Faculty and Staff

A

Learn more about the life of your visa by visiting the Department of State Web page.

A

Yes. Your DS-2019 must reflect your new program dates. You need a new DS-2019 for each session you work at Middlebury.

A

If you are coming to teach during the Summer School programs, it is likely that the most appropriate status for you will be to request Optional Practical Training (OPT) or Curricular Practical Training (CPT) through your current institution. You should discuss your plans with the International Advisor at your current institution. With Practical Training, your current institution will keep you on their I-20 in F-1 status. Please note that OPT can take up to 3 months to approve, so you should contact your International Advisor as soon as possible.

If you are currently in F-1 status and are coming to teach during the academic year, there are various options. You could apply for Optional Practical Training under your current F-1 Student status, change to J-1 status, or change to H-1B status. All of these options will allow you to work at Middlebury. The most appropriate status for you at Middlebury College will depend on variables including your travel plans, the length of your Middlebury College contract, and your long-term plans. You should discuss your situation with both your current institution and with International Student and Scholar Services to decide which status is most appropriate for you.

A

H-1B status is employer-specific, therefore, Middlebury College must submit an H-1B petition for you, even though you already hold H-1B status. (Please be aware that travel outside the United States will greatly affect how and when we submit the H-1B petition, so please inform us if you plan to travel outside the U.S. before coming to Middlebury.) 

If you will be teaching during the Summer Schools, Middlebury will either submit a “concurrent H-1B petition”, or a “change of employer” petition, depending on your plans after the summer. If you will return to your current U.S. institution to continue in H-1B status upon completion of the summer program, Middlebury College will apply for ”concurrent” H-1B status for you, which will grant you permission to teach at both institutions. If you do not plan to return to your institution upon completion of the Language School program, Middlebury will submit a “change of employer” petition for you. Please contact International Student and Scholar Services for the H-1B application.

If you will be teaching during the academic year, Middlebury College will most likely submit an H-1B petition for a change of employer and/or an extension of your H-1B status. However, many variables will affect if and how we apply for that status, including how long you have held H-1B status, your travel plans, and if you have a valid H-1B visa in your passport. Please contact International Student and Scholar Services to discuss your situation in detail.

A

In order to work at Middlebury College, you must hold a visa status which allows employment in the United States. The Visa Waiver Program (VWP) and tourist status DO NOT allow employment in the U.S. 

Which visa status is most appropriate for you will depend on a variety of factors including the length of your Middlebury College contract, your current location and visa status, your travel plans prior to coming to Middlebury, your plans after your Middlebury program, and if you are coming to teach during the academic year or for the summer programs. Please see the links below for general guidance on the most common scenarios, and contact International Student and Scholar Services, isss@middlebury.edu to discuss your specific situation.

A

If you have not recently been in the United States (i.e., in the past two years), you will most likely come to the United States in J-1 Exchange Visitor visa status. In order to apply for a J-1 visa, you will need to obtain a DS-2019 from Middlebury College. Once you have been officially offered a position at Middlebury College, you must complete the DS-2019 application and submit it with all supporting documents to International Student and Scholar Services at Middlebury College as soon as possible.

Please note that if you have held J-1 “Professor” status in the past 24 months, or if you are being hired for a tenure-track position, J status may not be an option. Please discuss with International Student and Scholar Services if you think you may not be eligible for J visa status.

If you have not recently been in the United States and are being hired for a multi-year or tenure-track position, H-1B status may be the most appropriate. However, if you have previously been in J-1 Exchange Visitor status in the U.S., and are subject to the 212(e) home residency requirement, H-1B status may not be possible. If you are being hired for a tenure-track position, please discuss with International Student and Scholar Services if you think you may not be eligible for H-1B status.

A

If you are in the J-1 ”Professor” category, we will most likely transfer your SEVIS record and J-1 visa status to Middlebury College, which will give you authorization to work at Middlebury. You should contact your International Advisor at your current institution to discuss the transfer process. To transfer your SEVIS record, please complete the SEVIS Transfer Form, and contact Middlebury’s International Student and Scholar Services.

If you are coming to teach at the Summer Schools, and you are currently in J-1 “Student” status, the most appropriate step is  to request Academic Training through your current institution. Academic Training will grant you authorization to work at Middlebury College during the summer. During Academic Training, your current institution will keep you on their DS-2019 in J-1 Student Status. You should discuss your plans with your International Advisor as soon as possible.

