Congratulations on your 50th Reunion!

Class of 1970 on the steps of the Chapel at 2022 Reunion
Class of 1971 on the steps of the Chapel at Reunion 2022

Relive the Memories

We loved celebrating your 50th Reunions with you! Please enjoy our photo galleries and a video of Convocation.

1970 & 1971 Reunion Photos

Convocation (1970 & 1971)

Speaker 1:

Welcome everyone. It is so nice to see both of your classes here for your delayed 50th celebrations. The weather has been awesome because you are awesome and it really wouldn’t be reunion convocation without kicking it off by singing Gamaliel Painter’s Cane. So we’re going to do that and then we’re going to go into the official invocation. So join in please.



Speaker 2:

We pause to acknowledge that Middlebury College sits on land that has served as a site of meeting and exchange among indigenous peoples since time in Memorial. The Western Abenaki are the traditional caretakers of these Vermont lands and waters, which they call Ndakinna or homeland. We remember their connection to this region and the hardships that they continue to endure. Let us take a moment of silence to pay respect to the Abenaki elders and to the indigenous inhabitants of Turtle Island past and present. We give thanks for the opportunity to share in the bounty of this place and to protect it. We are all one in the sacred web of life that connects people, animals, plants, air, water, and earth. And now please join in the spirit of invocation.



Speaker 2:

Oh moment. This reunion moment in convocation. May we be fully here with you and dwell in you for just this brief time gathered together holy. Come holy now and bring to us all our blessed recollections of beautiful days before, of difficult days before, with gratitude for the promises kept during these blessed college years, for friendships made and mentorships foraged. For the inevitable sense of belonging and the deepening of our being. Bless us sweet newness in sacredness, in sacred turnings that we have known here then and now. Through challenges met and hardships endured, and transformations undergone, let us be filled with the divine hope that comes in turning.



Speaker 2:

And in that fullness, we pause to acknowledge those who have been part of our experience here. Those we came to know and love, and who in this last year have passed on, friends, partners, spouses, children, and parents. We pause to acknowledge their continued presence with us as we embrace their memory. And so come now reunion celebrations and share with us your delights. May what happens to us in this space, in this special moment of convocation, this brief span of time, remind us of all that is right and good, and true in our college experience and our whole lives long. Amen. Amen and amen. Blessed be.



Speaker 3:

It is my great pleasure and privilege to welcome members of the classes of 1970 and 1971 back to Middlebury. You are here for your [inaudible 00:16:51], I am delighted that so many of you could join us. This is the way to kick COVID to the curb. You arrived in 1966 and 1967, two decisive years in our country’s history. And as you set up your dorm rooms and began thinking about your futures, the country around you was engulfed in turmoil. Both the war across the world in Vietnam and the battle for racial justice here at home provided intense backdrop for your Middlebury experience. Your 50th reunion yearbooks, both beautiful works that capture the essence of your classes include timelines of significant national and international events during your years at Midd. Here are just a few. Protests against the Vietnam war rage nationwide. The Black Panther Party and the National Organization for Women were formed.



Speaker 3:

Thurgood Marshall was sworn in as the first Black justice on the Supreme court. Congress passed the Civil Rights Act of 1968. Martin Luther King Jr. and Robert Kennedy were assassinated. We reached the moon setting foot in the stars. Four students were killed by the National Guard at Kent State and the New York Times published the Pentagon Papers. Just as the Rascals told us all the world over people everywhere just want to be free. I did not subject you to my singing on that one. They took to the streets to enact the change that they wanted to see and change came too to Middlebury. It’s quite possible that your two classes experienced and took part in greater shifts in college culture than any other classes before or since. Naturally that wasn’t obvious when you first arrived. Let’s go back to September 1966 for a moment. The number one song by the Supremes, but you might also have been listening to Yellow Submarine by the Beatles.



Speaker 3:

Beauty Is Only Skin Deep by The Temptations, or Wouldn’t It Be Nice by the Beach Boys. Beloved TV shows, Star Trek and Mission Impossible aired their first episodes and continuing hits like Bewitched and Get Smart remained in full swing. If you had time between classes and meeting classmates, you might have read Flowers for Algernon by Daniel Keyes, The Crying of Lot 49 by Thomas Pynchon or Valley of the Dolls by Jacqueline Susann. Before you got to campus, you probably watched some of the biggest movies of the summer, which included Who’s Afraid of Virginia Woolf? Alfie and Torn Curtain.



