including A Wild Sheep Chase, Wind-Up Bird Chronicle, and Kafka on the Shore, and then look at the relationship between Murakami and other contemporary writers (Yoko Ogawa, Ryu Murakami, Natsuo Kirino). Murakami's impact on the visual arts (Takashi Murakami and "Superflat") and the wider culture will also be examined. Students will gain a strong grounding in contemporary Japanese culture through the eyes of one of its most interesting and influential practitioners. AAL, LIT (Staff)

JAPN/RELI 0228 Japanese Religions (Spring 2015)
We will begin our study of Japanese religions with the ancient mythology that forms the basis of Shinto (the way of the kami, or gods). We will then consider the introduction of Buddhism, Confucianism, and Daoism to Japan and examine how these traditions were accepted, absorbed, and adapted. We will also investigate Japanese reactions to Christianity in the 16th century and the appearance of "new" Japanese religions starting in the 19th century. Throughout, we will ask how and why Japanese have both adhered to tradition and been open to new religions. 3 hrs. lect./disc. AAL, PHL (E. Morrison)

JAPN/SOAN 0230 Rethinking the Body in Japan (in English) (Spring 2015)                                      
In this course we will examine attitudes toward and tensions related to the human body in Japan.  Looking at art, music style, and social issues we will examine the symbolic as well as material concerns of bodies in contemporary Japan.  Religious, historical, martial, and aesthetic understandings of bodies will be addressed.  We will analyze Japan’s current attitudes toward organ transplantation, treatment of the deceased, plastic surgery, surrogacy, sex change surgery and other embodied practices.  Readings will include Twice Dead and Commodifying Bodies. AAL, SOC (L.White) 

JAPN/HIST 0235 History of Pre-Modern Japan (Fall 2014)
In this course we will explore the social, cultural, and institutional history of Japan from the eighth century up through the rise of the Tokugawa shogunate in the 17th century. The course is organized thematically to illuminate the different periods of Japanese history, including the imperial origin myth and Heian culture, the frontier and the rise of samurai government, localism and the warring states period, and finally the Tokugawa settlement and the paradoxes of centralized feudalism. Pre-1800. 3 hrs. lect./disc. AAL, CW (10 spaces), HIS, SOC (M. Ward)

JAPN/HIST 0236 The History of Modern Japan (Spring 2015)
In this course we will review the major themes and events of modern Japanese history from the Meiji Restoration (1868) to the present. Through reading a variety of primary texts, historical analyses, and literature, as well as watching films, we will explore the formation of the modern Japanese nation-state, Japan’s colonial project in East Asia, 1920s mass culture, the question of Showa fascism, and Japan’s unique postwar experience, from occupation to high-growth and the “lost decade” of the 1990s. We will pay particular attention to the relationship between changes within Japan and larger global trends. 3 hrs. lect./disc. AAL, HIS, SOC (M. Ward)

JAPN/GSFS 0245 Josei Undo: Women’s Activism in Contemporary Japan (in English) (Fall 2014)
In this course we will critically evaluate Japanese feminism since the late nineteenth century. We will focus on the following themes within Japanese feminism, namely, the structure of work and family life, the relationship between the state, women, and the military, and the politics of reproduction and women's bodies. In addition, we will consider the role of feminism in Japanese society and the connections between global feminisms and Japanese local political struggles. This course will help students develop a deeper understanding of Japanese society and the position of women in society. It will also help students contextualize gender relations and feminist activism cross culturally. 3 hr. lect./disc. AAL, SOC (L. White)

JAPN/FMMC 0260 Kurosawa (in English) (Spring 2015)
Akira Kurosawa is internationally recognized as one of the great auteurs of cinema. His visually stunning samurai films made him famous worldwide, but some of his most compelling works deal with crime and corruption in modern society. Whether set in the past or the present, each of his films tells a story about an unlikely hero who finds himself grappling with an enduring human question: What personal sacrifices must we make for the good of others? What is bravery and where does it come from? How do we achieve our own identity? Is goodness possible in an evil world? Students will explore and debate these issues as we analyze Kurosawa’s storytelling style and cinematic techniques in a dozen films spanning his fifty-year career, including Drunken Angel, Seven Samurai, Ikiru and Kagemusha. 3 hrs. lect./ 3 hrs. screen. AAL, ART (C. Cavanaugh)

JAPN 0290 The Tale of Genji (in English) (Fall 2014)
The Tale of Genji is the world’s first psychological novel. This rich narrative centers on the political intrigues and passionate love affairs of Genji, a fictional prince barred from the throne. In this course we will explore the narrative through a close reading in English translation. Students will gain knowledge of the aesthetic, religious, and social contexts of the Heian period, one of the most vibrant eras in Japanese culture. We will also trace how Genji monogatari has been interpreted over ten centuries in art, theater, films, and most recently, manga. (Formerly JAPN 0190) 3hrs. lect./disc. AAL, LIT (C. Cavanaugh)

JAPN 0301 Third-Year Japanese (Fall 2014)
This advanced course aims to increase the student's proficiency in modern standard Japanese, both spoken and written. A variety of written and audiovisual materials will be used to consolidate and expand mastery of more advanced grammatical points and vocabulary. Oral presentation, discussion, and composition in Japanese are also important components of the course. (JAPN 0202 or equivalent) 3 hrs. lect./3 hrs. drill LNG (S. Abe)

JAPN 0302 Third-Year Japanese (Spring 2015)
This course is a continuation of JAPN 0301. (JAPN 0301 or equivalent) 3 hrs. lect./3 hrs. drill LNG (S. Abe)

JAPN 0435 Workshop in Literary Translation (Spring 2015)                                                                                                                                                   Literary translation is a valuable but often neglected skill for advanced language learners.  In this workshop we will consider the basic theoretical arguments in translation studies influencing translation styles and then practice translation in a variety of literary genres.  Sessions will include discussions of translation strategies and active peer critique of sample translations.  Each student will produce a substantial translation as the semester project.  Topics covered will include: text selection, translation ethics, practical methodologies, and publishing industry standards. (JAPN 0302 and permission) AAL, LIT, LNG (S. Snyder)

JAPN/HIST 0436 Readings in Japanese History: Modernism and Fascism between the World Wars (Spring 2015)
The 1920s in Japan is typically understood as a period of political and cultural experimentation, as witnessed by the rise of avant-garde cultural groups and radicalized social movements. In contrast, the 1930s is portrayed as Japan's "dark valley", in which this sense of experimentation was suppressed or co-opted by the state. In this course, we will revisit these tumultuous decades by engaging with a range of historical assessments, novels, and critical essays. We will begin by examining theories of modernism and fascism, and then explore the changing socio-cultural milieu in interwar Japan, including mass-culture, modernization, romanticism, imperialism, and utopianism. (formerly HIST 0418) AAL, HIS (M. Ward)

JAPN 0450 Seminar in Classical Japanese, Heian Period (Fall 2014)
The Heian period marks the high point of literary Japanese. In this seminar students will learn to read and translate the original classical language (bungo) in canonical works of fiction, poetry, and diaries from the 9th through the 12th century. We will discuss how self-expression emerged in Japanese writing and how subjectivity developed in fiction and poetic journals. Students will gain a solid grounding in early literary history and will master the orthography, vocabulary, and basic structures of the pre-modern language. Our readings will include Taketori monogatari, Genji monogatari, Sarashina nikki, and Hyakunin isshu. (Approval only) 3 hrs. sem. AAL, LIT, LNG (C. Cavanaugh)

JAPN 0451 Seminar in Classical Japanese, Medieval to Edo Period (Spring 2015)
Samurai ideals and Buddhist thought coalesced in Medieval texts that continue to form the core of Japanese culture. In this seminar students will learn to read and translate the original classical language (bungo) in essays, warrior tales, and travel diaries from the 13th through the 17th century. We will discuss how Buddhist philosophy and samurai principles evolved into aesthetic values for aspiring urbanites in the Edo period. Students will gain knowledge of traditional writings familiar to contemporary Japanese readers and will master the orthography, vocabulary, and basic structures of the pre-modern language. Our readings will include Hōjōki, Heike monogatari, and Bashō’s Oku no hosomichi.(Approval only) 3 hrs. sem. AAL, LIT, LNG (C. Cavanaugh)

JAPN 0475 Advanced Reading in Japanese Studies (Fall 2014)                                
In this course students will read original materials in a variety of disciplines and develop skills to discuss them in Japanese on a near-native level.  Advanced listening practice will also be emphasized.  Students will create an annotated research bibliography in preparation for the senior project or thesis.  This course is required before taking JAPN 0700, but any student may enroll with approval of the instructor. (Approval only) 3 hrs. disc. (D. Humphrey)

JAPN 0500 Independent Project (Fall 2014, Spring 2015)
Qualified students may be permitted to undertake a special project in reading and research under the direction of a member of the department. Students should seek an advisor and submit a proposal to the department well in advance of registration for the term in which the work is to be undertaken. (Staff)

JAPN 0700 Honors Thesis (Fall 2014, Spring 2015)
Students write a thesis in English with a synopsis in Japanese on literature, film, or culture. The topic for the thesis is chosen in consultation with the instructor. (JAPN 0475) (Staff)

Jewish Studies
What is Jewish Studies? Jewish Studies ranges over the study of Jews and Judaism from the Biblical period to the present. It takes Judaism not only as a "religion," but as a civilization and culture encompassing a rich textual tradition, literature in several languages, philosophy and theology, customs and ritual, art, music and film. Jewish Studies is by its nature interdisciplinary and can be approached, for example, from within the disciplines of history, religion, sociology and anthropology, or literary study. The program also sponsors a wide array of lectures and other events, including the annual Hannah A. Quint Lecture in Jewish Studies and the Silberman Symposium in Jewish Studies.
     A distinguishing aspect of Middlebury's program is the depth of study possible in Hebrew. Middlebury also offers a Hebrew Minor, with courses in both Modern and Classical Hebrew. Introductory Modern Hebrew is offered every year, and Introductory Classical Hebrew in alternate years, usually in Winter Term. (For Hebrew course descriptions, click on the link to Courses, upper left.)
     Requirements: This program offers a minor in Jewish Studies to students who complete the following requirements:

(1) One of the following courses that offer a broad introduction to the study of Judaism:
RELI 0160 The Jewish Tradition
RELI/CLAS 0162 The Formation of Judaism in Antiquity

(2) Three additional courses pertinent to Jewish Studies from among the following:
GRMN 0325 Representing the Unthinkable: The Holocaust in Art and Literature
HEBM 0220 Modern Hebrew Culture in Translation
HIST 0250: The Jews in Modern Europe
HIST 0257 The Holocaust
HIST 0424 Readings in Modern European History: The Nazis and the Jews
RELI 0260 Classical Jewish Texts
RELI 0180 Biblical Literature
RELI 0280 Hebrew Bible / Old Testament
SOAN/HEBM 0234 State and Society in Contemporary Israel

Up to two courses in Hebrew language or texts (HEBR 0201 and higher) may count toward the requirements for the minor

(3) A 0300-level seminar in Jewish Studies;
RELI 0360 Seminar in Jewish Thought
RELI 0362 The Debate on Zionism
RELI 0380 Seminar in Biblical Studies

Other appropriate courses may be substituted for courses in categories (2) or (3) with the permission of the program director.

Linguistics

Linguistics can be broadly described as the study of language. It is an interdisciplinary field of inquiry that provides a framework for the understanding of all aspects of language, ranging from the theoretical and structural to the sociological and applied. Linguists employ a wide variety of tools to analyze language at the phonetic, phonological, morphological, syntactic and semantic levels. They also examine language as a universal aspect of human behavior and thinking, the place of language in human life, and the ways in which language functions in society to fulfill the needs of the people who use it. This interdisciplinary field encompasses language in all its different forms and manifestations around the world, spanning geographical, historical, and sociological divides, and providing a link between the humanities, the social sciences, education and the natural sciences. The different disciplines within linguistics theoretical linguistics, sociolinguistics, linguistic anthropology and applied linguistics, among others provide a solid foundation for the study of languages and cultures.
     The minor consists of a minimum of five courses: two required introductory level courses [LNGT 0101 and either LNGT 0102 or LNGT/SOAN 0109]

Core courses for the minor are as follows:
LNGT 0101 Introduction to Linguistics
LNGT 0102 Introduction to Sociolinguistics or LNGT/SOAN 0109 Language, Culture, Society

Courses at Middlebury College that count as electives include the following (students are advised to check with the director for a complete list of courses that count as electives):
CHNS 0270 Chinese Sociolinguistics
CSCI 0457 Natural Language Processing
GRMN 0340 The Structure of German
INTD/ARBC 0111 Diversity of Human Language
ITAL 0401 History of Italian Language
LNGT 0201 Introduction to Romance Linguistics
LNGT 1001 Introduction to Translation Studies
LNGT/EDST 1004 Second Language Acquisition and Educational Technology
PHIL 0180 Introduction to Modern Logic
PHIL 0354 Philosophy of Language
SOAN 0359 Language and Power
SOAN 0495 Language and Environment
SPAN 0322 Introduction to Spanish Linguistics
SPAN 0390 Linguistic Variation
SPAN 0435 Spanish in the United States
WRPR/EDST 0102 The English Language in a Global Context

LNGT 0101 Introduction to Linguistics (Fall 2014)
This is an introductory course in linguistics taught in English. The main topics will include the nature of human language as distinct from other communication systems; the subsystems of linguistic knowledge, i.e., sound patterns (phonology), word-formation (morphology), sentence structure (syntax), and meaning (semantics); language and the brain; language acquisition; language use in context; geographical and social dialects; and historical development of language and language change. (Formerly INTD 0112) 3 hrs. lect./disc. (U. Soltan)

LNGT/SOAN 0109 Language, Culture and Society (Spring 2015)
In this course students will be introduced to the comparative, ethnographic study of language in relation to socio-cultural context. Our readings will be drawn from diverse global settings and will focus upon language as the means by which people shape and are shaped by the social worlds in which they live. We will examine contrasts in ways of speaking across different communities, personal identities, and institutions. We will explore the consequences of communicative difference across a range of contact situations, including everyday conversation among peers, service encounters, political elections, and global connections or disconnections made possible through new media. 3 hrs. lect. (Anthropology) CMP, SOC (M. Nevins)

LNGT/JAPN 0210 Introduction to Japanese Linguistics (in English) (Fall 2014)
This course will provide an introduction to linguistics theories as applied to the study of Japanese. Through the exploration of a language that is very different from Indo-European languages, students will gain a better understanding of how human languages work and are structured. The relationship of language to culture will be a central theme in the course. Topics covered will include key concepts in linguistics, Japanese linguistics, culture, and pedagogy. This course will be taught in English; no Japanese language or linguistics knowledge required. 3 hrs. lect./disc. AAL (S. Abe)

LNGT 0226 The Sounds of Language: Introduction to Phonetics and Phonology (Fall 2014)
In this course we will study the description and analysis of speech: how the sounds of language are physiologically produced, acoustically represented, and psychologically perceived and categorized. Through acoustic and phonological analysis, students will develop the skills to distinguish and produce the sounds of the world’s languages, as well as explore the sound systems of different languages, in order to determine which patterns differ and which patterns are common to all. Students will hone their analytical and technical skills by solving phonological problem sets as well as by using computer software (Praat) to analyze the acoustics of speech. 3 hrs. lect./disc. SCI (M. Rohena-Madrazo)

LNGT/ARBC 0227 Arabic Sociolinguistics (taught in English) (Spring 2015)
In this course we will focus on the inter-relationships between the way Arabic is used by native speakers and the various social contexts affecting that usage. In particular, we will discuss the phenomenon of diglossia in Arabic speech communities (that is, the co-existence of Modern Standard Arabic with the vernacular Arabic dialects of today); aspects of linguistic variation and change in the Arab world; the relation between register and language; as well as the relation between language and such sociological variables as education, social status, political discourse, and gender. Readings are primarily drawn from sociolinguists' studies in the Arab world. (ARBC 0101 or instructor's approval) AAL, SOC (Staff)

LNGT 0250 The Structure of Language: Introduction to Morphology and Syntax (Spring 2015)
In this course we will focus on two fundamental areas in the study of language structure: morphology and syntax. Morphology is the study of the internal structure of words and their meaningful parts (e.g., roots and affixes), whereas syntax studies how words are combined to form larger units (phrases and sentences). Linguistic data for illustration and analysis will be taken both from English and a variety of languages belonging to different language families to help us better understand the unity and diversity of human language with regard to word and sentence structure. The course is intended to enhance students’ skills in linguistic description and analysis, as well as general problem-solving and analytical reasoning skills. 3 hrs. lect./disc. DED (U. Soltan)

LNGT/PHIL 0280 Logic and Formal Semantics (Fall 2014)
Using logical and mathematical tools, formal semantics answers the following questions: Why do sentences mean what they mean? How is reasoning possible? How does language structure our understanding of time, change, knowledge, morality, identity, and possibility? This course is well suited for students interested in computer science, linguistics, logic, mathematics, or philosophy. (PHIL 0180; pending instructor’s approval, PHIL 0180 may be taken contemporaneously with PHIL/LNGT 0280. Students who take these two courses simultaneously will meet for 6 total contact hours.) 2 hrs. lect./1 hr. disc DED, PHL (K. Khalifa)

LNGT/SPAN 0303 Introduction to Spanish Phonetics and Pronunciation (Fall 2014)
In this course we will study the sound system of Spanish with the aims of introducing the fields of phonetics and phonology while improving pronunciation. Students will become familiar with phonetic transcription, comparing and contrasting articulatory and acoustic characteristics of Spanish as well as English in order to understand and implement different phonological patterns produced by native speakers of Spanish. Additionally, we will discuss major pronunciation differences across the Spanish-speaking world. (SPAN 0220 or equivalent) 3 hrs. lect./disc. LNG (B. Baird)

LNGT/SPAN 0322 Introduction to Hispanic Linguistics (Spring 2015)
This course is an introduction to the theory and methodology of linguistics as applied to the study of Spanish. The course’s goals are to understand the basic characteristics of human language (and of Spanish in particular), and to learn the techniques used to describe and explain linguistic phenomena. We will study the sound system (phonetics/phonology), the structure of words (morphology), the construction of sentences (syntax), as well as the history and sociolinguistic variation of the Spanish language, as spoken in communities in Europe, Latin America, and Northern America. We will examine texts, speech samples, and songs, illustrating these linguistic phenomena. (SPAN 0220 or placement) 3 hrs. lect./disc. CMP, LNG, SOC (M. Rohena-Madrazo)

LNGT/GRMN 0370 German Linguistics (in German) (Fall 2014)
This course simultaneously presents an overview of the major subfields of linguistics as they apply to the German language and a discussion of how today's Standard German evolved. We will pay attention to important concepts in phonetics/phonology, morphology, syntax, semantics, and pragmatics. In addition to these theoretical and descriptive aspects, we will discuss sociolinguistic issues such as language and gender and regional variations within Germany, Austria, Switzerland, and Luxemburg. Lectures and discussions will be conducted in German. (Formerly GRMN 0340) 3 hrs. sem. EUR, LNG (F. Feiereisen)

LNGT/SPAN 0390  Linguistic Variation (Fall 2014)
In this course we will study linguistic variation in the Spanish-speaking world. The focus will be on the linguistic aspects of the varieties of Spanish spoken in Spain, Latin America, Asia, and the United States. Topics will include lexical variation, phonological variation, morphosyntactic variation, and geographic and social factors in linguistic variation. Special attention will be paid to Spanish in contact with other languages, e.g. with indigenous languages in Latin America, and with Basque and Catalan in Spain. The discussion will also include creole languages (e.g. Papiamentu). We will study texts, speech samples, and songs that illustrate specific cases of variation. (At least two Spanish courses at the 0300 level or above, or by waiver) 3 hrs. lect./disc. CMP (M. Rohena-Madrazo)

LNGT/SOAN 0395 Language and the Environment (Spring 2015)
Do languages simply put different labels on the environment, from rocks to trees to carbon, or are what we see and what we value shaped by the ways that we talk about it? Drawing upon ethnography, linguistics, and critical discourse analysis, we will explore how environmental perceptions and modes of action are formed in and through language. We will bring an appreciation of language differences to the analysis of ongoing environmental controversies, where the various stakeholders draw contrasting boundaries between nature and culture and define human involvement with nature in different ways. 3 hrs. lect./disc. (Anthropology)/ CMP, SOC (M. Nevins)

LNGT/ARBC 0435 Arabic Diglossia: A Linguistic Approach (Fall 2014)
Diglossia is an intricate sociolinguistic situation in which two related varieties of the same language co-exist within the same speech community. In this course we will focus on the study of diglossia as manifested in Arabic-speaking communities, where Modern Standard Arabic is used side by side with Vernacular Arabic. In particular, we will discuss the linguistic differences between the two varieties, their distinct and overlapping functions, their status in society, and code-switching between them in various contexts of language use. Course materials will be drawn from a variety of sources, including articles and book chapters, print and non-print media, political and religious discourse, and literary texts. The language of instruction is exclusively Arabic. (ARBC 0302 or equivalent) 3 hrs. sem. AAL, LNG, SOC (U. Soltan)

LNGT/SOAN 0459 Language and Power Seminar (Fall 2014)
This course is an introduction to both linguistic anthropology and political anthropology.  Communication patterns are always mediated by cultural processes, social inequality, and power, so in this course we will investigate cross-cultural examples of how language, discourse, and representation relate to inequality, power, and resistance.  Topics will include sociolinguistics, ethnolinguistics, gendered language practices, political discourse, and theoretical approaches to power (Marx, Foucault, and Bourdieu) (SOAN 0103 or SOAN 0105 or LNGT 0102) 3hrs. lect./disc. (Anthropology) CW (5 spaces), SOC (M. Nevins)

LNGT 0500 Independent Work (Fall 2014, Spring 2015)
Approval required. (Staff)

Literature at Middlebury
Students interested in Literature may pursue a major or a minor in the English and American Literatures Department, in any of the Language Departments, or a major in the Literary Studies Program or in the Comparative Literature Program.
     Comparative Literature Major: This course of study prepares students to focus on the comparative study of national literatures. Students majoring in comparative literature will receive training in one or two of these literatures in the original language along with comparative methodology.
     To view the requirements for the Comparative Literature Major, please refer to that section of the Course Catalog.
     English and American Literatures: To view the requirements for the English and American Literatures major and minor requirements, please refer to that section of the Course Catalog.
     Literary Studies: LITS [The Program in Literary Studies] is intended for students who over the course of four years wish to secure a comprehensive background in a full range of the major achievements of world literature, and also to develop the ability to read and appreciate significant literary works in at least one language other than English. By the time they leave Middlebury, graduating seniors in Literary Studies will have achieved a close familiarity with the principal writings of such authors as Homer, Aeschylus, Virgil, Dante, Shakespeare, Cervantes, Murasaki, Goethe, Wang Wei, Wordsworth, Baudelaire, Dostoevsky, Tolstoy, Melville, Faulkner, Proust, Kafka, and Joyce, as well as a dozen other literary figures of comparable stature and continuing importance. Students are free to count any literature course in the Middlebury College curriculum (and in approved programs abroad or at other U.S. institutions) toward completion of the Literary Studies major, but in their senior year they are required to complete a comprehensive examination that assesses their accomplishments as knowledgeable interpreters of a full spectrum of recognized literary works of enduring intellectual and artistic value in a variety of cultural traditions. For a full description of the program, please see the department listing under Literary Studies.
     To view the requirements for the Literary Studies major, please refer to that section of the Course Catalog.

Literary Studies

Required for the Major: The overall design of the program is simple, and its expectations are clearly defined. This is a program of study designed for students who by the time of their graduation from Middlebury wish to secure a comprehensive background in a full range of major achievements of world literature, as well as an ability to read and appreciate works of literature in at least one language other than English. To accomplish those ends, each Literary Studies major is required to take a total of 15 courses in literature over the course of four years. No more than six of these courses may be taken within a single department, and the individual courses may be selected from the literature of any language and of any period. They can be wide-ranging surveys or courses devoted to the study of single authors. The specific selection of courses is entirely up to the student, but in order to fulfill the requirements for the major, he or she will be expected to take: (a) two courses one historical, one generally theoretical in orientation selected from the list specified below under the "Summary of Major Requirements"; (b) one literature course in a foreign language (including Greek and Latin) normally 0300-level (though FREN 0210 and the FREN 0200-series will usually qualify); and (c) a Colloquium for majors to be taken during the fall semester of the senior year. In addition, in conjunction with an independent reading course taken during the fall semester of the senior year, the student will arrange to take a one-hour oral examination in an area of specialization (as described below) that he or she has defined. This oral examination takes place at the end of the fall semester, and it is followed by a five-hour written comprehensive examination at the end of winter term. The written examination will require the student to demonstrate a knowledge of a range of major works by the authors listed below. For reasons of practicality, the number of authors from this list whose works students will actually have an opportunity to discuss on the comprehensive examination in any given year will be limited to 12. The following current list will give the student a clear sense of the particular range of major authors it is presumed that he or she will be familiar with by senior year:

Homer
Aeschylus
Sophocles
Vergil
Ovid
Lucretius
Dante
Boccaccio
Pirandello
Cervantes
Tirso de Molina
Caldern
Lope de Vega
Borges
Moliere
Baudelaire
Proust
Goethe
Kafka
Mann
Wang Wei
Co Xuegin
Lu-Xn
Gogol
Dostoevsky
Tolstoy
Shakespeare
Milton
Wordsworth
Joyce
Emerson
Melville
Faulkner
Murasaki Shikibu
Chikamatsu Monzaemon
Natsume Soseki

     In addition to works by authors whose names appear on this primary list, Literary Studies majors will be urged to deepen their general cultural background by becoming acquainted with the Old and New Testaments (especially Genesis, Psalms, Job, Song of Songs, Matthew, John, Revelation, and the Epistle to the Romans), as well as principal works of Plato, Aristotle, Rousseau, Darwin, Marx, and Freud. A full list of the specific works by these authors included on the current Literary Studies comprehensive reading list is available on the Literary Studies Program website, or from Professor Donadio, the director of the program.
     Beyond the two historical and theoretical courses required for the program (both of which are counted toward the major), the 0300-level foreign language literature course, the senior year colloquium (LITS 0705) and independent reading course (LITS 0701), and the total of 15 courses, the general, defining requirement for the Literary Studies major is the winter term comprehensive examination (LITS 0700), the overall range of which is specified in the comprehensive reading list. In the process of working toward this general literary education, the student will also be expected to use the independent reading course (LITS 0701) to focus on a group of works chosen to represent an individual specialization in the literature of a particular culture (e.g., German, English, American, Spanish, Russian, Chinese, etc.), or period (e.g., the eighteenth century, the twentieth century, etc.), or genre (e.g., the novel, the drama, lyric poetry, etc.). The specific authors and the 10 to 12 texts selected by the student for this specialization will be approved by the director in conjunction with two faculty examiners with relevant expertise in the fields represented. This oral examination is the culmination of the independent reading course (LITS 0701) in the fall semester. At the end of the following winter term, there is a five-hour written winter term comprehensive examination based on the reading list. Students qualifying for honors (a B+ average in the major, including the comprehensive examination) will complete a Senior Honors Essay (LITS 0710) in their final semester.
     After completing all the specified requirements, the student will be graduated from Middlebury College as a Literary Studies major with a particular area of interest: for example, epic poetry, European drama, Japanese literature, the literature of the nineteenth century, etc. Should the student wish to pursue graduate study, depending on the nature of his or her interests and preparation, the student would be in a good position to do so in such fields as English or American literature, comparative literature, or the literature of a specific foreign language; in addition, he or she would have a secure background for further studies in such fields as law, political philosophy, religion, journalism, publishing, medicine, and cultural and intellectual history. Literary Studies majors have gone on to do work in all these areas.
     As indicated above, students will be eligible for departmental honors in Literary Studies if in their combined performance in literature courses and on the two parts of the comprehensive examination they have achieved an average grade of B+ or higher. Honors will be awarded on the basis of the overall grade average in the major, performance on the comprehensive examination, and a senior honors essay of 30-40 pages to be completed during the spring semester of the senior year (this project counts as one course). A one-hour oral examination on the content and implications of this honors essay is also required, and this examination will be conducted by two faculty members with particular expertise in the fields represented.

     Summary of Major Requirements: Total of 15 courses (no more than six in any one department).
(1) Two courses selected from the historical and theoretical courses listed below, one from each category, as currently offered. (With the permission of the director, alternative courses may be substituted for those specified here.)

Historical
:
CLAS 0150 Greek and Roman Epic
CLAS 0152 Greek Tragedy
RELI 0180 Introduction to Biblical Literature
PSCI 0101 Introduction to Political Science

Theoretical
:
ENAM 0205 Contemporary Literary Theory
CHNS/LITS 0360 Introduction to Literary Theory and Criticism
(2) One course in literature in a foreign language (normally 0300 level, but FREN 0201 and FREN 0220 series would usually qualify).
(3) At least four literature courses, but no more than six, to be taken within a single department. (Courses in language instruction may not be counted toward this requirement.)
(4) Independent Reading Course (LITS 0701) in Area of Specialization (by genre, period, theme, or national literature), an area of particular interest defined by the student in consultation with the director. A one-hour oral examination, to be taken in the fall semester before the winter term written comprehensive examination in the senior year, is devoted to this area of special interest. The 10 to12 texts required for this examination will be chosen by the student in conjunction with the director and two faculty examiners with appropriate backgrounds in the fields represented.
(5) Senior Colloquium for majors (LITS 0705, open to non-majors if space is available), focused on a range of works on the comprehensive reading list.
(6) Senior Comprehensive Examination (LITS 0700) in preparation for the written comprehensive examination. Students engaged in such preparation arrange to meet with one another over the course of winter term, and often solicit faculty participation in discussions of individual texts they have chosen to work on as a group.
(7) Written Comprehensive Examination (LITS 0700) (on works that appear on the Literary Studies comprehensive reading list), taken at the end of winter term of the senior year. As indicated, this five-hour written examination represents the second part of the comprehensive requirement, the oral specialization examination in LITS 0701 being the first.
(8) Students achieving an average grade of B+ or higher in the program will be eligible for honors. Honors will be awarded on the basis of the overall grade average in courses in the major, performance on the comprehensive examination, and a senior honors essay of 30-40 pages, to be completed (for one course credit) during the spring semester of the senior year; a one-hour oral examination on the content of this essay is administered by two faculty examiners with expertise in the field of investigation represented.
     Please Note: Any literature course in the Middlebury College curriculum (and in approved programs abroad or at other U.S. institutions) may be used to fulfill the requirements in the Program in Literary Studies. Hence, in addition to the specific LITS course descriptions indicated below, students majoring in Literary Studies as well as non-majors with an interest in literature are urged to read through the entire literature offering by various departments (including language departments) to secure a full sense of the range of courses available in any academic year.

LITS/ITAL 0290 Dante (in English) (Fall 2014)
An introduction to Dante's major literary works, La Vita Nuova (The New Life) and the Divine Comedy. Close readings of the text will seek to give students an appreciation of Dante's place in world literature. Dante's masterpieces will also be discussed in a historical and philosophical perspective, and supplementary readings will acquaint the reader with the medieval view of life and literature. EUR, LIT (P. Zupan)

LITS 0500 Independent Research Project (Fall 2014, Spring 2015)
Approval required. (Staff)

LITS 0510 Independent Essay Project (Fall 2014, Spring 2015)
Approval required. (Staff)

LITS 0701 Independent Reading Course (Fall 2014, Spring 2015)
Intended for majors in literary studies preparing for the senior comprehensive examinations. At the conclusion of this course, students will take a one-hour oral examination (part of the senior comprehensive examination) in a specialization of their choice. (Approval Required) (Staff)

LITS/ENAM 0705 Senior Colloquium in Literary Studies (Fall 2014)
In this course we will study, discuss, and analyze great works of world literature from the perspective of their achievement in thought and literary art. We will further consider them as part of a vital literary tradition in which the works enter into dialogue with one another. Among the authors to be appreciated this term are: Homer, Tolstoy, Dostoevsky, Mann, Proust, Joyce. (Open to non-majors with approval of instructor). 3 hrs. sem. (S. Donadio)

LITS 0710 Senior Honors Essay (Fall 2014, Spring 2015)
Approval required.

Mathematics

Required for the Major in Mathematics (Ten courses total at least half of which must be taken at Middlebury College in Vermont):
I. Core courses: MATH 0122, MATH 0200, MATH 0223, MATH 0302, and MATH 0323;
II. Electives: four MATH electives at the 0200-level or above;
III. Senior thesis: MATH 0704 in the senior year.
     Note: Students are strongly encouraged to include a proof-based course such as MATH 0241 or MATH 0247 early in their programs. This is especially helpful prior to taking MATH 0302 or MATH 0323.
     Required for the Mathematical Sciences Option in the Mathematics Major (Ten courses total at least half of which must be taken at Middlebury College in Vermont):
I. Core courses: MATH 0122, MATH 0200, and MATH 0223;
II. Electives: Six courses from categories A and B. At least four of the six courses must have the MATH designation, and at least two must be from category B.
A. Courses in applied specialization: MATH 0225, MATH 0310, MATH 0315, MATH 0318, ECON 0380, PHYS 0212, CSCI 0201, CSCI 0463;
B. Advanced electives: MATH 0302, MATH 0311, MATH 0323, MATH 0325, MATH 0410, CSCI 0302, ECON 0390, ECON 0411, MATH 0500 (with prerequisite: at least one course from categories A or B);
III. Senior thesis: MATH 0704 in the senior year.
     Note: Students should consult the mathematics department for examples of course sequences in the mathematical sciences option recommended for emphases in Mathematical Economics, Computer Science, or Physical Sciences/Engineering. For students completing double majors, electives used towards a major in another department cannot also be counted as electives in the mathematical sciences option.
     Students planning a "3-2" engineering program who wish to major in Mathematics will complete the thesis course MATH 0704 in their sixth semester at Middlebury. These students should normally choose the Mathematical Sciences Option in the major.
     Honors Program: A student who wishes to be considered for departmental honors in mathematics must submit a proposed plan of study during his or her junior year. Candidates for departmental honors should include two additional electives in their programs (12 courses total). For the mathematical sciences option, an honors program must include one of MATH 0302/0323 and an elective sequence such as MATH 0310-0410 or MATH 0310-0311. Students should consult their advisors as they develop proposals for honors study.
     Required for the Minor in Mathematics (six courses total at least half of which must be taken at Middlebury College in Vermont): MATH 0121, MATH 0122, MATH 0200, and three courses at the 0200-level or above.
     Joint Majors: The Department of Mathematics does not offer a joint major.
     Advanced Placement: Advanced placement in the department is offered to first-year students whose secondary training indicates they can commonly bypass one or more of the beginning courses in mathematics. Majors typically begin their study of mathematics in MATH 0122 or MATH 0200. Mathematics majors who need to begin the study of calculus with MATH 0121 may arrange with their advisors to use this course as one of the required electives. Credits for MATH 0121 and 0122 may be earned through the College Board AP exams or international exams such as the A-Levels or IB. At the discretion of the chair, additional courses may be waived in recognition of exceptional secondary school preparation. However, in all cases the major must include at least 7 Middlebury College or approved transfer courses, and the minor must include at least 4. Students who have earned grades on advanced placement calculus exams that are eligible for credit may not register for the equivalent course at Middlebury College. Thus students who have earned 4 or 5 on the Calculus AB exam or a 3 on the Calculus BC exam may not register for MATH 0121, students who have earned 4 or 5 on the Calculus BC exam may not register for MATH 0121 or MATH 0122, and students who have earned 4 or 5 on the Statistics exam may not register for MATH 0116. This policy applies irrespective of whether students choose to use their AP credits toward meeting Middlebury's graduation requirements. The following international credentials carry the same credit as a 4 or 5 on the Calculus BC Exam: A-level exam with a mathematics grade of A, B, or C; or IB Higher Level Mathematics with a grade of 6 or 7.
     Other Credits: Because of the wide variation in course offerings at other institutions, students wishing to substitute a course from another college for any course in mathematics must seek approval from the department before registering for the course. In addition, students seeking MATH 0121 credit for a summer course taken elsewhere must pass a written examination given by the department in the fall. Check with the department early in the first week of classes for details.