If you are coming to Middlebury College to teach during the academic year, and are currently in J-1 “Student” status at another institution in the U.S., there are various options for you. You could change to H-1B status, change to J-1 “Professor” status, or pursue Academic Training under your current J-1 “Student” status. The most appropriate status for you at Middlebury College will depend on many variables, including your travel plans prior to coming to Middlebury, the length of your Middlebury College contract, and your long-term plans. Please contact International Student and Scholar Services to discuss you situation in detail.

A

In order to apply for a J-1 visa, you must first obtain a DS-2019 form from Middlebury College. The DS-2019 is an official immigration document which shows that you are eligible for J-1 visa status.

Once you obtain the DS-2019 from Middlebury College, you must apply in person for a J-1 visa at a U.S. Embassy. A DS-2019 Request Form will be sent to you along with your Middlebury College contract, or can be downloaded here.  (Canadian citizens do not need a J-1 visa stamp in their passport. To enter the US in J-1 visa status as a Canadian, you must present the DS-2019 at a US Port of Entry.)

Once Middlebury College has received your signed contract and completed DS-2019 request form, a DS-2019 will be sent to you, along with instructions on how to apply for a J-1 visa.

For information on the visa application process, we encourage you to visit the U.S. Embassy where you plan to apply for the J-1 visa. A listing of US Embassies and Consulates is available at: 

A

Please complete the SEVIS Transfer Form. Once we receive the completed SEVIS Transfer Form and supporting documents, we will produce a new DS-2019 for you on the designated transfer date.

Please be aware that if you have applied for a waiver of the J-1 Exchange Visitor 212(e) home residency requirement, transferring your J-1 SEVIS record will again make you subject to the home residency requirement. If you have applied for and/or received a waiver of the 2-year home residency requirement, you should not transfer your J record.

A

Always make sure to stay calm, ask the officer/agent for identification, and know your rights when you find yourself in this situation. The American Civil Liberties Union (ACLU) maintains a detailed guide for individuals who find themselves in this situation. 

A

In most cases, family members (meaning spouses and unmarried, dependent children under 21) enter the U.S. as dependents on the primary family member’s visa status. J-2 for dependents of J-1 Exchange Visitors, H-4 as dependents of H-1B visas, and F-2 for dependents of F-1 students. However, if your family will only be coming to the U.S. for a short visit, the Visa Waiver Program (VWP) or B-1/B-2 tourist status may also be perfectly appropriate. As a general rule, if your family will be joining you for all or most of the time you are at Middlebury, they should enter as dependents on your visa status. If they will be coming for a quick visit, tourist status is also possible. Please contact isss@middlebury.edu or more information.

A

Waiting times vary from country to country. In some cases it only takes a few days, while in others it may take more than a month. To see visa wait times at specific U.S. Embassies and Consulates, please refer to the U.S. Department of State Visa Wait Time.

A

The Canadian tourist visa is called a “Temporary Resident Visa”. To obtain a Temporary Resident Visa to Canada, you must submit an application to the Canadian Embassy in New York. The visa application process is done by mail.

Find out if you need a visa to enter Canada, and to apply for a Temporary Resident Visa if necessary.

A

As an international  student or scholar, you may legally drive on the roads of the State of Vermont for up to one year from your date of arrival if you have an International Driving Permit AND a valid home country license AND if you are from one of the designated countries or territories. A valid home country license is limited to a licensed driver who is at least 18 years old and limited to a vehicle of the type covered by the license. Find detailed information and to access the list of designated countries.

New, Exchange, and Returning Students

A

Learn more about the life of your visa by visiting the Department of State Web page.

A

You may enter the U.S. 30 days prior to the program start date noted on your document (I-20 or DS-2019).

Each year a few students wish to enter the U.S. even earlier than 30 days prior to their program start date. In general, this is not advisable. Students wishing to enter the U.S. prior to the 30-day grace period must enter in another visa status, usually in tourist status. However, individuals in tourist status are not allowed to enroll in courses. Therefore, if you enter the U.S. as a tourist, you must change from tourist to your student visa status prior to enrolling in classes. Changing from tourist to student visa status is not always possible, but it is always time-consuming, expensive, and risky. Again, we strongly advise you to enter the U.S. in your student status within the 30-day grace period allowed by your I-20 or DS-2019. If you have questions, please contact us.

A

Waiting times vary from country to country. In some cases it only takes a week, in other countries it may take more than a month. To see visa wait times at specific U.S. Embassies and Consulates, please refer to the U.S. Department of State Visa Wait Time Web site.

