Middlebury

 

Shirley M. Collado

Dean of the College; Associate Professor of Psychology

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Phone: work802.443.5382
Office Hours: By Appointment
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Shirley M. Collado is an Associate Professor of Psychology, and is Dean of the College.   She received her B.S. in Human and Organizational Development and Psychology from Vanderbilt University, and a M.A. and Ph.D. in Clinical Psychology from Duke University.

Her clinical and research interests focus on trauma, dissociative disorders, and coping responses among multicultural populations.   Some of her work has specifically focused on the experience of racism and acculturative stress among Latina/os in the United States and the ways that this population copes with and responds to these experiences.

Professor Collado’s senior management experience as Executive Vice President of The Posse Foundation and Dean of the College at Middlebury has largely focused on issues related to diversity, access, student and leadership development in higher education.

Professor Collado has taught at several institutions including George Mason University, Georgetown University, Middlebury College, the New School University and New York University.  Her courses have included:  Racism and Mental Health, Psychology of Women, Cross-Cultural Therapy Skills, Research Methods, Management and Organizational Behavior, and Organizational Change.

 

Courses

Courses offered in the past four years.
indicates offered in the current term
indicates offered in the upcoming term[s]

PSYC 0224 - Psychological Disorders      

Psychological Disorders
What makes an individual “abnormal”? Under what circumstances do mental health professionals classify emotions, thoughts, or behaviors as “disordered”? In this course, we will explore these questions with attention to their historical, theoretical, ethical, and diagnostic implications. We will investigate various classes of disorders, like anxiety, mood, and psychotic disorders, with a focus on their causes and treatments. Throughout, we will aim to appreciate the complexities and uncertainties surrounding diagnosis, and to recognize and challenge common assumptions about psychological disorders. In addition to lecture, the course will include discussions of current and controversial topics, and occasional demonstrations, analysis of clinical case material, and/or role plays. (PSYC 0105; open to seniors by waiver only) 3 hrs. lect./1 hr. disc.

SOC

Spring 2012

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PSYC 0315 - Approaches to Psychotherapy      

Approaches to Psychotherapy
This course presents the central theories and practices of clinical and counseling psychology with emphasis on methods of therapeutic intervention. Students will explore the theoretical assumptions of common approaches (e.g., psychoanalytic, humanistic, cognitive, behavioral, eclectic, and other systems), watch and participate in example interventions, and evaluate each approach on both theoretical and empirical grounds. This course will explore these theoretical assumptions through a broad cultural lens that considers the intersections of identity and the multi-faceted experiences of clients from all backgrounds. Basic assumptions of the therapeutic relationship, how such relationships are established, and the role of these relationships in a diverse modern society, will also receive attention. Students will be expected to take an active role in class activities, demonstrations, and presentations. (Two psychology courses; not open to first-year students; open to psychology majors only) 3 hrs. lect.

SOC

Spring 2013

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PSYC 0350 - Directed Research      

Directed Research in Psychology
Directed research provides opportunities for advanced students to become familiar with and participate in ongoing research projects under the direction of a faculty member. The student will first read background literature on the content area to be investigated and experimental methodologies to be used. Procedures involved in conducting psychological research will then be learned through firsthand experience. Potential activities include the design of research and the defining of conceptual variables and the gathering, analyzing, and interpretation of data. Finally, students will learn how to write technical articles in psychology by preparing a paper describing the project, using APA style. (Approval required; not open to first-year students) 3 hrs. lect.

Winter 2013, Spring 2013, Winter 2014, Spring 2014, Fall 2014, Spring 2015

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PSYC 0500 - Advanced Research      

Advanced Research
A program of research arranged to meet the needs of advanced students majoring in psychology. (Approval required)

Winter 2013, Spring 2013, Winter 2014, Spring 2014, Fall 2014, Spring 2015

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PSYC 0700 - Senior Research      

Senior Research
A program of research arranged to meet the needs of advanced senior majors in psychology. (PSYC 0201 and PSYC 0202; Approval required)

Fall 2012, Spring 2013, Fall 2013, Spring 2014, Fall 2014, Spring 2015

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PSYC 0701 - Senior Thesis Proposal      

Senior Thesis Proposal
Students hoping to be considered as candidates for departmental honors must enroll in PSYC 0701 under the sponsorship of a department faculty member and submit a formal, written research proposal to the department by 5 p.m. on the Wednesday during the final week of fall classes in their senior year. If the proposal is approved, the student will enroll in PSYC 0702 during the winter term and PSYC 0703 during the spring term of their senior year. (Feb graduates should consult with their advisors about the appropriate semester in which to begin a thesis.) (PSYC 0201 and PSYC 0202; Approval required)

Fall 2012, Winter 2013, Spring 2013, Fall 2013, Winter 2014, Spring 2014, Fall 2014, Spring 2015

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PSYC 0702 - Senior Thesis Second Semester      

Senior Thesis Second Semester
Students whose honors thesis proposal (PSYC 0701) has been approved will collect, analyze, and interpret their data. This is the second semester of the 3-semester senior thesis. (PSYC 0201, PSYC 0202, and PSYC 0701; Approval required)

Fall 2012, Winter 2013, Spring 2013, Fall 2013, Winter 2014, Spring 2014, Fall 2014, Spring 2015

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PSYC 0703 - Senior Thesis      

Senior Thesis*
This is the third and final semester of the senior thesis. Students will finish analyzing, and interpreting their data. This process culminates in a written thesis to be submitted by 5 p.m. on the Monday BEFORE the final week of spring classes, a presentation, and an oral defense. The decision about awarding departmental honors will be made after the student submits the thesis. (PSYC 0201, PSYC 0202, and PSYC 0702; Approval required)

Winter 2013, Spring 2013, Fall 2013, Winter 2014, Spring 2014, Fall 2014, Spring 2015

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