MATH/INTD 0100 A World of Mathematics (Fall 2014)
How long will oil last? What is the fairest voting system? How can we harvest food and other resources sustainably? To explore such real-world questions we will study a variety of mathematical ideas and methods, including modeling, logical analysis, discrete dynamical systems, and elementary statistics. This is an alternative first mathematics course for students not pursuing the calculus sequence in their first semester. The only prerequisite is an interest in exploring contemporary issues using the mathematics that lies within those issues. (Approval required; This course is not open to students who have had a prior course in calculus or statistics.) 3 hrs. lect./disc. DED (J. Albert)

MATH 0116 Introduction to Statistical Science (Spring 2015)
A practical introduction to statistical methods and the examination of data sets. Computer software will play a central role in analyzing a variety of real data sets from the natural and social sciences. Topics include descriptive statistics, elementary distributions for data, hypothesis tests, confidence intervals, correlation, regression, contingency tables, and analysis of variance. The course has no formal mathematics prerequisite, and is especially suited to students in the physical, social, environmental, and life sciences who seek an applied orientation to data analysis. (Credit is not given for MATH 0116 if the student has taken ECON 0210 or PSYC 0201 previously or concurrently.) 3 hrs. lect./1 hr. computer lab. DED (J. Emerson)

MATH 0121 Calculus I (Fall 2014, Spring 2015)
Introductory analytic geometry and calculus. Topics include limits, continuity, differential calculus of algebraic and trigonometric functions with applications to curve sketching, optimization problems and related rates, the indefinite and definite integral, area under a curve, and the fundamental theorem of calculus. Inverse functions and the logarithmic and exponential functions are also introduced along with applications to exponential growth and decay. 4 hrs. lect./disc. DED (Fall 2014: P. Bremser, B. Peterson; Spring 2015: D. Dorman, W. Peterson)

MATH 0122 Calculus II (Fall 2014, Spring 2015)
A continuation of MATH 0121, may be elected by first-year students who have had an introduction to analytic geometry and calculus in secondary school. Topics include a brief review of natural logarithm and exponential functions, calculus of the elementary transcendental functions, techniques of integration, improper integrals, applications of integrals including problems of finding volumes, infinite series and Taylor's theorem, polar coordinates, ordinary differential equations. (MATH 0121 or by waiver) 4 hrs. lect./disc. DED (Fall 2014: D. Dorman, M. Kubacki; Spring 2015: S. Abbott, P. Schumer, F. Swenton)

MATH 0190 Mathematical Proof: Art and Argument (Spring 2015)
Mathematical proof is the language of mathematics. As preparation for upper-level coursework, this course will give students an opportunity to build a strong foundation in reading, writing, and analyzing mathematical argument. Course topics will include an introduction to mathematical logic, standard proof structures and methods, set theory, and elementary number theory. Additional topics will preview ideas and methods from more advanced courses. We will also explore important historical examples of proofs, both ancient and modern. The driving force behind this course will be mathematical expression with a primary focus on argumentation and the creative process. (MATH 0122 or MATH 0200) 3 hrs. lect. CW, DED (J. Albert)

MATH 0200 Linear Algebra (Fall 2014, Spring 2015)
Matrices and systems of linear equations, the Euclidean space of three dimensions and other real vector spaces, independence and dimensions, scalar products and orthogonality, linear transformations and matrix representations, eigenvalues and similarity, determinants, the inverse of a matrix and Cramer's rule. (MATH 0121 or by waiver) 3 hrs. lect./disc. DED (Fall 2014: J. Schmitt, F. Swenton; Spring 2015: P. Bremser, J. Emerson)

MATH 0223 Multivariable Calculus (Fall 2014, Spring 2015)
The calculus of functions of more than one variable. Introductory vector analysis, analytic geometry of three dimensions, partial differentiation, multiple integration, line integrals, elementary vector field theory, and applications. (MATH 0122 and MATH 0200 or by waiver) 3 hrs. lect./disc. DED (Fall 2014: J. Schmitt; Spring 2015: E. Proctor)

MATH 0225 Topics in Linear Algebra and Differential Equations (Fall 2014)
Topics may include diagonalization of matrices, quadratic forms, inner product spaces, canonical forms, the spectral theorem, positive matrices, the Cayley-Hamilton theorem, ordinary differential equations of arbitrary order, systems of first-order differential equations, power series, and eigenvalue methods of solution, applications. (MATH 0200 or by waiver) 3 hrs. lect./disc. DED (M. Kubacki)

MATH 0228 Introduction to Numerical Analysis
We will study the development, analysis, and implementation of numerical methods for approximating solutions to mathematical problems. We will begin with applications of Taylor polynomials, computer representation of numbers, and types of errors.  Other topics will include polynomial and spline interpolation, numerical integration and differentiation, rootfinding, and numerical solutions of differential equations.  Accuracy will be quantified by the concept of numerical error.  Additionally, we will study the stability, efficiency, and implementation of algorithms.  We will utilize the software MATLAB throughout to demonstrate concepts, as well as to complete assignments and projects.  (MATH 0200) DED (M. Kubacki)

MATH 0241 Elementary Number Theory (Spring 2015)
Divisibility and prime factorization. Congruences; the theorems of Lagrange, Fermat, Wilson, and Euler; residue theory; quadratic reciprocity. Diophantine equations. Arithmetic functions and Mobius inversion. Representation as a sum of squares. (MATH 0122 or by waiver) DED (D. Dorman)

MATH 0302 Abstract Algebra (Fall 2014, Spring 2015)
Groups, subgroups, Lagrange's theorem, homomorphisms, normal subgroups and quotient groups, rings and ideals, integral domains and fields, the field of quotients of a domain, the ring of polynomials over a domain, Euclidean domains, principal ideal domains, unique factorization, factorization in a polynomial ring. (MATH 0200 or by waiver) 3 hrs. lect./disc. DED (Fall 2014: P. Bremser; Spring 2015: F. Swenton)

MATH 0310 Probability (Fall 2014)
An introduction to the concepts of probability and their applications, covering both discrete and continuous random variables. Probability spaces, elementary combinatorial analysis, densities and distributions, conditional probabilities, independence, expectation, variance, weak law of large numbers, central limit theorem, and numerous applications. (concurrent or prior MATH 0223 or by waiver) 3 hrs. lect./disc. DED (W. Peterson)

MATH 0323 Real Analysis (Fall 2014)
An axiomatic treatment of the topology of the real line, real analysis, and calculus. Topics include neighborhoods, compactness, limits, continuity, differentiation, Riemann integration, and uniform convergence. (MATH 0223) 3 hrs. lect./disc. DED (S. Abbott)

MATH 0325 Complex Analysis (Spring 2015)
An introduction to functions of a complex variable. Mappings of the complex plane, analytic functions, Cauchy Integral Theorem and related topics. (MATH 0223 or by waiver) 3 hrs. lect./disc. DED (P. Schumer)

MATH 0335 Differential Geometry (Fall 2014)
This course will be an introduction to the concepts of differential geometry. For curves in space, we will discuss arclength parameterizations, Frenet formulas, curvature, and torsion. On surfaces, we will explore the Gauss map, the shape operator, and various types of curvature. We will apply our knowledge to understand geodesics, metrics, and isometries of general geometric spaces. If time permits, we will consider topics such as minimal surfaces, constant curvature spaces, and the Gauss-Bonnet theorem. (MATH 0200 and MATH 0223) 3 hr. lect./disc. DED (E. Proctor)

MATH 0345 Combinatorics (Spring 2015)
Combinatorics is the “art of counting.” Given a finite set of objects and a set of rules placed upon these objects, we will ask two questions. Does there exist an arrangement of the objects satisfying the rules? If so, how many are there? These are the questions of existence and enumeration. As such, we will study the following combinatorial objects and counting techniques: permutations, combinations, the generalized pigeonhole principle, binomial coefficients, the principle of inclusion-exclusion, recurrence relations, and some basic combinatorial designs. (MATH 0200 or by waiver) 3 hrs. lect./disc. DED (J. Schmitt)

MATH 0410 Stochastic Processes (Spring 2015)
Stochastic processes are mathematical models for random phenomena evolving in time or space. This course will introduce important examples of such models, including random walk, branching processes, the Poisson process and Brownian motion. The theory of Markov chains in discrete and continuous time will be developed as a unifying theme. Depending on time available and interests of the class, applications will be selected from the following areas: queuing systems, mathematical finance (Black-Scholes options pricing), probabilistic algorithms, and Monte Carlo simulation. (MATH 0310) 3 hrs. lect./disc. DED (W. Peterson)

MATH 0423 Topics in Analysis (Spring 2015)
In this course we will study advanced topics in real analysis, starting from the fundamentals established in MA401. Topics may include: basic measure theory; Lebesgue measure on Euclidean space; the Lebesgue integral; total variation and absolute continuity; basic functional analysis; fractal measures. (MATH 0323 or by waiver) 3 hrs. lect./disc. DED (S. Abbott)

MATH 0500 Advanced Study (Fall 2014, Spring 2015)
Individual study for qualified students in more advanced topics in algebra, number theory, real or complex analysis, topology. Particularly suited for those who enter with advanced standing. (Approval required) 3 hrs. lect./disc. (Staff)

MATH 0704 Senior Seminar (Fall 2014, Spring 2015)
Each student will explore in depth a topic in pure or applied mathematics, under one-on-one supervision by a faculty advisor. The course culminates with a major written paper and presentation. This experience emphasizes independent study, library research, expository writing, and oral presentation. The goal is to demonstrate the ability to internalize and organize a substantial piece of mathematics. Class meetings include attendance at a series of lectures designed to introduce and integrate ideas of mathematics not covered in the previous three years. Registration is by permission: Each student must have identified a topic, an advisor, and at least one principal reference source. 3 hrs. lect./disc. (Fall 2014: P. Schumer; Spring 2015: J. Schmitt)

MATH 0710 Advanced Probability Seminar (Fall 2014)
This course is a tutorial in Probability Theory for students who have completed work in Probability and Real Analysis. Starting from elementary results about random walks, we will explore the fundamental mathematical ideas underlying measure theoretic probability, martingales, the Weiner process, and the Itô stochastic calculus. Working independently and in small groups, students will gain experience reading advanced sources and communicating their insights in expository writing and oral presentations. This course fulfills the capstone senior work requirement for the mathematics major. (MATH 0310, MATH 0323, and by approval). 3 hrs. sem. (W. Peterson)

Molecular Biology and Biochemistry

Required for the Major: The requirements for the major in molecular biology and biochemistry provide a multidisciplinary yet integrated approach to examining life at the macromolecular, cellular, and organismal levels. The major is composed of 14 required courses including foundation courses, advanced courses, and two electives. Required foundation courses in mathematics, physics, chemistry, and biology establish a strong, broad understanding of the science necessary for advanced study. Required advanced courses in the core areas of molecular biology, biological chemistry, and bioinformatics build on this foundation. Finally, elective courses offer advanced opportunities to explore a wide variety of specific topics including neurobiology, developmental biology, computational biology, molecular genetics, and biochemical mechanisms. Students are encouraged to engage in mentored independent research in these areas.
     Placement Exams and Transfer Credit: Students may be able to bypass introductory courses in biology, chemistry, mathematics, or physics on the basis of AP credit or proficiency exams. Those who bypass CHEM 0103 may begin with CHEM 0104 (fall or spring) or CHEM 0107 (fall only). Those students interested in the health professions or graduate study may wish to take a full two semesters of calculus and physics in order to meet professional school entrance requirements. Students considering taking summer courses or courses abroad must get approval in advance from the program director. Students should consult with their adviser for assistance with the process of transferring credit from another institution.
     Electives: A list of appropriate electives is provided.

Required Background courses
:
BIOL 0140 Ecology and Evolution
BIOL 0145 Cell Biology and Genetics
BIOL 0211 Experimental Design and Data Analysis (preferred) or MATH 0116 Introduction to Statistical Science
CHEM 0103 or CHEM 0107 General Chemistry I or Adv. General Chemistry
CHEM 0104 or CHEM 0107 General Chemistry II or Adv. General Chemistry
CHEM 0203 Organic Structure and Reactivity
MATH 0121 Calculus I
PHYS 0109 Newtonian Physics

Required Advanced Courses:

BIOL 0310 or BIOL 0305 Microbiology or Developmental Biology
BIOL 0314 Molecular Genetics
CHEM 0322 Biochemistry of Macromolecules
MBBC 0324 Bioinformatics and Genomics

Two electives out of the following:

BIOL 0225 Human Genetics
BIOL 0280 Immunology
BIOL 0305 Developmental Biology*
BIOL 0310 Microbiology*
BIOL 0330 Mechanisms of Microbial Pathogenesis
BIOL 0331 The Genetics of Cancer
BIOL/NSCI 0420 Neurogenetics
BIOL 0450 Topics in Reproductive Medicine
CHEM 0204 Organic Synthesis and Spectroscopy
CHEM 0301 Medicinal Chemistry
CHEM 0355 Thermodynamics and Kinetics
CHEM 0425 Biochemistry of Metabolism
CHEM 0430 Current Topics in Biochemistry
CSCI 0101 The Computing Age OR CSCI 0150 Computing for the Sciences

Note: Independent Study courses (CHEM/BIOL/MBBC 0500/0700/0701) can not be used to fulfill elective credit.

     * When not taken as a requirement these courses may be used as an elective.
     There is no minor in molecular biology and biochemistry.
     The recommended progression through the required courses of the MBBC major is shown below. While there can be some deviation to this schedule, it is highly recommended that the students complete their introductory chemistry requirements (CHEM 0103 and CHEM 0104 or, with advanced placement, CHEM 0107/CHEM 0104) by the end of the first year and their introductory biology requirements (BIOL 0140 and BIOL 0145) by the end of their third semester. The decision to start the introductory biology sequence in the first semester along with introductory chemistry and calculus should be made with consultation with the students FYSE advisor and/or the MBBC Program Director. All mathematics, physics, introductory chemistry and biology, and organic chemistry courses should be completed by the end of the second year. A college writing (CW) course should be completed by the end of the third year. BIOL 0331, BIOL 0310, or BIOL 0305 are appropriate courses which have sections that fulfill the CW requirement.

First Year Fall
BIOL 0140 Ecology and Evolution OR BIOL 0145 Cell Biology and Genetics
CHEM 0103 General Chemistry I OR (if satisfied)
CHEM 0104 General Chemistry II OR (if satisfied)
CHEM 0107 Advanced General Chemistry
MATH 0121 Calculus I

First Year Spring
CHEM 104 General Chemistry II (if not taken previously)
BIOL 0140 Ecology and Evolution OR BIOL 0145 Cell Biology and Genetics

Second Year Fall
BIOL 0140 Ecology and Evolution OR BIOL 0145 Cell Biology and Genetics (if not taken previously)
CHEM 0203 Organic Structure and Reactivity
PHYS 0109 Newtonian Physics

Second Year Winter Term
BIOL 0211 Experimental Design and Data Analysis (or MATH 0116 in Spring)

Second Year Spring
CHEM 0322 Biochemistry of Macromolecules
MATH 0116 Introduction to Statistical Science (or BIOL 0211 in Winter Term)

Third Year
BIOL 0310 Microbiology OR BIOL 0305 Developmental Biology
BIOL 0314 Molecular Genetics
MBBC 0324 Bioinformatics and Genomics Electives

Fourth Year
Senior Thesis Research and/or Electives

     Molecular Biology & Biochemistry Research: Research is an essential component of a well-rounded academic pursuit; it contributes to the development of independence and creativity, as well as to the depth of knowledge needed to become an active contributor to the scientific community. All majors are encouraged to undertake independent research with an MBBC faculty mentor. Any major is eligible to perform an independent study research project (BIOL 0500, CHEM 0500, or BIOL/CHEM/MBBC 0700) with the consent of a mentor.
     Requirements for Honors: Senior thesis research may be initiated by any junior with the consent of a mentor. Students considering senior thesis research are urged to begin conversations with faculty early in their junior year (certainly by winter term) because many thesis projects begin during the summer preceding the senior year. Those eligible for high honors or honors in molecular biology and biochemistry will: (1) complete at least two semesters of research, which may include winter term; (2) enroll in MBBC 0701 for their final semester of research; (3) graduate with a minimum GPA of 3.3 for all courses counting towards the major; (4) present a public seminar describing the significance, methodology, results, and conclusions of their research; (5) successfully defend their thesis before a committee of three faculty, two of whom must be affiliated with the MBBC program; and (6) earn a grade of at least B+ for MBBC 0701, as determined by the members of the MBBC program, with the grade based on their research performance, their written thesis, their thesis presentation and their thesis defense.

MBBC 0324 Bioinformatics and Genomics (Spring 2015) 
Bioinformatics and genomics are quickly evolving fields that analyze and contextualize genome sequencing data.  Genomics is the study, with an emphasis on high-throughput techniques, of the nucleic acid content of organisms. Bioinformatics is the interdisciplinary field that uses the techniques of statistics, computer science, and system organization to interpret this genomic data. In this course students will use national repositories of genomic information, databases, and open-source bioinformatics tools to visualize and manipulate genomic data.  We will also explore genomics’ larger social context, particularly as it relates to medical informatics. (CHEM 0104 or CHEM 0107 and BIOL 0145 or by waiver) 3 hrs. lect. DED, SCI (J. Ward)

MBBC 0700 Senior Thesis (Fall 2014, Spring 2015)
Seniors conducting independent study in Molecular Biology and Biochemistry should register for MBBC 0700 unless they are completing a thesis project in which case they should register for MBBC 0701. (Approval required) (Staff)

MBBC 0701 Senior Thesis (Fall 2014, Spring 2015)
Students conducting independent thesis research in Molecular Biology and Biochemistry must register for MBBC 0701 while completing research projects initiated in BIOL 0500, MBBC 0700, or CHEM 0400. Students will organize and lead regular discussions of their research and research methods, and attend weekly meetings with their designated laboratory group to foster understanding of their special area, and practice the stylistic and technical aspects of scientific writing needed to write their thesis. (CHEM 0400 or BIOL 0500 or MBBC 0700) (Approval required) (Staff)

Music

Required for the Major: Majors are required to take MUSC 0209, MUSC 0220-0221, MUSC 0234, MUSC 0260-0261; a performance elective such as MUSC 0240, 0241, 0243, 0244, or 0500; two 0200-level or above elective music courses; and MUSC 0400, senior seminar.
     Piano proficiency: All music majors will be required to demonstrate basic piano proficiency in the semester when the major is declared. Otherwise they should take a semester of piano lessons geared to theory skills, arranged through the music office. Musicianship: All music majors will be required to demonstrate basic sight singing proficiency in the semester when the major is declared. If needed, students should take Musicianship (MUSC 0259). If possible, Musicianship should be taken before or during the semester in which Theory II (MUSC 0260) is offered. MUSC 0704 does not count as a course toward fulfillment of the music major.
     In addition to the curricular requirements, majors are required to participate for three semesters in at least one departmentally approved ensemble. Those approved ensembles are Middlebury College Orchestra, Middlebury College Choir, Middlebury College/Community Choir, the Middlebury College Sound Investment Jazz Ensemble, and African Music and Dance Ensemble.
     Required for the Joint Major:A minimum of eight courses at the 0200-level or above, which must include MUSC 0260-0261, MUSC 0220-0221, MUSC 0234, plus MUSC 0400 (Music Senior Seminar) and/or completion of senior work.
In addition to the curricular requirements, joint majors must participate for three semesters in at least one departmentally approved ensemble. Please see above for approved ensembles.
     Required for the Minor:Students who pursue the minor in music are required to complete five music courses, two of which may be general introductory courses (0100-level). The three other courses would all be at an upper level (0200-0400- level).
     Music Theory Placement Exam: It is possible for students to test into Music I (MUSC 0209) and Music Theory II (MUSC 0260) by taking a placement exam rather than taking Theory I (MUSC 0160).
     The placement exam is available at the following times: Incoming students: Take the placement exam during the scheduled time before classes begin. No other time is available for placement exams for new students.
Current students: Note: November 1 and April 1 deadlines for requesting placement exam for the next semester classes. Send an e-mail indicating your interest in taking the placement exam to Music Department Chair Greg Vitercik (vitercik@middlebury.edu). A time will then be arranged to administer the placement exam, before registration if possible.
     Departmental Honors: Departmental honors in music reflect a student's overall    achievement in and contribution to the department as well as excellence in an independent senior work project (MUSC 0704). To be eligible for independent senior work, a grade average of at least B+ in all music courses is required. Eligible students may propose a senior work project (MUSC 0704) of one or two semesters in length; proposals must be submitted by April 1 of the junior year. A grade of B+ in senior work and B+ in departmental courses will be eligible for honors; A- in senior work and A- in departmental courses will be eligible for high honors; A in senior work and A in departmental courses will be eligible for highest honors.
     Applied Music: Private instruction in musical instruments and voice is available through the department. Registration for these lessons takes place the first week of each term in the main lobby of the Center for the Arts. Contact the department at extension 5221 for further information. Contracts must be signed after the first lesson and are binding. The fee is to be paid to the cashier's office upon receipt of a bill at the mid-point of each term. No rebate is allowed for lessons missed except in the case of injury or continued illness. There are ten 45-minute applied music lessons per semester (four during winter term). Members of the Middlebury College Orchestra, Middlebury College Choir, Middlebury College/Community Choir, and Middlebury College Sound Investment Jazz Ensemble are entitled to half-price lessons for the instruments they play in the ensemble (or voice for choirs). The applied fee is waived for students who are music majors, music joint majors, or are enrolled in performance-related MUSC 0500 or MUSC 0704 projects. Music majors may receive a maximum of two complimentary series of private lessons each semester. Academic credit is not given for applied lessons.
     Private instruction: piano: D. Fanning, C. Huard, N. Paden, S. Brightman; harpsichord: C. Huard;  jazz piano and jazz voice: R. Forman; cello: D. Davydov; violin: K. Winterstein; viola: P. Reynolds; trumpet and double bass: G. Ingalls; flute: A. Janson; clarinet: Steven Klimowski; bassoon: R. Elliott; oboe: D. Frostman; trombone B. Irwin french horn: M. Fritze; acoustic and electric guitar: P. Asbell, D. Huckett; classical guitar: E. Despard; voice: C. Christensen, S. Peck, B. Thompson; drums: R. Lawton; harmonica: M. Lavoie; traditional fiddle, mandolin and banjo: P. Sutherland; bagpipes and celtic whistle: T. Cummings; carillon: G. Matthew; organ: E. Fanning; saxophone: M. Donahue; harp: D. Dodge. The department will assist the student in securing instrumental instruction not provided by the staff. In some cases, however, it may not be possible to find a qualified instructor.

Ensembles
Middlebury College Orchestra: The orchestra performs approximately four times a year in programs featuring music from all periods. Instrumentalists may arrange for an audition through the music department. Subsidized instrumental lessons with applied faculty members are available; see "Applied Music" above. See course listing for MUSC 0205. (A. Massey)
     Middlebury College Choir: The College Choir performs concerts each fall and spring, participates in Baccalaureate and other College functions, and tours or engages in other projects annually. Audition required, with attention to sight-reading, listening skills and vocal production. Intent to participate full year/multiple semesters strongly encouraged. Open to all students without prerequisite. Subsidized voice lessons with applied faculty members are available; see "Applied Music" above. See course listing of MUSC 0205. (J. Buettner)
     College Community Chorus: The Chorus performs concerts each fall and spring, usually including a major choral work for chorus and organ or orchestra. Open to all without audition; rehearsals focus on developing choral musicianship. Subsidized voice lessons with applied faculty members are available; see "Applied Music" above. See course listing of MUSC 0205. (J. Rehbach)
     Sound Investment Jazz Ensemble:Using traditional big-band instrumentation, the Jazz Ensemble plays the best of contemporary jazz arrangements as well as classic charts from the 75 years of swing and jazz band history. The Ensemble also features student compositions and arrangements when available. An active performance schedule is typical. Subsidized lessons with applied faculty members are available; see "Applied Music" above. See course listing of MUSC 0205 (D. Forman)
     African Music and Dance Ensemble: The African Music and Dance Ensemble is the core of the African Music and Dance Performance course (MUSC0244), for which enrolled students earn one (1) credit. The Ensemble gives students [with or without a musical background] a rich, hands-on experience with numerous East African (Ugandan) music and dance cultures through regular rehearsals and fall/spring end-of-semester concerts. See course listing of MUSC 0244 (D. Kafumbe)
     Other Chamber Ensembles: String quartets, woodwind and brass ensembles can be formed and coached for interested students. Independent projects (MUSC 0500) can be arranged for these groups.

MUSC 0101 Introduction to Western Music (Fall 2014)
This course is designed to introduce students to the music created by the men and women of Western civilization. The styles and genres of art music from the Middle Ages to the present will be a focus for the course. The relationship of music to society, historical context, and the other arts will also be examined. Music reading skills are not required. 3 hrs. lect./disc. ART, EUR (G. Vitercik)

MUSC 0130 Introductory Topics in Music History: Beethoven (Spring 2015)
Ludwig van Beethoven (1770–1827) was perhaps the most influential figure in the history of Western music. In this course we will explore Beethoven’s life and work in the context of political, social, and musical currents during and after his lifetime. Through intensive listening, reading, concert attendance, and discussion, we will develop critical listening skills, examine the relationship between an artist’s biography and creative work, and critique how and whether social and political events shape the development of music and vice versa. No previous musical experience is required. (Not open to students who have taken FYSE 1132) ART, EUR (L. Hamberlin)

MUSC 0160 Music Theory I: Fundamentals (Fall 2014, Spring 2015)
This course is an introduction to the basic elements and theoretical concepts of Western music. We will focus on such topics as basic keyboard skills, sight singing, musical notation, rhythm, and harmony. Theoretical work and drills will be combined with compositional and performance projects. The goal of the course is to expand students’ musical intuition and skill and to provide the technical basis for further music study. No prior musical experience is required. (Students who wish to take upper-level composition or music theory courses must either complete this course or pass a theory and musicianship test administered by the department to demonstrate equivalent experience.) (Formerly MUSC 0109). 2.5 hrs. lect. ART (Fall 2014: P. Hamlin; Spring 2015: S. Tan)

MUSC 0205 Performance Lab (Fall 2014, Spring 2015)
Credit can be conferred for performance in faculty-supervised ensembles: Middlebury College Orchestra, Middlebury College Choir and the Middlebury College Sound Investment Jazz Ensemble (see "Ensembles" above), one unit of such credit to accrue over two semesters (spring and fall only). The appropriate supervising faculty will give grades, based on attendance and quality of performance. A student should inform the ensemble director of intent to sign up for this course before starting, and should actually register for MUSC 0205 only the SECOND of the two terms by adding it as a fifth course. MUSC 0205 does not fulfill any major course requirements and may not be taken more than once. (Approval required) ART (A. Massey, J. Buettner, J. Rehbach, J. Forman)

MUSC 0209 Music I (Fall 2014)
Music I focuses on the materials and grammar of music through compositional exercises. As part of these explorations, we will examine the elements of harmony (scales, triads and seventh chords), notation, rhythm, polyrhythm, binary and ternary forms, two-voice counterpoint, variation, transposition, as well as skills in conducting, analysis, ear-training, and sight-singing. Students will write short pieces for a variety of instruments and ensembles, notate their pieces, and rehearse and perform them, thereby learning about music through discovery and observation. The assignments are designed for students with or without compositional experience. (Ability to play an instrument or sing; MUSC 0109 or 0160, or passing score on the MUSC 0160 placement exam) 3 hrs. lect./1 hr. lab. ART (S. Tan)

MUSC 0210 Music II (Spring 2015)
This course is a continuation of MUSC 0209. While using the same format, including composing and labs, as in MUSC 0209, the course covers elements of modality (western and non-western), functional harmony, heterophony, fugal processes, strophic forms, melodic analysis, serial processes, and extensions of tonality and atonality. (MUSC 0209) 3 hrs. lect./1 hr. lab. ART (S. Tan)

MUSC 0212 History, Theory, and Practice of Electronic Music (Spring 2015)
This course will provide a historical look at the development of electronic music from the earliest analog techniques to present-day computer technology. Students will learn about the theory of digital and analog sound, acoustics, and MIDI. Creative projects will guide the class through a range of techniques. Much of the focus will be on how the electronic medium enables composers to work with sound and musical forms in non-traditional ways. 3 hrs. lect. ART (P. Hamlin)

MUSC 0220 Music History I: Music to 1750 (Fall 2014)
In this course we will survey Western art music from the earliest notated Medieval music through the Renaissance and Baroque periods. Beginning with Gregorian chant and troubadour song, we will explore Renaissance vocal polyphony, the development of opera and instrumental music in the 17th century, and the late Baroque music of Bach and Handel. Analysis of the music is supplemented by consideration of the ways in which music relates to the other arts and reflects the history and culture of its time. (MUSC 0260 or waiver) 3 hrs. lect. ART, EUR, HIS (L. Hamberlin)

MUSC 0221 Music History II: Music Since 1750 (Spring 2015)
This course is a survey of the principle genres and forms of Western art music from the Viennese classicism of Haydn and Mozart to the present day. The approach of the course is analytical, historical, and cultural. That is, we will study selected works from the Western repertory, attempting to understand each piece on its own terms as artistic expression, in the context of stylistic developments, and as it reflects its time and the concerns of its composer and audience. (MUSC 0260 or waiver) 3 hrs. lect. ART, EUR, HIS (G. Vitercik)

MUSC 0230 Topics in Music History: The Romantic Era (Fall 2014)
In this course we will explore the vast realm of 19th century musical romanticism from its intimate lyric forms to its most grandiose commentaries on the human condition. We will examine the music of Schubert, Schumann, Berlioz, Verdi, Wagner, Brahms, and Mahler through analysis and interpretation and explore the social, literary, political, and philosophical contexts in which these works were created. 3 hrs. lect. (MUSC 0220, 0221, 0260, or waiver) ART, EUR (G. Vitercik)

MUSC/AMST 0232 Music in the United States (Spring 2015)
In this course we will examine folk, classical, and popular music in the United States from the 18th century to the present. We will use historical and analytical approaches to gain insight into the music, the musicians, and the social and cultural forces that have shaped them. Students will explore music’s relation to historical events, other artistic movements, technological changes, and questions of national identity and ethnicity. Topics may include music in the British colonies, minstrelsy, American opera and orchestras, the rise of the popular music industry, and the experimentalist composers of the 20th century. (Assumes ability to read music.) 3 hrs. lect./disc. ART, NOR (L. Hamberlin)

MUSC 0234 Music in World Cultures (Spring 2015)
In this course  students will develop skills for analyzing music and appreciating its social, economic, and political importance within societies other than their own. We will explore world musical styles through readings, lectures, discussions, film screenings, listening sessions, workshops, concerts, and hands-on activities. Assuming a strong background in music, this course will be open to music majors and others by approval. AAL, ART (D. Kafumbe)

MUSC 0240 Performing Chamber Music (Fall 2014, Spring 2015)
In this course for intermediate to advanced performers we will explore the art of collaborative music making in the classical tradition. Students will form small vocal and instrumental ensembles (2–6 players) at the beginning of the semester or may enroll in the course as an established ensemble. Repertoire will be determined in collaboration with instructor. Weekly coaching sessions for each group and master classes for all groups will culminate in at least one end-of-semester performance and writing assignment. In addition to technical performance issues, master classes and readings will consider group dynamics, rehearsal techniques, and interpersonal aspects of musical collaboration. Although previous chamber music experience is not required, students should be experienced performers of notation-based music. 3 hrs. lect./disc. ART (Fall 2014: L. Hamberlin; Spring 2015: G. Vitercik)

MUSC 0243 Conducting (Spring 2015)
In this course students will develop basic skills of conducting including movement, aural skills, creative gesture, and score study. Daily work will include preparation to conduct an ensemble of classmates. (MUSC 0160 or by approval of instructor. Score-reading ability is required.) 3 hrs. lect. ART (J. Buettner)

MUSC/DANC 0244 African Music and Dance Performance (Fall 2014, Spring 2015)
This course will introduce students to various techniques of performing East African (primarily Ugandan) musical and dance traditions through regular rehearsals, culminating in an end-of-semester concert. As an ensemble, we will learn and master how to play and sing/dance to bow-harps, thumb-pianos, xylophones, tube-fiddles, bowl-lyres, gourd shakers, reed-box rattles, ankle bells, and various types of drums. Prior knowledge of performing African music and dance is not required. 4 hrs. lect. AAL, ART (D. Kafumbe)

MUSC 0246 A Cappella Ensemble Performance (Fall 2014)
Unaccompanied vocal music is rich in cultural expression and artistic beauty. Singing in an unaccompanied vocal ensemble enhances creativity, musicianship, and communication skills. This course affords an opportunity to develop analytical and ensemble skills that contribute to creative and informed performance. Through study of scores and source readings, students will explore vocal technique, performance, and cultural context in European art music, North American folk songs, and styles of improvisation. This course will conclude with a public performance and may include additional performances off campus. Music reading is required, prior singing experience is not. A preview of the reading requirement is available at go/Ensemble246. ART, CMP (J. Buettner)

MUSC 0260 Music Theory II: Diatonic Theory (Fall 2014)
This course is an in-depth technical study of the materials of music, a study which expands one’s ability to analyze and create music and to understand different musical styles. We will cover harmonic materials, introduce musical form, and work with traditional compositional skills. These techniques are applied to the analysis of classical music, jazz and popular music. (MUSC 0160 or passing score on the MUSC 0160 placement exam.) 3 hrs. lect./disc. ART (P. Hamlin)

MUSC 0261 Music Theory III: Chromatic Theory (Spring 2015)
This course is a continuation of MUSC 0260. Students study more advanced harmonic devices including modulation and chromaticism, jazz harmony and post-tonal techniques. In-depth analysis of classical music, jazz, and popular music supports a more advanced study of musical form. (MUSC 0260) 3 hrs. lect./disc. ART (P. Hamlin)

MUSC 0309 Advanced Composition (Fall 2014)
In this course we will focus on writing for string quartet, brass quintet, a cappella singing, piano, or performance art and involve issues of technique, style, and practical considerations, as well as study of selected elements of the literature. The course will culminate with a reading of student works by a professional ensemble or solo performer. This semester we focus on composing for the string quartet. We will discuss a variety of string techniques as well as issues of form and orchestration. We will listen to important works for that medium and discuss the styles from the Classical period to this century. Students will compose exercises, leading to a substantial string quartet to be "read" by the Jupiter String Quartet. (MUSC 0209 and 0210 or approval of instructor). 3 hrs. lect./disc. (S. Tan)

MUSC 0400 Senior Seminar in Music: Ethnomusicological Approaches and Methods (Fall 2014)
In this course we will explore various theoretical approaches and methods of ethnomusicology (the study of music in culture and as culture). Students will investigate the relevance of this field to general areas of musical study and practice, including history, theory, composition, performance, analysis, and world music. Students pursuing senior work will also explore ways in to incorporate ethnomusicological approaches and methods in their projects. All music majors are required to take this course in the fall of their senior year. 3 hrs. lect./disc. AAL, ART (D. Kafumbe)

MUSC 0500 Independent Study (Fall 2014, Spring 2015)
Admission by approval. Please consult published departmental guidelines and paragraph below. (Staff)

MUSC 0704 Senior Work (Fall 2014, Spring 2015)
Senior work is not required of all music majors and joint majors. However, students interested in and eligible for departmental honors (see guideline above, in "Departmental Honors" section) may propose one or two-semester Senior Work projects. Projects may be in history, composition, theory, ethnomusicology, performance, or electronic music, and should culminate in a written presentation, a public performance, or a combination of the two. MUSC0704 does not count as a course toward fulfillment of the music major. (Staff)

Project and budget proposals for Independent Study and Senior Work should be submitted by the previous April 1 for fall and winter term projects, and the previous October 15 for spring term projects. Budget proposals will not be considered after those dates. Project proposals will be considered after the deadline but are more likely not to be approved due to previous commitments of faculty advisors or other scheduling reasons.

Neuroscience

Required for the major: The major includes required background courses, upper-level courses, and senior study. Required background courses in biology, psychology, and chemistry, establish a foundation in science necessary for upper-level study. Upper-level core courses in biology, psychology, and philosophy teach students to approach neuroscience broadly from intellectually different directions. Upper-level elective courses offer opportunities to explore a wide variety of specific topics. Senior study requires all majors to integrate their specific training through research or a senior seminar.

Required Background Courses:
BIOL 0145 Cell Biology and Genetics
BIOL 0216 Animal Behavior (completion recommended before end of sophomore year)
CHEM 0103 Fundamentals of Chemistry 1
PSYC 0105 Introduction to Psychology
PSYC 0201 Psychological Statistics or BIOL 0211 Experimental Design and Analysis

Upper-Level Core Courses:
BIOL 0370 Animal Physiology
PHIL 0352 Philosophy of the Mind or PHIL 0360 Consciousness or PHIL 0362 Philosophy of Psychology
PSYC/NSCI 0301 Physiological Psychology (complete before end of Junior year)

     Electives:  Three electives to be chosen from BIOL 0225; BIOL 0235; BIOL 0270; BIOL 0305; BIOL 0350; PHIL 0352; PHIL 0360; or PHIL 0362 (at least one must be taken as a required course); PSYC/NSCI 0302; PSYC/NSCI 0303; PSYC/NSCI 0305; PSYC/NSCI 0309; PSYC/NSCI 0311; PSYC/NSCI 0330; RELI/PSYC 0209. During winter term and as course offerings change there may be other electives in BIOL, PHIL, or PSYC that are available for NSCI elective credit.
     Senior Study:A Senior Seminar (from BIOL/NSCI 0420; BIOL 0475, BIOL/NSCI 0480; PSYC/NSCI 0411; PSYC/NSCI 0419; PSYC/NSCI 0430; PSYC/NSCI 0434; PSYC/NSCI 0435; or a PHIL 0400-level senior seminar, if approved in advance) OR independent research (NSCI 0500, NSCI 0700. NSCI 0701). During winter term and as course offerings change there may be other seminars in BIOL, PHIL, or PSYC that are available for NSCI seminar credit.
     Note: If students elect to pursue independent research (NSCI 0500/0700/0701), then a 0400-level senior seminar may fulfill one of the three required upper-level electives.
     Students may be exempt from some introductory courses through placement or bypass exams. For more information on placing out of a specific course, contact the chairperson of the relevant department. Seniors can do research with any faculty in the program, or with certain faculty in other departments provided the research project is approved by the neuroscience faculty and the project is related to understanding the nervous system and the mind.