 

A

International students who withdraw from Middlebury College have their SEVIS records “Terminated”. This means that your F-1 student status has been broken, and the I-20 you obtained from Middlebury College is no longer valid. You must obtain a new I-20 to return as an F-1 student. In order to obtain a new I-20 from Middlebury College, you must submit the following to International Student and Scholar Services:

  • I-20 Application
  • Supporting financial documents
  • Copy of your most recent F-1 student visa
  • Copy of your current passport
  • A letter with the following information:
  • Your current major and minor
  • Your intended graduation date
  • Your expected date of return to Middlebury, and travel plans prior to returning
  • If you are transferring your SEVIS record from another school in the U.S., please also submit the SEVIS Transfer Form.

Please note that if you receive financial aid you will need a confirmed financial aid award for the upcoming academic term before you can submit the I-20 application. Application procedures and deadlines are available on the Student Financial Services Web page.

A

Complete instructions on applying for a U.S. visa will be sent to you with your I-20. In short, you must first obtain an I-20 form from Middlebury. Then, you must arrange for an interview with a U.S. Embassy or Consulate to apply for the visa. Find the nearest Embassy or Consulate

Please be aware that a U.S. F-1 visa cannot be issued prior to 120 days before your program start date. You may want to inquire at the Embassy or Consulate about the visa application process in advance regarding scheduling an appointment, necessary forms, and required fees.

A

Complete instructions on applying for a U.S. visa will be sent to you with your DS-2019. In short, you must first obtain a DS-2019 from Middlebury College. Then, you must arrange for an interview with a U.S. Embassy or Consulate to apply for the visa. Find the nearest Embassy or Consulate.

Please be aware that a U.S. J-1 visa cannot be issued prior to 120 days before your program start date. You may want to inquire at the Embassy or Consulate about the visa application process in advance regarding scheduling an appointment, necessary forms, and required fees.

A

For September entrants, your I-20 (F-1 students), DS-2019 (J-1 students)  will be sent to you in June. Please note that in order to send you your document, we must have a complete application and all supporting documents from you by May 1. If you have special circumstances that necessitate receipt of an I-20 or DS-2019 before June, please make that request in writing and include details as to your circumstances. We evaluate requests on a case-by-case basis and will do our best to accommodate your needs. For February entrants, your I-20 or DS-2019 application should be completed by September 15 and we’ll send your document in November.

A

You are responsible for paying the visa application fee and the reciprocity fee which varies by country. A listing of the fees can be found at: https://travel.state.gov/content/travel/en/us-visas/visa-information-resources/fees/fees-visa-services.html.

Information regarding the SEVIS Fee (Student and Exchange Visitor Information System) will be sent to you with your document (I-20 or DS-2019). This fee must be paid a few days before your visa appointment and you must print out the receipt to confirm your payment at your visa appointment.

A

Always make sure to stay calm, ask the officer/agent for identification, and know your rights when you find yourself in this situation.

The American Civil Liberties Union (ACLU) maintains a detailed guide for individuals who find themselves in this situation.

A

As an international  student or scholar, you may legally drive on the roads of the State of Vermont for up to one year from your date of arrival if you have an International Driving Permit AND a valid home country license AND if you are from one of the designated countries or territories. A valid home country license is limited to a licensed driver who is at least 18 years old and limited to a vehicle of the type covered by the license. For detailed information and to access the list of designated countries, please visit http://dmv.vermont.gov/licenses/Drivers/Foreign.

Middlebury College Academic Year Students

A

Learn more about the life of your visa by visiting the Department of State Web page.

Automatic Visa Revalidation: travel to Canada and Mexico on an expired visa.

It is possible to enter the U.S. using an expired visa for trips to Canada, Mexico, and the adjacent islands; this is known as Automatic Visa Revalidation. You may re-enter the U.S. from these countries using an expired visa as long as the trip was for less than 30 days, and you did not depart Canada/Mexico/the adjacent island during your trip. Please be aware that individuals from Cuba, Iran, North Korea, Syria, and Sudan are not eligible for Automatic Visa Revalidation. If you are a citizen of one of these countries you must have a valid F-1 or J-1 visa to re-enter the U.S.

Please also be aware that if you have entered one of these countries to apply for a U.S. visa and are denied, you cannot re-enter the U.S. using an expired visa.