Speaker 3:

From the class of 71, your arrival in September 67 brought with it an entirely transformed landscape. You were probably listening to The Doors hit Light My Fire, Bobbie Gentry’s Ode to Billie Joe, and maybe even have dreamed of scoring tickets to Pink Floyd’s first US tour. Hit shows living on your TV screens likely included the Andy Griffith Show, Bonanza and the new kid, the Carol Burnett Show. You tour through the pages of Elia Kazan’s, The Arrangement, Chaim Potok’s, The Chosen and Mary Stewart’s, The Gabriel Hounds. And your summer of movies overflowed with classics like In the Heat of the Night and Bonnie and Clyde, as well as the massive hit The Dirty Dozen.



Speaker 3:

Once you settled into college, you worked together on initiatives to shape and change local and national communities. You had endless spirit and commitment to lend to your community in hopes of bettering it. You and many other Middlebury students marched in DC, protesting the war over your years at college. Students successfully pushed for the college to establish a commission to see what could be done for civil rights. A student coalition pressed for educational changes and political action, and students formed an abortion referral service. Many of the changes you witnessed at Middlebury had to do in fact, with a status of women. Although rules regarding what women could do, where they could go, what they could wear and when they had to be in their dorms had begun to relax in the early 60s. Women still had to deal with many restrictions and limitations that did not apply to men.



Speaker 3:

And your classes continued to chip away at them. In 1966, the hours when women could visit men in their dorms with the doors open at least 45 degrees, remember your geometry, that was extended. In 1968, curfews for all, but first year women were removed. In 1968 the trustees also approved a set of new social rules that applied to both men and women and eliminated the restrictive dress code that had been annoying Middlebury women for years. For most of its history, sports at Middlebury were something men did and women watched. When you arrived, the college had more than a dozen men’s varsity sports, and only one women’s varsity sport, skiing. But you helped to organize women’s teams in field hockey, swimming, and lacrosse. And just after you all graduated, Congress passed the Title IX of the Education Amendments Act of 1972. And the number of women’s varsity teams eventually grew to 15. I hope those of you who fought for women’s athletics feel pride and connection to today’s teams, including field hockey, ice hockey, and lacrosse, which all won NCAA Championships this year.



Speaker 3:

We are still confirming this, and this is a challenge to you historians out there, but we think this is unprecedented in the NESCAC League. Other significant changes that you witnessed at Middlebury include the end of sororities at Middlebury. In the spring of 69 four sororities decided to disband because their national organizations would not allow them to accept Black or Jewish pledges. The introduction of January term and the 4-1-4 academic calendar. Yes, you were there at the beginning. A new science center, which unfortunately is no longer and Johnson Memorial music and art building, which is being restored. You were among the first students to benefit. New dormitories, Hadley, Milliken and Kelly and Lang constructed on the hill near Pearsons, overlooking the Adirondacks and Green Mountains. When you graduated, America and Middlebury were not the same places that they had been when you started. It was a time of great uncertainty and great promise.



Speaker 3:

And none of you could have imagined where your journey from Middlebury might take you. And all of this makes the themes that you chose for your reunion yearbooks so resonant. For the class of 1970, you injected humor into the continuing process of growing and learning, calling yours, are we there yet? Not yet. And opting for an invocation of Robert Frost. Those of you in the class of 71, chose All the Roads Taken. Both titles and the pages held within the books bindings represent the remarkable journey that you all have taken since you graduated from Middlebury. Approaching the world around you with wit, intelligence, dedication and compassion, you have gone on to lead as our Middlebury mission statement now says, engaged, consequential, and creative.



Speaker 3:

You became teachers and doctors, and scientists, and writers, and business people, and artists. You have been active in public affairs in your communities and your states. You have traveled widely, made friends in the places you visited and helped to build new connections with other countries and cultures. And you have been more than generous with your time and your money in supporting Middlebury and the students who came after to you. We celebrate both of your classes with reunion awards. Class of 70 and 71, you have each been awarded the Armand LaFlamme ‘37 Cup for the Reunion class, other than the post 50th, with the highest giving participation, compared to all other classes in your specific reunion year.