Optional Cognate Courses
Note: there are several optional cognates desirable for those considering post-baccalaureate study. For example, those interested in the health professions or graduate study in neuroscience may wish to take some or all of the following courses. Students should consult with their advisor for assistance.
BIOL 0140 Ecology and Evolution
CHEM 0104 Fundamentals of Chemistry 2
MATH 0121 Calculus 1
MATH 0122 Calculus 2
CHEM 0203 Organic Chemistry I: Structure and Reactivity
CHEM 0204 Organic Chemistry II: Synthesis and Spectroscopy
CHEM 0322 Biochemistry of Macromolecules
PHYS 0109 Mechanics
PHYS 0110 Electricity and Magnetism

     Study Abroad: Study abroad can be a valuable experience that is encouraged, though majors must consult with the Office of Off-Campus Study and their advisor about the advisability of specific programs. Because the requirements for the NSCI major are complex, we recommend that students study abroad for a single term rather than an entire year. It is expected that the required courses listed for the major specifically by number (i.e. BIOL 0145, BIOL 0216, PSYC 0105, PSYC 0201 or BIOL 0211, BIOL 0370, PSYC 0301, PHIL 0352, PHIL 0360, or PHIL 0362) would be completed at Middlebury. However, NSCI electives may be taken abroad if they are determined to satisfy program requirements and are approved by the advisor and program director. Students generally receive major credit for a maximum of two courses taken abroad. The NSCI program does not grant major credit for Independent Study projects completed abroad.
     Program Honors: Majors are encouraged to undertake independent research (NSCI 0500, NSCI 0700, NSCI 0701) with any faculty member in the program (primary or resource). Students considering any senior research should begin conversations with faculty early in their junior year. Those eligible for high honors in neuroscience must (1) complete at least two semesters of thesis-related research (one term of NSCI 0500 or 0700 and one term of NSCI 0701); (2) have a minimum GPA of 3.3 in major courses (excluding NSCI 0500/0700/0701); (3) present a public seminar describing the background, methodology, results, and greater significance of their research; (4) submit a written thesis and (5) successfully defend their thesis before a committee comprised of at least three faculty members, two of which must be Neuroscience faculty, plus others as needed, who may recommend High Honors after considering these five components of a thesis.

NSCI 0100 Introduction to Neuroscience (Fall 2014)
Neuroscience is the interdisciplinary, scientific study of the nervous system. In this course we will investigate basic nervous system structure and function while tracking the history and methodology of neuroscience. We will study examples of neurons, sensation, behavior, memory, thought, language, consciousness, the mind, and disorders of the nervous system. Through lectures, discussions, exercises, electronic sources, and guest lecturers we will examine the working principles of nervous systems, modern neuroscientific methods, and topical issues. We will appreciate why an interdisciplinary approach is best suited for understanding our brain and mind. (Open only to first and second year students) 3 hrs. lect./1 hr. disc. SCI (G. Ernstrom, T. Root)

NSCI/PSYC 0301 Physiological Psychology (Fall 2014, Spring 2015)
This course concerns the biological basis of human behavior. The course will consider the neurochemical, neuroanatomical, and neurophysiological bases of processes such as language, sensation, emotion, aggression, sleep, learning, and memory. In the laboratory the student will conduct experiments using standard (surgical, anatomical, biochemical, behavioral) techniques to investigate central nervous system function. (PSYC 0105 or any biology course; not open to first-year students; open to psychology and neuroscience majors; others by waiver) 3 hrs. lect./3 hrs. lab. SCI (Fall 2014: C. Parker; Spring 2015: K. Cronise, M. Dash)

NSCI/PSYC 0303 Sensation and Perception (Fall 2014)
Remarkably, using just five basic senses, our brains translate simple external stimuli (e.g. light and sound waves) into unique and vivid perceptual experiences enabling us to interact with our surrounding physical reality. Focusing primarily on the underlying mechanisms of vision and audition, we will explore how our brains construct detailed representations of our world. Throughout these explorations, we will identify perceptual limitations and investigate how mental processes such as attention and emotion affect our perceptions. We will review recent scientific articles and conduct experiments. (PSYC 0105 or any BIOL course; open to psychology and neuroscience majors; others by waiver) 3 hrs. lect./1 hr. disc. SCI (M. Dash)

NSCI/PSYC 0305 Cognitive Psychology (Spring 2015)
Questions about the nature of the mind, thinking, and knowledge have a long and rich history in the field of psychology. This course will examine the theoretical perspectives and empirically documented phenomena that inform our current understanding of cognition. Lectures, discussions, demonstrations, and experiments will form the basis for our explorations of cognition in this class. Topics to be considered include attention, perception, memory, knowledge, problem solving, and decision making. (PSYC 0105; PSYC 0201 or MATH 0116 or ECON 0210 previously or concurrently; PSYC 0202 recommended; not open to first-year students; open to psychology and neuroscience majors; others by waiver) 3 hrs. lect./1.5 hrs. lab. SCI (J. Arndt)

NSCI/PSYC 0309 Psychopharmacology (Fall 2014)
This course will examine ways in which drugs act on the brain to influence behavior. Students will learn the basics of brain function, will learn basic properties of drug action, and will learn how legal and illegal drugs, including drugs used to treat psychological disorders, alter the brain function and behavior of humans and experimental animals. (PSYC 0301 or BIOL 0370; not open to first-year students; open to psychology and neuroscience majors; others by waiver) 3 hrs. lect. SCI (M. Collaer)

NSCI/PSYC 0430 Memory: A User's Guide (Spring 2015)
How can I remember names better? How can I best study for an exam? How accurate are our memories? A deep understanding of how people remember will allow us to answer these and many other questions. Topics covered in this course include working memory, the nature of encoding and retrieval, applied aspects of remembering, and neuroscientific approaches to understanding memory. Readings will be a mixture of textbook and journal articles. The class will have a seminar format, with emphasis on student-led discussions and contributions. Additionally, student research groups will design and execute a research study examining human memory. Evaluations will be based on the research project, student-led discussions, and reaction papers. (PSYC 0201; open to junior and senior psychology and neuroscience majors only) 3 hrs. sem. (J. Arndt)

NSCI/PSYC 0434 Genes, Brain, and Behavior (Fall 2014)
What we experience—and how we experience it—is influenced by our unique combination of genes. For better or worse, the gene variants we inherit from our parents contribute to our predispositions to psychological disorders, our personalities, and even the way in which we perceive the world around us. To be clear, anything that you can do or think is in some way influenced by your genes. However, this statement comes with a large caveat: except in the case of (relatively) rare single gene mutations, your genes do not determine but rather contribute to who you are. Working within the field of behavior genetics, we will cover topics such as social behavior, obesity, sexual promiscuity, drug abuse, language, and anxiety. (PSYC/NSCI 0301 or BIOL/NSCI 0370; Open to junior and senior neuroscience or psychology majors only, others by approval) SCI (C. Parker)

NSCI 0500 Independent Research (Fall 2014, Spring 2015)
Students enrolled in NSCI 0500 complete individual research projects involving laboratory or extensive library study on a topic chosen by the student and approved in advance by a NSCI faculty advisor. This course is not open to seniors; seniors should enroll in NSCI 0700. (Approval required) (Staff)

NSCI 0700 Senior Research (Fall 2014, Spring 2015)
This course is for senior NSCI majors who plan to conduct one or more semesters of independent research, or who plan to complete preparatory work toward a senior thesis, such as researching and writing a thesis proposal as well as, if appropriate, collecting data that will form the basis for a senior thesis. Senior NSCI majors who plan to complete a senior thesis should register initially for NSCI 0700. Additional requirements may include participation in weekly meetings with advisors and/or lab groups and attending neuroscience seminars. (Approval required, open to seniors only) (Staff)

NSCI 0701 Senior Thesis (Fall 2014, Spring 2015)
Senior NSCI majors who have completed one or more terms of NSCI 0700, who have a GPA of 3.3 in their major courses, and who plan to complete a senior thesis should register for NSCI 0701 for the final semester of the senior thesis process. Students enrolled in NSCI 0701 write a thesis, give a public presentation of their research, and present an oral defense of the thesis before a committee of at least two Neuroscience faculty members. Faculty may recommend High honors in Neuroscience after considering the quality of these components of a student’s thesis and the student’s GPA in major courses. Additional requirements may include participation in weekly meetings with advisors and/or lab groups and attending neuroscience seminars. (NSCI 0700, Approval required) (Staff)

Philosophy

Required for the Major: Majors must complete no fewer than 10 courses in the department, to include:
1.Logic Requirement: PHIL 0180
2.History Requirement:
   a) PHIL 0201 or CLAS/PHIL 0275
   b) PHIL 0250
3. Distribution Requirement:
   a) one course in Ethics and Social & Political Philosophy (ESP)
   b) one course in Epistemology, Language, Metaphysics, Mind and Science (ELMMS)
4. Seminar Requirement: two 0400-level seminars (see below)
5. Electives: three courses
     Additionally, it is highly recommended that students take either PHIL 0150 or PHIL 0151, preferably early in the program. PHIL 0180 must be completed by the end of the sophomore year. For students going abroad in their junior year, the history requirement should be completed prior to departure. Cognate courses may be substituted for no more than two departmental electives, but will not satisfy the departmental distribution requirement; such substitutions require the prior approval of a major's departmental advisor, and must be at the 0200-level or above. No more than one term of thesis work may count towards the 10 course requirement.
     Seminar Requirement: Majors must take two department seminars (0400-level courses on advanced topics in philosophy). Junior majors should take the seminar currently offered in the spring term; seniors should take the seminar currently offered in the fall term. Students who are abroad during the spring of the junior year must take both seminars in their senior year. This requirement will not be waived for students doing departmental honors. These seminars will not normally satisfy the departmental distribution requirement, but may in exceptional cases by permission of the Chair.
     Departmental Honors: Majors with at least a B+ average in philosophy courses may apply to the Chair to become candidates for departmental honors. To apply, a student must find a faculty member willing to supervise the project and then submit a proposal to that faculty member in writing. If (and only if) the proposal is accepted, the student should then register for two successive terms of PHIL 0700 (normally during the winter and spring terms of their senior year). To receive honors, students must complete a two-term project resulting in a thesis or a set of thematically related papers, give an oral defense (according to departmental regulations), and receive for their work a minimum grade of B+. In addition, they must maintain their B+ average in courses in the department.
     Required for the Joint Major: For the philosophy component of a joint major, students must (1) take eight philosophy courses, including (a) PHIL 0180, to be taken by the end of the sophomore year; (b) one 0400-level seminar to be taken in the last three semesters; (c) One course from the history requirement; and (d) one course from the distribution requirement (ESP or ELMMS). Either PHIL 0150 or PHIL 0151 is also highly recommended, and, like PHIL 0180, should be taken early in the program whenever possible. In addition, students must (2) give evidence of having used the training in both major fields, usually in an independent project or thesis, but sometimes in a seminar paper. Joint majors are eligible for department honors, if they do a two-term thesis.
     Required for the Minor: A total of six courses in philosophy, including PHIL 0180 and at least one course at the 0300 or 0400 level. Minors wishing to take a 0400-level seminar must have completed three other philosophy courses first. Enrollment priority in 0400-level seminars will be given to majors. Students electing the philosophy minor should arrange to have an advisor in the philosophy department.

PHIL 0150 Introduction to the Philosophical Tradition (Spring 2015)
This course will introduce students to fundamental philosophical issues concerning the nature of reality (metaphysics), the possibility of knowledge (epistemology), and the nature of value (ethical theory) through a reading of a number of important primary texts of thinkers such as Plato, Aristotle, Descartes, Hume, Kant, Kierkegaard, Mill, Nietzsche, and Freud. Cannot be taken by students with credit for PHIL 0151. 3 hrs. lect./1 hr. disc. EUR, PHL (M. Woodruff)

PHIL 0151 Introduction to Philosophy: Mortal Questions (Fall 2014)
This course is an issue-based introduction to core philosophical questions such as the following: What is the nature of reality, and can we ever know it? What is the relation between mind and body, and could computers ever think? What is the nature of the self? Do humans have free will? Is there such a thing as an objective right and wrong? Can we say God exists in the face of all the evil in the world? Readings will be drawn from both traditional philosophers (e.g., Descartes, Hume, Locke, Russell) and contemporary reflections on the issues (e.g., Nagel, Searle, Williams). Cannot be taken by students with credit for PHIL 0150. 3 hrs. lect./1 hr. disc. EUR, PHL (J. Spackman)

PHIL 0180 Introduction to Modern Logic (Fall 2014, Spring 2015)
Logic is concerned with good reasoning; as such, it stands at the core of the liberal arts. In this course we will develop our reasoning skills by identifying and analyzing arguments found in philosophical, legal, and other texts, and also by formulating our own arguments. We will use the formal techniques of modern propositional and predicate logic to codify and test various reasoning strategies and specific arguments. No prior knowledge of logic, formal mathematics, or computer science is presupposed in this course, which does not count towards the PHL distribution requirement but instead towards the deductive reasoning requirement. PHIL 0180 is not open to students who have already taken PHIL 0280/LNGT0280. 3 hrs. lect./1 hr. disc. DED (Fall 2014: K. Khalifa; Spring 2015: H. Grasswick)

PHIL 0201 Ancient Greek Philosophy (Fall 2014)
This class introduces students to the range and power of Greek thought, which initiated the Western philosophical tradition. We will begin by exploring the origins of philosophy as found in myth (primarily Hesiod) and in the highly original speculation of the Pre-Socratic thinkers (such as Heraclitus and Parmenides). We will then focus on Socrates, Plato, and Aristotle, examining their transformations of these earlier traditions and their own divergent approaches to ethics and education. We will also consider the influences of Greek philosophy on later thought. 3 hrs. lect. EUR, HIS, PHL (M. Woodruff)

PHIL 0206 Contemporary Moral Issues (Fall 2014, Spring 2015)
We will examine a selection of pressing moral problems of our day, seeking to understand the substance of the issues and learning how moral arguments work. We will focus on developing our analytical skills, which we can then use to present and criticize arguments on difficult moral issues. Selected topics may include world poverty, animal rights, abortion, euthanasia, human rights, just and unjust wars, capital punishment, and racial and gender issues. You will be encouraged to question your own beliefs on these issues, and in the process to explore the limit and extent to which ethical theory can play a role in everyday ethical decision making. 2 hrs. lect./1 hr. disc. PHL (Fall 2014: L. Besser-Jones; Spring 2015: S. Viner)

PHIL 0208 Morality & War (Fall 2014)
Are there any Just Wars? What would make a war a Just War? In the first part of this course we will investigate the historical origins of Just War Theory. In the second part, we will analyze contemporary moral perspectives on whether war can be morally justified and if so, what actions in war are morally justified or prohibited. In the final part, we will read articles concerning war and humanitarian intervention and on what actions, e.g. punishment, are morally permissible or demanded after war. Authors will include Augustine, Grotius, Nagel, Walzer, Luban. 3 hrs. lect. PHL (S. Viner)

PHIL 0209 Philosophy of Law (Fall 2014)
In this course, we shall consider a number of questions concerning law and its institution in human society. What is the origin and authority of law? What is legal obligation? What is the connection between law and coercion, between law and morality, and law and rights? Are laws merely conventions or is there a law of nature? What is the role of law in judicial decisions and the effect of these on the law? We shall also consider and evaluate various theories of law: natural law theories, utilitarian theories, analytical philosophy of law, critical legal studies, feminist theories. 3 hrs. lect. PHL (S. Viner)

PHIL 0216 Science and the Quest for Truth (Spring 2015)
On a fairly conventional view, science exemplifies humankind's rational inquiry into the true structure of the world. But what exactly is science? In what sense is it rational? Are scientific claims true or merely useful in predicting and controlling our environment? To answer these questions, we will examine scientific activities such as theory construction, explanation, confirmation, and experimentation, and their role in debates concerning the role of rationality and truth in scientific knowledge. (This course presupposes no prior knowledge of philosophy or science.) PHL (K. Khalifa)

PHIL 0220 Knowledge and Reality (Spring 2015)
This course will introduce students to central issues in epistemology (the philosophical study of knowledge) and metaphysics (the philosophical study of reality). We will examine philosophical answers to some of the following questions: What is knowledge? How do we know what we know? How does knowledge differ from mere opinion? Does reality exist independently of our minds? When is it rational to believe something? What is the nature of time, causality, and possibility? Are our actions freely chosen or determined by natural forces? Do abstract entities-such as numbers and universals-exist? 3 hrs. lect. CW, PHL (K. Khalifa)

PHIL/RELI 0232 Philosophy of Religion (Spring 2015)
In the first part of this course we will focus on philosophical reflections on the existence of God, the relation between religion and morality, the existence of evil, arguments for and against religious belief, and religious experience. We will read texts by Pascal, Hume, Kant, Kierkegaard, William James, and Freud. In the second part we will focus on the place of religion in society, considering what it means to live in a secular society, the relation between secularism and modernity, and the resulting modern forms of religious experience and practice. 3 hrs. lect. CW, PHL (J. Spackman)

PHIL/HIST 0237 Chinese Philosophy (Fall 2014)
A survey of the dominant philosophies of China, beginning with the establishment of the earliest intellectual orientations, moving to the emergence of the competing schools of the fifth century B.C., and concluding with the modern adoption and adaptation of Marxist thought. Early native alternatives to Confucian philosophy (such as Mohism, Daoism, and Legalism) and later foreign ones (such as Buddhism and Marxism) will be stressed. We will scrutinize individual thinkers with reference to their philosophical contributions and assess the implications of their ideas with reference to their historical contexts and comparative significance. Pre-1800. 3 hrs. lect./disc. AAL, HIS, PHL (D. Wyatt)

PHIL 0250 Early Modern Philosophy (Spring 2015)
This course offers an introduction to some of the most influential European philosophers of the 17th and 18th centuries: Descartes, Spinoza, Locke, Berkeley, Hume, and Kant. We will consider and critically examine the responses these thinkers gave to various questions in metaphysics and epistemology, including the following: What is the relationship between reality and our perception of reality? What is the nature of the mind and how is it related to the body? What is the nature of physical reality? Which of our beliefs, if any, do we have good reason to maintain in the face of radical skepticism? 3 hrs. lect. EUR, PHL (L. Besser-Jones)

PHIL/RELI 0255 Kierkegaard, Marx, and Nietzsche (Fall 2014)
This course will investigate the works of three of the central philosophical and cultural critics of the nineteenth century. All of these thinkers revolted against the apotheosis of Reason that had occurred in the Enlightenment and that reached its culmination in the works of Hegel. We shall read Kierkegaard's Either/Or, Philosophical Fragments, and Concluding Unscientific Postscript; Marx's early essays criticizing Hegel, the Economic and Philosophic Manuscripts of 1844, and other selections concentrating on Marx's philosophical views, not his economic analysis; and Nietzsche's The Birth of Tragedy, The Use and Abuse of History, Thus Spoke Zarathustra (selections), and The Genealogy of Morals. EUR, HIS, PHL (S. Bates)

PHIL/CLAS 0276 Roman Philosophy (Spring 2015)
In this course we will seek to answer the question of what is Roman philosophy - philosophia togata. Is it simply Greek philosophy in Roman dress? Or, while based in its Greek origins, does it grow to have a distinctive and rigorous character of its own, designed and developed to focus on uniquely "Roman" questions and problems, in particular, ethical, social, and political questions? We will investigate how some of the main schools of Hellenistic Greek thought came to be developed in Latin: Epicureanism (Lucretius), Academic Skepticism (Cicero), and Stoicism (Seneca). As we read we will investigate how each school offers different answers to crucial questions such as what is the goal of life? What is the highest good? Should one take part in politics or not? What is the nature of the soul? What is the nature of Nature itself? Is there an afterlife? Can we ever have a certain answer to any of these questions? 3 hrs. lect. EUR, PHL (C. Star)

PHIL/LNGT 0280 Logic and Formal Semantics (Fall 2014)
Using logical and mathematical tools, formal semantics answers the following questions: Why do sentences mean what they mean? How is reasoning possible? How does language structure our understanding of time, change, knowledge, morality, identity, and possibility? This course is well suited for students interested in computer science, linguistics, logic, mathematics, or philosophy. (PHIL 0180; pending instructor’s approval, PHIL 0180 may be taken contemporaneously with PHIL/LNGT 0280. Students who take these two courses simultaneously will meet for 6 total contact hours.) 2 hrs. lect./1 hr. disc. DED, PHL (K. Khalifa)

PHIL 0302 Philosophy of Plato (Spring 2015)
In this class, we will explore the significance, influence, and development of Plato's thought, paying special attention to the form of the dramatic dialogue and topics such as Platonic love, rhetoric and politics, learning and recollection, and the theory of forms. We will begin with the early period (dialogues such as the Meno and the Apology) focused on the historical figure of Socrates, continue to the middle period (Symposium, Republic), in which Plato develops his own distinctive views; and conclude with the later period (Philebus, Parmenides) in which Plato suggests a critique of Socrates and his own earlier positions. (Previous course in philosophy or waiver) EUR, PHL (M. Woodruff)

PHIL 0310 Moral Psychology (Spring 2015)
Moral psychology is the study of human behavior in the context of morality. How do we think about morality? How do we make moral judgments? How do we behave in moral situations? Answering these questions forces us to think deeply about the nature of our actions and the way we do and should evaluate them. In this course we will explore these questions and more. Specific topics covered may include altruism and egoism, moral judgment, moral responsibility, practical deliberation, intentional action, virtue and vice, character, and moral development. Readings will be drawn from both philosophy and psychology. 3 hrs. sem. PHL, SOC (L. Besser-Jones)

PHIL/HIST 0319 Readings in the Philosophy of History (Spring 2015)
Even before the appearance of Georg W. F. Hegel's classic study The Philosophy of History, a heated debate was being waged concerning the nature and substance of history. Is history, like science, expressible in predictable patterns or subject to irrevocable laws? What factors distinguish true history from the mere random succession of events? What should we assume to be the fundamental nature of historical truth, and are we to determine it objectively or subjectively? Is it possible to be human and yet be somehow "outside of" history? These are among the questions we will examine as we read and deliberate on a variety of philosophies of history, while concentrating on the most influential versions developed by Hegel and Karl Marx. 3 hrs. sem. CW (5 seats), EUR, HIS, PHL (D. Wyatt)

PHIL/RELI 0320 Seminar in Buddhist Philosophy: Yogacara Depth Psychology and Philosophy of Mind (Spring 2015)
In this seminar we will survey the basic ideas of Yogacara Buddhism (4-6th c. CE), one of two major schools of Indian Buddhism, in relation to cognitive science and philosophy of mind. We will examine these ideas historically, philosophically and comparatively. We focus on the Yogacara analyses of the largely unconscious ‘construction of reality’ and its systematic deconstruction through forms of analytic meditation. We will read primary and secondary texts on Indian Buddhism and texts espousing similar ideas in modern philosophy and the social and cognitive sciences. (one course on philosophy or RELI 0120, RELI 0220, RELI 0223, RELI 0224, RELI 0225, RELI 0226, RELI 0227or RELI 0228.) 3 hrs. sem. AAL, PHL (W. Waldron)

PHIL 0326 Biomedical Ethics (Fall 2014)
The field of biomedical ethics explores ethical issues pertaining to both the practice of medicine and the pursuit of biomedical research. In this course we will explore topics central to biomedical ethics at an advanced level. We will consider topics fundamental to the study of life and death, such as reproductive technologies, physician-assisted suicide, and euthanasia, as well as the micro- and macro- issues specific to medicine and biomedical research, such as consent, confidentiality, and paternalism, experimentation with human subjects, and resource allocation. (Previous philosophy course or waiver) 3 hrs. sem. PHL (L. Besser-Jones)

PHIL 0352 Philosophy of Mind (Spring 2015)
What is the nature of the mind, and how does it relate to the body and the physical world? Could computers ever think? Do animals have mental and emotional lives? This course will explore several of the major recent philosophical conceptions of the mind. A central focus will be on evaluating various attempts to explain the mind in purely physical terms, including the project of artificial intelligence (AI). Can these theories give us a complete understanding of the mind? Other key questions will include: What is the nature of thought, and how is it capable of representing the world? What is consciousness, and can it be explained physically? 3 hrs. lect./1 hr. disc. PHL (J. Spackman)

PHIL 0360 Consciousness (Fall 2014)
In this course we will focus on recent philosophical issues in the study of consciousness: What is the nature of our conscious subjective experience? What is the function of conscious states? Can we find neural correlates of consciousness, and if so, can consciousness simply be reduced to them? If not, how does consciousness relate to the physical? Is there something irreducible about the qualitative features of consciousness (qualia)? Could computers ever be conscious? Are animals conscious? We will consider such questions through the writings of contemporary philosophers and neuroscientists such as Dennett, Chalmers, Churchland, Nagel, Damasio, and Searle. (PHIL 0352 is strongly recommended but not required). 3 hrs. lect. PHL (J. Spackman)

PHIL/FREN 0389 Passion and Pain, Love and Lust: The World of the Senses in Early Modern France (Fall 2014)
In this course we will examine early modern theories of emotion—“passion,” “affect,” and “sentiment”—as they are discussed in philosophy and represented in fiction. Seventeenth and 18th-century philosophers and other thinkers confronted questions that continue to haunt contemporary thinking: What is “feeling”? Does language promote or frustrate the expression of emotion? How do the senses relate to other experiences like cognition, memory, and imagination? We will look at texts that transformed how we talk, think, and feel about “feeling.” Readings include short works by Gournay, Lafayette, Descartes, Élisabeth of Bohemia, Du Plaisir, Bernard, Leibniz, Condillac, Rousseau, Condorcet, and Diderot. (FREN 0221 or equivalent) 3 hrs. lect./disc. EUR, LIT, PHL (E. LaBrada)

PHIL 0408 Global Justice (Spring 2015)
In this course, we will investigate questions of justice that arise in global affairs. We will inquire into whether there are moral principles that constrain the actions of states and how these principles support a conception of global justice. Also, we will seek to understand what global responsibilities are entailed by global justice. Specific topics that will be considered include global distributive justice, world poverty, human rights, humanitarian intervention, and the relationship between global justice and nationalistic moral concerns. Authors will include Beitz, Nussbaum, O'Neill, Pogge, Rawls, Singer, Miller, and Walzer. 3 hrs. sem. PHL (S. Viner)

PHIL/GSFS 0434 Feminist Epistemologies (Fall 2014)
In recent years, feminist epistemologies, such as feminist standpoint theories and feminist empiricisms, have been extremely influential in developing social theories of knowledge. They have also served as a crucial intellectual tool for feminist theorists trying to understand the connections between social relations of gender and the production of knowledge and ignorance. In this course we will investigate some of the major themes and challenges of feminist epistemologies and feminist philosophies of science: How is knowledge socially situated? What does it mean to look at knowledge through a gendered lens? How is objective knowledge possible according to feminist epistemologies? We will work to understand the influence of feminist epistemologies in contemporary philosophy. We will also consider how feminist epistemologies have guided research on gendered and raced relations. (Approval required; Open to philosophy and GSFS senior and junior majors. GSFS majors must have previously taken GSFS 0320, or permission.) 3 hrs. sem. CMP, PHL (H. Grasswick)

PHIL 0500 Research in Philosophy (Fall 2014, Spring 2015)
Supervised independent research in philosophy. Approval required. (Staff)

PHIL 0700 Senior Thesis (Fall 2014, Spring 2015)
Approval required. (Staff)

Physical Education

Physical education is a degree requirement. The physical education program concentrates on lifetime sports, so that all students leave Middlebury College with exposure to sports or recreational activities in which they have developed a degree of skill and interest, which will be an asset to them in later years. Each course carries one unit of physical education credit.
     Before graduation, students must complete two different activities to receive the required two credits. Students are encouraged to complete the credits by the end of their fourth academic semester at Middlebury. In the case of transfer students, students are encouraged to complete the requirement by the end of their second semester at Middlebury. Students who have not completed their requirement by the second semester of their senior year will not be eligible to graduate.
     Students may use participation on varsity and junior varsity intercollegiate teams as a way of satisfying the physical education requirement. No more than one of the two physical education credits may be earned from participation in a single sport. Two-sport athletes may satisfy both physical education credits through participation on varsity and junior varsity intercollegiate teams.
     The Physical Education Department also recognizes participation in six clubs sports. The six club sports that can receive a physical education credit are rugby, crew, water polo, aikido, sailing, and cricket, which have a coach on site for practices and games. In order to receive a physical education credit, students must participate in one full season of crew, rugby, water polo, sailing, or cricket. Students in aikido must attend 20 classes per semester. Each of these club sports will equal one physical education credit.
     Students who wish to elect additional courses beyond those required for graduation may register with the department for the appropriate season and be scheduled for classes on a space-available basis. Some of the courses and activities follow:
     Certification Courses (textbook and related fee applicable): Lifeguard Training and First Aid/CPR.
     Fee Classes: alpine skiing, kickboxing, martial arts, massage, meditation, horseback riding, nordic skiing, spinning, and yoga. Various other classes may also be offered. Instructors outside of the College generally teach these courses. The fees and times are available during Banner web registration.
     Equipment Sports (students provide equipment): tennis.
     More Equipment Sports (department provides equipment): archery, badminton, fencing, golf, and squash.
     Conditioning Courses: resistance training, strength training, and swim for conditioning.
     Dance Courses (as available): varying levels of ballet, jazz, and modern dance (DANC 0160, DANC 0161, DANC 0162, DANC 0260, DANC 0261, DANC 0276, DANC 0360, DANC 0361, DANC 0380, DANC 0381).
     The department schedules two seasons of instructional courses in the fall and spring terms and one season in the winter term. Registration is on a first-come, first-served basis and is open to students electing courses on a space-available basis. Students unaware of their physical education record should check with the Registrar's Office to ensure completion of their program prior to graduation. Applications for transfer credit must be made in advance, following college procedure for academic credit transfer. The Registrar's Office processes credits from transcripts for students transferring to Middlebury.
     All requests for medical waivers must come from the student's physician. Injuries and illnesses suffered on campus will be considered as exceptions to the previous statement and will be handled by the College health center.

Season Dates (2014-2015)
Fall I: September 15 - October 17
Fall II: October 27 – December 5
Winter Term: January 5 - January 30
Spring I: February 16 - March 20
Spring II: March 30 - May 1

Physics

Physics is the fundamental science; it leads to our most basic understanding of the natural world and of human technological achievements. The physics program at Middlebury is designed to integrate physics into the liberal arts curriculum, as well as to provide challenging courses and research opportunities for students majoring in physics. Courses and student research activities in astronomy are also part of the physics program.
     Course offerings reflect the needs of three categories of students: (1) those majoring in physics; (2) those majoring in another science who need a basic introduction to physics and the analytical skills it provides; and (3) those majoring in areas outside the sciences, who seek to explore the concepts of physics with a minimum of mathematics.
     Courses designed especially for nonscience students are PHYS 0155 (Introduction to the Universe), PHYS 0101 (Physical Reality and Human Thought), PHYS 0104 (Chaos, Complexity, and Self-Organization), and first-year seminars. Students majoring in the sciences, and others who desire a more analytical approach to physics, usually take the two-semester introductory physics sequence PHYS 0109-0110, and PHYS 0111. In addition, they may elect more advanced courses at the 0200-level or above.
     Students in premedical and other preprofessional programs requiring two semesters of physics should take PHYS 0109 and PHYS 0110; other 0100-level physics courses are not acceptable. Such students are advised to take PHYS 0111 as well.
     For those majoring in physics, we offer a broad range of courses that emphasize a variety of topics in physics while building both theoretical understanding and experimental skills. Middlebury physics majors apply their education in a wide variety of careers. Some pursue graduate work in physics and related fields; others find their physics degrees valuable in engineering, medicine, business, law, teaching, government service, and other pursuits. The physics program is designed to serve the needs of both those intending advanced study in physics and those for whom formal work in physics will end with the Middlebury degree.
     The physics department encourages its majors to study abroad to gain experience at international research facilities, learn different national styles of scientific practice, improve language proficiency, and pursue academic interests outside of physics. One upper-level physics course taken abroad may be eligible for physics course credit upon approval of the department chair; students are strongly encouraged to obtain this approval before going abroad.
     Physics majors interested in obtaining high school physics teaching certification should notify the education studies program preferably no later than the middle of their sophomore year.
     Required for the Major in Physics: The major program consists of eight required physics courses: PHYS 0109, PHYS 0110, PHYS 0111, PHYS 0201, PHYS 0202, PHYS 0212, PHYS 0301, and PHYS 0321; a minimum of three PHYS electives; and a one-term senior project (PHYS 0704). To be eligible for departmental honors, a student must also complete either a semester of senior thesis (PHYS 0705) or one additional elective beyond those required.
     Electives must be chosen from physics courses at the 0200, 0300, or 0400 level, except that an upper-level physics course taken off campus or an advanced cognate course from another department at Middlebury may be used to satisfy one of the elective requirements. Acceptable cognate courses are CHEM 0351, CHEM 0355, CSCI 0202, and MATH 0335. Mathematics at least through the level of MATH 0122 is also required; this requirement may be satisfied either at Middlebury or through appropriate pre-college courses in calculus. Independent study courses such as PHYS 0500 may not be used for elective credit. In addition to the courses listed below, PHYS courses that satisfy the elective requirement are occasionally offered during the winter term.
     Prospective majors must begin the physics sequence no later than the sophomore year. Starting in the first year allows more flexibility in the choice of courses and senior work. Students planning graduate work in physics or a related subject should elect as many as possible of, PHYS 0302 (Electromagnetic Waves), PHYS 0330 (Analytical Mechanics), PHYS 0350 (Statistical Mechanics), and PHYS 0401 (Quantum Mechanics). In addition, MATH 0200 (Linear Algebra), MATH 0223 (Multivariable Calculus), and MATH 0225 (Topics in Linear Algebra and Differential Equations) are strongly recommended for those anticipating graduate study. Most physics majors will find computer programming skills through the level of CSCI 0201 extremely valuable.
     Senior Program: The senior project (PHYS 0704) involves a significant piece of experimental or theoretical research to be completed in the final year at Middlebury. Topics in recent years have included work in astrophysics, atomic and optical physics, biophysics, condensed matter physics, cosmology, environmental applications, laser spectroscopy, nuclear magnetic resonance, plasma physics, and quantum computing. Outstanding performance in PHYS 0704 may, with the permission of the advisor, allow continuation of the senior project as a senior thesis (PHYS 0705).
     Departmental Honors:A minimum grade average of B in physics courses is required of all honors candidates. To be eligible for departmental honors, a student must also complete either a semester of senior thesis (PHYS 0705) or one additional elective beyond those required. Honors in physics are awarded on the basis of excellent senior work combined with depth and excellence of coursework in physics. A student's overall accomplishments in the department, including teaching assistantships and leadership, are also considered in the awarding of honors.
     Beginning in Fall 2014, the Physics Department will no longer offer a minor.
Required for the Minor in Physics:
The minor in physics consists of at least six PHYS courses, at least three of which must be at the 0200 level or above, and at least four of which must be taken at Middlebury College.
     Pre-Engineering: Some students study physics with the intent of eventually doing engineering, either through a dual degree or in graduate school. Students who pursue a physics major en route to a 3-2 engineering degree (in which the Middlebury component is completed after the junior year) take the same eight-course sequence outlined above, with one elective chosen from physics courses at the 0200, 0300, or 0400 level; they also must complete a one-unit senior project (PHYS 0704). Four-year pre-engineering students (those who return to Middlebury for the senior year) take the normal physics major and choose electives in consultation with the pre-engineering advisor.
Advanced Placement: Students who seek advanced placement in physics should take the College Board AP examinations. Credit for PHYS 0109 is given to students who achieve a score of 4 or 5 on the Physics C: Mechanics examination, and credit for PHYS 0110 is given to students who achieve a score of 5 on the Physics C: Electricity and Magnetism examination. One AP credit is given to students who take the Physics B examination and achieve scores of 4 or 5, but such students are advised to begin their study of physics with PHYS 0109.