A

When ISSS signs page 3 of your Form I-20, they verify that you are maintaining status in your current program of study at Middlebury College. This travel signature is valid for up to one year. As a student in F-1 visa status, you are responsible for ensuring that you have a current travel signature at all times. ISSS encourages students to stop in each term to obtain a travel signature to avoid the serious implications of being outside of the U.S. with a lapsed signature. All you need to do is bring your current Form I-20 and passport to ISSS during drop-in hours. If you have recently updated your major or minor with the Registrar’s office, you should submit a major/minor update form prior to your visit to ISSS.

A

Yes. Students who have completed the full IB Diploma and earned grades of 6 or 7 for at least three higher-level examinations, are eligible for a maximum of two Middlebury course credits. Students who earned fewer than three scores of 6 or higher on higher level examinations, may receive one course credits for each higher level examination passed with a score of 6 or 7. No credit is awarded for standard level exams.

The other major European examination certificates, such as the French Baccalauréat, Swiss Maturité, Artium Examination, British A levels, and German Abitur, are normally considered to have a value of two credits if students receive scores that indicate excellent performance.

Students who receive such credit may not then receive credit for Middlebury introductory courses in subjects covered on the examination.

The credit transfer process is handled by the Registrar. Please contact the Registrar’s Office for the proper forms to transfer credit to Middlebury College at registrar@middlebury.edu

A

Yes. You should always enter the U.S. as a student (using your I-20 and in F-1 status) throughout your entire program at Middlebury College, even if you are only entering the U.S. for a few days.

If you enter the U.S. in any other status (tourist, for example), your F-1 status is “broken”, and your student record ends. This creates a great deal of trouble; you then need to apply for a new SEVIS record, and go through the whole I-20 application process you went through as a First Year student (completing an I-20 application form, showing proof of funds, etc).

In addition, in order to be eligible for off-campus employment authorization (OPT), or to receive payment for a Winter Term Internship (CPT) within the U.S., students must be in continuous F-1 status for an academic year. If your F-1 status is broken, the clock starts over and you are not eligible for off-campus employment or a paid internship until you have been in F-1 status for another year.

A

You will get a new I-20 when you make an update to your SEVIS record, which is reflected in the information posted on your I-20. Common updates which result in a new I-20 include:

  • Declaring a primary major
  • A change in your expected date of graduation
  • Applying for OPT or CPT

Not all of the information in your SEVIS record is reflected on your I-20. Changes such as the following will be updated in your SEVIS record, but will not necessitate a new I-20:

  • Declaring a second major field of study
  • Declaring a minor
  • Change of address
A

Please contact isss@middlebury.edu and we can create a replacement I-20 for you.

If you are currently in the United States, we will send the I-20 to you via regular mail, or you can come pick it up in person. Please bring your passport and I-94 card with you when to come to pick up your new I-20.

If you are currently outside the United States and need an I-20 to enter the U.S., we may be able to send you a new I-20 if time allows. If there is not sufficient time to send you a new I-20, you will need to enter the U.S. without it. This will create an additional delay for you, as students in F-1 status are expected to have appropriate documents when entering the United States; a valid passport, a valid I-20 with a recent signature, and a valid F-1 visa.  Students traveling without their I-20 will most likely receive an I-515 form, which grants temporary 30-day admission to the U.S. in F-1 status. If you are granted an I-515, you must come to International Student and Scholar Services immediately upon your arrival to campus. You must obtain a new I-20 from ISSS, and submit a series of documents to the U.S. Government within 30 days, or you will be out-of-status. Being out-of-status will have serious consequences on your immigration status.

If you are traveling without an I-20, the Border Official may suggest you enter the U.S. in tourist status, instead of granting the I-515. Under no circumstances should you enter the U.S. in tourist status. Tourist status does not allow enrollment in courses or employment. If you enter in tourist status and attend classes, you will be in violation of your immigration status. Changing from tourist status back to F-1 status is time-consuming and expensive.

A

The I-94 record serves as a record of your stay in the U.S. If you enter the U.S. by air or sea, your I-94 record will be created electronically. You will only receive an I-94 card if you enter the U.S. by land.

If you entered the U.S. by land and have a physical I-94 card and it is not surrendered when you depart the U.S., there may not be a record of your departure, and your record may be flagged as an “overstay”. This could complicate your re-entry, or, in a worst-case scenario, prevent a future visit, to the U.S.**

If you have a physical I-94 card and it was not taken when you departed the U.S., you will need to mail the following items to CBP.