Speaker 3:

Class of 70, you achieved a 65% participation rate and raised more than four million and [inaudible 00:26:10] 2% participation rate and raised more than six million. You have also received the Patricia Judah Palmer ‘57 Cane Society Award for your reunion year. This award honors the 50th or post 50th reunion class that raises the largest total of life income gifts and documented bequest intentions. In addition, the class of 71 has won the Raymond A. Ablondi class of ‘52 Cup for the Reunion class, with the largest total class gift. Members of the class of 70 and 71, I salute you. Middlebury is proud to call you alumni and grateful that you have returned to us this weekend. Congratulations.



Speaker 4:

As the incoming vice president of the Middlebury Alumni Association, otherwise known as the MAA Board, I am honored to help present the Alumni Plaque Awards. Every year the Alumni Plaque is awarded to alumni for exceptional service to Middlebury, its students and alumni. We honor these alumni for their loyalty and their contributions to our alma mater. In 2020 and 2021, three of your classmates were selected by the MAA Board to receive this honor. The first recipient of the Alumni Plaque is from the class of 1970. Would Bronwen Williams Flahive please come forward



Speaker 4:

For decades, Brownen Williams Flahive has been making time in her busy life as a teacher, professor, mother, counselor, and community leader with service on multiple boards to support Middlebury. Brownen is someone Middlebury can count on, a volunteer’s volunteer. Whenever the college has reached out for her expertise and energy, Brownen has responded unequivocally. Her Middlebury legacy includes the many talented students who are admitted to the college after having their first important contact with her. Serving for 20 years in the Alumni Admissions Program, Brownen was an informative presence at college fairs, a skilled alumni interviewer, and a dynamic chair of alumni interviewing. Over the years, she has met with scores of prospective students, providing them with information about Middlebury and offering her observations to the admissions office. Brownen’s leadership has extended well beyond admissions. From 1993 to 1998 she served on the alumni board, organizing events, conducting board meetings, working with alumni relations and Annual Giving to achieve important goals and helping to make the alumni board as welcoming and effective as possible for alumni.



Speaker 4:

Additionally, she played a key role in chapter programming in her home state of New Hampshire. The Annual Giving team has been the fortunate beneficiary of Brownen’s talents as an organizer and fundraiser for decades through her service as a class agent and lead class agent. Leading by example, and educating her fellow alumni about the rewards of supporting our alma mater, she has demonstrated a commitment to excellence. Last but not least, as a reunion volunteer, Brownen helped to make the reunion experience memorable, many times over, including this, her 50th reunion. We deeply appreciate the proficiency, enthusiasm and drive that Brownen has brought to the college. With gratitude for her decades of dedication to Middlebury and her loyalty as an alumni, we are honored to give her the 2020 Alumni Plaque Award.



Speaker 1:

The second recipient of the Alumni Plaque Award is from the class of 1971. Would Ann Einsiedler Crumb please come forward. Since she arrived on campus as a first year student in 1967, Ann Einsiedler Crumb has demonstrated a deep and abiding commitment to Middlebury. She strongly believes in the college’s importance and mission, and she has dedicated much of her life to furthering that mission. As a volunteer for over five decades and as a staff member for nearly 30 of those years, thanks to Ann’s work in both of those roles, generations of students have had access to life changing opportunities at Middlebury. Ann began her volunteer service after graduating with a major in history in 1971. As a member of the alumni admissions committee, Ann interviewed prospective students and trained and supported other alumni interviewers in finding the best candidates for Middlebury. She raised funds to support Middlebury students as a class agent, a lead class agent and member of the Alumni Fund Advisory Council.



Speaker 1:

As a career mentor, she shared her knowledge of fundraising and alumni relations with students and alumni interested in careers in college and university advancement. In the 1980s, Ann served on the Alumni Board as a director, and then as an officer. Two decades later as staff liaison and ex-officio member, Ann helped to guide the board through the first decade of the 21st century. Overseeing alumni relations was just a part of her work over decades in Middlebury’s Advancement Office, where she was instrumental in the success of three major fundraising campaigns. Ann mentored generations of colleagues with her trademark kindness and understated leadership. And these colleagues went on to raise hundreds of millions of dollars for Middlebury.



Speaker 1:

Ann is instrumental in keeping the class of 1971 connected. She has served on numerous reunion committees and was co-chair for this 50th reunion. She has always been the go-to person for classmates who needed information or advice about Middlebury. Ann has helped move Middlebury forward and she has done it with grace and warmth, never seeking credit, nor recognition. The college has benefited greatly from her leadership, vast experience and deep commitment to our alma mater. With gratitude for her devotion and service to Middlebury and her many accomplishments on its behalf. We are honored to give Ann the 2021 Alumni Plaque Award.