PHYS 0106 Physics for Educated Citizens (Spring 2015)
In this course for nonscience majors we will explore topics of current interest—climate change, energy resources, nuclear processes, radiation, satellite communication—and show how each is understood within the context of physics. Our resources will be a textbook, Physics and Technology for Future Presidents, and non-technical articles of your choosing. Our goals will be to develop a working knowledge of physics as it applies to important topics, to effectively communicate that knowledge through discussions and oral presentations, and to develop an understanding of how science is grounded in data and thoroughly intertwined with society. (Not open to students who have taken FYSE 1381). 3 hrs. lect./disc. DED, SCI (S. Watson)

PHYS 0109 Newtonian Physics (Fall 2014, Spring 2015)
This course examines motion as it occurs throughout the universe. Topics covered include inertia, force, Newton's laws of motion, work and energy, linear momentum, collisions, gravitation, rotational motion, torque, angular momentum, and oscillatory motion. Emphasis is on practical applications in physics, engineering, the life sciences, and everyday life. Laboratory work and lecture demonstrations illustrate basic physical principles. (MATH 0121 or MATH 0122 concurrent or prior; students who have taken high school calculus or other college calculus courses should consult with the instructor prior to registration) 3 hrs. lect./3 hrs. lab. DED, SCI (Fall 2014: S. Watson; Spring 2015: M. Durst)

PHYS 0110 Electricity and Magnetism (Fall 2014, Spring 2015)
The physical principles of electricity and magnetism are developed and applied to the electrical structure of matter and the electromagnetic nature of light. Practical topics from electricity and magnetism include voltage, current, resistance, capacitance, inductance, and AC and DC circuits. Laboratory work includes an introduction to electronics and to important instruments such as the oscilloscope. (PHYS 0109; MATH 0122 concurrent or prior) 3 hrs. lect./3 hrs. lab. DED, SCI (Fall 2014: N. Graham; Spring 2015: S. Ratcliff)

PHYS 0111 Thermodynamics, Fluids, Wave Motion, and Optics (Spring 2015)
This lecture and laboratory course covers concepts from classical physics that are not included in PHYS 0109 and PHYS 0110, and that serve as a bridge between those two courses. Topics include thermal properties of matter, thermodynamics, fluid mechanics, wave motion, sound, and geometrical and physical optics. This course is strongly recommended for all students otherwise required to take PHYS 0109 and PHYS 0110 as part of a major or a premedical program, and is required for physics majors. (PHYS 0109, MATH 0121, or equivalent) DED, SCI (J. Dunham)

PHYS 0155 An Introduction to the Universe (Fall 2014)
Our universe comprises billions of galaxies in a rapidly expanding fabric. How did it begin? Will it expand forever, or how may it end? How do the stars that compose the galaxies evolve from their births in clouds of gas, through the tranquility of middle age, to their often violent deaths? How can scientists even hope to answer such cosmic questions from our vantage point on a small planet, orbiting a very ordinary star? Are there other planets, orbiting other stars, where intelligent beings may be pondering similar issues? This introductory astronomy course, designed for nonscience majors, will explore these and other questions. Students will also become familiar with the night sky, both as part of our natural environment and as a scientific resource, through independent observations and sessions at the College Observatory. The approach requires no college-level mathematics, but students should expect to do quantitative calculations using scientific notation and occasionally to use elementary high-school algebra. (Students may not receive credit for both PHYS 0155 and PHYS 0165.) 3 hrs. lect./ hrs. lab./disc. DED, SCI (E. Glikman)

PHYS 0201 Relativity and Quantum Physics (Fall 2014)
This course probes a number of areas for which classical physics has provided no adequate explanations. Topics covered include Einstein's special relativity, quantization of atomic energy levels and photons, the atomic models of Rutherford and Bohr, and wave-particle duality. (PHYS 0109, PHYS 0110, MATH 0122) 3 hrs. lect. DED, SCI (S. Ratcliff)

PHYS 0202 Quantum Physics and Applications (Spring 2015)
This course introduces quantum theory and statistical mechanics, and explores the Heisenberg uncertainty principle, the Schrödinger wave equation, and wave mechanics. These techniques are then applied to atomic, molecular, nuclear, and elementary particle systems. (PHYS 0201; PHYS 0212 concurrent or prior) 3 hrs. lect. DED, SCI (E. Glikman)

PHYS 0212 Applied Mathematics for the Physical Sciences (Spring 2015)
This course concentrates on the methods of applied mathematics used for treating the partial differential equations that commonly arise in physics, chemistry, and engineering. Topics include differential vector calculus, Fourier series, and other orthogonal function sets. Emphasis will be given to physical applications of the mathematics. Both analytic and numerical methods are employed. This course is a prerequisite for all 0300- and 0400-level physics courses. (MATH 0122; PHYS 0110 concurrent or prior) 4.5 hrs. lect. DED (N. Graham)

PHYS 0221 Electronics for Scientists (Fall 2014)
An introduction to modern electronic circuits and devices, emphasizing both physical operation and practical use. Transistors and integrated circuits are considered in both analog and digital applications. Examples and laboratory experiments stress measurement and control applications in the physical and biological sciences. Students will gain hands-on familiarity with the design, use, and troubleshooting of electronic instrumentation. (PHYS 0110 or by waiver) 3 hrs. lect./3 hrs. lab. DED, SCI (R. Wolfson)

PHYS 0301 Intermediate Electromagnetism (Fall 2014)
The unified description of electricity and magnetism is one of the greatest triumphs of physics. This course provides a thorough grounding in the nature of electric and magnetic fields and their interaction with matter. Mathematical techniques appropriate to the solution of problems in electromagnetism are also introduced. The primary emphasis is on static fields, with the full time-dependent Maxwell equations and electromagnetic waves introduced in the final part of the course. (PHYS 0212) 3 hrs. lect. (M. Durst)

PHYS 0321 Experimental Techniques in Physics (Fall 2014)
This course will cover the design and execution of experiments, and the analysis and presentation of data, at an advanced level. Laboratory experiments will be chosen to illustrate the use of electronic, mechanical, and optical instruments to investigate fundamental physical phenomena, such as the properties of atoms and nuclei and the nature of radiation. Skills in computer-based data analysis and presentation will be developed and emphasized. This course satisfies the College writing requirement. (PHYS 0201 and PHYS 0202 and PHYS 0212; MATH 0200 recommended) 3 hrs. lect./3 hrs. lab. CW (J. Dunham)

PHYS 0340 Introduction to Solid State Physics (Spring 2015)
In this course, the properties of solids are shown to arise naturally from their atomic composition and their structure. Elementary quantum mechanics, electromagnetism, and statistical mechanics are invoked to explore fundamental properties of crystalline solids, including their classification as metals, insulators, semiconductors, and semimetals. Topics covered include crystal structure and diffraction; crystal vibrations; electrical and thermal conduction; and the response of solids to external electric and magnetic fields. (PHYS 0202 and PHYS 0212) 3 hrs. lect. (S. Watson)

PHYS 0370 Cosmology (Spring 2015)
Cosmology is the study of the Universe as a whole entity, including the origin, evolution, and ultimate fate of the entire Universe. In this course we will study the Big Bang, inflation, primordial nucleosynthesis, the cosmic microwave background, the formation of galaxies, and large-scale structure. The course will link observations to theory in order to address some of the current open questions in cosmology such as: what are the forms of matter and energy distributed in the Universe? What is the expansion rate of the Universe and how has it changed with time? What is the age of the Universe? What is the shape of the Universe? (PHYS 0201, PHYS 0202, and PHYS 0212) 3 hrs. lect. DED, SCI (E. Glikman)

PHYS 0401 Quantum Mechanics (Fall 2014)
A fundamental course in quantum mechanics aimed at understanding the mathematical structure of the theory and its application to physical phenomena at the atomic and nuclear levels. Topics include the basic postulates of quantum mechanics, operator formalism, Schrödinger equation, one-dimensional and central potentials, angular momentum and spin, perturbation theory, and systems of identical particles. (PHYS 0202 and PHYS 0212; MATH 0200 recommended) 3 hrs. lect. (N. Graham)

PHYS 0402 Advanced Quantum Mechanics (Spring 2015)
This course will emphasize realistic atomic and nuclear structure calculations using the techniques of perturbation theory and angular momentum coupling. A major goal is complete calculations of fine structure, hyperfine structure and the Lamb shift for the hydrogen atom in the presence of perturbing fields. The electromagnetic field is quantized and used to calculate transition rates and angular distributions for simple radiating systems. Nuclear magnetic resonance and blackbody radiation will receive extended treatment. (PHYS 0401) (J. Dunham)

PHYS 0500 Independent Study and Special Topics (Fall 2014, Spring 2015)
Approval required. (Staff)

PHYS 0704 Senior Project (Fall 2014, Spring 2015)
Independent research project culminating in both written and oral presentations. (N. Graham)

PHYS 0705 Senior Research and Thesis (Fall 2014, Spring 2015)
Independent research in the fall, winter, and spring terms culminating in a written thesis (two units total). Approval required. (Staff)

Political Science

Required for the Major in Political Science: A major must take ten regular political science courses. One of these ten must be an introductory course in the political theory subfield (PSCI 0101 or PSCI 0107). Two additional courses must be introductory courses in two of the three other subfields: American politics (PSCI 0102 or PSCI 0104); comparative politics (PSCI 0103); and international relations (PSCI 0109). These three required introductory courses should normally be completed before the end of the sophomore year. Among the ten total courses required for the major, the student must also fulfill the field distribution requirement, and complete the 0400-level seminar. At least seven of these ten courses, including the 0400-level seminar, must be taken at Middlebury College in Vermont. Students may count a maximum of one political science winter term course as one of the ten required courses for the major. Winter term courses may be used to fulfill the field distribution requirement.
     The Field Distribution Requirement: All regular fall and spring term political science courses are classified in one of the following four fields: Political Theory, American Politics, Comparative Politics, and International Relations and Foreign Policy. Students must take at least two courses in any three of these fields and one course in the fourth field.
     Senior Program: The senior program consists of a seminar of the major's choice. Each seminar includes advanced work appropriate to the field in which the seminar is offered. The seminars are the 0400-level courses offered by the department. Seminars are open to juniors and seniors. Normally, the senior program requirement must be completed by taking a seminar offered by a member of the Middlebury faculty. Work done in programs abroad, at other North American colleges and universities, or in the Washington Semester program will not count as the equivalent of a Middlebury seminar. IGST seminars co-taught by PSCI faculty cannot substitute for 0400-level PSCI seminars but will count as an elective towards the 10 required courses in PSCI.
     Departmental Honors:Students who elect to seek departmental honors write a thesis in the senior year. All students who plan to write a thesis are strongly encouraged to enroll in PSCI 0368 or PSCI 0347 before their senior year (and students writing a political theory thesis are encouraged to take a 0300-level theory course). Honors candidates should initiate the process by contacting their prospective faculty advisor during their junior year (including students who are abroad during their junior year). Candidates must submit an honors thesis proposal to their advisor prior to the term(s) in which the thesis is to be written. If the proposal is approved, the student may register for PSCI 0700 winter term thesis and PSCI 0700 for the spring term. After an oral examination of the completed thesis, honors are conferred or denied on the basis of (1) the level of the grade achieved on the thesis; and (2) the level of the average grade received in other fall and spring courses taken at Middlebury. Courses taken abroad do not count toward the grade point determination. Honors theses candidates will have a political science course average of at least 3.33 and a thesis grade of B+ or higher to attain honors; a political science course average of at least 3.50 and a thesis grade of A- or higher to attain high honors; and a political science course average of at least 3.67 and a thesis grade of A to attain highest honors. (For a full description of regulations, pick up a copy of Honors Theses Procedures and Regulations in Munroe 213 or check the PSCI web page at www.middlebury.edu/academics/ps/requirements/thesesproceduresandschedule.
     Independent Study: Students with demonstrated preparation and proficiency in the field may elect independent study projects (PSCI 0500). These projects are prepared under the supervision of a member or members of the department. The PSCI 0500 projects may not be substituted for the seminar requirement. The PSCI 0500 projects are reading and research courses; the department will not award PSCI 0500 credit for political experience such as congressional internships.
     Joint Majors: Students wishing to do a joint major in political science and another department or program of studies must take eight regular political science courses. One of these eight must be an introductory course in the political theory subfield (PSCI 0101 or PSCI 0107). Two additional courses must be introductory courses in two of the three other subfields: American politics (PSCI 0102 or PSCI 0104); comparative politics (PSCI 0103); and international relations (PSCI 0109). These three required introductory courses should normally be completed before the end of the sophomore year. Among the eight total courses required for the major, the student must also take at least two courses in any two of the four fields of political science and one course in the third and fourth fields and complete a 0400-level seminar. Students must also give evidence of having used the training in both majors, usually in a seminar paper, but sometimes in an independent project or thesis. At least five courses including the 0400-level seminar must be taken at Middlebury College in Vermont. Students may count a maximum of one political science winter term course as one of the eight required courses for the joint major. Winter term courses may be used to fulfill the field distribution requirement. Joint majors do not qualify for honors in political science. (Double majors are eligible.)
     International Politics and Economics Major: The IPE major allows students to combine the study of politics, economics, and languages, linking these disciplines with an appropriate experience abroad. Students wishing to pursue this major should refer to International Politics and Economics in both the General Catalog and the on-line catalog.
     International and Global Studies Major: To specialize in political science within the IGST major, students must take: PSCI 0103 or PSCI 0109; one course from PSCI 0101, PSCI 0102, PSCI 0104, PSCI 0107; four other courses from either the comparative politics or international relations and foreign policy categories, including one 0400-level seminar taken at Middlebury College in Vermont. IGST seminars co-taught by PSCI faculty cannot substitute for 0400-level PSCI seminars, but will count towards the six required courses in political science. In addition, it is highly recommended that IGST thesis candidates enroll in PSCI 0368 or PSCI 0347 before their senior year.
     Minors in Political Science: The minor in political science will consist of five regular fall or spring term courses taken at Middlebury College, which must come from at least two of the four fields in the department. At least one of the courses must be at the 0300-level or above. The five course requirement will not be reduced by AP credits.
     Advanced Placement: A score of 4 or 5 on the College Board Advanced Placement Examination in American politics will entitle the student to exemption from PSCI 0104; such a score may satisfy the requirement of one course in the American politics field. A score of 4 to 5 on the College Board Advanced Placement Examination in comparative politics will entitle the student to exemption from PSCI 0103; such a score may satisfy the requirement of one course in the comparative politics field. While supplying two college credits, advanced placement in both American politics and comparative politics will only count as one of the ten courses required for the political science major. Students will also receive only one distribution credit for AP courses, and notwithstanding the distribution credit, all students must take at least one course in each subfield.

PSCI 0101 Introduction to Political Philosophy (Fall 2014, Spring 2015)
What is politics? What is the purpose of politics? Is there a best regime? Is it attainable? What is justice? What is the good life? How is each related to political life? Is there a science of politics? In this course, we will raise these and other fundamental questions through a study of major ancient and modern works of political philosophy. Authors may include Plato, Aristotle, Augustine, Machiavelli, Hobbes, Locke, Montesquieu, Rousseau, Constant, Tocqueville, Mill, Marx, and Nietzsche. 3 hrs. lect./disc. (Political Theory) EUR, PHL, SOC (Fall 2014: M. Driy; Spring 2015: K. Callanan)

PSCI 0102 The American Political Regime (Spring 2015)
This is a course in American political and constitutional thought. The theme, taken from de Tocqueville's Democracy in America, is the problem of freedom. The first half covers the American founding up through the Civil War and the "refounding." This includes de Tocqueville, Madison's Notes on the Debates in the Federal Convention, the Federalist-Anti-Federalist ratification debate, Supreme Court decisions (Marbury, McCulloch), writings of Jefferson, Calhoun, and Lincoln. The second half considers basic problems in American politics, such as race, gender, foreign policy, and education. Readings include a novel, de Tocqueville, and Supreme Court decisions (Brown, Frontiero, Roe, Casey, Grutter, Lawrence). 4 hrs. lect./disc. (American Politics) NOR, SOC (M. Dry)

PSCI 0103 Introduction to Comparative Politics (Fall 2014, Spring 2015)
This course offers an introduction to the comparative study of political systems and to the logic of comparative inquiry. How are different political systems created and organized? How and why do they change? Why are some democratic and others authoritarian? Why are some rich and others poor? Other topics covered in this course include nationalism and political ideologies, forms of representation, the relationship between state institutions and civil society, and globalization. The goal in this course is to use comparative methods to analyze questions of state institutions -- how they arise, change, and generate different economic, social, and political outcome. 3 hrs. lect./disc. (Comparative Politics) CMP, SOC (Fall 2014: S. Gumuscu, Staff; Spring 2015: J. Teets)

PSCI 0104 Introduction to American Politics (Fall 2014, Spring 2015)
This course introduces the institutions and practices of American government and politics. The aim is to give students a firm understanding of the workings of and the balance of power among the American Congress, President, bureaucracy, and court system. We begin with the Constitution, which provides the set of founding principles upon which the American government is based. We then look at how American citizens make decisions about politics. Finally, we examine how political institutions, interest groups, parties, elections, and legislative bodies and rules aggregate diverse, often conflicting preferences and how they resolve or exacerbate problems. 3 hrs. lect./disc. (American Politics) NOR, SOC (Fall 2014: B. Johnson; Spring 2015:  M. Dickinson)

PSCI 0109 International Politics (Fall 2014, Spring 2015)
What causes conflict or cooperation among states? What can states and other international entities do to preserve global peace? These are among the issues addressed by the study of international politics. This course examines the forces that shape relations among states, and between states and international regimes. Key concepts include: the international system, power and the balance of power, international institutions, foreign policy, diplomacy, deterrence, war, and global economic issues. Both the fall and spring sections of this course emphasize rigorous analysis and set theoretical concepts against historical and contemporary case studies. 3 hrs. lect./disc. (International Relations and Foreign Policy) CMP, SOC (Fall 2014:  A. Dean; Spring 2015: K. Fuentes-George)

PSCI 0208 The Politics of the U.S. Congress (Fall 2014)
Introduces students to the analysis of Congress and congressional policy-making. Considers how congressional elections, institutions, and policy hang together roughly in equilibrium. Focuses on the internal organization of Congress-committees, parties, House and Senate leadership, rules and norms, and congressional staff. Analyzes the power of Congress relative to the president, the bureaucracy, and the courts, specifically in the policy process. Investigates how unified and divided party control of the government affects legislation in the House and Senate. Finally, applies congressional theories to determine the fates of specific policy proposals in Congress. (PSCI 0102 or PSCI 0104 or waiver) 3 hrs. lect./disc. (American Politics) NOR (M. Dickinson)

PSCI/ENVS 0211 Conservation and Environmental Policy (Fall 2014)
This course examines conservation and environmental policy in the United States. In order to better understand the current nature of the conservation and environmental policy process, we will begin by tracing the development of past ideas, institutions, and policies related to this policy arena. We will then focus on contemporary conservation and environmental politics and policy making—gridlock in Congress, interest group pressure, the role of the courts and the president, and a move away from national policy making—toward the states, collaboration, and civil society. 3 hrs. lect./disc. (American Politics) NOR, SOC (C. Klyza)

PSCI 0214 International Environmental Politics (Fall 2014)
What happens when the global economy outgrows the earth's ecosystem? This course surveys the consequences of the collision between the expanding world economy and the earth's natural limits: shrinking forests, falling water tables, eroding soils, collapsing fisheries, rising temperatures, and disappearing species. We will examine how countries with different circumstances and priorities attempt to work together to stop global environmental pollution and resource depletion. 3 hrs. lect./disc. (International Relations and Foreign Policy) CMP, SOC (K. George)

PSCI 0215 Federalism, State and Local Politics (Spring 2015)
What are the unique political opportunities and constraints facing state and local governments? How have these changed over time? In this course we examine the relationships between different levels of government in the U.S. federal system, considering the particular tasks and dilemmas facing states and cities, and scrutinizing the complex interactions between governments that characterize federalism in the United States. Topics include local political culture, intergovernmental grants, state parties, and state political economy. Vermont, New York, and California will receive special scrutiny. (PSCI 0102 or PSCI 0104 or by waiver) 3 hrs. lect./disc. (American Politics) NOR, SOC (B. Johnson)

PSCI 0217 Politics of the Middle East and North Africa (Spring 2015)
This course is an introduction to important themes, concepts, and cases in the study of Middle Eastern and North African politics.  We will examine key political issues in the region, focusing primarily on developments since World War II and issues of relevance to the region today.  For the purposes of this course, the region is defined as the countries of the Arab world, Israel, Turkey, and Iran.  The first half of the course introduces major themes in Middle Eastern politics.  These include state development, nationalism, revolution, authoritarian rule, the petro-state, the Arab-Israeli conflict, conflicts in the Persian Gulf, civil conflict, the rise of Islamism, and attempts at liberal reform.  The second half of the course examines how these themes have affected political development in a number of key cases.  Primary cases include Egypt, Israel, Iran, Morocco, Turkey, Saudi Arabia, and Iraq.  Students will have the opportunity to individually assess other countries of personal interest in the region.  3 hrs. lect./disc. (Comparative Politics) AAL, SOC (S. Gumuscu)

PSCI 0221 Contemporary Chinese Politics (Spring 2015)
This introductory course provides students with a background on major political events in modern China beginning with the end of the Qing dynasty, and then investigates the major political issues in China today-—civil society activity, problems and benefits associated with deepening economic liberalization, and discourse from within the CCP on political reform. This course focuses first on economic reform issues, such as income inequality, the floating population, and changes in the socialist welfare model, and then on political reform issues, such as the liberalization of news media, NGO and civil society activity, protest and social movements, environmental protection, and legal reform. Course readings range from selections by Marx and Lenin to recent works in political science and sociology on the transformation of state and society under Communist Party rule. 3 hrs. lect./disc. (Comparative Politics) AAL, SOC (J. Teets)

PSCI 0227 Soviet and Russian Politics (Spring 2015)
This course seeks to introduce the student to a major phenomenon of 20th century politics, the rise and decline of the Soviet Union and the emergence of Russia as its successor state. The first part of the course provides an overview of key factors that influenced Russian and Soviet politics under communism, including history, economy, ideology, institutions of the communist party, and the role of political leadership from Lenin to Gorbachev. The second part surveys radical political and social transformations in the 1990s and analyzes Russia's struggle with the twin challenges of democratic and market reform under Yeltsin and Putin. 3 hrs. lect./disc. (Comparative Politics) EUR, HIS, SOC (M. Kraus)

PSCI 0228 Central and East European Politics (Fall 2014)
This introductory course surveys the key stages in the political development of East and Central Europe in the 20th century, including the imposition of communist rule, crises of de-Stalinization, the revolutions of 1989, the politics of post-communist transitions, the Balkan wars, and democratization. It focuses on those factors that either promote or impede the development of stable democratic regimes and assesses East Europe's prospects in the context of EU enlargement and NATO expansion. 3 hrs. lect./disc. (Comparative Politics) EUR, HIS, SOC (M. Kraus)

PSCI 0234 Religion & Politics: Ancient & Modern (Fall 2014)
What role should religion play in politics? And what is the proper role of the state in regulating religion? Is religious conviction a precondition of or threat to healthy civic life? Why should regimes prefer religious toleration to religious uniformity? In this course we will examine these and other questions at the intersection of religion and politics in the western political tradition, affording special attention to early modern debates over the separation of church and state, toleration, and civil religion. Authors will include Plato, Emperor Julian, Augustine, Machiavelli, Luther, Calvin, Bayle, Hobbes, Locke, Montesquieu, Rousseau, Lessing, and Tocqueville. (Political Theory) EUR, PHL, SOC (K. Callanan)

PSCI 0242 International Politics and WMD (Spring 2015)
In this course we will examine the international ramifications of nuclear, biological, and chemical weapons use. What is a weapon of mass destruction (WMD)? How have WMD changed the way states behave toward international conflicts and within international crises? How has the development of these weapons influenced the policies states have adopted in response? Beyond these questions, major course themes include the threats of proliferation and the highs and lows of weapons reduction initiatives. This course includes a required field trip to the Middlebury in DC offices during spring break. 3 hrs. lect./disc. (International Relations and Foreign Policy) SOC (A. Yuen)

PSCI/IGST 0251 Identity and Conflict in South Asia (Spring 2015)
In this course we will examine political development and conflict in South Asia through the concept of identity. South Asians take on a variety of identities -- ethnic, religious, linguistic, caste, national, etc. These identities often form the basis of political mobilization and both inter- and intrastate conflict. We will study the general concept of identity, including how identities are constructed and used, and then specific manifestations in South Asia. We will also examine the question of whether these identities were constructed during colonial or post-colonial times, or have an earlier basis. AAL, SOC (J. Lunstead)

PSCI 0258 The Politics of International Humanitarian Action (Spring 2015)
Humanitarian intervention has emerged as a new moral imperative that challenges traditional concepts and practices in international relations. In this course we will consider how a range of actors--international organizations, states, NGOs--understand the concept of humanitarian intervention and engage (or not) in humanitarian actions. We will examine a variety of policy choices, including aid and military intervention, through case studies, including Somalia, Kosovo, and Rwanda. The goal of the course is to enable students to assess critically the benefits and challenges of a humanitarian approach to global politics. 3 hrs. lect./disc. (International Relations and Foreign Policy) AAL, CMP, SOC (S. Stroup)

PSCI 0260 The Political Economy of Drug Trafficking (Fall 2014, Spring 2015)
This course examines the political economy of drug trafficking in the Western Hemisphere. How have transnational drug markets evolved, and why? What effects has narco-trafficking had on the political, economic, legal, financial, and social systems of producer, consumer, and transshipment countries? What policy responses are available to combat it? How should we weigh alternative policy options? Examination of these issues centers on source countries in Latin America's Andean region, the chief transshipment country (Mexico), and the principal consumer country (the US). Attention also is devoted to the drug trade's effects on American society and criminal justice system. 3 hrs. lect./disc. (International Relations and Foreign Policy) AAL, CMP, CW, SOC (Fall 2014: M. Williams; Spring 2015:  M. Williams)

PSCI 0280 The Politics of Policy Innovation (Fall 2014)
Why do policymakers engage in policy innovation and experimentation? In this course we will explore the incentive structure facing policymakers to understand why they create new policies even if the outcome of experimentation is uncertain and perhaps risky. We will examine case studies from around the world, including countries at different levels of development and different regime types, to understand the conditions under which policymakers innovate. Finally, in this course, we will analyze the effectiveness of policy innovation and experimentation in generating positive outcomes such as economic growth and social welfare. 3 hrs. lect.  (Comparative Politics) CMP, SOC (J. Teets)

PSCI 0292 Political Communication (Fall 2014)
How are media and communications technology re-shaping politics? From a global comparative perspective—ranging from the United States to the Middle East and to Asia—this course will survey the historical development of communications, the role of media in shaping public opinion and behavior, the impact of new media, and the rise of transnational satellite TV. Conceptually, the course will assess the importance of communications for understanding authoritarianism, democracy, and foreign policy. We will develop general comparative frameworks for understanding the growing importance of communications in the information age, while clarifying the limitations of media for shaping polities. (This course is not open to students who have taken PSCI 0413) 3 hrs. lect. (Comparative Politics) AAL, CMP, SOC (O. Lewis)

PSCI 0303 U.S.-Latin American Relations (Fall 2014)
This course examines American foreign policy toward Latin America. Grounded in international relations theory, it chronicles the expansion of U.S. power in the nineteenth century, the interwar period, the Cold War, and the current era of continental economic integration. To ensure rigorous analysis the course sets theoretical concepts against specific case studies. Topics include the Inter-American System, specific doctrines (Monroe Doctrine, Roosevelt Corollary), specific policies (Good Neighbor Policy, Alliance for Progress), and milestone events in U.S.-Latin American relations, including the Cuban missile crisis, Falkland Islands War, and North American Free Trade Agreement. 3 hrs. lect./disc. (International Relations and Foreign Policy) CMP, SOC (M. Williams)

PSCI 0304 International Political Economy (Fall 2014, Spring 2015)
This course examines the politics of global economic relations, focusing principally on the advanced industrial states. How do governments and firms deal with the forces of globalization and interdependence? And what are the causes and consequences of their actions for the international system in turn? The course exposes students to both classic and contemporary thinking on free trade and protectionism, exchange rates and monetary systems, foreign direct investment and capital movements, regional integration, and the role of international institutions like the WTO. Readings will be drawn mainly from political science, as well as law and economics. (PSCI 0109) 3 hrs. lect./disc.
(International Relations and Foreign Policy) SOC (Fall 2014:  A. Dean; Spring 2015: S. Stroup)

PSCI 0306 American Constitutional Law: Individual Rights (Fall 2014)
This course focuses on the Supreme Court's interpretation of the first amendment freedoms of speech, press, and religion, and, to a lesser extent, the rights of the accused, as reflected in amendments four through eight. It includes consideration of philosophic arguments regarding speech and religion (Mill, Locke), the framing of the original bill of rights, and the constitutional history of free speech in America (Levy). Sullivan and Gunther's Constitutional Law is the text; written work includes three or four essays, a mock court exercise, and a final exam. (Sophomores, juniors, and seniors with PSCI 0102 or PSCI 0104 or PSCI 0205 or PSCI 0206 or PSCI 0305 or waiver) 4.5 hrs. lect./disc. (American Politics)/ CW (5 spaces), NOR, PHL (M. Dry)

PSCI 0307 The Politics of Virtual Realities (Spring 2015)
How has technology changed our politics? Are those changes all for the good? In this course we will explore the political, legal, and normative implications of the Internet for liberal democracy. We start with the US Constitution and explore arguments that it cannot by itself prevent the Internet from becoming a domain of manipulation rather than of freedom. How can we uphold the ideals of liberty and equality? And, since cyberspace has no country, whose laws should govern it? Cases will include President Obama's campaign and governance strategies, Google's activities abroad, cybersecurity, virtual war, and the WikiLeaks controversy. 3 hrs. lect./disc. (International Relations and Foreign Policy) CW, SOC (A. Stanger)

PSCI 0308 U. S. National Elections (Fall 2014)
In this course we will analyze  national elections in the United States. Topics covered will include party systems, electoral realignment, voting behavior and turnout, candidate strategy, the nomination process, the legal framework for elections, the Electoral College, gender, race and ethnicity, the media, the Internet, and U.S. elections in comparative perspective. Although the focus will be on the upcoming congressional and presidential contests, earlier elections will be studied for insight into continuity and change in American electoral politics. 3 hrs. lect./disc. (American Politics) NOR, SOC (M. Dickinson)

PSCI 0310 American Public Policy (Spring 2015)
This course examines the functioning of the entire United States political system, with an emphasis on the policies or outcomes of this political system. The first part of the course will examine the context in which policy is made (e.g., history, capitalism, liberalism). The second part of the course will focus on the policy-making process. We will examine the major stages of the policy process: agenda setting, policy formulation, adoption, implementation, and evaluation. The third and final part of the course will focus on specific policy areas, such as education policy and health care policy. 3 hrs. lect./disc. (American Politics) NOR, SOC (C. Klyza)

PSCI 0311 American Foreign Policy (Fall 2014)
Does America exercise its power in the world in a distinctive way? If yes, has it always done so? In this course we will examine the evolution of American foreign policy from the time of the founding to the present. As we make our way from the height of the Cold War to the 21st century, we will assess how leaders, institutions, domestic politics, and the actions and inactions of other countries have shaped American international behavior. Topics considered include terrorism, nuclear proliferation, globalization, democracy promotion, whether the rich US has an obligation to help the less fortunate, how much power the Pentagon should have, what role the private sector can and should play in advancing American interests, and the Bush revolution in foreign policy. A central aim of the course is to map competing perspectives so that the student can draw his or her own political conclusions. 3 hrs. lect./disc. (International Relations and Foreign Policy) NOR, SOC (A. Stanger)

PSCI 0318 Modern Political Philosophy (Spring 2015)
In this course. we will study: Machiavelli (Prince, Discourses); Bacon (Advancement of Learning); Hobbes (Leviathan); Locke (Second Treatise); Spinoza (Theological-Political Treatise); Montesquieu (Spirit of the Laws); Rousseau (Social Contract); Burke (Reflections); Kant (Foundations of the Metaphysics of Morals, Perpetual Peace); Hegel (Introduction to Philosophy of History); Marx (Communist Manifesto, German Ideology, Capital); Nietzsche (Beyond Good and Evil); Heidegger (Question Concerning Technology). We will examine modernity's rejection of ancient thought, its later replacement of nature by history as the standard for right, and its subsequent rejection of any standard of right. Other topics include religion, freedom of speech, and the separation of powers. (PSCI 0101 or PSCI 0107 or PSCI 0317, or PSCI 0333, or waiver) 4.5 hrs. lect./disc. (Political Theory/ EUR, PHL, SOC (M. Dry)

PSCI 0322 War and Peace (Spring 2015)
What causes conflicts between states and within countries? What factors facilitate or impede their resolution? In this course we will examine interstate and intrastate conflicts and the challenges faced in resolving them, from both practical and theoretical perspectives. Employing some of the most prominent theories on war, and more recent theories of bargaining, negotiation, and conflict, we will draw upon a range of case studies to illustrate and evaluate the theoretical dynamics of conflict and conflict resolution. (PSCI 0109 or PSCI 0201 or by waiver) 3 hrs. lect./disc. (International Relations and Foreign Policy) SOC (A. Yuen)

PSCI 0324 The Political Development of Western Europe (Spring 2015)
In what ways are the political systems and politics of France, Germany, Italy, and Britain similar? In what ways do they differ? How might we explain these patterns? This course attempts to answer these questions through comparative investigation of the processes and consequences of economic and political modernization in these nations from the feudal period to the 21st century. 3 hrs. lect./disc. (Comparative Politics) CMP, CW, EUR, SOC (A. Stanger)

PSCI 0330 Comparative Development Strategies (Fall 2014)
Why have some countries developed more rapidly than others? What do we mean by "development?" How can governments help or hinder development prospects? These broad questions are addressed by analyzing the development experiences of Asian, Latin American, and African countries. The course focuses particularly on what governments have done to try to accelerate the development process. To gain a historical perspective, the course begins with a brief consideration of the experiences of the now "developed" countries, followed by an examination of how difference countries have confronted the dilemmas of development of the 20th century. 3 hrs. lect./disc. (Comparative Politics) CMP, SOC (J. Teets)

PSCI 0335 Latin American Revolutions (Spring 2015)
This course examines the causes, goals, and outcomes of revolutions in twentieth-century Latin America, with special reference to Mexico, Cuba, Venezuela, Chile, and Nicaragua. It seeks to understand (1) why this region has experienced multiple revolutions; (2) what their political, economic, or social impact has been; (3) why revolutions produced authoritarian, socialist, dictatorial, or democratic outcomes across countries; and (4) what factors have kept revolutionaries from achieving their political, social, or economic goals. Evaluation entails rigorous application of theory to in-depth case studies. 3 hrs. lect./disc. (Comparative Politics) AAL, SOC (M. Williams)

PSCI 0340 Order & Organization (Fall 2014)
“International Order and Organization: Theories and Practice”*
In this course we will study the organization of global politics in the 20th century and beyond. Using both "secondary" and "primary" perspectives, we will evaluate some of the key mechanisms by which international relations are supposed to have been ordered—international institutions (like the World Bank), international organizations (like the United Nations), and international norms (like human rights). Students will develop greater knowledge of the evolution of the international system and refine their tools for analyzing international organization. (PSCI 0109 or PSCI 0311 or waiver) 3 hrs. sem. (International Relations and Foreign Policy) 3 hrs. sem. CMP, SOC (S. Stroup)

PSCI 0349 International Politics of the Middle East (Spring 2015)
In this course we will study the evolution of the inter-state system in the Middle East. Using contemporary International Relations (IR) theories we will examine the influence of great powers, regional states, transnational movements, and regional organizations on state interests, ideology, religion, and the region's political economy. Questions to be addressed will include: which levels of analyses are most helpful in understanding the complexity of Middle East politics? Which of the IR theories--realist, liberal, or constructivist-- best explain inter-state relations in the region? What other approaches may be useful in this endeavor? 3 hrs. sem. (International Relations and Foreign Policy) AAL, SOC (S. Gumuscu)

PSCI 0368 Frontiers in Political Science Research (Fall 2014)
Nothing is more controversial among political scientists than the topic of how to study politics. In this course, we consider a variety of advanced techniques for studying political phenomena, including statistical methods, game theory, institutional analysis, case study techniques, experiments, and agent-based modeling. We will work with concrete examples (drawn from major political science journals) of how scholars have used these techniques, and consider the ongoing philosophical controversies associated with each approach. Students will have the opportunity to conduct original research using a method and subject of their choosing. (Two political science courses) 3 hrs. lect./disc. (Political Theory) DED, SOC (B. Johnson)

PSCI/GSFS 0372 Gender and International Relations (Spring 2015)
Many issues facing international society affect, and are affected by, gender.  Global poverty, for example, is gendered, since 70% of the world's population living below $1.25 per day is female. Women are far more vulnerable to rape in war and water scarcity, and they are moreover globally politically underrepresented.  In this course we will use theories of international relations, including realism, neoliberalism, and feminism, to study how international society addresses (or fails to address) these challenges through bodies such as the UN and treaties such as the Elimination of Violence Against Women. 3 hrs. lect./disc. (International Relations and Foreign Policy) CMP, SOC (K. George)

PSCI 0392 Insurgency and Security Policy (Spring 2015)
In the post-Cold War era insurgency is the predominant form of conflict and now tops the list of major security concerns.  Understanding the origins and tactics of insurgency in cases around the world in comparative perspective allows students to develop nuanced analyses of how security strategy should be improved to combat emergent non-state threats.  How have insurgent tactics evolved in response to changing military, political, technological, and geographical conditions? What are the implications for international intervention and homeland security policy?  This course brings Middlebury and Monterey students together in pursuit of this broad policy objective. Note: To align the Middlebury and MIIS schedules, Middlebury students will need to begin their coursework prior to their return to campus for the spring semester. 4 hrs. lect./disc. CMP, SOC (O. Lewis)

PSCI 0421 American Environmental Politics (Spring 2015)
In this seminar we will examine various aspects of environmental politics in the United States. Topics to be covered include how society seeks to influence environmental policy (through public opinion, voting and interest groups,) and how policy is made through Congress, the executive branch, the courts, collaboration, and through the states. Policy case studies will vary from year to year.  Students will write a major research paper on an aspect of U.S. environmental politics. (PSCI/ENVS 0211; open to PSCI/ESEP majors, others by approval) 3 hrs. sem. (American Politics) (C. Klyza) 

PSCI 0425 The American Presidency (Spring 2015)
In-depth examination of the exercise of presidential leadership from a normative and empirical perspective. What are the sources of presidential power, the constraints on its use, and the implications for the American political system? The focus is on the leadership strategies of the modern presidents (FDR through Obama). (PSCI 0102 or PSCI 0104 or PSCI 0206 or waiver) 3 hrs. sem. (American Politics) (M. Dickinson)

PSCI 0438 Political Islam (Fall 2014)
In this course we will survey the central questions in studies of political Islam, focusing on the emergence of Islam as a political force in the contemporary period. Discussion will center on the following core topics: (1) the nature of political Islam and Islamic interests; (2) how Islamic political movements develop; (3) why Islamic political movements flourish or fail; (4) how Islamic interests are expressed in the political arena; and (5) what types of political systems are most compatible with politicized Islam? These questions will be addressed by looking at the general history of the contemporary Islamic resurgence and by examining case studies on Egypt, Algeria, Iran, Afghanistan, Turkey, West Africa, and Southeast Asia. 3 hrs. sem. (Comparative Politics) AAL (S. Gumuscu)