  • The original I-94 card. Complete the back of the I-94 card, listing the U.S. Port of Departure (Port), the date of departure (Date), the airline you traveled on (Carrier) and your Flight Number.
  • A letter including these departure details, and explaining why the I-94 card was not surrendered as you departed the U.S.
  • If possible, include proof that you have departed the U.S.; for example, a copy of your airline boarding pass or passport stamps.

Please consult the CBP website for the mailing address and further instructions.

**Please note that if you are going to Canada by land for a trip of less than 30 days, and plan to re-enter the U.S. in the same visa status that you departed, you should not surrender your I-94 card.  You will need to present your I-94 card upon re-entry to the U.S.

A

If you enter the U.S. via air or land, your I-94 record is created electronically and can be accessed online. You should print this record and keep it with your passport and other immigration documents.

If you enter the U.S. via land, you will receive a physical I-94 card that should be stapled inside your passport.

Your I-94 record or card governs your status in the U.S. It is essential that you have an I-94 record or card that accurately displays your current immigration status and the expiration date of your status. 

If you have a physical I-94 card from a land entry and lose that I-94 card, you can go to the Customs and Border Protection (CBP) website to print a record of your arrival to the U.S.

If you find that your I-94 record displays the incorrect U.S. immigration status, please contact ISSS immediately at isss@middlebury.edu and we will guide you through the process of correcting this.

A

In order to re-enter the U.S. in F-1 status, you will need three documents:

  • A valid passport (valid 6-months into the future)
  • Your current I-20, which has been signed within the last term 
  • A valid F-1 visa*

*Citizens of Canada and Bermuda do not require a visa stamp in their passport. If you are a citizen of Canada or Bermuda, you will only need to present a valid passport and current I-20 at the border.

*There is an exception to the requirement of a valid visa to enter the U.S. for trips of less than 30 days to Canada, Mexico, and the adjacent islands. This is called Automatic Visa Revalidation

Students from some countries may have further restrictions. Please check our International Travel Restrictions Information page for more details.

updated 10/10/2018

A

It is possible to apply for a U.S. visa in a country other than the country from which you hold your passport; this is called applying as a “Third Country National”. While most Embassies accept applications from Third Country Nationals, not all do so. You should check the website of the Embassy at which you plan to apply for the visa to see if they accept applications from “Third Country Nationals.”

There are risks in applying for a visa in a country other than your own. Since the F-1 visa is a nonimmigrant visa, the Embassy Official must determine if you are planning to immigrate to the U.S. and judge the likelihood of your returning to your home country once your program in the U.S. is complete. Officials in other countries will probably not be familiar with your country of citizenship and may not be comfortable in making this determination. Also, if for any reason you are denied a visa, you would not be able to re-enter the U.S., even if your current F-1 visa had not expired. (The visa denial would in effect invalidate your current visa.) Therefore, we advise students not to apply for a new visa as a Third Country National unless there is a real need to do so.

A

Some embassies will allow people to apply for a new visa to the U.S. before their current visa has expired, others will not. You should look at the Embassy’s website at which you will apply for the new visa to see what their policy is, and to contact the Embassy directly if they don’t have the information on the website.

A

No. It is not possible to apply for a U.S. while in the U.S. Applications for visas must be made outside the U.S. through a U.S. Consulate.

A

Always make sure to stay calm, ask the officer/agent for identification, and know your rights when you find yourself in this situation. The American Civil Liberties Union (ACLU) maintains a detailed guide for individuals who find themselves in this situation.

A

To see if you need a visa to enter Canada, please refer to Canada’s Citizenship and Immigration.

A

Citizens of many countries need to obtain a tourist visa to enter Canada. You must apply for this visa yourself as International Student and Scholar Services does not apply for you.

The Canadian tourist visa is called a “Temporary Resident Visa”. To obtain a Temporary Resident Visa to Canada, you must submit an application to the Canadian Embassy in New York. The visa application process is done by mail.
 
Find out if you need a visa to enter Canada, and to apply for a Temporary Resident Visa if necessary.

A

Find information on who needs a visa to enter Mexico, and on how to apply for a tourist visa. Click on “Visas” on the left hand side of the page, then on “Tourism.”

The application process requires an in-person visit to the Boston Consulate. Please contact the Mexican Consulate directly if you have questions regarding the visa process.

A

International students can apply for a Vermont driver’s license through the Department of Motor Vehicles (DMV). The DMV has a mobile office in Middlebury on certain days of the week at the Addison County Court House (behind Shaw’s grocery store). If this is your first U.S. Driver’s license, you will need to take three tests:

  • written test
  • driving test
  • vision test

(Canadian Citizens may turn in their Canadian license for a Vermont license with only the eye test.)