Speaker 4:

And now it is my honor to present the third Alumni Plaque Award to a member of the class of 1971. Jim Keyes will you please come forward? Jim Keyes has been actively involved with the college since shortly after he graduated with a degree in geography. For decades, he has made time for Middlebury in his busy life as a banker, board member for many organizations and parent, always serving where he was needed. That service continues today as Jim worked hard to help rally his class to celebrate their 50th reunion, first remotely and now in person. Ask anyone who knows him and they will smile and describe Jim as an unsung hero. He works quietly behind the scenes to help Middlebury, never seeking credit or accolades for as many accomplishments as a volunteer.



Speaker 4:

Jim’s first volunteer role was in Boston’s alumni chapter, nurturing the Middlebury community there and ensuring events and programs met the needs of the Boston alumni. He has served as a class agent leading by example and educating his fellow alumni about the importance of supporting our alma mater and as an alumni admissions interviewer, and later chair of the Alumni Admissions Program. His legacy includes the many talented students who were admitted to the college and who engaged with Jim or with the many admissions volunteers he mentored.



Speaker 4:

Jim served on the Alumni Board in the 1990s, including a stint as the chair of the Nominating Committee. Alumni trustees and administrators took notice of his competence, compassion and quiet leadership, and he was elected as an alumni trustee in 2000. In all, he served 11 years on the board resigning to take a position as vice president for advancement at Middlebury. During his tenure as a trustee, he chaired the Audit Committee, an essential assignment where he oversaw the financial reporting process, the audit process and the college’s system of internal controls and compliance with laws and regulations. But perhaps Jim’s greatest contributions have been as a connector of people and a creator of opportunities.



Speaker 4:

Alumni across the generations talk of how he would drop anything to help them, sharing his contacts, providing leads, competing with colleagues to get more students from Middlebury hired at Bank of Boston than from any other college. And he has been instrumental in keeping his basketball teammates connected for over 50 years, rallying them to return and support the current team. With gratitude for his decades of unyielding dedication to Middlebury and his longstanding loyalty as [inaudible 00:37:20], we are honored to give Jim the 2021 Alumni Plaque Award.



Speaker 3:

Another way to beat COVID to the curb. Several of you received those awards in the mail and kindly brought them back so that we could give them to you in person. Welcome back again. It’s such a joy to see you sitting and standing for your colleagues, just where you should be, in the chapel pews together again to celebrate your long delayed 50th reunions. We have missed you. You might have noticed all of the cheers as you walked up. Young people missed you. Older staff missed you. We missed you. And this is the first in person reunion since the global pandemic upended our lives in March 2020. The pandemic has indeed tested us all. But I believe as we look back on this time of social isolation, we will also remember the innovations in teaching and student, and community life that now characterize Middlebury. I am proud of the resilience and dedication, and creativity that our students and faculty, and staff have demonstrated over the past two years. Just one week ago, we celebrated two commencements, less than a week ago in fact.



Speaker 3:

One for the class of 2022 and one for the class of 2022.5, the long delayed celebration of the class of 2020. Together and as individuals, these young graduates have taken on more, experience more and perhaps lost more under exceptional and often challenging circumstances than many people can imagine experiencing in a lifetime, and yet they persisted. Among them are recipients of nationally competitive fellowships, including Goldwater and Keasbey scholarships, Watson fellowships, and Fulbright teaching assistantships. They have excelled in athletics, winning NESCAC and NCAA titles and numerous awards for sportsmanship, academics, and coaching. And as you know, over Memorial Day weekend, women’s lacrosse won the NCAA Championship, its third title in seven years. That same weekend senior Stan Morris was crowned NCAA Men’s Tennis Singles Champion. And this winter women’s ice hockey claimed the NCAA title, their sixth overall ending with a perfect 27-0 record. And last ball, an undefeated field hockey team captured the NCAA Championship. The first team ever in division three to win four consecutive titles. Yeah, that’s what I said.