PSCI 0452 Ecocriticism and Global Environmental Justice (Spring 2015)
Many global environmental problems—climate change, biodiversity, deforestation, clean water, and transboundary waste movement—are ineffectively managed. In this course we will take a critical look at these failures and ask: do existing norms and attitudes make effective, sustainable environmental management more difficult? In doing so, we will examine institutions and phenomena such as the sovereign nation-state, free market capitalism, and the authority of scientific knowledge. We will ask whether sustainable management is compatible with these institutions and phenomena, or whether they contribute to environmental injustice, racism, political marginalization, and gender and class inequity by studying contemporary and historic examples. 3 hrs. sem. (International Relations and Foreign Policy) (K. Fuentes-George)

PSCI 0454 Leadership, Politics and Personality (Spring 2015)
What difference do leaders make?  Are leaders born or made?  What accounts for effective leadership?  Do answers to these questions change when the social, cultural, and political context varies?  This course will approach the subject of leadership from a multidisciplinary perspective, focusing on (1) individual personalities and values of leaders; (2) the relationship of leaders to the institutions they serve; (3) the role of the state and cultural context in which the leadership is exercised; and (4) the process of leading.  (One course in comparative politics) 3 hrs. sem. (Comparative Politics) (M. Kraus)

PSCI 0455 Political Economy of International Trade (Spring 2015)
In this course we will examine the political economy of international trade with a focus on economic development and globalization. Emphasis will be placed on the distributional consequences of trade policy, as well as the relationship between trade, international organizations, and international law. Readings will explore the role of international trade in the history of industrialization, theories of development, and contemporary concerns regarding labor rights, the environment, and public health. Students will be encouraged to investigate both new and recurrent distributional issues related to economic growth. The course will assume knowledge of some basic concepts from economics and political science, but no prerequisite coursework is required. 3 hrs. sem. (International Relations and Foreign Policy) CMP, SOC (A. Dean)

PSCI 0462 Empire and Political Theory (Spring 2015)
In this course, we will examine empire as an idea and a political form. Drawing upon works by major political theorists, we will pose a range of questions raised by the phenomenon of empire. What is empire? Why does it arise? Does it find root in some element of human nature or the nature of political communities? Can empire be justified? Can democratic and liberal regimes be imperialistic? If so, are they inherently so? What about the US or the EU? Authors will include Herodotus, Plutarch, Machiavelli, Montesquieu, Vitoria, Locke, Burke, Mill, Tocqueville, and Hobson. (PSCI 0101 or PSCI 0107) 3 hrs. sem. (Political Theory) EUR, HIS, PHL (K. Callanan)

PSCI 0482 Private and Public Governance in an Era of Globalization (Fall 2014)
Although the study of international affairs has traditionally focused on states, other actors play important roles in governance. Working alongside the public sector, private actors bring innovative approaches and substantial resources to social problems, but effective collaboration between public and private actors remains elusive. In this seminar we will examine general theories of private and public governance, followed by specific discussion of issues such as economic development, environmental protection, and public health. This course is equivalent to IGST 0482. (International Relations) CMP, SOC (C. MacCormack, S. Stroup)

PSCI 0483 The Rise of Asia and US Policy (Fall 2014)
In this course we will study what is arguably the most important strategic development of the 21st century: how the rise of Asia presents security challenges to the region and the United States. Drawing from international relations scholarship, the course will focus on foreign policy challenges and potential responses. These challenges include both traditional security and nontraditional areas such as water and the environment. We will integrate the analysis of these issues in South, East, and Southeast Asia with study of the policy process, in part through simulations and role-playing exercises. This course is equivalent to IGST 0483. 3 hrs. sem. (Comparative Politics) AAL, CMP, SOC (O. Lewis, J. Lunstead)

PSCI 0484 The Political Economy of Regionalism (Fall 2014)
In this course we will address the political economy of regionalism in a variety of national and regional contexts. We will consider both integration projects—such as the European Union and South America’s Mercosur—as well as subnational local autonomy movements, such as those in Catalonia and Scotland. We will study theories of integration as well as case studies from Europe, Latin America, Asia, and Africa, focusing on the political and economic forces driving both integration and disintegration in their historical and contemporary contexts. We will also consider how globalization affects regional integration projects. (Comparative Politics) 3 hrs. sem. AAL, CMP, SOC (J. Cason)

PSCI 0500 Independent Projects (Fall 2014, Spring 2015)
A program of independent work designed to meet the individual needs of advanced students. Approval required. (Staff)

PSCI 0700 Honors Thesis (Fall 2014, Spring 2015)
Approval required. (Staff)

Psychology

The Department of Psychology at Middlebury College has a strong commitment to the scientific study of human mental processes, emotions, and behavior. In keeping with this philosophy, the department offers a broad range of courses that provides students with the opportunity to learn about basic research and its applications in a variety of areas, including social, cognitive, behavioral, cultural, clinical, environmental, biological, and developmental psychology.
Requirements for the Major in Psychology: The psychology major consists of a minimum of 11 courses in five categories: (I) Foundation courses, (II) Area core courses, (III) Electives, (IV) Labs, and (V) Advanced seminars and senior work.
I. Foundation courses: The foundation courses provide an overview of the field and provide students with the background and skills necessary to understand psychology as an empirical science. The required foundation courses are Introduction to Psychology (PSYC 0105) and the Statistics/Research Methods sequence (PSYC 0201 and PSYC 0202). Students are expected to complete the Statistics/Research Methods sequence by the end of their sophomore year, and no later than the end of their junior year.
II. Area core courses: Area core courses ensure that students have a broad understanding of various subfields within the discipline. Students are strongly encouraged to complete area core courses no later than the end of junior year. All students must take three area core courses, at least one in each of the two main areas of the curriculum.
Area 1 Biopsychology, Cognitive, and Physiological Psychology: PSYC 0301, PSYC 0302, PSYC 0303, and PSYC 0305.
Area 2 Clinical, Developmental, Personality, and Social Psychology: PSYC 0203, PSYC 0204, PSYC 0224, and PSYC 0216 or PSYC 0225.
III. Electives: Students choose three additional courses from any level of the psychology curriculum, including winter term. PSYC 0350, PSYC 0500, or PSYC 0700 can be used as one of the elective requirements. (PSYC 0701, 0702, and 0703 do not satisfy the elective requirement.)
IV. Labs: All students must take at least one course with a lab section in addition to Psychological Statistics and Research Methods in Psychology. This lab course also may fulfill another course requirement simultaneously (e.g., an area core or elective course). Lab courses are designated as such in the course descriptions. For 2014-15, these are PSYC 0301 and 0305.
V. Advanced seminars and senior work: Advanced seminars and senior work in psychology emphasize the synthesis and integration of theory and research. Each student must take two seminars (0400-level courses) in psychology; these may be taken during junior and senior years. Students who meet the department requirements also may apply to the department to complete a senior honors thesis in psychology, which requires students to apply their skills and knowledge to the completion of a year-long empirical research project. Students who complete an honors thesis in psychology can count PSYC 0703 for one of their two advanced seminar requirements. (See description below.)
Departmental Honors in Psychology: Students who seek to graduate with departmental honors should consult with a faculty member no later than their junior year to actively begin planning their research. Students intending to complete honors work are expected to submit a Thesis Intent Form by the stated deadline (early to mid-March) of their junior year. The psychology thesis requires three semesters (including Winter Term) of independent research. During the fall term of their senior year, candidates will enroll in PSYC 0701. During the winter and spring terms, after meeting the special requirements listed in the course description and being accepted into honors candidacy, they will enroll in PSYC 0702 and PSYC 0703, respectively. A minimum GPA of 3.5 in psychology department courses is required for admission to honors candidacy. Students who complete an honors thesis in psychology can count PSYC 0703 for one of their two advanced seminar requirements.
VI. Independent Research in Psychology or Optional Independent Work: Students may take Directed Research (PSYC 0350) or Advanced Research (PSYC 0500) under the supervision of a faculty member. Students need permission from a faculty member prior to enrollment in these courses. Students cannot take more than one independent research course in psychology per semester. PSYC 0350, PSYC 0500, or PSYC 0700 can be used to fulfill one elective requirement.
Requirements for the Minor in Psychology: Five psychology courses, including the following: (1) PSYC 0105; (2) two core courses from among PSYC 0201, PSYC 0202, PSYC 0203, PSYC 0204, PSYC 0224, PSYC 0225 (or PSYC 0216), PSYC 0301, PSYC 0302, PSYC 0303, PSYC 0305, (3) two electives (any fall, spring, or winter term PSYC courses; one of which can be PSYC 0350, PSYC 0500, or PSYC 0700).
Advanced Placement: Students can bypass PSYC 0105 and move directly to a higher-level course if they earned a Psychology AP Examination score of 4 or 5; or earned a score of 6 or 7 on the IB (International Baccalaureate) Higher Level psychology exam, or achieved a passing grade on the PSYC Department Placement Exam. Students with lower AP/IB scores, or who took the IB standard Level psychology exam, or who have done previous psychology course work may choose to take the placement exam.  A passing score on the placement exam means that students may enroll in courses that list PSYC 0105 as a pre-requisite, but it does not provide course credit toward graduation or other College requirements. Credit for PSYC 0105 is given to students who achieve a score of 4 or 5 on the Psychology AP Examination. Credit for PSYC 0201 is given to students who achieve a score of 4 or 5 on the Statistics AP Examination.

Major in Neuroscience: See Neuroscience Program listing for a description of this major.
Major in Environmental Studies with a focus in Psychology: See the Environmental Studies Program listing for a description of this major.
Joint Major in Psychology and Sociology: The Departments of Psychology and Sociology/Anthropology no longer offer a Joint Major in Psychology and Sociology (as of 2011-12).
Education Studies Minor with a Psychology Major:
Up to two of the Psychology courses required for the Education Studies minors may also be counted towards the Psychology major.
Restrictions Concerning the Transfer of Courses in Fulfillment of the Psychology Major: Effective fall 2007, students may transfer no more than two psychology courses while enrolled as a full time student at Middlebury. Students wishing to obtain approval to transfer more than two courses must petition the department in advance.

PSYC 0105 Introduction to Psychology (Fall 2014, Spring 2015)
This course will provide a general introduction to the field of psychology. The most central and important theories, concepts, findings, controversies, and applications in the following areas will be considered: biological bases of behavior, learning, perception, thinking, development, personality, psychological disorders, and social behavior. (Open to Juniors and Seniors by waiver only) 3 hrs. lect./1 hr. disc. SOC (Fall 2014: J. Arndt, K. Cronise, C. Vélez-Blasini; Spring 2015: M. Collaer, M. Kimble, C. Parker)

PSYC 0106 Introduction to Psychology for Juniors and Seniors (Spring 2015)
This course will provide a general introduction to the field of psychology. The most central and important theories, concepts, findings, controversies, and applications in the following areas will be considered: biological bases of behavior, learning, perception, thinking, development, personality, psychological disorders, and social behavior. This course fulfills the requirement for psychology coursework for premedical students; it does not satisfy the PSYC 0105 requirement for psychology majors or minors. First year and sophomore pre-medical students should enroll in PSYC 0105. (Open to Juniors and Seniors; First-Year Students and Sophomores by waiver only) 3 hrs. lect. SOC (A. DiBianca)

PSYC 0201 Psychological Statistics (Fall 2014, Spring 2015)
This course will examine statistical methods used in the behavioral and biological sciences. Students will learn the logic underlying statistical analysis, focusing primarily on inferential techniques. They also will become familiar with the application and interpretation of statistics in psychological empirical research, including the use of computer software for conducting and interpreting statistical analyses. (PSYC 0105; Fall: open to psychology and neuroscience majors and undeclared majors, others by waiver; Spring: open to psychology and neuroscience majors; others by waiver. Not open to students who have taken MATH 0116 or ECON 0210) 3 hrs. lect./1.5 hr. lab DED (Fall 2014: M. Collaer, M. Dash; Spring 2015: S. Gurland, C. Parker)

PSYC 0202 Research Methods in Psychology (Fall 2014, Spring 2015)
This course will provide students with an understanding of the research methodology used by psychologists. Students will learn to read psychological studies and other related research as informed consumers. Students will collect, analyze, and interpret data during lab assignments. They will also design an empirical study, review the related literature, and write a formal APA-style research proposal. (PSYC 0105 and PSYC 0201 or MATH 0116 or ECON 0210; not open to first-year students; open to psychology and neuroscience majors) 3 hrs. lect./1.5 hr. lab CW, DED (Fall 2014: M. Kimble, R. Moeller; Spring 2015: B. Hofer)

PSYC 0203 Social Psychology (Fall 2014, Spring 2015)
Social psychology is the study of how social situations affect the thoughts, feelings, and behaviors of individuals. This course will provide an overview of social psychological theory and research findings, as well as reviewing the ways in which these findings are applied to the study of issues such as aggression, close relationships, prejudice, and altruism. Students will also learn about the research methods that social psychologists use to test their theories. (PSYC 0105; open to seniors by waiver only) 3 hrs. lect. SOC (C. Vélez-Blasini)

PSYC/RELI 0209 Religion and Science: Mindfulness and Modern Psychology (Spring 2015)
Mindfulness meditation is now widely embraced as a way to enhance personal wellbeing. To better understand this ancient practice, we will explore its traditional Buddhist background alongside its application and study in modern psychology and neuroscience. We will first study mindfulness in its historical context and examine how a traditionally religious practice was adapted for modern individualistic and therapeutic purposes. We will learn basic neural and psychological foundations of emotion, cognition, social behavior, and psychological disorders and raise theoretical and methodological issues in the scientific study of mindfulness. As an experiential component, students will also receive meditation training throughout the semester.    3 hrs. lect./1 hr. disc. (W. Waldron, K. Cronise)

PSYC 0216 Adolescence (Fall 2014)
This course is designed to provide an overview of adolescent development, including the biological, cognitive, and social transitions of individuals during this period of life. Development also takes place in context, and we will pay particular attention to the role of family, peer group, school, work, and culture. Students will read research literature, as well as cases, in order to examine the central psychological issues of this developmental period, including identity, autonomy, intimacy, sexuality, and achievement. (PSYC 0105; open to seniors by waiver only) 3 hrs. lect./1 hr. disc. SOC (B. Hofer)

PSYC 0224 Psychological Disorders (Fall 2014, Spring 2015)
What makes an individual “abnormal”? Under what circumstances do mental health professionals classify emotions, thoughts, or behaviors as “disordered”? In this course, we will explore these questions with attention to their historical, theoretical, ethical, and diagnostic implications. We will investigate various classes of disorders, like anxiety, mood, and psychotic disorders, with a focus on their causes and treatments. Throughout, we will aim to appreciate the complexities and uncertainties surrounding diagnosis, and to recognize and challenge common assumptions about psychological disorders. In addition to lecture, the course will include discussions of current and controversial topics, and occasional demonstrations, analysis of clinical case material, and/or role plays. (PSYC 0105; open to seniors by waiver only) 3 hrs. lect./1 hr. disc. SOC (Fall 2014: M. Kimble; Spring 2015: L. Basili)

PSYC 0225 Child Development (Spring 2015)
In this course, we will examine the nature of developmental change from the prenatal period through middle childhood. Our critical examination of developmental processes will invite us to consider various theoretical perspectives (e.g., learning, cognitive, biological, contextual) across various domains of development (i.e., physical, social-emotional, and cognitive). We will address major themes in developmental psychology, such as the interrelatedness of development across domains, the contributions of nature and nurture, and the relative continuity versus discontinuity of developmental change. Throughout, we will practice applying developmental principles to practical settings, policy issues, and topics of current interest. (PSYC 0105; open to seniors by waiver only) 3 hrs. lect./1 hr. disc. SOC (R. Moeller)

PSYC 0233 Environmental Psychology (Spring 2015)
This course will provide an introduction to environmental psychology. We will discuss the relevance of psychology to understanding and addressing environmental problems as well as the potential for the natural environment to serve as a protective factor in our own psychological health. In particular, we will focus on using psychological theory to encourage conservation behavior. We will strive to understand not only the relevant psychological theories and empirical findings, but also the practical implications of the research. (PSYC 0105 or by approval; or ENVS 0112, or ENVS 0211, or ENVS 0215; open to seniors by waiver only) 3 hrs. lect. SOC (M. McCauley)

PSYC/NSCI 0301 Physiological Psychology (Fall 2014, Spring 2015)
This course concerns the biological basis of human behavior. The course will consider the neurochemical, neuroanatomical, and neurophysiological bases of processes such as language, sensation, emotion, aggression, sleep, learning, and memory. In the laboratory the student will conduct experiments using standard (surgical, anatomical, biochemical, behavioral) techniques to investigate central nervous system function. (PSYC 0105 or any biology course; not open to first-year students; open to psychology and neuroscience majors; others by waiver) 3 hrs. lect./3 hrs. lab. SCI (Fall 2014: C. Parker; Spring 2015: K. Cronise, M. Dash)

PSYC/NSCI 0303 Sensation and Perception (Fall 2014)
Remarkably, using just five basic senses, our brains translate simple external stimuli (e.g. light and sound waves) into unique and vivid perceptual experiences enabling us to interact with our surrounding physical reality. Focusing primarily on the underlying mechanisms of vision and audition, we will explore how our brains construct detailed representations of our world. Throughout these explorations, we will identify perceptual limitations and investigate how mental processes such as attention and emotion affect our perceptions. We will review recent scientific articles and conduct experiments. (PSYC 0105 or any BIOL course; not open to first year students; open to psychology and neuroscience majors; others by waiver) 3 hrs. lect./1 hr. disc. SCI (M. Dash)

PSYC/NSCI 0305 Cognitive Psychology (Spring 2015)
Questions about the nature of the mind, thinking, and knowledge have a long and rich history in the field of psychology. This course will examine the theoretical perspectives and empirically documented phenomena that inform our current understanding of cognition. Lectures, discussions, demonstrations, and experiments will form the basis for our explorations of cognition in this class. Topics to be considered include attention, perception, memory, knowledge, problem solving, and decision making. (PSYC 0105; PSYC 0201 or MATH 0116 or ECON 0210 previously or concurrently; PSYC 0202 recommended; not open to first-year students; open to psychology and neuroscience majors; others by waiver) 3 hrs. lect./1.5 hrs. lab. SCI (J. Arndt)

PSYC/NSCI 0309 Psychopharmacology (Fall 2014)
This course will examine ways in which drugs act on the brain to influence behavior. Students will learn the basics of brain function, will learn basic properties of drug action, and will learn how legal and illegal drugs, including drugs used to treat psychological disorders, alter the brain function and behavior of humans and experimental animals. (PSYC 0301 or BIOL 0370; not open to first-year students; open to psychology and neuroscience majors; others by waiver) 3 hrs. lect. SCI (M. Collaer)

PSYC 0314 Psychology of Morality (Spring 2015)
The psychological study of morality has existed for nearly a century, but recently there has been a renewed and lively interest in this area. Questions that were raised by early psychologists continue to be central, such as the relationship between morality and society, reasoning and emotions, judgment and action, and universality and diversity. In this course we will address these questions through our exploration of such topics as moral judgment and justification, moral emotions, moral development, moral identity, moral psychopathology, and empathy. Course readings will be comprised solely of empirical and theoretical primary sources, drawn largely from psychology. By the end of the semester, students should be able to understand methodological and theoretical issues in the scientific study of morality, develop a reflective perspective on social and personal attitudes using the lens of moral psychology, and be able to discuss these ideas with a general audience. (Two psychology courses; not open to first-year students) 3 hrs. lect. SOC (A. DiBianca)

PSYC 0320 Social and Emotional Development (Fall 2014)
In this course students will explore current research and theory on the interrelated development of social and emotional domains from infancy through young adulthood. Families and peers serve as the primary relationships for children’s and adolescents’ socialization, and these will be examined to understand how such relationships influence emotion regulation, adaptation to stressful life events, and intrapersonal conflicts. Emphasis will be placed on the role of context and culture in the formation of social and emotional competencies and experiences. We will explore the theory and practice of Social Emotional Learning (SEL) curricula to enhance individuals’ social and emotional skills. (PSYC 0105; PSYC 0216 or PSYC 0225; not open to first year students; open to Psychology majors, others by waiver). 3 hrs. lect. SOC (R. Moeller)

PSYC 0327 Educational Psychology (Spring 2015)
The goal of this course is to introduce students to a psychological understanding of teaching and learning through an overview of principles, issues, and related research in educational psychology. The course will examine theories of learning, complex cognitive processes, cognitive and emotional development, motivation, and the application of these constructs to effective instruction, the design of optimum learning environments, assessment of student learning, and teaching in diverse classrooms. (PSYC 0105 and PSYC 0216 or PSYC 0225; not open to first-year students; open to psychology majors, and to education studies minors by waiver) 3 hrs. lect. SOC (B. Hofer)

PSYC 0350 Directed Research in Psychology (Fall 2014, Spring 2015)
Directed research provides opportunities for advanced students to become familiar with and participate in ongoing research projects under the direction of a faculty member. The student will first read background literature on the content area to be investigated and experimental methodologies to be used. Procedures involved in conducting psychological research will then be learned through firsthand experience. Potential activities include the design of research and the defining of conceptual variables and the gathering, analyzing, and interpretation of data. Finally, students will learn how to write technical articles in psychology by preparing a paper describing the project, using APA style. (Approval required; not open to first-year students) 3 hrs. lect. (Staff)

PSYC 0406 Psychological Trauma (Spring 2015)
Current evidence indicates that we have a 50/50 chance of being exposed to a psychologically-traumatizing event during our lifetime. This seminar explores psychological trauma from social, psychological, and biological perspectives. The course will cover the antecedents and consequences of trauma, past and present treatment approaches, and current controversies in the field (i.e., repressed memory, false disability claims). We will consider examples from literature, case studies, and current journal articles Assessment will be based on participation, presentation, and written work. (PSYC 0105; open to junior and senior psychology majors; neuroscience majors by waiver) 3 hrs. sem. (M. Kimble)

PSYC 0415 Psychology and Emerging Technology (Fall 2014)
New media and technology, such as smart phones and social media, are changing how we think, relate, connect, learn, and work. In this course we will examine what recent psychological literature tells us about the pros and cons of our wired world. We will review research on the use of cell phones, social media, video games, and the internet, and look at topics such as attention, addiction, cyber-bullying, learning, brain and mind, and relationships with friends and family. In this course we will draw on multiple areas of psychology, including social, developmental, cognitive, educational, and neuroscience, and will undertake critical analysis and understanding of research in a new field. Students will also conduct empirical research on related topics of their choice. (Open to junior and senior psychology majors, others by approval) 3 hr. sem. SOC (B. Hofer)

PSYC 0416 Environmental Problems and Human Behavior (Fall 2014)
Eco-psychologists believe there is a synergistic relation between our personal well-being and that of the earth. Viewed through this lens, damaging the eco-system is self-destructive behavior. In this course we will examine: (1) the state of the environment, (2) what motivates people to engage in pro-environmental behaviors (or not), and (3) the extent to which our views of self and happiness relate to our attitudes and beliefs about nature and the environment. In order to examine these issues we will investigate psychology's role in consumerism, community, and pro-environmental behaviors such as recycling. By the end of the semester we should be able to offer, based on the psychological research, suggestions for changes we can make as individuals, and as a society, to help protect the environment. (Any three psychology, neuroscience, or environmental studies courses; open to junior and senior psychology, neuroscience, and environmental studies majors; open to education studies minors by waiver; others by waiver) (Not open to students who have taken PSYC 0401). 3 hrs. sem. (M. McCauley)

PSYC/NSCI 0430 Memory: A User's Guide (Spring 2015)
How can I remember names better? How can I best study for an exam? How accurate are our memories? A deep understanding of how people remember will allow us to answer these and many other questions. Topics covered in this course include working memory, the nature of encoding and retrieval, applied aspects of remembering, and neuroscientific approaches to understanding memory. Readings will be a mixture of textbook and journal articles. The class will have a seminar format, with emphasis on student-led discussions and contributions. Additionally, student research groups will design and execute a research study examining human memory. Evaluations will be based on the research project, student-led discussions, and reaction papers. (PSYC 0201; open to junior and senior psychology and neuroscience majors only) 3 hrs. sem. (J. Arndt)

PSYC/NSCI 0434 Genes, Brain, and Behavior (Fall 2014)
What we experience—and how we experience it—is influenced by our unique combination of genes. For better or worse, the gene variants we inherit from our parents contribute to our predispositions to psychological disorders, our personalities, and even the way in which we perceive the world around us. To be clear, anything that you can do or think is in some way influenced by your genes. However, this statement comes with a large caveat: except in the case of (relatively) rare single gene mutations, your genes do not determine but rather contribute to who you are. Working within the field of behavior genetics, we will cover topics such as social behavior, obesity, sexual promiscuity, drug abuse, language, and anxiety. (PSYC/NSCI 0301 or BIOL/NSCI 0370; Open to junior and senior psychology or neuroscience majors only, others by approval) 3 hrs. sem. SCI (C. Parker)

PSYC 0440 Health Psychology (Spring 2015)
In this course we will explore contributions of psychological research and theory to the treatment, management, and prevention of illness, as well as the promotion of health. Students will consider how the psychological study of health has led to new insights of mind-body connections. We will primarily focus on health issues in the United States, but we will also explore health in a global context. Course readings and activities will focus on such topics as HIV/AIDS, obesity, stress management, and health promotion behaviors. Students will choose a health promotion topic that will be pursued in greater detail throughout the course, and present their work in class. (Open to junior and senior psychology majors, others by approval) 3 hr. sem. SOC (R. Moeller)

PSYC 0500 Advanced Research (Fall 2014, Spring 2015)
A program of research arranged to meet the needs of advanced students majoring in psychology. (Approval required) (Staff)

PSYC 0700 Senior Research (Fall 2014, Spring 2015)
A program of research arranged to meet the needs of advanced senior majors in psychology. (PSYC 0201 and PSYC 0202; Approval required) (Staff)

PSYC 0701 Senior Thesis Proposal (Fall 2014, Spring 2015)
Students hoping to be considered as candidates for departmental honors must enroll in PSYC 0701 under the sponsorship of a department faculty member and submit a formal, written research proposal to the department by 5 p.m. on the Wednesday during the final week of fall classes in their senior year. If the proposal is approved, the student will enroll in PSYC 0702 during the winter term and PSYC 0703 during the spring term of their senior year. (Feb graduates should consult with their advisors about the appropriate semester in which to begin a thesis.) (PSYC 0201 and PSYC 0202; Approval required) (Staff)

PSYC 0702 Senior Thesis Second Semester (Fall 2014, Spring 2015)
Students whose honors thesis proposal (PSYC 0701) has been approved will collect, analyze, and interpret their data. This is the second semester of the 3-semester senior thesis. (PSYC 0201, PSYC 0202, and PSYC 0701; Approval required) (Staff)

PSYC 0703 Senior Thesis (Fall 2014, Spring 2015)
This is the third and final semester of the senior thesis. Students will finish analyzing, and interpreting their data. This process culminates in a written thesis to be submitted by 4 p.m. on the Monday BEFORE the final week of spring classes, a presentation, and an oral defense. The decision about awarding departmental honors will be made after the student submits the thesis. (PSYC 0201, PSYC 0202, and PSYC 0702; Approval required) (Staff)

Religion

Requirements for the major (11 courses): (For students declaring a Religion Major beginning with the Spring 2011 semester) The Religion major allows students to concentrate in particular Traditions (Buddhism, Christianity, Hinduism, Islam, or Judaism) and/or Areas (American Religion or Ethics). The major will consist of at least eleven courses, including no more than one winter term course, distributed as follows:

  • a primary concentration of four courses in a specific Tradition or Area. These courses will include a 0100-level course and a 0300-level seminar that focus in that tradition/area.
  • a secondary concentration of three courses in a specific Tradition or Area. These courses will include a 0100-level course and a 0300-level seminar that focus in that tradition/area.
  • Two electives.
  • RELI 0400, Seminar on the Study of Religion
  • a Senior Project or Thesis (RELI 0700/0701). Normally senior work will relate to the majors primary concentration of study.

Important Notes:
(1) Majors must take at least one course in Western Traditions (Christianity, Judaism, or Islam) and one course in Asian Religions (e.g., Hinduism, Buddhism, Taoism). These courses may be used toward the primary or secondary concentration, or they may be electives.
(2) At least one of the two concentrations in a Religion major must focus on a Tradition. The other may focus on a second Tradition or an Area.
     Students should consult closely with faculty advisors to determine which courses in the department satisfy a given concentration. The chair of the department, in consultation with the students advisor, will determine how transfer credits and courses taken during study abroad will be applied toward departmental requirements.
     Joint major: Please note: the chair of the department must approve each joint major proposal.
For the Religion component of a joint major, a student will complete seven courses:

  • A primary concentration of four courses in one Tradition or Area. These courses will include a 0100-level course and a 0300-level seminar that focus in that tradition/area.
  • A secondary concentration of two courses in another Tradition or Area
  • RELI 0400

     In addition, the student will complete a Senior Project or Thesis that utilizes the expertise of both majors.
     Religion Minor: The Religion minor will consist of at least five courses, three of which will focus in a single Tradition or Area. One of the courses in the focus must be a 0300-level seminar.
     The Minor in Jewish Studies: Refer to Jewish Studies for description, or if searching the online catalog, please refer to Interdisciplinary Programs.
     The Minor in Hebrew: Refer to Hebrew in the Course Catalog for description, or if searching the on-line catalog, please refer to Interdisciplinary Programs.
     Departmental Honors: Graduation with departmental honors requires at least a B+ in courses counted toward the major. Students who meet this threshold and receive an A- or A on their senior project will be awarded Honors. Students who meet the course grade threshold and write a thesis will be eligible for Honors if the thesis grade is at least a B+, and High Honors if the thesis grade is an A- or A. Highest Honors will be reserved for students who earn at least an A- in courses counted toward the major and an A on the thesis.
Courses are keyed as follows:

AR = American Religions
AT = Asian Traditions
ET = Ethics
ST = Sacred Texts
WT = Western Traditions

RELI 0120 Asian Religious Classics AT (Fall 2014)
An introduction to the classics of the major religious traditions of Asia: Taoism, Confucianism, Buddhism, and Hinduism. Central themes from these traditions will be studied through the selected scriptures and texts of each tradition. 3 hrs. lect./1 hr. disc. AAL, CMP, PHL (E. Morrison, W. Waldron)

RELI 0130 The Christian Tradition WT (Fall 2014)
An introduction to the ecclesiastical and theological development of Christianity. The course will begin with the formation of doctrine in the first five centuries. Attention will then be given to the development of Roman Catholicism, the Reformation, and the rise of Protestantism. The latter part of the course will deal with the changes that have occurred in the post-Enlightenment period and end with some contemporary issues. 2 hrs. lect./1 hr. disc. EUR, PHL (E. Gebarowski-Shafer)

RELI 0140 Hindu Traditions of India AT (Fall 2014)
In this course we will identify and examine key themes and issues in the study of Hindu religious traditions in India, beginning with the defining of the terms Hinduism, religions, and religious. We will primarily focus on the ways Hindu religious traditions—texts, narratives, and practices—are performed, received, and experienced in India. Essential aspects of Hindu religious traditions will be examined, including: key concepts (darsan, dharma, karma and caste), key texts (the Bhagavad Gita and the Ramayana), and major religious deities (Shiva, Devi and Vishnu). The course will also cover contemporary Hindu-Muslim encounters, and the emerging shape of Hinduism in the American diaspora. 2 hrs. lect./1 hr. disc. AAL, PHL (Staff)

RELI 0150 Introduction to Islam WT (Fall 2014)
What is Islam? Is it a religion, a way of life, a civilization, or a political ideology? Was Muhammad a political leader, a warrior, or an ascetic? What is the Qur’an? How did it develop as a sacred text and how does it compare to the Bible? This course is designed to provide a platform for us to explore such questions by focusing on historical, social, and intellectual developments in the wide swath of land known as the Muslim world. Special attention will be given to early developments of the Islamic community as well as the later response of different Muslim communities to modernity. 2 hrs. lect./1 hr. disc AAL, PHL (A. Anzali)

RELI 0161 The Making of Modern Jewish Life (Spring 2015)
Jewish life in the 21st century is radically transformed from a century ago. We will explore these transformations through the thinkers, movements, and events that have shaped Jewish life in our day: the emergence of religious denominations in Europe and North America (Reform, Conservative, Orthodox, Reconstructionist), the revival of Kabbalah in our times, the Holocaust as a crisis in religious thought, the eruption of Zionism and founding of the State of Israel, the transformations brought about by the changing role of women, and finally, post-denominationalism and "the un-Jewish Jew." 3 hrs. lect. PHL (R. Schine)

RELI 0165 Cultures of the Jews (Fall 2014)
Judaism is more than a religion, but how? We will seek to answer this question by studying Jewish life as a global phenomenon encompassing varieties in custom, gender roles, family and communal structure, language, music, literature, and art. We will range across the major divisions of Jewish culture in Europe (Ashkenazic and Sephardic), to Jewish life in the Middle East, and follow the diffusion of these cultures as far as China and India. Readings include translations from a variety of languages (Hebrew, Yiddish, and Ladino), and genres including memoir, ethnography, poetry, philosophy, and scripture. 3 hrs. lec.t/disc. CMP,  CW (5 spaces), PHL (R. Schine)

RELI/HIST 0170 Religion in America AR (Fall 2014)
America often has been defined paradoxically as both the "most religious" and "least religious" of nations. This course, a historical survey of American religious life, will trace the unique story of American religion from colonial times to the present. Guiding our exploration will be the ideas of "contact," "conflict," and "combination." Along the way, we will examine the varieties of religious experiences and traditions that have shaped and been shaped by American culture such as, Native American traditions, Puritan life and thought, evangelicalism, immigration, African-American religious experience, women's movements, and the on-going challenges of religious diversity. Readings include sermons, essays, diaries and fiction, as well as secondary source material. 2 hrs. lect./1 hr. disc. HIS, NOR, PHL (E. Rochford)

RELI/ENAM 0180 An Introduction to Biblical Literature (I) (Spring 2015)
This course is a general introduction to biblical history, literature, and interpretation. It aims to acquaint students with the major characters, narratives, and poetry of the Jewish and Christian scriptures, with special emphasis on the ways scripture has been used and interpreted in Western culture. Students interested in more detailed analysis of the material should enroll in RELI 0280 and RELI 0281. 3 hrs. lect./1 hr. disc. LIT, PHL (L. Yarbrough)

RELI 0190 Ethics and Abrahamic Religion ET, WT (Spring 2015)
Ethics is the study of the values and convictions by which individuals and communities determine what is right, wrong, good, and bad. For many, religion is a lens through which to understand those moral values. In this course we will explore the varied contributions that Christianity, Judaism, and Islam have made to debates over issues like violence, sex, the environment, human rights, and social justice. In the process of understanding these traditions and their impact on global moral discourse, students also will develop skills in ethical reasoning through class discussion and from the perspective of their own worldviews. 3 hrs. lect., 1 hr. disc. CW, PHL (J. Davis)

RELI/PSYC 0209 Religion and Science: Mindfulness and Modern Psychology (Spring 2015)
Mindfulness meditation is now widely embraced as a way to enhance personal wellbeing. To better understand this ancient practice, we will explore its traditional Buddhist background alongside its application and study in modern psychology and neuroscience. We will first study mindfulness in its historical context and examine how a traditionally religious practice was adapted for modern individualistic and therapeutic purposes. We will learn basic neural and psychological foundations of emotion, cognition, social behavior, and psychological disorders and raise theoretical and methodological issues in the scientific study of mindfulness. As an experiential component, students will also receive meditation training throughout the semester.    3 hrs. lect./1 hr. disc. (W. Waldron, K. Cronise)

RELI 0225 Chinese Religions AT (Spring 2015)
An introduction to the rich religious history of China, with an emphasis on primary sources. Topics will include: the ideas and practices of ancient China, the teachings of Confucius and early Taoist (Daoist) thinkers, the introduction of Buddhism to China and its adaptation to Chinese culture, the complex interaction of Buddhism with the Confucian and Taoist traditions, the role of the state in religion, the "popular" Chinese religion of local gods and festivals, and the religious scene in modern Taiwan and mainland China. 3 hrs. lect. AAL, PHL (E. Morrison)

RELI/JAPN 0228 Japanese Religions AT (Spring 2015)
We will begin our study of Japanese religions with the ancient mythology that forms the basis of Shinto (the way of the kami, or gods). We will then consider the introduction of Buddhism, Confucianism, and Daoism to Japan and examine how these traditions were accepted, absorbed, and adapted. We will also investigate Japanese reactions to Christianity in the 16th century and the appearance of "new" Japanese religions starting in the 19th century. Throughout, we will ask how and why Japanese have both adhered to tradition and been open to new religions. 3 hrs. lect. AAL, PHL (E. Morrison)

RELI/PHIL 0232 Philosophy of Religion (Spring 2015)
In the first part of this course we will focus on philosophical reflections on the existence of God, the relation between religion and morality, the existence of evil, arguments for and against religious belief, and religious experience. We will read texts by Pascal, Hume, Kant, Kierkegaard, William James, and Freud. In the second part we will focus on the place of religion in society, considering what it means to live in a secular society, the relation between secularism and modernity, and the resulting modern forms of religious experience and practice. 3 hrs. lect. CW, PHL (J. Spackman)

RELI 0237 Christianity in Early Modern Europe WT (Spring 2015)
In this course we will examine the theological ideas and social conditions that transformed European life and thought in the 16th and 17th centuries. Particular attention will be paid to the Protestant Reformation in Germany and England, as well as the Catholic Counter-Reformation and changes within the Roman Catholic Church. We will study major theologians like Martin Luther, John Calvin, and Ignatius of Loyola, but we also will consider popular religious practices of the period. Finally, we will ask how cultural evolution and religious revolution influenced one another, especially in the rise of vernacular translations of the Bible and in the European colonization of the New World. 3 hrs. lect. EUR, HIS, PHL (E. Gebarowski-Shafer)