You will need access to a car to take the driving test; if you do not own a car you will need to borrow one.

Please be aware that you cannot take the written test and the driving test on the same day, so you will need to visit the DMV twice to take all of the required tests. You should therefore plan to allow at least two weeks to obtain your Vermont Driver’s License.

You should call or email the DMV to schedule an appointment for a written and driving test. Contact information, hours and location for the DMV in Middlebury.

When you go to the DMV, you will need to present your Middlebury Student ID Card, I-20, passport, and I-94 card. You should be sure that you have had your I-20 signed for this semester!

It is not necessary to have a Social Security Number (SSN) to apply for a Drivers License, however, if you do not have an SSN, the DMV may request that you obtain a letter from the Social Security Administration indicating that you are not eligible for an SSN. If you need a letter to this effect, please contact ISSS, and we will help you to obtain the letter from the Social Security Administration.

Seniors, please note:
When you apply for a driver’s license, the expiration date will be listed as the expiration date of your I-20.  If you have applied for Optional Practical Training (OPT), you are able to use your new I-20 from the OPT application to get a driver’s license that is valid beyond your graduation date. You can go through this process before your OPT has been approved by USCIS.

A

As an international  student or scholar, you may legally drive on the roads of the State of Vermont for up to one year from your date of arrival if you have an International Driving Permit and a valid home country license and if you are from one of the designated countries or territories. A valid home country license is limited to a licensed driver who is at least 18 years old and limited to a vehicle of the type covered by the license.  Find detailed information and to access the list of designated countries.

Middlebury Institute Students

A

The I-20 and DS-2019 applications are online web forms, which can be accessed from the Middlebury ISSS website.

The Fall 2021 semester process timeline is outlined below.

  • March 18, 2021 – I-20 and DS-2019 applications and instructions made active on the website.
  • Between March 18 – April 18, 2021: ISSS accepts completed I-20 and DS-2019 applications.
  • Between April 19 – May 14, 2021 (and ongoing): ISSS will issue an I-20 or DS-2019 for students who have submitted a complete I-20 or DS-2019 application.
  • As of May 3, 2021 (and ongoing): ISSS will mail the I-20 or DS-2019 forms to students.

ISSS will work as promptly as we can. We will not be able to honor requests to expedite, given our high-volume workload at this time of year. It is important that you submit your complete I-20 or DS-2019 application as early as possible. 

After your I-20 or DS-2019 has been created, you will receive an email with information that will allow you to start the visa application process while waiting for your documents to arrive.

Please keep in mind that you will need to receive the original I-20 or DS-2019 before going for your visa interview.

A

Yes. In addition to completing the I-20 or DS-2019 application, you will need to provide a copy of your passport, evidence of your financial support, and a financial sponsor letter. Financial documents must be issued on or after March 1 for students starting their program in fall, and October 1 for students starting spring semester. 

If you are receiving financial support from a loan or scholarship, we need to see the approval notice from the lender or your scholarship award letter issued by the sponsoring organization or foundation. Until the loan or scholarship has been issued, we will not be able to issue this funding for issuance of the Form I-20 or DS-2019.

If you are bringing dependents, you will also need to provide copies of their passports as well as show additional financial support to cover the estimated cost of living.

A

U.S. embassies and consulates are required to collect a $350 (F-1) or $220 (J-1) SEVIS fee before issuing F-1 or J-1 visas for first-time visa applicants only. For students who need F-1 or J-1 visa renewal while attending the Institute, this SEVIS fee is not applicable.

Please visit the SEVIS website, www.fmjfee.com, for information about paying the fee.

A

All financial documentation submitted to ISSS needs to be in English. If your financial institution cannot provide a document in English, then a certified translated copy can be submitted with the original document. 

A

Dependents are considered your spouse (wife or husband) and unmarried children under the age of 21. Each of your dependents will be issued an I-20 or DS-2019 in order to apply for the F-2 or J-2 visa. A copy of a dependent’s passport and financial documentation showing support for estimated cost of living must be received by ISSS before an I-20 or DS-2019 can be issued.

A

The required amount for the 2021–2022 academic year is $64,290 for a two year master’s degree program. This amount may differ if pursuing an advanced entry degree. Please visit the Tuition and Fees page for more information.

