Middlebury

 

Wetland Trail Bridge

Wetland Trail Bridge

The Middlebury College Teaching and Research Natural Area is a 20ha that is available for class and research use.

Human oocycte in the meiotic stage Metaphase II as imaged in the Christopher D. Watters Cell Imagine Facility. Chromosomes are stained red while spindle fibers are green.

Human Oocycte GV

Human Oocycte GV

Human oocycte as imaged in the Christopher D Watters cell imaging facility.

Alumni College, Aug. 2009. Prof. Helen Young explaining a passage of Beak of the Finch during lab

Jewelweed spur

Jewelweed spur

Jewelweed is a common plant in Vermont. Dr. Helen YOung has been studying the co-evolution of the flowers and their bee pollinators here in Vermont.

Jewelweed flowers with different spur shapes. Dr Helen Young has been studying how the interaction between the flowers and their bee pollinators might lead to these differences in shape.

This map shows the location of several gaps created by the 1998 ice storm. Regeneration dynamics in these gaps has been the focus of student theses by Amy Gilbert in 1999, Kelly Jewell in 2001, Becky Hewitt in 2004, and Aiko Weverka in 2009.

Alumni College, Aug. 2009. Students replica-plating bacterial colonies.

Alumni College, Aug 2009. Students replica-plating bacterial colonies.

Alumni College, Aug. 2009. Students spreading bacterial colonies onto Petri dishes.

Alumni College, Aug. 2009. Prof. Young explaining how to measure spur angle of jewelweed flowers.

Alumni College, Aug. 2009. Prof. Helen Young showing students how to count bacterial colonies on plates.

Alumni College, Aug 2009. Prof. Helen Young shows how to measure jewelweed flowers.

Transferring bumblebees between nests, winter 2007

Patrick Sedney and Luke Yoquinto, thesis students of Prof. Helen Young 2007

Prof. Helen Young examining a jewelweed flower

Kristen Pelz at the Posters on the Hill, Washington DC 2007

Sarah Bunnell and Bryan Costa asking bees which flowers they would like to visit. Summer 2002

Bryan Costa, Sarah Bunnell, Michael Lin in field in Middlebury, working with Helen Young. Summer 2002

Battel Forest Gap

Battel Forest Gap

Students Nick Meiers and Meaghan Conneeny sampling plants in a gap created by a 1998 ice storm. Comparing the new growth in these gaps with growth in closed canopy areas can help us learn about forest regeneration.

Battell forest canopy

Battell forest canopy

The closed canopy at the Battell Research Forest. Recent student theses have compared forst regeneration under closed canopy areas such as this to gaps created by at 1998 ice storm.

Battel forest students

Battel forest students

Students from a BIOL0490 Senior Seminar sample sediment cores at the Battell Research Forest. From L-R: Kristin Link, Jill Morrison, Anna Chavis and Dr. Andi Lloyd.