RELI/CMLT 0238 Literature and the Mystical Experience (Spring 2015)
In this course we will explore how narrative art articulates spiritual perception by examining selected works of 20th century writers such as Miguel De Unamuno, Nikos Kazantzakis, J. D. Salinger, Charles Williams, Flannery O'Connor, Thomas Merton, Alice Munroe, Marilynne Robinson, and Annie Dillard.  Drawing on theology and philosophy as an interpretative mode, we will consider the following questions: How does literature illuminate selfhood and interiority? How do contemplation and ascetic practice guide the self to divine knowledge and cosmic unification? How do language, imagery and symbols shape the unitive experience as a tool for empathy and understanding of the other? 3 hrs. lect./1 hr. disc. LIT, NOR, PHL (M. Hatjigeorgiou)

RELI 0243 Hindu Ethics (Spring 2015)
What constitutes the good life? How is morality established? Who are the arbiters of virtuous conduct? Such questions will guide us as we probe the complexities of ethics in Hindu religious life. We will identify how such notions as dharma, caste, karma, mokṣa, purity, and nonviolence have shaped the development of Hindu moral consciousness.  We will do so through readings of orthodox Hindu ethical texts (dharma śāstra), ethnographic explorations of moral identity, considerations of holistic medicine (Ayurveda), theological visions of protecting the environment, and modern reform movements headed by Gandhi and Ambedkar. With increased sensitivity we will more deeply understand Hindu moral identities while considering our own ethical determinations. 3 hrs. lect./disc. AAL, PHL (J. Pierce)

RELI/PHIL 0255 Kierkegaard, Marx, and Nietzsche (Fall 2014)
This course will investigate the works of three of the central philosophical and cultural critics of the nineteenth century. All of these thinkers revolted against the apotheosis of Reason that had occurred in the Enlightenment and that reached its culmination in the works of Hegel. We shall read Kierkegaard's Either/Or, Philosophical Fragments, and Concluding Unscientific Postscript; Marx's early essays criticizing Hegel, the Economic and Philosophic Manuscripts of 1844, and other selections concentrating on Marx's philosophical views, not his economic analysis; and Nietzsche's The Birth of Tragedy, The Use and Abuse of History, Thus Spoke Zarathustra (selections), and The Genealogy of Morals. EUR, HIS, PHL (S. Bates)

RELI/GSFS 0258 The Qur’an and the Feminist Subject WT (Fall 2014)
How was the Qur’an compiled, and who was involved in that process? What does the Qur’an say about Muhammad and the early community of believers? Why is it so difficult to approach? While considering the answers to these questions, we will explore the socio-cultural context in which the Qur’an was revealed and its similarities and differences with the Bible. We will also discuss major themes and concepts of the Qur’an and the various ways they have been interpreted by different Muslim communities throughout history. 3 hrs. lect. AAL, PHL (A. Anzali)

RELI/ENAM 0279 The Bible and American Literature AR, WT (Fall 2014)
In this course we will study American literary responses to the spiritual and social demands of Christianity as expressed in select Biblical passages and narratives. We will examine how writers of different times and regions responded to this tradition, raising and exploring such questions as: How is Christian conduct to be defined in a political democracy? In an increasingly secular society, can a life lived “in imitation of Christ” result in more than victimization? How can a minister, serving a worldly congregation, know the degree to which his words are sacred or profane? Writers will include Stowe, Melville, Eliot, West, Baldwin, and Robinson. 3 hrs. lect. LIT, NOR, PHL (J. McWilliams)

RELI/GSFS 0290 Women's Religious Life and Thought: The Female Pursuit of God in Late Antiquity and Byzantium WT (Fall 2014)
This course will explore the female religious experience in Greco-Roman antiquity and Early Christianity. We shall trace the transition from the mystery religions of Demeter and Isis in the Eastern Mediterranean to the cult of Mary the Mother of God (Theotokos) and the worship of female saints. Drawing on a wide range of sources (hymns, saints' Lives, Apocryphal Gospels, Patristic texts, and icons), we shall study the varieties of female devotion and examine the roles available to women in the early Church: deaconesses and desert mothers, monastics and martyrs, poets and rulers. Different theoretical approaches will enable us to ask a series of questions: were women in the early Church considered capable of holiness? To what extent did the female 'gifts of the spirit' challenge church authority? What is distinct about the feminine experience of the divine? Finally, we shall consider the vision and poetics of female spirituality in select modern poets. 3 hrs. lect./disc.  EUR, HIS, PHL (M. Hatjigeorgiou)

RELI/SOAN 0303 Cults and New Religions AR, AT (Spring 2015)
Religious outsiders have been persistent yet controversial. Mystics and messiahs preaching a variety of radical beliefs and ways of life have provoked strong responses from mainline traditions as well as from publics concerned about the "cult" menace. Yet new religions have also been a source of religious experimentation and revival. In this course we will explore the unique characteristics of new religions, the historical circumstances that give rise to them, who join and why, the societal reaction they generate, questions of authority and leadership, violence, and the factors that influence their success, decline and failure. A variety of new religions from North America and the West, as well as from Japan and China, will be considered. These may include the Shakers, the People's Temple, Hare Krishna, Soka Gakkai, the Children of God/Family, Solar Temple, Aum Shinrikyo, Falun Gong, the Branch Davidians, and the Raelians. 3 hrs. sem. CMP, PHL, SOC (B. Rochford)

RELI/PHIL 0320 Seminar in Buddhist Philosophy: Yogacara Depth Psychology and Philosophy of Mind AT (Spring 2015)
In this seminar we will survey the basic ideas of Yogacara Buddhism (4-6th c. CE), one of two major schools of Indian Buddhism, in relation to cognitive science and philosophy of mind. We will examine these ideas historically, philosophically and comparatively. We focus on the Yogacara analyses of the largely unconscious ‘construction of reality’ and its systematic deconstruction through forms of analytic meditation. We will read primary and secondary texts on Indian Buddhism and texts espousing similar ideas in modern philosophy and the social and cognitive sciences. (One course on philosophy or RELI 0120, RELI 0220, RELI 0223, RELI 0224, RELI 0225, RELI 0226, RELI 0227or RELI 0228.) 3 hrs. sem. AAL, CMP, PHL (W. Waldron)

RELI/HARC 0321 The Art of Tibetan Buddhism (Fall 2014)
In this course we will explore the fascinating imagery of Tibetan Buddhist art, with special attention paid to the rich visual language of tangkas—devotional paintings on cloth of Buddhas, Buddhist deities, spiritual teachers (lamas), and cosmic diagrams (mandalas)— which were used as aids for visualization and meditation. Topics will include the history of Tibet, the growth of Tibetan Buddhist sects, and the development of distinctive stylistic and iconographic characteristics as seen in tangkas, religious sculpture, ritual implements, and monastic architecture. This course will be offered in conjunction with a visiting exhibition of Tibetan tangkas at the Middlebury College Art Museum. 3 hrs. sem./3 hrs. screening. AAL, ART, HIS (C. Packert)

RELI 0335 Roman Catholicism WT (Spring 2015)
In this course we will examine the rise of Roman Catholicism, focusing on tradition and change from the 16th-century Council of Trent to the present day.  Topics will include changing views on vernacular Bibles and lay reading of Scripture, adaptations of Catholicism in global contexts, and Catholic theologies of liberation.  We will also examine current controversies over traditional beliefs and practices, such as women's roles in the church, and views of the pope and clergy on contraception, abortion, and gay marriage. We will pay attention to recent waves of disaffiliation stemming from these issues and the appeal of charismatic Protestant Christianity.  Some background in the study of religion or European history expected.  3 hrs. sem. EUR, HIS, PHL  (E. Gebarowski-Shafer)

RELI 0344 Tantric Visions of Sex, Death, and Madness (Spring 2015)
Using the esoteric realms of Tantric religion in India as our framework, we will explore how unconventional and secretive rituals shape religious experience and identity, and how our understandings of religious life may be challenged by such categories as madness, mysticism, and the supernatural. Readings will focus on Hindu hagiography, Tantric ritual texts, Buddhist narratives, and a range of secondary literature addressing gender, power, sex, and the subaltern. We will also learn how nontraditional religious practices allow for a diversity of meaningful religious expression, thereby fostering in us an enriched vision of religiosity while inviting us to examine the role of esotericism in our own lives. 3hrs. lect./disc. AAL, PHL (J. Pierce)

RELI 0350 Sufism: The Mystical Tradition of Islam (Spring 2015)
In this seminar, we will start our adventure in the Sufi world by focusing on the historical and religious contexts in which the mystical tradition of Islam developed during the early Islamic centuries. We will then turn to the so-called classical period focusing on the institutionalization of Sufism, major themes of the classical Sufi literature; fundamental teachings and practices of Sufis; and important figures like Rumi, Ibn Arabi, and Hafez. Finally, we will move to the modern period to discuss the ways in which the Sufi tradition has been re-interpreted, contested, or transformed throughout the Muslim world in response to the challenges of modernity. In all this, our main concern will be to develop an understanding of the mystical perspective that has influenced the outlook of much of the world's diverse Muslim population. Requires familiarity with the Islamic tradition. 3 hrs. sem. AAL, PHL (A. Anzali)

RELI 0362 The Debate on Zionism WT (Spring 2015)
What is Zionism? A Jewish national movement?  A European colonial enterprise? A secular rebellion against tradition? A form of religious messianism? A manifestation of “Orientalism” and racism, or a collective Jewish response to these phenomena? From its beginnings in Europe to the present, Zionism and debates over Zionism have proven vital—and often fatal—for their participants. Readings will include major proponents and critics of Zionism: Palestinian and Marxist critiques of Zionist ideology, modern scholarly and journalistic accounts, film, and Palestinian and Israeli literature. 3 hrs. sem. AAL, PHL HIS (R. Schine)

RELI/GSFS 0383 Storied Women (Fall 2014)
In this course we will read and analyze stories about women in the Jewish Bible, its Greek translations, and the New Testament, using various historical, literary, and gendered approaches to the study of ancient texts. Though student interests will help determine the final list of the characters we will consider, contenders include Eve, Hagar, Rebekah, Tamar, Deborah, Ruth, Judith, Mary, the women of Paul’s letters, and Revelation’s great whore of Babylon. In addition to recent academic treatments of the stories, we will also consider some of the ways they have been retold through time and in contemporary literature and film. 3 hrs. sem. LIT, PHL (L. Yarbrough)

RELI/GSFS 0391 Seminar on Women and Religion: Goddesses in South Asia (Fall 2014)
In this course we will examine the multiple portrayals of the divine in feminine form in the Hindu and Buddhist traditions of India and Tibet. We will first raise questions about the role and significance of goddesses from a comparative perspective, before examining the large variety of South Asian feminine divinities within their historical, mythological,  iconographic, and theological contexts. We will also examine sociological and psychological perspectives on these traditions, opening a way for dialogue between indigenous and modern theoretical frameworks. 3 hrs. sem. AAL, PHL (J. Pierce)

RELI/ENVS 0395 Religion, Ethics, and the Environment ET (Spring 2015)
We will explore the relationship between religion and ecology through two general approaches. Firstly, we will examine what religious traditions (especially, Jewish and Christian, but also Hindu and Buddhist) have had to say about the human-nature relationship by studying such dominant themes as: doctrines of creation and stewardship, restraints on human impact, concepts of interdependence, and ideas of sacred space. Secondly, we will turn our attention to contemporary religiously-based environmental activism, examining the possibilities and problems that emerge when religious traditions are mobilized on behalf of the environment. Students may write research papers using one or both of these approaches. (RELI 0110 or RELI 0130 or RELI 0160 or RELI 0190 or RELI 0295 or ENVS 0215) 3 hrs. sem. PHL (R. Gould)

RELI 0398 American Religion and Social Justice (Spring 2015)
Religious communities and organizations have contributed significantly to moral and social reform movements throughout U.S. history. From the colonial period to the present, religion has helped shape the discourse around issues like economic justice, racial equality, women’s rights, immigration, environmentalism, and LGBTQ rights. In this course we will study religious involvement in these social justice movements, critically examining the theologies that inspired both reform and resistance to social change. Throughout the course, we will consider the impact religion may have had—positive and negative—on struggles for social justice in the United States. 3 hrs. sem. HIS, NOR, PHL (J. Davis)

RELI 0400 Seminar on the Study of Religion (Fall 2014)
This seminar for advanced religion majors examines important and influential theories and methods in the study of religion. (Open to junior and senior religion majors or by waiver.) 3 hrs. sem. (W. Waldron)

RELI 0500 Independent Research (Fall 2014, Spring 2015)
Approval required. (Staff)

RELI 0700 Senior Project (Fall 2014, Spring 2015)
Approval required. (Staff)

RELI 0701 Senior Research for Honors Candidates (Fall 2014, Spring 2015)
Approval required. (Staff)

Russian

Major Requirements: Normally, majors must complete second-year Russian, RUSS 0122, RUSS 0151, four other courses, including at least one mainstream course in Russia, and a senior seminar. (HIST 0247 and HIST 0248 may be substituted for RUSS 0122.) Each student's program is planned individually with the department chair. Students planning careers in government, business, or law are advised to consider a major in the Russian and East European studies track of the International and Global Studies program. Russian majors also frequently combine their language study with a minor in economics, geography, history, or political science, or do a joint or double major with one of these subjects. Majors planning teaching careers should study a second language, preferably through at least the third-year level, and should consult members of the education studies faculty regarding certification.
     Departmental Honors: Majors with a B+ average in Russian courses and a B average overall are encouraged to prepare an honors thesis, the final copy of which is due April 20 of the year of graduation. Departmental honors are determined by a combination of thesis grade and grade point average in courses taken in the Russian Department, the Russian School and Middlebury's programs in Russia. Highest honors will be awarded for a GPA of 3.75 plus A on the thesis; high honors will be awarded for a GPA of 3.5 and A- or better on the thesis, and honors will be awarded for a GPA of 3.35 and a grade of B+ or better on the thesis.
    
Minors: The Russian department offers two minor programs: The Russian language minor includes RUSS 0101, RUSS 0103, RUSS 0201, RUSS 0202, RUSS 0311 and RUSS 0312. The Russian literature and culture minor includes any two of RUSS 0122, RUSS 0151, RUSS 0152, RUSS/FMMC 0245, and three of the following: RUSS 0351, RUSS 0352, RUSS 0354, and RUSS/ENAM 0359. A first-year seminar may, on occasion, be substituted for one of these courses.
     Junior Year in Russia: All majors and language minors are encouraged to study for a year in Russia. Middlebury's programs at Irkutsk State University, Russian State University for the Humanities in Moscow, and Yaroslavl State Pedagogical University are open to juniors who have completed 0300-level Russian. Students in Moscow may also enroll in courses at the Shchukin Theater Institute and the Higher School of Economics. Students are strongly encouraged to spend a summer in the Kathryn Wasserman Davis School of Russian on the Middlebury College campus before studying abroad in Russia. Students who have completed only 0200-level Russian must spend the fall semester at Yaroslavl. In their first semester, all students will take conversation, composition, and culture/civilization courses organized exclusively for our students; students who have completed third-year-level Russian will also take one mainstream course with Russian students, selected from the full university curriculum. In the second semester, students who have not yet taken a mainstream course will take one, and students who have already taken one will take two or more, in addition to the courses organized for Middlebury. Majors are expected to take at least one mainstream course while in Russia. Students unable to attend for a full year may study in Russia for one semester, preferably in the fall. The following courses are among those offered at our programs in Russia in recent years. While we cannot guarantee that each of these courses will be available on a regular basis, they are representative of the kinds of offerings students may expect:

In Irkutsk:
Russian Literature of the Nineteenth Century
Language of the Mass Media
Scientific Texts
History of Russia 1917-1970 Through Film
Siberian Culture and Ethnic Groups

In Moscow:
Russian Folklore
History of Economics
Nationalities and Contemporary Political Problems
The Language of Russian Business
Russian Civilization and Culture: Art, Architecture, and Music
Stage Speech (at the Shchukin Theater Institute)
Strategies against Corruption (at the Higher School of Economics)

In Yaroslavl:
History of Russia, Tenth - Seventeenth Centuries
Modern Russian History and Contemporary Politics
Readings in Russian Literature
Russian Prose Translation
Russian Civilization and Culture: Art, Architecture, and Music

RUSS 0101 Beginning Russian (Fall 2014)
This course is an approach to the language using four skills (speaking, listening, reading, and writing). It provides a firm control of the sound system and the structure of Russian. Although much emphasis is put on the spoken colloquial language, reading, writing, and a conscious understanding of the fundamentals of grammar prepare a strong foundation for work in advanced courses or for reading in specialized fields. 3 hrs. lect./3 hrs. drill. LNG (T. Portice)

RUSS 0103 Beginning Russian (Spring 2015)
This course is a continuation of the approach used in RUSS 0102, but with increased emphasis on reading. (RUSS 0102) 3 hrs. lect./3 hrs. drill. LNG (K. Moss)

RUSS 0122 The Russian Mind (in English) (Fall 2014)
In this course we will study the dominant themes of Russia's past and their role in shaping the present-day Russian mind. Topics will include: Slavic mythology; Russian Orthodoxy; Russian icons; the concept of autocracy; the legacy of Peter the Great and Catherine the Great; the Golden Age of Russian Literature (Pushkin, Gogol, Tolstoy and Dostoevsky); Russian composers, including the "Mighty Five"; Russian theater and ballet; the origins of Russian radicalism; the Russian Revolution; the legacy of Lenin and Stalin; and Russia from Khrushchev to Putin. 3 hrs. lect. AAL, HIS, LIT (T. Portice)

RUSS 0151 Russian Literature's Golden Age: 1830-1880 (in English) (Spring 2015)
Duels, ghosts, utopias, murders, prostitution, and adultery- these are the raw materials Russian authors turned into some of the world's greatest literature. This course is an introduction to Russian literature of the 19th century, from the short stories of Pushkin and Gogol to the great novels of Dostoevsky and Tolstoy. The centrality of literature in Russian society and the interrelations among the authors and texts will be discussed. How do the authors combine reality, fantasy, and philosophy to make these works both uniquely Russian and universal? 3 hrs. lect. EUR, LIT (T. Beyer)

RUSS 0201 Intermediate Russian (Fall 2014)
Systematic review of grammar and development of the spoken and written skills attained in Beginning Russian. (RUSS 0103 or equivalent) 3 hrs. lect./3 hrs. drill LNG (K. Moss)

RUSS 0202 Intermediate Russian (Spring 2015)
Continuation of the approach used in RUSS 0201. Reading of contemporary Russian texts, conversation, and written assignments in Russian based on reading assignments. (RUSS 0201 or equivalent) 3 hrs. lect./3 hrs. drill LNG (N. Wieda)

RUSS 0312 Russian Culture and Civilization II (Spring 2015)
This course is a continuation of RUSS 0311 but may be taken independently. It offers a bilingual approach to the study of Russian culture from the second half of the nineteenth century to the present. Works of literature, art, and music will be examined in their historical and political context. Particular attention will be devoted to the improvement of oral and written skills. (RUSS 0202 or equivalent) (formerly RUSS 0412) 3 hrs. lect. EUR, LIT, LNG (T. Beyer)

RUSS 0351 Dostoevsky (in English) (Fall 2014)
A study of the most important works by literary giant Fyodor Dostoevsky. Readings include: selected early fiction (Poor Folk, The Double, The Gambler); his seminal manifesto Notes from Underground; his first major novel Crime and Punishment; and his masterpiece The Brothers Karamazov. Biographical information, excerpts from the author's notebooks, analysis of comparative translations, and film adaptations will supplement readings. No knowledge of Russian required. Open to first-year students. 3 hrs. lect. EUR, LIT (T. Beyer)

RUSS/ENAM 0359 The Art of Vladimir Nabokov (in English) (Spring 2015)
A study of the "perverse" aesthetics of this Russian-American writer. We will expose the hidden plots under the surface of his fiction, follow and arbitrate the ongoing contest between the author and his fictional heroes, and search for the roots of Nabokov's poetics in Western and Russian literary traditions. An attempt will be made to show the continuity between the Russian and English works of this bilingual and bicultural writer. 3 hrs. lect. LIT, NOR (T. Beyer)

RUSS 0500 Advanced Studies in Language and Literature (Fall 2014, Spring 2015)
Supervised individual study for highly qualified students. Approval required. (Staff)

RUSS 0700 Senior Independent Study (Fall 2014, Spring 2015)
Approval required. (Staff)

RUSS 0704 Senior Seminar (in Russian) (Fall 2014)
This seminar topic changes every year. Recent seminar titles have included Research, Recast, Relay, The History of Russian Poetry, and Russian Drama. This course will provide students with the skills to identify and utilize Russian sources, provide professional quality written summaries and analyses, make oral presentations in Russian, and produce a substantial written assignment and project. (Senior Majors) 3 hrs. sem. (T. Beyer)

Sociology & Anthropology

Required for the Major in Sociology/Anthropology:A minimum of 10 courses will constitute the major; at least eight of these courses (and all the core courses listed in the tracks below) must be fall and spring courses taught at Middlebury (e.g., not winter term courses or transfer credits). No more than two electives may be introductory 0100-level courses. We strongly recommend that students planning a study abroad experience take at least one area studies course. Students must complete a methods course (SOAN 0301 or SOAN 0302) before they begin either SOAN 0700 or SOAN 0710 in order to prepare for this senior research and writing project.

There are three tracks a student may choose from:
Track 1: Sociology/Anthropology
consists of SOAN 0103, SOAN 0105, SOAN 0301 or SOAN 0302, and SOAN 0305 or SOAN 0306. Students must also take a 0400-level seminar and complete a senior project (SOAN 0700 or SOAN 0710), and these requirements may be in either sociology or anthropology. In addition, each sociology/anthropology track major will take four electives in the department.
Track 2: Anthropology
consists of SOAN 0103, either SOAN 0301 or 0302, SOAN 0306, a 0400-level anthropology seminar and a senior project (SOAN 0700 or 0710). In addition, anthropology track majors will take five electives in the department, of which at least four must be anthropology, and of which at least one must be in archaeology or linguistic anthropology.
Track 3: Sociology
consists of SOAN 0105, either SOAN 0301 or 0302, SOAN 0305, a 0400-level sociology seminar and a senior project (SOAN 0700 or 0710). In addition, sociology track majors will take five electives in the department, of which at least four must be sociology.
     Joint Majors in Sociology/Anthropology and Environmental Studies-Human Ecology:
This focus requires eight or nine courses depending on senior work: SOAN 0103; SOAN 0105; SOAN 0211; SOAN 0301 or SOAN 0302; SOAN 0305 or SOAN 0306; two electives related to the topic of human ecology (to be selected in consultation with your advisor) from among sociology/anthropology offerings, ENVS 0210. In addition, students will take either SOAN 0700 or SOAN 0710. This focus qualifies students for joint major status. No more than one course may be taken outside of the regular fall and spring semesters at Middlebury (e.g., as a winter term course or transfer credit).
     Joint Majors with other departments: Students wishing to do a joint major with another department or program must complete the following sociology/anthropology courses: SOAN 0103, SOAN 0105, SOAN 0301 or SOAN 0302, SOAN 0305 or SOAN 0306, SOAN 0700 or SOAN 0710 and two electives. No more than one course may be taken outside of the regular fall and spring semesters at Middlebury (e.g., as a winter term course or transfer credit). Any departures from this program must be approved by the department chair.
The Departments of Sociology/Anthropology and Psychology no longer offer a Joint Major in Sociology and Psychology.
     International and Global Studies Major:
To specialize in sociology/anthropology within the International and Global Studies major, students must take: SOAN 0103, SOAN 0105, SOAN 0305 or SOAN 0306, plus three other sociology/anthropology electives. No more than one elective may be taken outside of the regular fall and spring semesters at Middlebury (e.g., as a winter term course or transfer credit). Students who plan to write an IGS senior thesis must complete either SOAN 0301 or SOAN 0302 as one of these electives before starting the thesis.
     Sociology Minor: SOAN 0105 and four elective courses in SOAN, no more than one of which can be at the 0100-level and no more than one of which can be an anthropology course. No courses may be taken outside of the regular fall and spring semesters at Middlebury (e.g., no winter term courses or transfer credits).
     Anthropology Minor: SOAN 0103 and four elective courses in SOAN, no more than two of which can be at the 0100-level and no more than one of which can be a sociology course. No courses may be taken outside of the regular fall and spring semesters at Middlebury (e.g., no winter term courses or transfer credits).
     Senior Project in Sociology/Anthropology: Each student must complete an independent research project of at least one semester. The senior program typically consists of either a one-semester senior project (SOAN 0700, one credit, usually 25-40 pages) or a two-semester senior project (SOAN 0710, two credits, usually 60-100 pages). Students who wish to work on a project for more than one semester must present their progress for review by two professors who will decide whether the project qualifies for extended study. A one-semester project can be either in the fall or spring semesters; a two-semester project is usually in the fall and winter semesters or in the winter and spring semesters. Variation from these patterns is possible by permission from the department. A mandatory non-credit senior seminar for both SOAN 0700 and SOAN 0710 begins the first week of fall semester and meets as necessary during the rest of the year. Senior project requirements for joint majors and other special circumstances will be approved in consultation with both departments.
     A SOAN 0700 project qualifies for honors after both the project adviser and a second reader from the SOAN faculty agree that it deserves an A- or an A. A SOAN 0710 project qualifies for honors after an oral defense with the project advisor, a second reader from within the sociology/anthropology department, and (optional) a third reader from another part of the College or the local community. If this committee agrees that the SOAN 0710 project deserves a B+, the student receives honors; if the grade is A-, the student receives high honors; and if the grade is A, the student receives highest honors.
     Departmental Honors: To receive honors, students must a) achieve a minimum of a B average in all sociology/anthropology courses and b) achieve an A or A- for their one-semester project (SOAN 0700), or an A, A- or B+ for their two-semester project (SOAN 0710).

SOAN 0103 Selected Topics in Sociocultural Anthropology (Fall 2014, Spring 2015)
This course introduces students to the varieties of human experience in social life and to the differing approaches and levels of analysis used by anthropologists to explain it. Topics include: culture and race, rituals and symbolism, kinship and gender roles, social evolution, political economy, and sociolinguistics. Ethnographic examples are drawn chiefly from non-Western societies, from simple bands to great agrarian states. The ultimate aim is to enable students to think critically about the bases of their own culture and about practices and beliefs previously unanalyzed and unexamined. 2 hrs. lect./1 hr. disc./2 hrs. screen (Anthropology) CMP, SOC (Fall 2014: E. Oxfeld; Spring 2015: D. Stoll)

SOAN 0105 Society and the Individual (Fall 2014, Spring 2015)
This course examines the ideas and enduring contributions of the giants of modern social theory, including Karl Marx, Max Weber, Emile Durkheim, and Sigmund Freud. Readings will include selections from original works, as well as contemporary essays. Key issues will include the nature of modernity, the direction of social change, and the role of human agency in constructing the "good society." This course serves as a general introduction to sociology. (Not open to second semester juniors or seniors without approval) 3 hrs. lect./ disc. (Sociology) SOC (Fall 2014: R. Tiger; Spring 2015: J. McCallum)

SOAN 0107 Introduction to Archaeology (Fall 2014)
Archaeology is the scientific analysis and interpretation of cultural remains. Archaeologists examine artifacts, architecture, and even human remains in order to answer questions about the growth and development of societies worldwide. In addressing these issues we not only illuminate the past but also explore patterns relevant to contemporary social concerns. From the tropical lowlands of Central America to the deserts of ancient Egypt, this course provides an introduction to world prehistory. We proceed from humanity's earliest beginnings to the development of complex societies worldwide and use case examples to explore the major topics, methods, and theories of contemporary archaeology. 2 hrs. lect./1 hr. lab. (Anthropology) HIS, SOC (J. Fitzsimmons)

SOAN/LNGT 0109 Language, Culture and Society (Spring 2015)
In this course students will be introduced to the comparative, ethnographic study of language in relation to socio-cultural context. Our readings will be drawn from diverse global settings and will focus upon language as the means by which people shape and are shaped by the social worlds in which they live. We will examine contrasts in ways of speaking across different communities, personal identities, and institutions. We will explore the consequences of communicative difference across a range of contact situations, including everyday conversation among peers, service encounters, political elections, and global connections or disconnections made possible through new media. 3 hrs. lect. (Anthropology) CMP, SOC (M. Nevins)

SOAN/JAPN 0110 Current Social Issues in Japan (in English) (Spring 2015)
In this course we will use ethnography, fiction, and historical studies to examine some of the underlying themes of Japanese culture. Japan is a highly developed, post-industrial society renowned across the globe for economic success in the post-World War II period. What historical and social factors have shaped Japan’s contemporary culture, and how have interactions with other countries influenced Japanese society? We will study a number of different spheres of Japanese life including the family and the workplace to better understand contemporary society. We will pay special attention to Japan’s global position and its relationship to the United States. 3 hrs. lect./disc. AAL, SOC (L. White)

SOAN/GSFS 0191 Introduction to Sociology of Gender (Fall 2014)
What is gender and what would a sociology of it look like? When did gender become a category of inquiry and more importantly why? We will look at how the meaning and performance of gender changed over time, from Classical Greece to Victorian England, to the contemporary U.S. We will also look at how gender changes depending on one’s position in social space, e.g. one’s race, class, sexuality, and nationality. Finally, we will consider how the need to look at gender is the result of a variety of discourses, from psychoanalysis to capitalism to movements of liberation such as feminism. 3 hrs. lect. (Sociology) CMP, SOC (L. Essig)

SOAN 0201 Sociology of Labor (Fall 2014)
In this class we will survey the sociological literature on labor and labor movements in America and around the world. We will raise questions related to the organization and transformation of work, the making of class society, trade unionism and other class-based organizing, and the impact of globalization on labor organizations. Exploration of these key themes will happen through an analysis of classic and contemporary texts, as well as fiction and film. This is a seminar-style course with opportunities for students to lead class discussions and debates. 3 hrs. lect. (Sociology) CW (7 spaces), SOC (J. McCallum)

SOAN 0211 Human Ecology (Spring 2015)
Environmental issues are also cultural and political conflicts, between competing social groups, economic interests and cultural paradigms. This course introduces students to human ecology, the study of how our adaptations to the environment are mediated by cultural differences and political economy. Topics include: how ecological anthropology has evolved as a subdiscipline, with a focus on systems theory and political ecology; how ritually regulated societies manage resources; how rural communities deal with environmental deterioration; and how contradictions between environmental protection, economic development, and cultural values complicate so many ecological issues. Limited places available for students to satisfy the College writing requirement. (SOAN 0103 or ENVS 0112 or ENVS 0211 or ENVS 0215 or BIOL 0140) 3 hrs. lect. (Anthropology) CMP, SOC (D. Stoll)

SOAN/GSFS 0212 The Family in Contemporary Society (Fall 2014)
This course will investigate the social, economic, and political forces that have brought about changes in family life in the beginning of the 21st century. We will begin by looking at various attempts to define "the family," and we will then explore a range of topics, including the webs of family relationships (e.g., mothering, fathering, kin networks), labor and family intersections (e.g., mediating between work and family; the household division of labor), gay and lesbian family life, and domestic violence. Although the focus will be on contemporary United States, we will also examine some cross-cultural and historical material. 3 hrs. lect. (Sociology) CMP, NOR, SOC (M. Nelson)

SOAN 0215 Sociology of Education (Fall 2014)
In this course we will study education both as a social institution and as a social process. In our analysis of education and its relationship to the structure of society, we will pay particular attention to the intersection of gender, class, race, and ethnicity within schools. Our objective will be to explore the ways in which education might contribute to the reproduction of social inequalities, as well as its potential for social change. The substantive focus will be on American society. Limited places available for students to satisfy the college writing requirement. 3 hrs. lect. (Sociology) CMP, NOR, SOC (M. Nelson)

SOAN/JAPN 0230 Rethinking the Body in Contemporary Japan - In English (Spring 2015)
In this course we will examine attitudes toward and tensions related to the human body in Japan. Looking at art, music, style, and social issues we will examine the symbolic as well as material concerns of bodies in contemporary Japan. Religious, historical, martial, and aesthetic understandings of bodies will be addressed. We will analyze Japan's current attitudes toward organ transplantation, treatment of the deceased, plastic surgery, surrogacy, sex change surgery and other embodied practices. Readings will include Twice Dead and Commodifying Bodies. (Anthropology) AAL, SOC (L. White)

SOAN/HEBM 0234 State and Society in Contemporary Israel (Fall 2014)
In this course we will examine Israeli society and politics in a period of rapid and profound transformation. We will begin with an introductory unit on Zionism, Palestinian nationalism, and the history of the state. Subsequent units will examine the social, cultural, and political characteristics of Israel’s main population sectors (European, Middle Eastern, Russian, and Ethiopian Jews and Palestinian citizens of the state) and religious groupings (Muslims and Jews, including secular, traditional, national-religious, and ultra-Orthodox). The final units will examine ongoing political struggles that will shape the future of the state, including struggles over the role of religion in public life; civil rights and democracy; and West Bank settlements and the Palestinian-Israeli peace process. Most readings assignments will be social scientific or historical in nature, but will also include some journalism and literature. 3 hrs. lect. AAL, SOC (T. Sasson)

SOAN 0235 The City and Its People (Spring 2015)
We all live somewhere, and increasingly we find ourselves living in an urban environment. In this course we will explore current topics in urban sociology, with particular emphasis on the power of place, culture, and community in U.S. cities. We will study the historical, cultural, and political conditions that have shaped contemporary U.S. cities, such as New York City, Chicago, and Los Angeles. We will examine how cities change and resist change through the lens of such subjects as migration, poverty, urban arts, crime, and education as it pertains to the city. Students will read a variety of ethnographic and sociological materials, in order to gain an understanding of the complexities of both urban life and processes of representation. 3 hrs. lect./disc. (Sociology) CW (7 spaces), NOR, SOC (L. Owens)

SOAN 0252 Social Psychology in Sociology (Spring 2015)
The purpose of this course is to examine the relationship between self and society from a sociological perspective. Our initial focus will on the nature of symbols, language, and the social self as theorized by G. H. Mead and early "symbolic interactionists." We will then address the presentation of self through the works of Erving Goffman, and subsequently consider more contemporary concerns, such as emotions, emotional labor, and inequality in social interaction. The second half of the course will address questions of identity and debates surrounding the emergence of "postmodern" selves. 3 hrs. lect. (Sociology) SOC (C. Han)

SOAN 0255 Social Change: Theory and Practice (Fall 2014)
In this course we will take a behind-the-scenes look at how people organize grassroots social movements by exploring the art, theory, and science of making social change. By examining case studies of different movements, we will consider varied perspectives on power and powerlessness, political organization, collective action, and reform versus revolution. As a crash course in organizing for change, we will practice the hands-on tactics and strategies that social movement organizers employ to foment social transformation from the bottom up: creating a campaign strategy, mobilizing workers and communities, analyzing power structures, and developing leadership. Through partnerships with local organizations, we will have the chance to learn about and participate in ongoing campaigns. Students will craft political manifestos, draft strategy reports, and respond to readings and films. (Not open to students who have taken SOAN 1023) 3 hrs. lect. SOC (J. McCallum)

SOAN 0267 Global Health (Fall 2014)
This course provides an introductory survey of the basic issues and initiatives in contemporary global public health, including in-depth case studies of public health projects in locales including Haiti, Venezuela, Brazil, Rwanda, and Pakistan. We will explore the political, socioeconomic, and cultural complexity of health problems, and critically examine the structure and methods of global public health institutions. 3 hrs. lect./disc. (Anthropology) AAL, CMP, SOC (S. Closser)

SOAN/IGST 0273 Diasporas and Homelands (Fall 2014)
War, mass migration, and globalization have spurred development of diaspora communities and heightened scholarly interest in the phenomenon. In contrast to other groups of exiles and immigrants, diaspora communities seek integration within host countries as well as ongoing political, economic, and cultural ties to their homelands. A number of questions arise from these complex and dynamic relationships: How do diaspora communities maintain cultural distinctiveness within host countries? How do they maintain and reproduce cultural ties with homelands and other centers of diaspora life? What influence do diaspora communities have on political relationships between host countries and homelands? What influence do they have on internal homeland politics? Finally, what are the implications of the diaspora phenomenon for the future of the nation state and globalization? Case studies will be drawn from a variety of diaspora communities, including Armenians, Nigerians, Jews, Palestinians, Dominicans, and South Asians. 3 hrs. lect. CMP, SOC (T. Sasson)

SOAN 0301 The Logic of Sociological Inquiry (Spring 2015)
In this course students will be introduced to the basic tools of sociological research including problem formulation, strategies of design and data collection, and analysis and presentation of results. This class will help students formulate a research question and develop a research strategy to best explore that question. Those strategies may include interviews, structured observation, participant observation, content analysis, and surveys. This class, strongly recommended for juniors, will culminate in the submission of a senior project proposal. (SOAN 0103 or SOAN 0105) 3 hrs. lect./disc./3 hrs. research lab. (Sociology) DED, SOC (C. Han)

SOAN 0302 The Research Process: Ethnography and Qualitative Methods (Fall 2014)
The aim of this course is to prepare the student to conduct research, to analyze and present research in a scholarly manner, and to evaluate critically the research of others. Practice and evaluation of such basic techniques as observation, participant-observation, structured and open-ended interviews, and use of documents. Introduction to various methodological and theoretical frameworks. Thesis or essay prospectus is the final product of this course. Strongly recommended for juniors. Three-hour research lab required. (SOAN 0103 or SOAN 0105) 3 hrs. lect./disc./3 hrs. research lab (Anthropology) DED, SOC (S. Closser)