If you are receiving merit scholarship, this is considered financial support, and the amount that you will receive for the first academic year of your program counts toward the cost that ISSS needs to verify.  You will be required to provide additional financial documentation showing the difference. For example, if you are receiving a $10,000 merit scholarship, then you will only need to show $54,290.

If you are bringing a spouse and/or children to the U.S. with you, you will need to show additional amounts. Please contact isss@middlebury.edu for the amount of support you will need to show for a spouse and/or child.

A

No. The tax return information from last year only tells us you or your sponsor’s income from last year. We need to know if you have the sufficient funds set aside for your studies at the Institute.

A

The Department of State can issue the visa for your program no more than 120 days prior to the start of your program as indicated on the I-20 or DS-2019. It is recommended that you apply for the visa as soon as possible.

A

If you will continue to receive your same salary while attending the institution, this would be considered your own personal funds. If your employer will be paying above your salary or specifically for tuition expenses, you should provide a letter from your employer identifying what they will be paying. If this is a small business, your employer will need to show a bank statement.

Language Schools and Bread Loaf Students

A

Learn more about the life of your visa by visiting the Department of State Web page.

A

Yes. When you submit your deposit to reserve your place at Middlebury, it is applied to your bill. It is considered part of your family contribution. When completing the I-20 Application, if you have already paid the deposit, you may deduct the deposit from the total family contribution you are required to show on the I-20 application.

Updated, January 2010

A

No. B-1/B-2 visa status, and the Visa Waiver Program (VWP) do not allow enrollment in courses.

A

Students must be in the U.S. for one full academic year before they become eligible for Optional Practical Training (OPT) Employment Authorization. Most Summer School students are not eligible for OPT, as they are only in the U.S. for the summer sessions.

We strongly recommend that students completing a program at another institution discuss the OPT application process with their international student advisor to determine the best strategy.

A

Yes. To transfer funds electronically to Middlebury College, please contact the Cashier’s Office.

A

In order to attend the BLSE School in Oxford, you may need to apply for a student visa to the United Kingdom. You are responsible for submitting the documents necessary to obtain the appropriate visa to study in the United Kingdom in a timely manner. Find the UK Embassy nearest you.

A

You are responsible for paying the $160 visa application fee and the reciprocity fee (which varies by country). A listing of the fees can be found at:
https://travel.state.gov/content/travel/en/us-visas/visa-information-resources/fees/fees-visa-services.html.

You may also be responsible for paying the $350 SEVIS (Student and Exchange Visitor Information System) fee. We will send information on how to pay the fee with your I-20 if it pertains to you.

A

Waiting times vary from country to country. In some cases it only takes a week, while in others it may take more than a month. To see visa wait times at specific U.S. Embassies and Consulates, please refer to the U.S. Department of State Visa Wait Time Web site.

A

If you have been outside the U.S. for more than 5 months, we recommend that you apply for a new F-1 visa to avoid possible problems at the U.S. Port of Entry. The Department of State indicates that F-1 student visas become invalid if a student has been out of the U.S. for more than 5 months. If you choose not to obtain a new visa after an absence of more than 5 months, there is a risk that the Border Official may choose not to admit you to the U.S.

You may wish to contact your local U.S. Embassy or Consulate to request their advice on whether or not you should apply for a new F-1 visa.

A

Instructions on applying for a U.S. visa will be sent to you with your I-20. In short, you will need to make an appointment with a U.S. Embassy for a visa interview, and then take your I-20 and series of documents to the Embassy to apply for the F-1 visa. We encourage you to inquire at your nearest U.S. Embassy or Consulate about the visa application process.

A

Starting in March, we expect to produce and send I-20s within two weeks of receiving your completed I-20 application and supporting financial documents. Your I-20 will be sent to you via express mail.

For financial aid applicants, please note that we cannot process your I-20 until the financial aid process is complete. Language School students must pay the deposit before you will be issued an I-20. We urge you to submit your financial aid application and deposit as soon as possible.

A

Always make sure to stay calm, ask the officer/agent for identification, and know your rights when you find yourself in this situation.

The American Civil Liberties Union (ACLU) maintains a detailed guide for individuals who find themselves in this situation.

A

If your Summer School program is being funded by a non-Middlebury scholarship, please submit the original letter of award as financial proof. If your program is being funded through your employer, the letter must be on original letterhead, and state your employer’s intent to pay for a specific amount of the cost of your program.