Speaker 3:

And our students have challenged us to confront systemic racism more directly in our country and on our campus, to increase campus diversity and equal access to the full Middlebury experience, to broaden our understanding of accessibility and gender identification and inclusivity, and to acknowledge the original habitants of the land where our campus now sits. These have not been easy conversations. They are intergenerational and we have conducted them with grace and grit. And in July we will welcome a new vice president for equity and inclusion, Khuram Hussain from Hobart and William Smith. Khuram comes to us with deep experience as an administrator, a scholar and an educator, and I can’t wait for you to meet him. As I look ahead to next year, I know that the next generation of students will just be as bright and active, and engaged as ever. The largest group of applicants in the history of Middlebury College, a total of 13,028, students applied for admission to the class of 2026. That represents a 9% increase over the previous year’s total and an acceptance rate of 15%.



Speaker 3:

And in the last five to six years, our applicant pool has nearly doubled. We will welcome them to an increasingly dynamic and diverse college focused on its mission to prepare students to lead engaged, consequential and creative lives, to contribute to their communities and to address the world’s most challenging problems. That is our mission statement since 2017, when we adopted Envisioning Middlebury, our new strategic framework. I’m particularly excited and proud to share news about some of our new initiatives that exemplify that mission of leading engaged, consequential and creative lives contributing to our communities and addressing the world’s most challenging problems. Earlier this year, Middlebury received a $25 million grant from an anonymous donor to fund the Kathryn Wasserman Davis Collaborative in Conflict Transformation. We are capitalizing on Middlebury’s deep, existing expertise across our undergraduate and our graduate programs in conflict studies and intercultural competency to lead a critical effort to teach conflict transformation in our nation and across the world.



Speaker 3:

We’ve heard already from Congress people, from local folks, from other educational leaders, all about how can they can get involved in this wonderful new initiative where we see conflict transformation as a liberal art. The idea of conflict transformation, you may have heard of conflict resolution, conflict management and so on, but conflict transformation assumes that conflict will always be present, but that it can be transformed towards positive rather than destructive societal goals. The approach focuses not just on problem solving, although it does focus on that, but also on addressing the underlying conditions that give rise to conflict and ensuring as much possible a sustainable peace for the future. Conflict transformation attempts to reshape the social structures and dynamics behind the conflict. And as a globally networked institution, we are well situated to do this work and to share with and learn from others. You may be aware, but you may not be aware, in the last 50 years, we’ve grown to have 36 sites of study abroad and 16 schools endowed, partially endowed by the Starr Foundation.



Speaker 3:

That’s how global we’ve become. More global than many of our peers, either colleges or universities. And Middlebury serves and will serve as the incubator for the development of research based pedagogical tools and student experiences in addressing conflict, both locally, nationally, and abroad. I’d like to highlight a couple of the programs that are already underway. This summer our Bread Loaf School of English is inaugurating a three course conflict transformation curriculum, teaching, writing and acting for change at its Vermont campus. These courses will seed transformative projects where participants working under the auspices of the wide Bread Loaf Teacher Network, teachers networked across the United States more than 1000 of them will carry out in their home schools and their communities this curriculum. And this week, students are participating in a Conflict Transformation Trek to Washington, DC, organized by the Center for Careers & Internships. And the Trek connects students with alumni, working in areas of conflict transformation, including peace and security studies and migration and refugee issues. This exposure to real world professional experiences will inform their career explorations in other postgraduate planning.



Speaker 3:

Join us if you can. I also want to share an update on our environmental programs and Energy2028, our plan to address climate change. There is so much exciting news just in the last year. As you know, from its founding in 65, just a little bit before you came to us, environmental studies has grown into the third largest major at the college. More than 200 courses now examining the environment from various perspectives. And just a few days ago, we received a gift to establish the VT Middlebury environmental studies professorship, which will support an eminent teacher and scholar in the field or a practitioner of equal distinction. A critical goal of Energy2028 is to provide our students with a comprehensive understanding of the climate crisis and how they can address it. Funded by a gift from the Erol Foundation, the Climate Action Capacity Project or CACP, aims to integrate climate action into every aspect of Middlebury life. From organizing the Clifford Symposium in 2021, where all people come together to address this issue, to creating alumni mentoring opportunities.



Speaker 3:

The project is helping us to develop the knowledge, innovation and capacity to tackle climate change. And since 2019, the Sustainability Solutions Lab has provided more than 100 students with the opportunities to work with faculty, staff, and field experts to define and solve some of our environmental challenges while shaping Middlebury’s sustainability journey. Projects range from working with the admissions office to reduce the offices’ carbon footprint, to collecting data and creating building energy models for the town of Bristol. We’ve also made significant progress towards our goals in using 100% renewable energy by 2028 and reducing our energy consumption by 25%.