SOAN/RELI 0303 Cults and New Religions (Spring 2015)
Religious outsiders have been persistent yet controversial. Mystics and messiahs preaching a variety of radical beliefs and ways of life have provoked strong responses from mainline traditions as well as from publics concerned about the "cult" menace. Yet new religions have also been a source of religious experimentation and revival. In this course we will explore the unique characteristics of new religions, the historical circumstances that give rise to them, who join and why, the societal reaction they generate, questions of authority and leadership, violence, and the factors that influence their success, decline and failure. A variety of new religions from North America and the West, as well as from Japan and China, will be considered. These may include the Shakers, the People's Temple, Hare Krishna, Soka Gakkai, the Children of God/Family, Solar Temple, Aum Shinrikyo, Falun Gong, the Branch Davidians, and the Raelians. 3 hrs. sem. (Sociology) CMP, PHL, SOC (B. Rochford)

SOAN 0305 Topics in Sociological Theory (Fall 2014)
This course provides an overview of major lines of development in 20th century social theory relevant to the field of sociology, focusing on how various theorists have grappled with the basic issues that have dominated 20th century social thought. Particular attention will be given to the questions arising from the conceptual distinctions between structure and action, on the one hand, and identity and culture, on the other. How is social order possible? How autonomous are human agents? How do we explain the persistence of observed patterns of human interaction and social practice? How do we analyze relations between the world of everyday life and the large-scale development of social systems? How does social change take place? (SOAN 0103 or SOAN 0105) 3 hrs. lect. (Sociology) SOC (L. Owens)

SOAN 0306 Topics in Anthropological Theory (Spring 2015)
This course gives an introduction to some important themes in the development of anthropological thought, primarily in the past century in anglophone and francophone traditions. It emphasizes close comparative reading of selections from influential texts by authors who have shaped recent discourse within the social sciences. (SOAN 0103 or SOAN 0105) 3 hrs. lect. (Anthropology) (E. Oxfeld)

SOAN 0307 Social Movements and Collective Action (Fall 2014)
An analysis of the range of factors which influence the emergence and development of social protest, social movements, rebellion, and revolution. Topics to be considered include: the generation and mobilization of discontent; recruitment and participation; member commitment; tactics and strategy; revolutionary situations and outcomes; collective violence; and the factors that influence the success and failure of movement organizations and collective action in general. Emphasis will be placed on critically analyzing alternative approaches and theories of social movements and collective action (i.e., self-interest/deprivation, participation gratification, traditional collective behavior and resource mobilization). Empirical studies will be used throughout the course. Limited places available for students to satisfy the College writing requirement. 3 hrs. lect. (Sociology) SOC (L. Owens)

SOAN/GSFS 0315 Sociology of Freakishness (Fall 2014)
P.T. Barnum taught us that freaks are always made, not born. A freak is a performance of otherness for fun and profit. In this course we will explore how the freak show gave birth to American culture and how American culture continues to organize itself around the display of freakishness. We will ask what configurations of power are at play in the performance of freaks. How do gender, race, nation, sexuality, and class come into play, and how are those forms of power translated into a performance of otherness that forces us to watch it over and over again? 3 hrs. lect. (Sociology) NOR, SOC (L. Essig)

SOAN 0318 Theories of Celebrity (Spring 2015)
In this course we will explore the cultural significance of the concept "celebrity" from a variety of theoretical perspectives. We will draw from a range of examples, including the history of Hollywood, the branding of sport stars, the rise of reality television, YouTube fame, and celebrity gossip, to examine the structures of power and inequality the celebrity phenomenon and its commodification embody. We will use theoretical concepts such as hegemony, the spectacle, mechanical reproduction, the panopticon, hyperreality, microcelebrity, postmodernity, and neoliberalism to analyze the extraordinary rise of a visual culture based on the production and consumption of celebrity. (Formerly SOAN 0281) (SOAN 0105) 3 hrs. sem. CW (6 spaces), NOR, SOC (R. Tiger)

SOAN 0319 The Idea of Drugs and Addiction (Spring 2015)
Drugs cause panic and social hysteria. We spend time talking about them and expend energy distinguishing between good and bad drugs and users. Movies, documentaries, literature, art, and television shows reflect this preoccupation with the use and misuse of drugs. In this course we will investigate the social significance of “drugs” as a cultural, rather than pharmacological, category. We will consider drugs and addiction as ideas that reflect concerns about the “self” in modernity. We will examine the panic surrounding drug use and addiction, our preoccupation with treatment, and our emphasis on sobriety. Overall, we will engage with the larger themes the idea of drugs and addiction raises: harm, exclusion, inequality, pleasure, freedom, desire, perfection, enlightenment, and control. 3hrs. lect. (SOAN 0105 or SOAN 0288) (Sociology) SOC (R. Tiger)

SOAN 0325 Indigeneity and Colonialism in Native North America (Fall 2014)
In this course we will approach Native North America and the American political mainstream as dynamically intertwined. Through ethnography, ethno-history, oral literature, and indigenous film we will examine the history of colonial encounters between the Indigenous and the 'Western'. We will examine how indigenous cultural difference and moral claims to land have challenged dominant political cultures across the history of the North American settler states. Our analysis will extend to ongoing questions concerning cultural knowledge, sustainability, and imagined futures. 3 hrs. sem. (Anthropology) CW (5 spaces), HIS, NOR, SOC (M. Nevins)

SOAN 0326 Latin American Culture and Society (Fall 2014)
Latin America is a paradise for cultural anthropologists because, with its long history of invasion and cultural hybridization, it is a meeting ground for people from all over the world. This course looks at how the Americas south of the Rio Grande have been symbolized, constructed and contested in debates over national character, the culture of poverty, and dependency on foreign powers. Case material includes peasants, shanty-town dwellers, immigrants to the U.S. and the iconic figures of the Vodoun healer, pop star, druglord and guerrillero. Topics include the polarities of identity along the U.S.-Mexican border, African possession cults of the Caribbean, the requirements of survival for the poor of the Brazilian Northeast, the hegemony of "whiteness" in the mass media, and the frustrated messianic strivings of revolutionary Cuba. This course is primarily for students doing study abroad in the region. 3 hrs. lect./disc.., 2 hrs. screen (Anthropology) AAL, CW (7 spaces), SOC (D. Stoll)

SOAN 0328 The Rise and Fall of the Ancient Maya (Spring 2015)
As perhaps the most famous of all of the cultures of Mesoamerica, the Maya are best known for soaring temples, portraits of kings, a complex hieroglyphic writing system, and a dramatic collapse when their ancient kingdoms were abandoned or destroyed. In this course, we will view their accomplishments through the archaeology of the Classic Period (250-850 AD) and examine how the Maya built cities within the tropical jungles of present-day Mexico, Guatemala, Belize, El Salvador, and Honduras. We will also explore the history of the Maya after the “fall,” from their revival in the post-Classic Period to the present day. Limited places available for students to satisfy the College writing requirement. 3 hrs. lect./disc. (Anthropology) AAL, CW (5 spaces), SOC (J. Fitzsimmons)

SOAN 0335 The Anthropology of China (Spring 2015)
China serves as a case study in the anthropological analysis of a complex rapidly changing non-Western society. This course will be a survey of the principal institutions and ideas that form the background to modern Chinese society. Areas covered include: family and kinship, ritual, transformations of class hierarchies, and the impact of globalization. Materials will be drawn from descriptions of traditional, contemporary (including both mainland and Taiwanese settings), and overseas contexts. 3 hrs. lect./disc. (Anthropology) AAL, CW (5 spaces), SOC (E. Oxfeld)

SOAN 0340 The Anthropology of Human Rights (Fall 2014)
Human rights has become the master narrative for understanding moral responsibility between nations. High expectations have collided with brutal realities, raising difficult questions. Since cultures vary greatly in the rights they recognize, particularly for subordinate groups such as women and ethnic minorities, campaigning for human rights can become hard to distinguish from international intervention, complicating the issue of who is victimizing who. This course explores the anthropology of pre-state violence; contradictions between human rights and solidarity; the competing priorities of truth, justice and reconciliation; the synergy between international humanitarian relief and warlordism; ethnic fratricide and the failed state. Case studies include repression in Guatemala, vigilante justice in Peru, the South African Truth and Reconciliation Commission, and the flow of political and economic refugees to zones of safety such as the United States. 3 hrs. lect./disc., 2 hrs. screen (Anthropology) CMP, SOC (D. Stoll)

SOAN 0356 The Continuing Significance of Race in the United States (Fall 2014)
This course will introduce students to theories of race and racism in the United States, how racial categories are formed and maintained in a variety of social arenas, and how race and racism influence social systems. In order to demonstrate the prevalence of race and racism in the U.S., the course will be a “topics” course in that each week, we will explore a different topic (such as education, crime, gender) and examine how they are influenced by race and racism. In addition, the course will compare and contrast the experiences of different racial and ethnic groups in the United States and examine how these different experiences influences the way they are seen, how they see themselves, and how they interact with other groups. Upon completion of the course, students will have a better understanding of the historic and contemporary significance of race and how race influences our everyday interactions in multiple different social arenas. 3 hrs. lect. (Sociology) CMP, NOR, SOC (C. Han)

SOAN 0357 Death and the Body (Fall 2014)
This course will provide an overview of how archaeologists and anthropologists encounter and interpret death in societies worldwide. We will look at death and the body from the perspective of burials and tombs, discussing ancient and modern conceptions of souls, afterlives, and identities. Drawing upon my own research in the tropical lowlands of Guatemala and Honduras, we will compare Maya attitudes towards death with those of other world societies, from the mummies of ancient Egypt to modern jazz funerals in New Orleans. We will explore different ideas about death, social boundaries, and even what it is to be human. 3 hrs. lect. (Anthropology) AAL, CMP, SOC (J. Fitzsimmons)

SOAN 0363 On the Move: Mobile Lives, Mobile Technologies (Spring 2015)
Social life is increasingly on the move. Mobile phones, the Internet, and even "old-fashioned" technologies like cars and planes, produce lives in motion and interaction at a distance. How does this constant movement affect the organization of social worlds and the ways we understand them? Where are we going? How are we getting there? Through exploring mobilities, we will tackle questions of place, politics, belonging, work, leisure, borders, social control, and social change. We will use sociology to engage these new practices and technologies, and, in turn, use them to rethink the old assumptions of classical social science. (SOAN 0105) 3 hr. sem. (Sociology) SOC (L. Owens)

SOAN 0379 Indigenous Religions of the Americas (Spring 2015)
This course focuses on the religious traditions of the Americas, from native North America to the Andes, with the focus being on the practices of ancient urban societies like the Mississippians of the American Southeast, the Maya of Mesoamerica, or the Inka of the Andes. In this course we will look at the types of religious ideas and practices common in the Americas prior to the Colonial Period, including concepts of ancestors, sacrifice, and cyclical time. We will also examine how those traditions have changed, particularly following the introduction of Christianity in the 16th century. 3 hrs. lect./disc. (Anthropology) AAL, CMP, PHL, SOC (J. Fitzsimmons)

SOAN 0387 Medical Anthropology: Approaches to Affliction and Healing (Spring 2015)
In this course, an introduction to medical anthropology, we will explore cultural and political-economic perspectives on health, illness, and disease. Topics covered include: (1) biocultural approaches to understanding health; (2) medical systems, including biomedicine and others; (3) the effects of poverty and inequality on health outcomes; and (4) the social construction of health and illness. Students will apply these concepts in understanding an aspect of health, illness, or healing in their own research project with an ethnographic component. An introductory course in anthropology or familiarity with medical or public health issues is recommended. 3 hrs. lect./disc. (Anthropology) CMP, CW (5 spaces), SOC (S. Closser)

SOAN/LNGT 0395 Language and the Environment (Spring 2015)
Do languages simply put different labels on the environment, from rocks to trees to carbon, or are what we see and what we value shaped by the ways that we talk about it? Drawing upon ethnography, linguistics, and critical discourse analysis, we will explore how environmental perceptions and modes of action are formed in and through language. We will bring an appreciation of language differences to the analysis of ongoing environmental controversies, where the various stakeholders draw contrasting boundaries between nature and culture and define human involvement with nature in different ways. 3 hrs. lect./disc. (Anthropology) CMP, SOC (M. Nevins)

SOAN/GSFS 0402 Sex and Society (Spring 2015)
In this seminar we will explore the pleasures, power, and problems of sex and will place sexuality in dynamic interaction with larger social issues. It is impossible to understand sexuality as separate from other dimensions of the human condition such as economics, politics, work, family, race, and gender. In particular, we will examine questions related to the science of sex, morality, monogamy, sex work, power and domination, desire and fantasy, and sexual politics. Overall, students will gain an understanding of sexuality as a social phenomenon. 3 hrs. sem. (J. McCallum)

SOAN/LNGT 0459 Language and Power Seminar (Fall 2014)
This seminar is an introduction to both linguistic anthropology and political anthropology. Communication patterns are always mediated by cultural processes, social inequality, and power, so in this course we will investigate cross-cultural examples of how language, discourse, and representation relate to inequality, power, and resistance. Topics will include sociolinguistics, ethnolinguistics, gendered language practices, political discourse, and theoretical approaches to power (Marx, Foucault, and Bourdieu) (SOAN 0103 or SOAN 0105) 3 hrs. sem. (Anthropology) CW (5 spaces), SOC (M. Nevins)

SOAN 0468 Success and Failure in Global Health and Development Projects (Spring 2015)
In 1977, the Smallpox Eradication Program obliterated a disease that once killed almost two million people a year. In contrast, the Malaria Eradication Program of the same era blanketed much of the world in DDT, yet failed to make much of a dent in incidence of malaria in Africa. Through case studies and critical engagement of readings from political science, economics, and anthropology, we will explore the questions: Why do a few global health and development projects succeed? Why do most fail? Why do some make things worse for the people they are supposed to benefit? Does a productive way forward exist? (One course in global health or development, such as SOAN 0267, SOAN 0360, SOAN 0387, SOAN 0467, PSCI 0258, ECON 0325, ECON 0327, ECON 0425, ECON 0429, or GEOG 0210) 3 hrs. sem. (Anthropology) SOC (S. Closser)

SOAN 0478 Sociology of Punishment (Fall 2014)
In this course, we will examine the changing ideologies and practices of state-sponsored punishment that have led to the spectacular expansion of imprisonment and other forms of penal supervision in the U.S. Drawing on theoretical accounts of punishment, historical examinations of prison and parole, and contemporary studies of criminal law and sentencing, we will consider social control as it plays out via institutionalized contexts, namely prisons and asylums, as well as alternative sanctions, such as coerced treatment. We will identify the major phases of penal development and consider mass imprisonment as both a reflection and cause of racial and economic inequality. (SOAN 0105) 3 hrs. sem. (Sociology) NOR, SOC (R. Tiger)

SOAN 0500 Advanced Individual Study (Fall 2014, Spring 2015)
Prior to registering for SOAN 0500, a student must enlist the support of a faculty advisor from the Department of Sociology/Anthropology. (Open to Majors only) (Approval Required) (Sociology or Anthropology) (Staff)

SOAN 0700 One-Semester Senior Project (Fall 2014, Spring 2015)
Under the guidance of a faculty member, a student will carry out an independent, one-semester research project, often based on original data. The student must also participate in a senior seminar that begins the first week of fall semester and meets as necessary during the rest of the year. The final product must be presented in a written report of 25-40 pages, due the last day of classes. (Sociology or Anthropology) (Staff)

SOAN 0710 Multi-Semester Senior Project (Fall 2014, Spring 2015)
Under the guidance of a faculty member, a senior will carry out an independent multi-semester research project, often based on original data. The student must also participate in a senior seminar that begins the first week of fall semester and meets as necessary during the rest of the year. The final product must be presented in a written report of 60-100 pages, due either at the end of the Winter Term or the Friday after spring break. (Sociology or Anthropology) (Staff)

South Asian Studies
This program offers a minor in South Asian Studies to students who complete the following requirements:
(1) Two of the following core courses which focus primarily on South Asia or the religions of South Asia:
ENAM 0270 Postcolonial Literature: 20th-Century South Asia
ENAM 0310 Postcolonial Studies and Politics
HARC 0227 Poetry, Piety & Power: Indian Painting 1200-Present
HIST 0238 Modern Sri Lanka
HIST 0239 Modern India
HIST 0429 Gandhi
IGST 0250 International Diplomacy and Modern South Asia
RELI 0140 Hindu Traditions of India
RELI 0150 The Islamic Tradition
RELI 0220 Buddhist Traditions in India
RELI 0224 Tibetan Tantric Traditions
RELI 0391 Seminar on Women and Religion (when offered as Goddesses of South Asia)
Winter term East India Company
(2) Two courses, chosen from group 1 (above) or from the following courses, which include significant course materials on South Asia or Islam:
HARC 0102 Monuments and Ideas in Asian Art
HARC 0204 Approaches to Islamic Art
HIST 0108 The Early History of Islam and the Middle East
HIST 0109 The History of Islam and the Middle East
IGST 0449 Imperialism and Culture
RELI 0120 Intro to Asian Religions
RELI 0255 Islam in the Modern World
RELI 0320 Seminar in Buddhist Philosophy
GSFS/ FMMC 0347 Remote Control: Global TV Culture
(3) One advanced, relevant 0400-level course (including those listed above in group 1) or an independent 0500-level project.
     NOTE: Other courses offered during the fall and spring semesters, or during the winter term, or at universities in South Asia, may substitute for courses in category 2 at the discretion of the program director. The director or minor adviser will also approve courses to count in category 3.
     There are many possibilities for study at universities in South Asia. Contact the Office of Off-Campus Study for details.

Spanish & Portuguese

Major in Spanish: The major consists of a minimum of nine courses numbered 0300 or above. At least three of these courses must be taken at Middlebury during the academic year. The requirements are as follows:
I. SPAN 0300 (must be taken before studying abroad)

II. Seven elective courses from the 0301-0399 level.

  • A maximum of three courses from the 0301-0349 level may count towards the major
  • At least four elective courses must be at the 0350 level or above.
  • At least one elective must be in Spanish American literature or cultures.
  • At least one elective must be in the literature or culture of Spain.
  • At least one elective must be taken at Middlebury during the academic year.
  • Elective courses may be taken on campus or at the Middlebury College summer Spanish School, the School in Spain, the School in Latin America, or, with departmental approval, at study abroad programs in Latin America sanctioned by Middlebury's Programs Abroad Committee.

III. A 0400-level seminar on campus during the senior year.

  • Study abroad in the region of interest for at least one semester is highly recommended and a course on the culture of the region is highly recommended before studying abroad. Students are expected to consult with their advisor when selecting courses and making plans to study abroad.

     Joint Major: The Spanish component of a joint major will consist of at least six courses from departmental offerings numbered 0300 and above, as follows:
I. SPAN 0300 (must be taken before studying abroad)
II. Four elective courses from the 0301-0399 level.

  • A maximum of one course from the 0301-0349 level may count towards the major.
  • At least three elective courses must be at the 0350 level or above.
  • At least one elective must be in Spanish American literature or cultures.
  • At least one elective must be in the literature or culture of Spain.
  • At least one elective must be taken at Middlebury during the academic year.
  • Elective courses may be taken on campus or at the Middlebury College summer Spanish School, the School in Spain, the School in Latin America, or, with departmental approval, at study abroad programs in Latin America sanctioned by Middlebury's Programs Abroad Committee.

III. A 0400 level seminar on campus during the senior year.

  • Study abroad in the region of interest for at least one semester is highly recommended and a course on the culture of the region is highly recommended before studying abroad. Students are expected to consult with their advisor when selecting courses and making plans to study abroad.

Spanish Courses
Courses labeled SPAN 0100 through 0299 are Elementary, Intermediate and Advanced Intermediate language instruction focused on developing skills in speaking, listening comprehension, reading and writing.
     Courses labeled SPAN 0300 through 0349 introduce writers and significant themes in literature, film, linguistics, and culture & civilization. These courses are closed to juniors and seniors returning from study in Spain or Latin America.
     Courses labeled SPAN 0350 through 0399 are advanced offerings that explore in greater depth a specific line of inquiry, literary, cultural or linguistic issue, or theme in Spanish and Spanish American writing and thought, and satisfy the International Studies advanced language requirement in Spanish. Courses taken abroad will count as this level, regardless of their course number.
     Courses labeled SPAN 0400 and above are reserved for seniors who are Spanish majors, Latin American Studies majors with a literature and culture track, and European Studies majors with a Spanish literature and culture track; others only by approval.
     Minor in Spanish: The Spanish minor consists of at least four courses numbered 0300 or above, at least two of which are at the 0350-level or above. Courses can be taken on campus during the academic year or at the Middlebury College Spanish Language School, the School in Spain, the School in Latin America, or, with departmental approval, at study abroad programs in Spain or Latin America sanctioned by Middlebury’s Programs Abroad Committee. At least one 0350-level or above course must be taken at the Middlebury College campus during the academic year.
     Senior Work: During the senior year, majors and joint majors must complete a 0400-level seminar.
     International Studies: Latin American studies and European studies majors with a discipline in Literature and Culture must take, in addition to their core requirements: six courses at the 0300 level or above, including SPAN 0300, at least one literature course in the area of interest, at least one culture course in the area of interest, and one 0400-level seminar during the senior year.
     Advanced Placement: College credit is awarded for successful performance on the Advanced Placement Examinations in Spanish Language and/or Spanish Literature. In all cases the student must satisfactorily complete a course at the 0300 level before the credit will be awarded. AP credit does not affect course placement, nor does it count towards the major or minor. There is a maximum of one credit allowed for Spanish AP.
     Programs Abroad for Juniors: The department expects that majors will spend at least one semester in residence in a Spanish-speaking country. Middlebury's School in Spain offers both year and semester programs in Madrid. Sites in Crdoba, Getafe, and Logroo are designed for immersion in the Spanish university system. Middlebury's School in Latin America (Argentina, Chile, Mexico and Uruguay) offers both year and semester programs. Internship opportunities are available. For more information on these programs, please see the Schools Abroad Web page: http://www.middlebury.edu/sa/. Students who are interested in going abroad and who are also double or joint majors or are thinking of participating in the teacher education program should consult with their advisors in both areas as early as possible to avoid any conflict in plans.
     Students who are planning to study abroad at the C.V. Starr-Middlebury Schools in Spain or Latin America are required to have taken at least one course at the 0300 level or above. Majors must take SPAN 0300 before their semester abroad.
     Honors: The department will award honors on the basis of a student's work in the department and performance in SPAN 0705. All students interested in receiving honors must contact their advisors at the start of their last year at Middlebury; either in September or in February. Please see the course description for SPAN 0705.

Portuguese
Minor in Portuguese: The Portuguese minor consists of at least four courses numbered 0300 or above, at least two of which are at the 0350-level or above. Courses can be taken on campus during the academic year or at the Middlebury College Portuguese Language School, the C.V. Starr-Middlebury School in Brazil, or, with departmental approval, at study abroad programs in Lusophone countries sanctioned by Middlebury’s Programs Abroad Committee. At least one 0350-level or above course must be taken at the Middlebury College campus during the academic year.
     International Studies: Latin American studies majors with a track in the literature and culture of Brazil must take, in addition to their core and regional requirements: PGSE 0202 or its equivalent, four upper level courses in literature or culture taken at Middlebury or in Brazil, and PGSE 0500 during the senior year. At least one elective must be taken at Middlebury during the academic year.

PGSE 0101 Beginning Portuguese I (Fall 2014)
This course is a fast-paced introduction to Brazilian Portuguese and contemporary Brazilian culture. It focuses on the development of skills in listening, reading, speaking, and writing within a cultural context. Students are expected to continue with PGSE 0102 in winter term, and PGSE 0103 in spring term, after successful completion of PGSE 0101. 5 hrs. lect./disc. LNG (A. Marchi)

PGSE 0103 Beginning Portuguese III (Spring 2015)
This course is a continuation of Portuguese 0102. Intensive reading, writing, and speaking. (PGSE 0102) 5 hrs. lect./disc. LNG (F. Rocha)

PGSE 0201 Intermediate Portuguese I (Fall 2014)
This is a course designed to consolidate the linguistic skills and expand the cross-cultural knowledge acquired in the PGSE 0101 - PGSE 0103 sequence. A grammar review will accompany critical readings, discussions, and compositions on contemporary Brazilian culture. (PGSE 0103 or equivalent) 3 hrs. lect./disc. LNG (M. Higa)

PGSE 0210 Beginning Portuguese for Romance-Language Speakers (Fall 2014, Spring 2015)
This course is designed for Romance-language speakers and advanced Romance-language learners at the 0200 or 0300-level, depending on the language. It is an intensive introduction to Portuguese, covering all of the basic structures and vocabulary as well as important aspects of the cultures of Lusophone countries. Language learning is based on the students’ previous knowledge of one or more Romance languages. Students are expected to continue with PGSE 0215, after successful completion of PGSE 0210. (FREN 0205, ITAL 0251, SPAN 0220, or placement at French 0210 or above, Italian 0252 or above, Spanish 0300 or above, or instructor’s approval) 6 hrs. lect./disc. LNG (D. Silva)

PGSE 0215 Advanced Portuguese (Spring 2015)
This course is a continuation of either PGSE 0103 or PGSE 0210. It is designed to balance textual and cultural analysis with a thorough review of grammar at an intermediate/high level. Students will hone their critical thinking and linguistic skills through guided readings, oral discussions, and short written assignments on Lusophone cultural topics. (PGSE 0103 or PGSE 0210 or by waiver) 4 hrs. lect./disc. LNG (M. Higa, F. Rocha)

PGSE 0330 Aesthetics of Urban Poverty in Literature, Film, and Music (Fall 2014)
Spaces of urban poverty have long held an ambivalent place within cultural imaginaries, as sites of various stereotypes and signified differences, but also as places of notable cultural production and social contestation. We will consider how urban poverty in Brazil, Lusophone Africa, and Portugal has been represented and commodified (trans)nationally, and how the voices from these locales challenge and pose a series of questions pertaining to capital, imperialisms, nationhood, globalization, and history. In doing so, we will also confront the complex relationships between race, gender, class, family, culture, and social violence, while spanning historical periods, literary and cinematic movements, and musical genres. (PGSE 0215 or equivalent) 3 hrs. lect./disc. AAL, CMP, LIT, LNG (D. Silva)

PGSE/CMLT 0375 Colonial Discourse and the “Lusophone World” (Spring 2015)
In this course we will analyze how European colonialism and imperial endeavors produced meaning, particularly in the interconnected realms of culture, race, language, gender, sexuality, and place. In addition to studying the colonial period, we will pay particular attention to the role and manifestations of colonial discourse more contemporarily in the contexts of nationhood, globalization, sports, and cultural consumption. In doing so, we will address the problematics of the concept of “Lusophone,” starting with the historical legacies and cultural implications of such a transnational entity. Course materials will include critical theory, literary texts, primary historical sources, visual media, and music from Brazil, Lusophone Africa, Lusophone Asia, and Portugal. (PGSE 0215 or equivalent) 3 hrs. lect./disc. AAL, CMP, LNG, SOC (D. Silva)

PGSE 0500 Independent Study (Fall 2014, Spring 2015)
Approval required. (Staff)

SPAN 0101 Beginning Spanish I (Fall 2014)
This course is an introduction to the fundamentals of grammar and focuses on the development of four skills in Spanish: comprehension, speaking, reading, and writing. Emphasis will be placed on active communication aimed at the development of oral and comprehension skills. This course is for students who have not previously studied Spanish. Students are expected to continue with SPAN 0102 and SPAN 0103 after successful completion of SPAN 0101. 5 hrs. lect./disc. (R. Pareja, G. González Zenteno)

SPAN 0103 Beginning Spanish III (Spring 2015)
This course is a continuation of SPAN 0102. Intensive reading, writing, and oral activities will advance students' proficiency in Spanish in an academic setting. (SPAN 0102) 5 hrs. lect./disc. (B. Baird, Staff)

SPAN 0201 Intermediate Spanish (Fall 2014, Spring 2015)
This accelerated course is designed to review, reinforce, and consolidate the linguistic structures that students need in order to reach the intermediate level of proficiency in Spanish. A grammar review will accompany intensive language acquisition, vocabulary expansion, readings, discussions, and compositions. (Placement test required) 3 hrs. lect./1 hr. drill. LNG (Fall 2014: A. Fil, E. García, C. Nuñez; Spring 2015: R. Chávez-Castañeda, M. Fernández, G. González Zenteno, A. Fil)

SPAN 0220 Intermediate Spanish II (Fall 2014, Spring 2015)
A course for students seeking to perfect their academic writing skills in Spanish. The course is also an introduction to literary analysis and critical writing and will include reading and oral discussion of literary texts. The course will also include a thorough review of grammar at a fairly advanced level. This course may be used to fulfill the foreign languages distribution requirement. (SPAN 0201, SPAN 0210, or placement) 3 hrs. lect./disc. LNG (Fall 2014: B. Baird, L. Castañeda, L. Lesta Garcia; Spring 2015: E. García, M. Rohena-Madrazo, R. Pareja)

SPAN 0300 An Introduction to the Study of Hispanic Literature (Fall 2014, Spring 2015)
This course in literature and advanced language is designed to introduce students to literary analysis and critical writing. The work will be based on the reading of a number of works in prose, drama, and poetry. Frequent short, critical essays will complement readings and provide students with practice in writing. This course is required for Spanish majors. (SPAN 0220 or placement) 3 hrs. lect./disc. AAL, LIT, LNG (Fall 2014: M. Manrique-Gómez; Spring 2015: L. Castañeda)

SPAN 0301 Advanced Spanish Grammar (Fall 2014)
This course offers a detailed study of complex aspects of Spanish grammar and syntax. Designed to build upon students' existing knowledge of Spanish grammar, the course will begin with a reconsideration of all the tenses in both the indicative and subjunctive moods, their values and their uses. After briefly reviewing the structure of simple sentences, we will analyze in depth all the different types of dependent clauses. Within the context of sentence structure, we will also look at several key aspects of Spanish grammar (ser and estar, prepositions, the infinitive, and the gerund, among others). Students will demonstrate their understanding of the material through a variety of practical and creative exercises. (SPAN 0220 or placement; not open to students who have taken SPAN 0380). CW (15 spaces), LNG (M. Manrique-Gómez, A. Fil)

SPAN 0302 Creative Non-Fiction in Spanish (Spring 2015)
This course will introduce students to creative non-fiction in the Spanish language. We will explore the techniques and literary skills necessary for researching and writing memoirs and personal essays, and students will produce at least three polished essays. Readings will include Spanish and Latin American masters and theorists of the genre will include Borges, Cortázar, Castellanos, Larra, Hostos, Paz, and Poniatowska. 3 hrs. lect. (At least one course at the 0300 level or by waiver) AAL, ART, CW, LIT, LNG (G. González Zenteno)

SPAN/LNGT 0303 Introduction to Spanish Phonetics and Pronunciation (Fall 2014)
In this course we will study the sound system of Spanish with the aims of introducing the fields of phonetics and phonology while improving pronunciation. Students will become familiar with phonetic transcription, comparing and contrasting articulatory and acoustic characteristics of Spanish as well as English in order to understand and implement different phonological patterns produced by native speakers of Spanish. Additionally, we will discuss major pronunciation differences across the Spanish-speaking world. (SPAN 0220 or placement) 3 hrs. lect./disc. LNG (B. Baird)

SPAN 0304 Ideas and Cultures of Spain (Fall 2014)
In this course we will analyze the major sociopolitical and cultural elements in representative Spanish texts from the Middle Ages to the present. We will discuss literary, historical, and political texts, works of art, and films that illustrate cultural elements that bear upon the formation of present day Spanish culture and civilization. (SPAN 0220 or placement) 3 hrs. lect./disc. EUR, LNG (L. Lesta Garcia)

SPAN 0310 (Intimate) Otherness in Contemporary Hispanic Fiction (Spring 2015)
Recent Hispanic literature locates otherness in ambiguous spaces. The "other" can be excluded in order to demarcate selfhood, but also recognized as internal ("intimate") to a complex and perhaps richer self. In this course students will sharpen oral and written communication skills and build a sophisticated vocabulary to analyze the literary and cultural context of the Spanish speaking world. This goal will be accomplished through readings in late 20th/early 21st century short stories and novellas from the Iberian Peninsula and Spanish America. Race, gender, class, nationality, and health are some perspectives we will adopt in order to map the literary production/deconstruction of "others" as marginalized/embraced subjects. (SPAN 0220 or placement) 3 hrs. lect./disc. CMP, LIT, LNG (L. Castañeda)

SPAN 0313 The Hispanic Short Story (Fall 2014)
In this course we will study the main literary, sociopolitical, and cultural issues in a selection of short stories from the Hispanic world. Emphasis will be on the close reading of texts with the purpose of developing critical vocabulary and writing skills. Authors may include: Pardo Bazán, Valle Inclán, Palma, Borges, Rulfo, Corázar, Quiroga, Matute. (SPAN 0220 or placement) 3 hrs. lect./disc. AAL, LIT, LNG (G. González Zenteno)

SPAN 0320 Hispanic Creative Writing (Spring 2015)
In this course we will focus on creative writing as a way to develop a deeper understanding of the Spanish language. We will achieve this goal by using the language and our imagination to tell stories. This course will also provide the opportunity to read and discuss literary works of important Hispano-American authors including Onneti, Borges, Rulfo, Cortázar, and Méndez. We will also read theoretical texts by Francisco Guzmán Burgos, Pablo Fernández, Alex Grijelmo, Ricardo Piglia, Jorge Luis Borges, among others. (SPAN 0220 or placement). 3 hrs. lect./disc. ART, LNG (R. Chávez-Castañeda)

SPAN/LNGT 0322 Introduction to Hispanic Linguistics (Spring 2015)
This course is an introduction to the theory and methodology of linguistics as applied to the study of Spanish. The course’s goals are to understand the basic characteristics of human language (and of Spanish in particular), and to learn the techniques used to describe and explain linguistic phenomena. We will study the sound system (phonetics/phonology), the structure of words (morphology), the construction of sentences (syntax), as well as the history and sociolinguistic variation of the Spanish language, as spoken in communities in Europe, Latin America, and Northern America. We will examine texts, speech samples, and songs, illustrating these linguistic phenomena. (SPAN 0220 or placement) 3 hrs. lect./disc. CMP, LNG, SOC (M. Rohena-Madrazo)

SPAN 0340 Representations of Social, Cultural, and Political Identities in Spain (Spring 2015)
In this course we will study the different representations of Spanish culture and politics. We will emphasize specific aspects that make Spain richly varied: Spain´s breathtaking reinvention and reaffirmation of its own identity after the Disaster of 1898, religious customs and conflicts, gender relations, political values of Spaniards. At the same time, the cultural impact of Don Quixote, Goya, Lorca, republicanism and dictatorship, civil war, flamenco, bullfighting, and soccer. Works to be discussed include a short selection of literary pieces, cultural, visual, musical, and film representations. This course is recommended for students planning to study in Spain. (SPAN 0220 or placement) 3 hrs. lect. /disc. EUR, LNG (M. Manrique-Gómez)

SPAN 0350 Los raros: Alternative Hispanic Fiction (Fall 2014)
In this course we will analyze fiction by authors often described as “raros” (“strange”). “Los raros” is a category coined by poet Rubén Darío and later adopted by critic Angel Rama and others to designate a “secret society” of peripheral and imaginative writers who have spawned unclassifiable, experimental, sometimes dreamlike, always revolutionary texts. We will delve into the narrative worlds of “raros” (Bellatin, Hernández, Levrero, Somers, Vila-Matas, etc.) and articulate the threat that “rareza” poses to dominant notions of identity, normality, sanity, and coherence. (Two Spanish courses at the 0300-level or above, or waiver) 3 hrs. lect./disc. AAL, LIT, LNG (L. Castañeda)

SPAN 0361 Hispanic Musical Films (Spring 2015)
In this course we will study Hispanic musical films (including fiction and documentaries) from Spain, Latin America, and the United States. Our main goal will be to understand how Hispanic countries use this cinematic genre to establish nationalist constructions and ideologies, and how this has consequently affected the development of Hispanic musical narratives in the United States. Analyses will focus on how different ethnic aspects are defined as 'Other' in musical genres such as Flamenco, Tango, Rancheras, Tex-Mex, Salsa, Reggaeton, Merengue, and Spanish Rock. We will explore why Hispanic musicals are perceived as exotic in relation to their Anglophone counterparts while studying films such as Buena Vista Social Club, Allá en el rancho grande, Selena, and El día que me quieras. (At least two Spanish courses at the 0300 level or above, or by waiver) 3 hrs. lect./screening AAL, LIT (E. García)

SPAN/CMLT 0371 Don Quixote/ and Its Representation in Visual Culture (Fall 2014)
In this course we will read Cervantes’ masterpiece, Don Quixote. Special attention will be given to the historical, philosophical, and cultural context of the period. Emphasis will be placed on specific topics such as religion, governance, intercultural relationships, madness, parody, authorship, and love. We will also study the novel’s representation and adaption in a selection of illustrations, graphic novels, animated films, comics, children’s books, and music. Representation in contemporary global cinema, television, and advertising will also be examined. Students will study different adaptations from Europe, Latin America, Asia, and the United States. (At least two courses at the 0300-level or above or by waiver). 3 hrs. lect../screening. CMP, CW (5 spaces), EUR, LIT, LNG (P. Saldarriaga)