If you are receiving support from an outside source, you still must provide proof that you have sufficient funds for the total estimated cost of your program, including tuition, room, board, books, travel and personal expenses. Please see the chart on the I-20 instructions for the total estimated costs of the Summer Schools programs, and deduct the amount of outside support from the total to arrive at the amount you must show in order for Middlebury College to produce your I-20.

A

To transfer your SEVIS record to Middlebury College, please complete the:

  • I-20 application form
  • SEVIS transfer form

Please submit the forms with the required supporting documents as soon as possible. We will create a new I-20 for your Summer Language Program once the transfer date has arrived.

Please note that transferring your SEVIS record to Middlebury College is only possible if you are completing a program in the Spring, and plan to enroll in the Middlebury Summer School Program for the Summer of the same year.

A

While not impossible, it is extremely difficult to change from tourist to F-1 student visa status. The change of status application is long, costly, and in many cases, the change of status is denied. If you have entered the country as a tourist, and wish to enroll in the Middlebury College Summer Schools, you will probably have more success, and it will be more time efficient, to depart the U.S., apply for an F-1 visa at a U.S. Embassy or Consulate, and enter the U.S. in F-1 student status.

If you wish to attempt to change from a tourist to F-1 student status, you should begin the change of status application several months before you intend to study. Your change of status application must be approved before you are allowed to begin classes. Individuals in tourist status are not allowed to enroll in coursework.

A

Individuals in H-1B status are allowed to enroll in classes, as long as the coursework is “incidental” to their H-1B status. This means that you can enroll in the Language Schools in H-1B status, as long as the classes do not interfere with your work, which is your primary purpose of being in the U.S. in H-1B status.

Many individuals who come to the Summer Schools work at Universities in H-1B status, have the summer off as a regular vacation period, and return to their institution in the fall to continue working in H status. In this case, there should not be a problem with enrolling in the Summer Schools in H-1B status.

However, if your H-1B status is ending prior to the Summer School Program, and you will not be returning to work in the fall, it gets more complicated. H-1B status is employer-specific, and comes to an end as soon as the employment ends, even if the individual has an H-1B visa or Approval Notice for dates beyond the end of employment. If your employment in H-1B status is ending prior to the Summer School program, you must change to a visa status which allows full-time enrollment (such as F-1). You are allowed to enroll in courses while your change of status to H-1B is pending.

A

As an international  student or scholar, you may legally drive on the roads of the State of Vermont for up to one year from your date of arrival if you have an International Driving Permit AND a valid home country license AND if you are from one of the designated countries or territories. A valid home country license is limited to a licensed driver who is at least 18 years old and limited to a vehicle of the type covered by the license. For detailed information and to access the list of designated countries, please visit http://dmv.vermont.gov/licenses/Drivers/Foreign.

A

…I received one last year from Middlebury?

Yes. Your I-20 must reflect your current program dates of study. You need a new I-20 for each session you attend Middlebury.

…if I am Canadian?

Yes.

Although Canadian citizens do not need to obtain a visa stamp in their passport, Canadians must obtain an I-20 from Middlebury College in order to enter the U.S. as students in F-1 visa status. You must take the I-20 with you to present to the U.S. officials at the border.

Please be aware that individuals who enter the U.S. in tourist status or through the Visa Waiver Program are not eligible to enroll in courses.

…if I am completing a program at another U.S. institution?

Probably. If you have not applied for Optional Practical Training (OPT), you must request a transfer of your SEVIS record from your current institution to Middlebury College in order to maintain your F-1 student status over the summer. Study is not allowed during grace periods.

If you are graduating in the Spring, and will be attending Graduate School in the fall, you also should transfer your SEVIS record, and obtain a Middlebury College I-20. Upon completion of the Summer School, you may request that Middlebury College transfer your SEVIS record to the Graduate School.

To transfer your SEVIS record to Middlebury College, please complete the I-20 application and the SEVIS transfer form as soon as possible.

If you have applied for OPT, please check with your current international student advisor to determine whether you will be able to follow your current school’s OPT policies and maintain your F-1 status while attending Middlebury’s summer program.

…if I have an I-20 from another school?

Probably not. If you are currently in F-1 status and working towards a degree at another institution in the U.S., you do not need to obtain an I-20 from Middlebury College, as long as you were enrolled in the spring term prior to, and will enroll in the fall term following, your summer program at Middlebury College. 

In other words, you do not need to obtain an I-20 from Middlebury as long you are attending the Middlebury College Summer Schools during a regular summer vacation period during your program at another university which you attend during the academic year as an F-1 student.

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