Middlebury

 

Imogen Cooper, piano

 Sussie Ahlburg</p>
Thursday, October 10, 2013
7:00 pm, Mahaney Center for the Arts, Concert Hall

Imogen Cooper, piano

Recognized worldwide as a pianist of virtuosity and poetic poise, Imogen Cooper has established a reputation as one of the finest performers of the classical repertoire. Cooper’s epic Middlebury program features Schubert’s three final piano sonatas, opuses 958–960. “Imogen Cooper has shown herself to be one of the interpretative élite . . . and one of the finest Schubertians in the world”—International Record Review. Due to the extended nature of this program, please note the early start time; complimentary refreshments will be served during the two intermissions. See associated dinner event. Sponsored by the Performing Arts Series.

Reserved Seating. Tickets: $25/20/6Visit the Box Office for details>>

Associated Residency Activity

Dinner and Conversation with Friends

Thursday, October 10, 2013
6:00 pm, Mahaney Center for the Arts, Lower Lobby

The pre-performance dinner is back by popular demand! Before settling into the Concert Hall for an evening of piano music by Imogen Cooper, join fellow concertgoers for dinner and a creative conversation about the arts in our community. Tickets: $25


Media


Imogen Cooper performs No. 4 in A-flat: Allegretto, Four Impromptus D899, by Franz Schubert


Program

SCHUBERT Piano Sonata in C Minor, D.958

Allegro
Adagio
Menuetto. Allegro
Allegro

**intermission**

SCHUBERT Sonata in A Major, D.959

Allegro
Andantino
Scherzo. Allegro vivace
Rondo. Allegretto

**intermission**

SCHUBERT Sonata in B-flat Major, D.960

Molto moderato
Andante sostenuto
Scherzo. Allegro vivace e con delicatezza
Allegro, ma non troppo


Artist Biography

Recognized worldwide as a pianist of virtuosity and poetic poise, Imogen Cooper has established a reputation as one of the finest interpreters of the classical repertoire. During the 2013/14 season she will perform concertos with the London Symphony Orchestra and Mark Elder and with the Cleveland Orchestra and Jane Glover. She will play solo recitals in the USA, UK and the Netherlands, which will include completing a cycle of Schubert’s solo works at the Wigmore Hall. Imogen Cooper is celebrating the Britten centenary year by performing two of his song cycles with Christianne Stotijn. One of these was featured in a BBC Prom and in Imogen’s second appearance at the Proms this year, she performed a Schubert recital in the Royal Albert Hall; a solo sonata and the Grand Duo with Paul Lewis.

Last season, Imogen Cooper’s concerto performances included the Philadelphia Orchestra (play/direct), Deutsche Symphonie-Orchester with Mark Elder and a UK tour with the Budapest Festival Orchestra under Ivan Fischer. She also performed the Ravel G major concerto at the BBC Proms and Lincoln Center New York, with the Orchestra of the Royal Academy of Music and the Juilliard School, conducted by John Adams.

Imogen Cooper has a widespread international career and has appeared with the New York Philharmonic, Vienna Philharmonic, Royal Concertgebouw, Leipzig Gewandhaus, London Symphony and NHK Symphony Orchestras. She has also undertaken tours with the Camerata Salzburg, Australian and Orpheus Chamber Orchestras. Imogen Cooper has played with all the major British orchestras and has particularly close relationships with the Royal Northern Sinfonia and Britten Sinfonia, play/directing.

Her recital appearances have included New York, Tokyo, Paris, Vienna, Prague, London and the Schubertiade in Schwarzenberg. As a supporter of new music, Imogen Cooper has premiered two works at the Cheltenham International Festival; Traced Overhead by Thomas Adès (1996) and Decorated Skin by Deirdre Gribbin (2003). In 1996, she also collaborated with members of the Berliner Philharmoniker in the premiere of the quintet, Voices for Angels, written by the ensemble’s viola player, Brett Dean. Imogen Cooper is a committed chamber musician and performs regularly with the Belcea Quartet and cellist Sonia Wieder-Atherton. As a Lieder recitalist, she has had a long collaboration with Wolfgang Holzmair in both the concert hall and recording studio (for Philips).

Her discography also includes Mozart Concertos with the Royal Northern Sinfonia (Avie), a solo recital at the Wigmore Hall (Wigmore Live) and a cycle of solo works by Schubert recorded live and released under the label ‘Schubert Live’. Her first recording for Chandos Records features music by Brahms and Schumann.

Imogen Cooper received a CBE in the Queen’s New Year Honours in 2007 and was the recipient of an award from the Royal Philharmonic Society the following year. In 1997 she was awarded an Honorary Membership of the Royal Academy of Music and in 1999 she was made a Doctor of Music at Exeter University. Imogen Cooper was the Humanitas Visiting Professor in Classical Music and Music Education at the University of Oxford for 2012-13.


Artist Website

http://www.imogen-cooper.com/


 

Press Reviews

"She is an outstanding artist, one of the finest pianists now playing. Go, listen, and wonder how many better pianists there are alive in this country, or anywhere." --Daily Telegraph

"…a rare ability to negotiate the composer's change of moods between flippancy and tragedy, managing such delicacy in differentiating shades and tones within individual phrases. It was playing of the greatest intelligence and musical integrity… International audiences have woken up to a rare and understated British talent. Long may her moment in the sun last." --"In praise of… Imogen Cooper", The Guardian, 11 December 2009

"What transfixed the audience was the palpable energy that coursed from player to player: from keyboard to leader's bow, from violins to woodwind and brass, and back again… Cooper's own rhythmic regeneration of theme and counter- theme, her sense of direction, and her ability to let the music yield and breathe, led to a fearless cadenza with a movingly hushed exit. A veiled inwardness hung over the slow movement. And the finale was measured, tense with concentrated energy, and with wonderfully tapered phrases of harp-like passagework." --The Times, 11 February 2009 (with Britten Sinfonia)