SPAN/LNGT 0390 Linguistic Variation (Fall 2014)
In this course we will study linguistic variation in the Spanish-speaking world. The focus will be on the linguistic aspects of the varieties of Spanish spoken in Spain, Latin America, Asia, and the United States. Topics will include lexical variation, phonological variation, morphosyntactic variation, and geographic and social factors in linguistic variation. Special attention will be paid to Spanish in contact with other languages, e.g. with indigenous languages in Latin America, and with Basque and Catalan in Spain. The discussion will also include creole languages (e.g. Papiamentu). We will study texts, speech samples, and songs that illustrate specific cases of variation. (At least two Spanish courses at the 0300 level or above, or by waiver) 3 hrs. lect./disc. CMP (M. Rohena-Madrazo)

SPAN 0392 Spanish National Identity at the End of the Empire: Literature and Music of the Generation of '98 (Spring 2015)
National identities reflect the conflicts and contradictions in the social and political arenas in which they are constructed and conceptualized. What is the role of literature and music in the building of Spanish National Identity? In this course we will study the social and political circumstances in Spain from the end of the 19th Century to the Civil War (1936-39). We will focus on literary texts of the writers of the Generation of '98 as well as on musical traditions as diverse as the "zarzuela," and the "pasodoble," that contributed to change the notion of National Identity in Spain. Writers to be analyzed include Angel Ganivet, José Martínez Ruiz "Azorín," Pío Baroja, Ramiro de Maeztu, Antonio Machado, Miguel de Unamuno, and Ramón Maria del Valle Inclán; composers include Manuel de Falla and Isaac Albéniz. (At least two courses at the 0300-level or above or by waiver) 3 hrs. lect./disc. ART, EUR, LNG (M. Manrique-Gómez)

SPAN 0399 From Page to Stage: Representing Hispanic Theatre (Spring 2015)
In this course we will both study and perform a selected play from Spain or Latin America. The first half of the course will be dedicated to an in-depth analysis of the selected play. We will complement our study with readings on semiotics and performance studies, other works by the author, other plays, and texts on relevant socio-historical and political topics. The second half of the semester will be dedicated to preparing a full production of the play to be presented at the end of the semester. Students will be involved as actors as well as in all aspects of production and decision-making, requiring about three hours of rehearsal time per week outside of class. Through performance students will find deeper meaning in the literary text. (At least two courses at the 0300-level or above or by waiver) 3 hrs. lect./disc./rehearsal ART, EUR, LIT, LNG (M. Fernández)

SPAN 0420 Latin American Comic Books and Visual Culture (Fall 2014)
In this course we will explore the development of Latin American serialized comic books and graphic novels, and their rise from pulp entertainment to iconic national narratives. We will examine the cultural aspects that mark these Hispanic comic books as different from those produced within the framework of the U.S. visual industry. However, we will also establish a parallel with the texts' multiple esthetic and cultural influences from the United States, Europe, and Japan. Discussion topics will include controversial race issues such as the import of blackface esthetics into Mexican narratives (e.g. Memín Pinguín), political and relationship humor in serials (e.g. Elpidio Valdés and Condorito), and the variations among the narratives according to their respective countries of origin and ideology. We will pay special attention to the new global culture in which international influences merge into new narratives that defy traditional ideas of Hispanic identity (e.g. Gilbert Hernández' Poison River and Tom Beland's True Story Swear to God). (Senior majors with at least two Spanish courses numbered 0350 or above, or by waiver.) 3 hrs. sem. AAL, ART (E. García)

SPAN 0450 National Culture and Space: Art, Narrative, and Travel of Explorations in 19th Century Bolivia and Peru (Spring 2015)
In this seminar we will study canonical and non-canonical narrative texts from 19th-century Bolivia and Peru from a socio-spatial perspective. Alongside literary texts, we will consider texts by travelers and explorers, pamphlets, maps, pictorial artwork, and photographs that highlight the importance of constructing national spaces as a prerequisite for constructing national cultures in both of these countries during the 19th century. Among other materials, we will read and analyze Nataniel Aguirre's historical novel Juan de la Rosa, extracts from Manuel Atanasio Fuentes' Lima: apuntes históricos, descriptivos, estadísticos y de costumbres, the pictorial artwork of Johann Moritz Rugendas, and relevant theory on the relationship between space and nation. (Senior majors with at least two Spanish courses numbered 0350 or above, or by waiver.) AAL, ART (R. Pareja)

SPAN 0500 Independent Study (Fall 2014, Spring 2015)
The department will consider requests by qualified juniors and senior majors to engage in independent work. Approval required. (Staff)

SPAN 0705 Senior Honors Thesis (Fall 2014, Spring 2015)
The department will award honors, high honors, or highest honors on the basis of a student's work in the department and performance in SPAN 0705. Approval required. (Staff)

Studio Art

Required for the Major (12 courses): ART 0157, or ART 0159, or another introductory level drawing course; HARC 0100 or HARC 0102 (or an approved substitute in the history of art practice); five studio art courses, three of which must be at the 0300 level or higher;* four additional courses in either studio art practice or any cross-disciplinary electives chosen in consultation with your advisors from the elective categories below; and ART 0700 or a designated senior work section of a 0300 level ART course is also required.
* The 0300 level classes integrate to give students well-rounded experience in major approaches to the practice of visual art. Classes in sculpture, photography, printmaking and painting focus on unique properties of each medium, yet highlight technical and expressive connections with each other and other areas of the curriculum (see elective categories). Instruction is highly individualized in order to help students develop their own artistic voice.
     Joint Major Requirements (8 courses): ART 0157, or ART 0159, or another introductory level drawing course; HARC 0100 or HARC 0102 (or an approved substitute in the history of art-practice); four electives in studio art, three of which must be at the 0300 level or higher; one additional elective chosen in consultation with your advisors from the elective categories below; and ART 0700 or a designated senior work section of a 0300 level ART course.
     Minors in Studio Art (6 courses): ART 0157, ART 0159, or another introductory level drawing course; HARC 0100 or HARC 0102 (or an approved substitute in the history of art practice); four studio art courses, three of which must be at the 0300 level or higher. Minors are eligible to apply to enroll in ART 0700.

Elective Categories for Studio Art Major:
     History of Visual Art Practice
: Any history course in the history of human visual culture. For examples, please refer to the course descriptions of AMST 0225, FMMC 0267, HARC 0204, IGST 0420, and PHIL 0233.
     Visual Imaging: Any course that seeks to understand and process knowledge through cognitive visual imaging. For examples, please refer to the course descriptions of CSCI 0461, DANC 0361, GEOG 0325, GEOL 0211, and PHYS 0221.
     Metaphorical Thinking
: Any course that teaches how to process knowledge through mapping experience between two realms, linguistic or non-linguistic. For examples, please refer to the course descriptions of CRWR 0170, ENVS/DANC 0277, FMMC 0106, MATH 0121, PHYS 0101, PHYS 0201, THEA 0218, and SPAN 0320.
     Creative Practice
: Any creative practicum course. For examples, please refer to the course descriptions of DANC 0160, FMMC 0348, HARC 0330, and MUSC 0221.
     Honors:
Categories of honors are based upon cumulative departmental averages as follows: honors, 3.7; high honors, 3.8; highest honors, 3.9 or higher.
     Teacher Training: Students interested in teacher training in art should consult with the chairs of the education studies program and the studio art program.
     Study Abroad
: Many students in Studio Art wish to pursue visual art-practice in depth during junior year away from Middlebury. The Program has long experience with many institutions abroad (as well in the U.S.) that offer excellent studio art programs. Students should consult with their advisors to develop a plan for which schools and programs of study are most suitable for their goals.

ART 0159 Studio Art I: Drawing (Fall 2014, Spring 2015)
This course is a complete and thorough basic drawing course. Mediums used will be pencil, charcoal, and ink, among others. Work will be done from observation and invention. Line, perspective, value, composition, and introduction to color will be discussed. Assignments will involve students with the formal and technical aspects of drawing and with the idea of drawing as an individual means of expression. No prior drawing experience is assumed or expected. This course is required of all art majors and minors. 6 hrs. lect./lab ART (Fall 2014: J. Huddleston, J. Kemp, H. Klein; Spring 2015: J. Kemp)

ART 0167 Intro to Sculpture-Form and Space (Spring 2015)
What defines a sculpture? How do we make a sculpture? How do we talk about sculpture? What purpose does sculpture have? In this foundational, 3-dimensional art class, we will address fundamental sculpture concepts by considering form, function, scale, volume, and ideas behind the tactile world.  Students will learn useful techniques such as: basic welding and woodworking; as well as how to use less traditional materials like rubbers, plastics, and foams. Through a series of sculpture-making projects we will learn to control these methods in creating our own art objects. Slide presentations of contemporary and historical artworks will integrate individual instruction and group critiques.  No experience is required or expected. 6 hrs. lect., lab ART (S. Mirling)

ART 0300 Advanced Drawing: Making Your Mark (Spring 2015)
In this course students will refine their drawing skills and their understanding of formal pictorial language and how to visually communicate ideas to a viewer. Students will have the option to explore drawing from observation, imagination, abstraction, and unconventional. Students will be exposed to the importance and relevance of both contemporary art as well as ancient art, stressing critical thinking and the exploration of materials. (ART 0157, ART 0158, ART 0159 or by approval) 6 hrs. lect./lab. ART (H. Klein)

ART 0311 Painting in Water Based Media – Exploring Design and Graphic Concepts (Fall 2014)
In this course we will explore painting using water-based media including watercolor, gouache, acrylic, and ink. Our focus will be on parallels and crossovers between worlds of fine art and applied design. We will discuss styles common to both art and design from the decorative arts of the Renaissance and Art Nouveau periods to rational geometries of the Bauhaus. Through projects, students will learn to reinvent the past to create contemporary painted images. We will augment water-based painting with digital tutorials in Photoshop and Illustrator to merge handmade and computer methodologies, and to exploit color, layers, and textures of design motifs in typography and popular imagery. (ART 0157, ART 0159, or another intro level studio art course) 3hrs lect./3hrs. lab ART (J. Kemp)

ART 0312 Painting in Oil: Exploring Color and Movement (Spring 2015)
In this class students will learn oil painting histories and techniques in order to develop skills and aesthetic sensibilities in two dimensions. Through assignments that increase the understanding of the mechanics and composition of color, we will expand our notion of picturing to include sciences, narratives, and the natural world. Towards the end of the semester we will use our paintings to create a time-lapse video animation based on the oil painting process itself. In this way students will explore how to make a static image come to life with change and motion. Sources and examples by visual artists from the past and present will direct students toward making original contemporary art. (ART 0157, ART 0159, or other introductory level studio art course) 3 hrs. lect./3 hrs. lab ART (J. Kemp)

ART 0315 Scratching the Surface (Spring 2015)
In this course we will explore studio instruction in traditional and contemporary methods of intaglio printmaking with a critical emphasis on different methods of working directly on the plate. The general term intaglio (from the Italian intagliare, which means to engrave, carve, or cut) covers a multitude of processes. The incised line in the plate holds the ink while the surface is wiped clean. Only the line prints when paper is placed on the plate and both are run through the etching press. The course is augmented by slide lectures to provide the students with a thorough background in the intaglio medium as well as other drawing based mediums. Depending on resources, students may have the opportunity to be a part of an intensive, collaborative print project to produce an edition of prints with a professional artist. (ART 0157, ART 0158, ART 0159 or by approval) 6 hrs. lect./lab ART (H. Klein)

ART 0318 Silkscreen Printmaking (Fall 2014)
In this course students will explore the silkscreen medium with guided studio instruction. This will include paper stencil method, film stencil method, photographic stencil method, and multicolor printing. Concentration will be on drawing. Towards the end of the semester, students will learn to use basic computer-aided imagery. Students will explore the roll of silkscreen printing in contemporary art as well as its use in popular culture. Depending on resources, students may have the opportunity to be part of an intensive collaborative print project to produce an edition of prints with a professional artist. (ART 0157, ART 0158, ART 0159 or by approval) 6 hrs. lect./lab ART (H. Klein)

ART 0327 Black and White Photography (Fall 2014)
In this course we will explore traditional and contemporary B&W photographic expression, including portraiture, landscape, street, and collage. This course will include some study of the history of photography, as well as basic camera, darkroom, and digital techniques. Students must have a 35 mm film (preferable) or 8MP (or bigger) digital SLR camera with manual controls of focus, aperture, and shutter. Non-sectarian mindfulness practice will be part of this class (ART 0157, ART 0158 or ART 0159 or by approval) 6 hrs. lect./lab ART (J. Huddleston)

ART 0328 Color Photography (Spring 2015)
This course is an introduction to color photography with an emphasis on the construction of images using personal and social ideas. It will include some study of the history of photography and basic digital imaging techniques to make color prints. Students must have an 8MP (or bigger) digital DSLR camera with manual controls of focus, aperture, and shutter. Non-sectarian mindfulness practice will be part of this class. (ART 0157, ART 0158, or ART 0159, or by approval) 6 hrs. lect./lab. ART (J. Huddleston)

ART 0371 Sculpture I - Communicating in Three-Dimensions (Fall 2014)
This course is designed to further an investigation into the techniques and principles of three-dimensional art. Project objectives are designed to provide new problems and techniques to provoke creative solutions and visions. We will experiment with a number of materials and concepts, from wood-bending and welding to performance and installation. Each project's success will rely heavily on the research and commitment students bring to the creative process. Students will be expected to communicate the process and concept behind each artwork visually, orally, and in writing. (ART 0159 and another introductory level studio practice course from the following list: ART 0157, ART 0159, ART 0180, or by approval) 6 hrs. lect./lab ART (S. Mirling)

ART 0700 Senior Independent Study (Fall 2014, Spring 2015)
Approval required. 4 hrs. sem./lab (Fall 2014: S. Mirling; Spring 2015: S. Mirling)

Theatre

Theatre at Middlebury is an interdisciplinary pursuit in which students examine the art form from multiple perspectives. The program offers a major, a joint major, and a minor.
     Requirements for the Major: Students must complete a combination of twelve courses (eight core courses and four Theatre electives) and a Crew Requirement (defined below).

Core Courses
ARDV 0116 The Creative Process
THEA 0101 Visual Creativity for the Stage or THEA 0111 Scenic Design I: Beginning or THEA 0113 Lighting Design I: Beginning or THEA 0205 Costume Design I: Beginning
THEA 0102 Acting I
THEA 0208 Theatre History
THEA 0214 Directing I: Beginning
THEA/CRWR 0218 Playwriting I: Beginning or HARC 0100 Monuments and Ideas in Western Art or a THEA literature course
THEA 0406 Twentieth/Twenty-First Century Performance Aesthetics
THEA 0700 Senior Independent Project
     The remaining four courses are Theatre electives to be chosen in consultation with the advisor as preparation for the Senior Independent Project (THEA 0700).
Only one Production Studio course may be counted in fulfillment of the major.
     Joint Majors: Students must complete a combination of eight courses (six core courses and two Theatre electives) and a Crew Requirement (defined below). Joint majors who choose to do their Senior Independent Project in acting or directing may be required to complete an additional course.

Core Courses
ARDV 0116 The Creative Process
THEA 0101Visual Creativity for the Stage or THEA 0111 Scenic Design I: Beginning or THEA 0113 Lighting Design I: Beginning or THEA 0205 Costume Design I: Beginning
THEA 0102 Acting I
THEA 0208 Theatre History
THEA 0406 Twentieth/Twenty-First Century Performance Aesthetics
THEA 0700 Senior Independent Project
Only one Production Studio course may be counted in fulfillment of the joint major.
     Senior Independent Project: Students may pursue independent senior projects in acting, directing, design (set, light, or costume), playwriting, literature, applied theatre, or by combining two or more of the above disciplines. All senior projects will include both experiential and analytical work. Intermediate Independent Projects (THEA 0500) are not required but may be proposed in all disciplines except acting. Please visit Senior work for a guide to Senior Work Course Requirements.
     Crew Requirement: The Crew Requirement must be completed by the end of the 5th semester and will normally be satisfied by undertaking a running crew assignment (lights, sound, wardrobe) on a for-credit production. This requirement may also be fulfilled by stage managing or assistant directing a faculty show, or by completing THEA 0119 Fall Production Studio: Design.
     Theatre Minors: Students must complete a combination of six courses (three core courses and three Theatre electives).

Core Courses
ARDV 0116 The Creative Process or THEA 0101 Visual Creativity for the Stage
THEA 0102 Acting I
THEA 0208 Theatre History
Only one Production Studio course may be counted in fulfillment of the minor.
     Advising
: Theatre at Middlebury requires of its majors an ongoing and significant advising relationship with departmental faculty. This relationship will build, rather than diminish, through a student's time at the College, culminating in the advising relationship for senior work.
     Honors: Honors, high honors, or highest honors are awarded to graduating seniors in the Theatre Program based upon their grade point average of 3.8 or better in theatre courses, and overall distinction in the department. Normally only majors will be eligible for high for highest honors.

ARDV 0116 The Creative Process (Fall 2014, Spring 2015)
In this course, students will have the opportunity to dig deeply into their own creativity and explore the processes by which ideas emerge and are given shape in the arts. The experiential nature of this course integrates cognition and action, mind and body. Students will engage a range of modes of discovering, knowing, and communicating, which are designed to push them beyond their present state of awareness and level of confidence in their creative power. Practical work will be closely accompanied by readings and journaling, culminating with the creation and performance of a short project. (First- and second-year students only; Not open to students who have taken FYSE 1364) 3 hrs. lect. ART (Fall 2014: C. Brown, J. Vandenberg; Spring 2015: Staff)

THEA 0101 Visual Creativity for Stage (Fall 2014)
Students will develop an understanding of color, line, form, shape, texture, and balance as they apply to historical and current theatrical literature. Projects in figure drawing, charcoal and chalk, watercolor painting, and model making are intended to stretch the student's research ability, artistic imagination, critical-analysis, and presentation skills. The class is designed for all students interested in the visual and the performing arts and serves as an introduction to set, costume, and light design. 25 hours of production lab work will be assigned in class. 3 hrs. lect. ART (M. Evancho)

THEA 0102 Acting I: Beginning Acting (Fall 2014, Spring 2015)
Rigorous physical and psychophysical exercises attempt to break through the cultural and psychological barriers that inhibit an open responsiveness to impulses, to the environment, and to others. Attempt is made to free personal response within improvised scenes and, eventually, within the narrative structure of a naturalistic scene. Attention is given to various theories of acting technique. Students are expected to audition for departmental shows. (First- and second-year students only) 3 hrs. lect./individual labs ART (Fall 2014: A. Draper,  Staff;  Spring 2015:  Staff)

THEA 0111 Scenic Design I: Beginning (Fall 2014)
Exploration and development of basic set design skills for theatre and dance. Class projects will introduce the student to sketching, sculpting, script analysis, and presentation skills. The design projects will challenge the student's imagination and creativity through historical and current theatrical literature, the study of artistic movements in theatre, concept development, and research. In addition, students will work on productions in order to understand better how theory relates to practice. 25 hours of production lab work will be assigned in class. 3 hrs. lect. ART (M. Evancho)

THEA 0113 Lighting Design I: Beginning (Spring 2015)
This course examines historical and present lighting theories, theatrical artistic movements, and theatrical literature, leading to the planning and conceptual development of the lighting plot. Class projects will also introduce the student to sketching, painting, sculpture, script analysis, and presentation skills. In addition, students will work on productions in order to understand better how theory relates to practice. 25 hours of production lab work will be assigned in class/3 hrs. lect. ART (M. Evancho)

THEA/AMST 0117 Dramas of the American Civil Rights Movement (1956-1966) (Spring 2015)
Racial egalitarianism was a central premise of the U.S. Civil Rights Movement; playwrights, using their voices as cultural arbiters, played a significant role in raising awareness about racial injustices, thus contributing in an important way to the success of the movement. Relying on critical analyses, archival material, oral interviews, and dramatic texts, students will explore how dramatists (Loften Mitchell, Lorraine Hansberry, Ossie Davis, Amiri Baraka, George Sklar) addressed crucial issues (education, housing, and voting) in their plays. Students will also have an opportunity to explore the role of comedy and militancy on the stage while simultaneously understanding how the theatre served as a vehicle for political progress and social change. ART, LIT, NOR (N. Nesmith)

THEA 0119 Fall Production Studio: Design (Fall 2014)
In preparing a fully produced theatrical production for the stage, students will participate in and be exposed to professional production practices in all areas of theatrical design, including sets, costumes, props, lights, and sound. Students will be involved in planning, building, painting, constructing, and running and striking of shows. More advanced students may speak to the professors about taking on special projects, but those with little or no experience backstage are very much encouraged to participate. 8 hrs. lab ART (M. Evancho)

THEA 0129 Spring Production Studio: Design (Spring 2015)
In preparing two fully produced theatrical productions for the stage, students will participate in and be exposed to professional production practices in all areas of theatrical design, including sets, costumes, props, lights, and sound. Students will be involved in planning, building, painting, constructing, and running and striking of shows. More advanced students may speak to the professors about taking on special projects, but those with little or no experience backstage are very much encouraged to participate. 8 hrs. lab ART (M. Evancho)

THEA/ENAM 0136 Dramatizing the Black Experience for the American Stage (Fall 2014)
In this course we will explore how influential contemporary African American dramatists bring to the American stage different aspects of the black experience.  From William Branch’s A Medal For Willie (1951) to Dominique Morriseau’s Detroit ’67 (2013), readings will provide students the opportunity to investigate how plays are interpreted by actors and directors, and wrestle with topics such as voting rights, cultural appropriation, housing discrimination, gender inequality, and equal access to education.  Beyond dramatic texts and critical readings, students will hear some of the playwrights (via video conferencing) offer their views on topics and issues we will discuss in class. ART, CMP, LIT, NOR (N. Nesmith)

THEA 0202 Acting II: Voice for the Actor (Fall 2014)
Using the Linklater technique for the voice, students will study the physiological foundations of voice and alignment. By means of interrelated physical and vocal exercises, students will discover ways of changing patterns that restrict a full range of physical and vocal expressiveness. Students will study and present passages from Shakespeare to explore ways in which their new physical and vocal skills may be used to express a greater range of intellectual and emotional understanding. (THEA 0102 and ARDV 0116; Approval required) 4 hrs. lect. (A. Draper)

THEA 0205 Costume Design I: Beginning (Fall 2014)
This introductory course will explore the art and practice of costume design for the theatre. Topics will include the psychology of dress, play-script and character analysis, concept development, historical research, figure drawing, and fabric considerations. (No prior drawing experience is assumed or expected.) 4 hrs. lect. ART (J. Emerson)

THEA 0208 Theatre History (Fall 2014)
Using the dramatic text as the primary focus, this course will chart the progression of theatre from its ritualistic origins to the advent of modern drama. This survey will include an overview of theatrical architecture, the evolution of design and acting styles, and the introduction of the director. Since theatre does not exist in a void, a consideration of the social, cultural, political, and scientific milieu of each era studied will be included in the course. 2 1/2 hrs. lect./discussion & 1 screening per week ART, CMP, EUR, HIS  (J. Vandenberg)

THEA 0210 Fall Production Studio: Acting (Fall 2014)
The cast works as part of a company interpreting, rehearsing, and performing a play. Productions for Fall 2014 include /Vampire/ by Snoo Wilson and /Mendel, Inc./ by David Freedman. Those receiving credit can expect to rehearse four to six nights a week. Appropriate written work is required. Participation in the course is determined by auditions held the previous term. (Approval required) 3 hrs. lect. ART (R. Romagnoli, C. Faraone)

THEA 0214 Directing I: Beginning (Spring 2015)
As a group, students will analyze one or two plays to discover the process involved in preparing a script for production. Attention will be given to production and design concepts, textual values, auditions, rehearsals, and the structuring of a performance in time and space. Students will also cast and direct one or more scenes to be worked on and performed in class. The practical work is combined with written analysis. (Approval required; ARDV 0116, THEA 0102) 4 hrs. lect. (C. Medeiros)

THEA/CRWR 0218 Playwriting I: Beginning (Fall 2014)
The purpose of the course is to gain a theoretical and practical understanding of writing for the stage. Students will read, watch, and analyze published plays, as well as work by their peers, but the focus throughout will remain on the writing and development of original work. (Formerly THEA/ENAM 0218) 2 1/2 hrs. lect./individual labs ART, CW (D. Yeaton)

THEA 0220 Spring Production Studio: Acting (Spring 2015)
The cast works as part of a company, interpreting, rehearsing, and performing a play. Those receiving credit can expect to rehearse four to six nights a week. Appropriate written work is required. Participation in the course is determined by auditions held during the term prior to the performance. (Approval required) 3 hrs. lect. ART (C. Medeiros, A. Draper)

THEA 0221 Scenic Design II: Advanced (Spring 2015)
This upper level course is designed for students interested in an extension of Scenic Design I. The design projects will challenge the student's imagination and creativity through historical and current theatrical literature, the study of artistic movements in theatre, concept development, and research. Students will work to develop their theoretical designs into fully realized productions - from theory into practice.  (THEA 0111 or by approval) (M. Evancho)

THEA/ENAM 0228 Contemporary British Playwrights (Fall 2014)
This course will explore Great Britain's controversial theatrical movement, beginning in the late sixties, which came to be known as "The Fringe." Plays by David Hare, Howard Brenton, Stephan Poliakoff, Howard Barker, David Edgar, Caryl Churchill, Snoo Wilson, Trevor Griffiths, and others will be discussed. Particular focus will be on the plays' dramaturgical and theatrical values, as well as their impact on the overall development of the Fringe theatre movement and its influence on the more traditional theatrical establishment. ( 3 hrs. lect. ART, EUR, LIT (R. Romagnoli)

THEA 0237 Devised Theatre (Fall 2014)
Devised Theatre is a process of making a theatre piece without beginning with a formal script and is often created to explore social issues. The work may be composed through vocal or physical improvisation, created through interviews, or collaged from various sources. In the course we will both study and experience devised theatre, frequently called collaborative or verbatim theatre. Readings include selections from The Frantic Assembly Book of Devising Theatre, Verbatim Theatre, and the works of Anne Bogart. Students will engage the form’s history, build a shared vocabulary, and create pieces within the class and with outside collaborators, The roles of director, actor, playwright, and designer will be re-examined in light of this process. (THEA 0102 or THEA 0218 or THEA 0235) ART (C. Faraone)

THEA/CRWR 0318 Playwriting II: Advanced (Spring 2015)
For students with experience writing short scripts or stories, this workshop will provide a support structure in which to write a full-length stage play. We will begin with extended free and guided writing exercises intended to help students write spontaneously and with commitment. Class discussions will explore scene construction, story structure, and the development of character arc. (ENAM 0170 or THEA 0218 or ENAM/THEA 0240; by approval) 2 1/2 hrs. lect./individual labs ART, CW (D. Yeaton)

THEA 0406 Twentieth/Twenty-first Century Performance Aesthetics (Fall 2014)
This course is an intensive exploration of the evolution of the theory and practice of theatrical experimentation in the 20th and 21st centuries. The Modernist movement irrevocably altered the artist’s relationship to the social, and political order. The ramifications of this change will be addressed throughout the course, with particular emphasis on Brecht, Artaud, and Grotowski. Students will write papers and give presentations on the work of such contemporary artists as Peter Brook, DV8, Robert Wilson, Ariane Mnouchkine, Complicite and Jerzy Grotowski. (Approval required; ARDV 0116 and THEA 0208) 3 hrs. lect./1 hr. disc. ART (C. Faraone)

THEA 0500 Intermediate Independent Project (Fall 2014, Spring 2015)
In consultation with their advisors, theatre majors in design may propose a THEA 0500 Intermediate Independent Project. Preliminary proposal forms approved by the student's advisor will be submitted to the program by March 1st of the preceding academic year for those wanting credit in the fall or winter terms and by October 1st for those wanting credit in the spring term. Projects will conform to the guidelines that are available in the theatre office. Students are required to attend a weekly THEA 0500/0700 seminar. (Staff)

THEA 0505 Intermediate Independent Project (Fall 2014, Spring 2015)
Approval required. (Staff)

THEA 0700 Senior Independent Project (Fall 2014, Spring 2015)
Senior work is required. In consultation with their advisors, theatre majors may propose a THEA 0700 Independent Project. Preliminary proposal forms approved by the student's advisor will be submitted to the program by March 1st of the preceding academic year for those wanting credit in the fall or winter terms and by October 1st for those wanting credit in the spring term. Projects will conform to the guidelines that are available in the theatre office. Students are required to attend a weekly THEA 0500/0700 seminar. (Staff)

THEA 0708 Senior Work: Joint Majors in Theatre and  English & American Literatures (Fall 2014, Spring 2015)
Approval required. (Staff)

Writing Program

Within their first two years, all matriculated students must complete a First Year Seminar and at least one other writing-intensive class (all classes marked "CW" in the catalog are writing-intensive and will satisfy this requirement). All academic departments participate in the College Writing Program, offering "writing intensive" courses within the major and in the First-Year Seminar Program.
     The Program for Writing and Rhetoric in the Disciplines promotes the use of writing both in students' learning and in their ability to communicate what they have learned.
     Our writing courses focus on critical and creative thinking, conventions of academic discourse, and persuasive argumentation. Through writing, students learn to use the methods of inquiry and the specialized forms and styles appropriate to the major disciplines. Our Writing Center is open to all Middlebury students.
     College Writing Requirement: Writing is not simply "assigned" in writing intensive courses. Instead, the writing done in these courses helps students develop their analytical and persuasive powers. Additionally, in many courses, students are encouraged to use writing to learn. Because learning, like writing, is a constant process of collecting, connecting, discarding and reorganizing, instructors may encourage students to think through new or difficult ideas and terminology in writing.
     Instructors of writing intensive courses frequently employ both informal and formal writing assignments. Informal writing might be graded or ungraded and might include journals, diaries, field notes, responses to discussion questions, and/or free writing. Informal writing might be used as a way to begin a formal paper, as a means to generate good class discussion, or as an end in itself. Formal writing assignments are usually graded, and might include critical, creative or researched papers, or might combine formal writing strategies, like outlining, with an oral presentation. The formal writing done in these courses averages 20-25 pages, although the number of papers and the number of pages per paper vary. In some courses, formal writing is submitted for assessment in a portfolio once or twice during the semester.

WRPR 0100 The Writing Workshop I (Fall 2014)
This course is for students who would like extra work on critical thinking and analytical writing. All sections of this course will address a variety of writing strategies and technologies, from free writing to online writing. Each section will focus on a particular theme to be determined by the instructor. This course does not fulfill the college writing requirement. 3 hrs. lect./disc. (M. Bertolini, C. Wright)

WRPR 0101 Writing Workshop II (Spring 2015)
All sections of this course will address a variety of writing techniques and communications tools. Each section will focus on a particular theme. This course does not fulfill the college writing requirement. 3 hrs. lect./disc. (H. Vila)

WRPR 0202 Writing To Heal (Spring 2015)
This writing-intensive course examines writing as a catalyst for healing after loss or grief. In a workshop focused on student writing, we will analyze the fiction, drama, poetry and creative nonfiction of Arthur Miller, Jane Austen, Frank McCourt, C.S. Lewis, Sharon Olds, William Wordsworth, Christopher Noel, Madeleine Blais, Susan Minot. Reading James W. Pennebaker's Opening Up and Louise DeSalvo's Writing As A Way of Healing will create a theoretical underpinning for our discussions. Assignments for this course will include formal analytical essays, creative work (published online), as well as electronic journals and oral presentations. CW, LIT (M. Bertolini)

WRPR/GSFS 0303 Outlaw Women (Spring 2015)
In this course we will read and discuss literary novels that feature women who defy social norms: daring survivors, scholars, “whores,” queers, artists, “madwomen,” servants, revolutionaries. We will take a critical and transnational approach to issues of race, class, gender, sexuality, ability, and religion. Texts will include Toni Morrison’s Sula, Audre Lorde’s Zami, Marguerite Duras’ The Lover, Jamaica Kincaid’s Lucy, Patricia Powell’s The Pagoda, and Azar Nafisi's Reading Lolita in Tehran. Students will write formal literary analysis,and narrative criticism. Together we will engage in some contemplative practice and study selected films. CMP, CW, LIT, SOC (C. Wright)

WRPR 0500 Special Project: Literature (Fall 2014, Spring 2015)
Approval required. (Staff)

 LITERATURE COURSES IN ENGLISH

ARBC/CMLT 0221 Modern Arabic Literature (Fall 2014)
This course is a survey of the most important moments in the development of Modern Arabic Literature from the end of 19th century to the present. We will map the developments, achievements, and innovations by Arab writers against a double background of rising nationalism, decolonization, and wars on the one hand and the idea and experiences of modernity and the west on the other. We will examine works of fiction by both male and female writers including novels, short stories, and drama, as well as poetry representing several different Arab countries. Students are encouraged to read in advance Albert Hourani's A History of the Arab People. (Open to all, no previous knowledge of Arabic is required). 3 hrs. sem. AAL, LIT (S. Liebhaber)

HEBM 0236 Israel from the Margins: Culture and Politics (Spring 2015)
How does Israeli culture negotiate the diversity of Israeli society? How does it represent the internal tensions complicating this society? And how do marginal subjects claim their place in Israeli culture? In this course we will explore the literary and cinematic production of Israeli women, LGBT people, Mizrahim, and Palestinians. Course materials (in translation) will range from the provocative poetry of Yona Volach, to the work of Palestinian Hebrew authors Anton Shammas and Sayed Kashua, and Mizrahi authors Ronit Matalon, Amira Hess, and Albert Swissa. We will also watch several Israeli and Palestinian films that foreground question of nationality, ethnicity, gender, and sexuality. 3 hrs lect./disc. AAL, CMP, LIT (O. Zakai)

JAPN 0215 Modern Japanese Fiction (in English) (Fall 2014)
In this course we will examine the development of Japanese literature from the Meiji restoration (1868) through WWII. During this period of rapid and often tumultuous modernization, fiction played a crucial role in the creation of the nation-state and in the formation of the individual's sense of self. We will read works by writers who participated actively in the imagination of modernity and those who resisted it, including Kunikida Doppo, Higuchi Ichiyo, Natsume Soseki, and Mori Ogai. 3 hrs. lect./disc. AAL, LIT (Staff)

JAPN 0217 Contemporary Japanese Fiction: Haruki Murakami and His Generation (in English) (Spring 2015)
Contemporary Japanese literature is dominated by the work of Haruki Murakami and writers who have been influenced by him. We will examine Murakami's work in detail, including A Wild Sheep Chase, Wind-Up Bird Chronicle, and Kafka on the Shore, and then look at the relationship between Murakami and other contemporary writers (Yoko Ogawa, Ryu Murakami, Natsuo Kirino). Murakami's impact on the visual arts (Takashi Murakami and "Superflat") and the wider culture will also be examined. Students will gain a strong grounding in contemporary Japanese culture through the eyes of one of its most interesting and influential practitioners. AAL, LIT (Staff)

JAPN 0290 The Tale of Genji (in English) (Fall 2014)
The Tale of Genji is the world’s first psychological novel. This rich narrative centers on the political intrigues and passionate love affairs of Genji, a fictional prince barred from the throne. In this course we will explore the narrative through a close reading in English translation. Students will gain knowledge of the aesthetic, religious, and social contexts of the Heian period, one of the most vibrant eras in Japanese culture. We will also trace how Genji monogatari has been interpreted over ten centuries in art, theater, films, and most recently, manga. (Formerly JAPN 0190) 3hrs. lect./disc. AAL, LIT (C. Cavanaugh)

RUSS 0122 The Russian Mind (in English) (Fall 2014)
In this course we will study the dominant themes of Russia's past and their role in shaping the present-day Russian mind. Topics will include: Slavic mythology; Russian Orthodoxy; Russian icons; the concept of autocracy; the legacy of Peter the Great and Catherine the Great; the Golden Age of Russian Literature (Pushkin, Gogol, Tolstoy and Dostoevsky); Russian composers, including the "Mighty Five"; Russian theater and ballet; the origins of Russian radicalism; the Russian Revolution; the legacy of Lenin and Stalin; and Russia from Khrushchev to Putin. 3 hrs. lect. AAL, HIS, LIT (T. Portice)

RUSS 0151 Russian Literature's Golden Age: 1830-1880 (in English) (Spring 2015)
Duels, ghosts, utopias, murders, prostitution, and adultery- these are the raw materials Russian authors turned into some of the world's greatest literature. This course is an introduction to Russian literature of the 19th century, from the short stories of Pushkin and Gogol to the great novels of Dostoevsky and Tolstoy. The centrality of literature in Russian society and the interrelations among the authors and texts will be discussed. How do the authors combine reality, fantasy, and philosophy to make these works both uniquely Russian and universal? 3 hrs. lect. EUR, LIT (T. Beyer)

RUSS 0351 Dostoevsky (in English) (Fall 2014)
A study of the most important works by literary giant Fyodor Dostoevsky. Readings include: selected early fiction (Poor Folk, The Double, The Gambler); his seminal manifesto Notes from Underground; his first major novel Crime and Punishment; and his masterpiece The Brothers Karamazov. Biographical information, excerpts from the author's notebooks, analysis of comparative translations, and film adaptations will supplement readings. No knowledge of Russian required. Open to first-year students. 3 hrs. lect. EUR, LIT (T. Beyer)

RUSS/ENAM 0359 The Art of Vladimir Nabokov (in English) (Spring 2015)
A study of the "perverse" aesthetics of this Russian-American writer. We will expose the hidden plots under the surface of his fiction, follow and arbitrate the ongoing contest between the author and his fictional heroes, and search for the roots of Nabokov's poetics in Western and Russian literary traditions. An attempt will be made to show the continuity between the Russian and English works of this bilingual and bicultural writer. 3 hrs. lect. LIT, NOR (N. Wieda)