Speaker 3:

A natural gas, anaerobic digester, fondly known as cow power, has been completed in the summer of 2021, which will help us reach our goal of heating our campus with 100% renewable fuel along with a biomass heating system, which uses wood chips as fuel. And we’ve broken ground on a five-megawat solar project that will provide about 40% of our electricity beginning in 2023. These are both exciting projects. Patrick Leahy joined us for the inauguration of our solar field, and we are so excited to continue that work in the future. And I am confident that we will reach our ambitious goals and that you can be part of that journey. Think about your own carbon footprint and look to Middlebury for best practices on how to reduce it. If you are already working in the environmental field, share your experience with students, offer internships and consider our grads for jobs. And to those who have already done so, thank you.



Speaker 3:

The other thing that I am so excited about is the way that we have used our global connections to make the world a better place. The best example I can share with you right now was less than a year ago in August when the Taliban were taking over Afghanistan and particularly Kabul. We were able to support two young alums, 2010 and 2011 in finding a way out. I’ll share more of that story with our dinner companions in a sec.



Speaker 3:

But I do want to say that at the end of that harrowing escape of both of our alums, one of them, Shabana Basij-Rasikh, reached out to me just three days after she herself had made it to safety with 200 of the alums who had accompanied her out of Kabul. And said, “We have nine alums who would prefer to study in the United States. Can’t go home and would not feel safe currently studying at their Asian universities because of the instability of travel in the region. Would you be willing to take those nine SOLA alums,” the alums of the boarding school that she had started, “And make the Middlebury students?” I said, “Let’s make it happen.” We created a process. We created an assessment tool. And I am thrilled to say that nine Afghan alums of the boarding school that our alum started, SOLA, have just completed their first spring semester here at Middlebury. We’re so happy to have them here



Speaker 3:

Yet another way in which our global reach is part of the work that we do every day in addressing the world’s most challenging problem. So this is your Middlebury. It’s a 2022 Middlebury. It is strong because of the support it has received from you and other alums who have volunteered their time and contributed their dollars over many decades. And now we are embarked on a campaign that will shape Middlebury’s future. And this is everyone’s campaign. Your gifts in honor of reunion count toward the campaign goal. In fact, reunion classes are already leading the way, including your own. Our goal this year was $90 million. We have surpassed it. About two or three weeks ago, we were at 94 million. Thank you. Thank you. This matters because of what the campaign will enable us to do next. We have four main goals for Middlebury’s future. We want to increase access to our Middlebury education, enhance our academic programs and create 21st century forms of literacy for our campus and the world.



Speaker 3:

Ensuring our students are world ready and work ready through our characteristic immersive learning opportunities. And finally create campus environments to support the academic mission and build community. There’s so much more to share, but I’ll end by saying that this weekend we are celebrating your Middlebury past, present, and future. We are celebrating you and your bond to the college and to each other. We are celebrating your generosity and your optimism for us and for our futures. And we particularly want to celebrate our reunion volunteers, the many people who worked so hard to make this special reunion happen. Thanks to all of you who are part of reunion planning and preparation. You’ve been extraordinary. I’ve loved meeting you. And your classmates and I, and all of us here on campus appreciate your work and you very much. I’m so proud and honored to be with you at this turning point in your Middlebury lives. Without you and the strength of your past and present commitment to Middlebury, we could not imagine our future. Thank you for helping us to imagine our future. Welcome back and welcome home.



Speaker 2:

As we prepare to conclude with the singing of our alma mater. Receive now this good word, this benediction. O divine moment, our hearts are made glad by such sweet convocation, sweet reunion. Make it our practice to notice and to be glad. O divine noticing, let it be our posture, our orientation from this gathering to be generous and open, and receptive. Let us set our intention to be right and true and good as we are now to one another and as we would be for the whole world. As we have been learners in this place and companions in this time, may it be for us always for the sake of kindness and compassion. Ever good stewards of our consciences, caretakers of our conscience consciousness. Go now and enjoy each other, rejoicing in your bonds of affection and intentions around the things that belong to this Middlebury blue. Blessed be. Amen. Let us stand as we are able and join in the alma mater.

50th Reunion for 1970 & 1971 program cover: Middlebury Chapel with bright flags at dusk

Events and Activities

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Frequently Asked Questions

Have questions? Start with our FAQs page, as well as the section for the Classes of 1970 and 1971.