COVID-19: Essential Information

Trinh Tran

Assistant Professor of Anthropology/Education Studies

 
 work(802) 443-3641
 Fall Semester: M 4:30-5:30 (via Zoom) and W 10am-noon (in person).
 Robert A. Jones '59 House B04

 

Courses

Course List: 

Courses offered in the past four years.
indicates offered in the current term
indicates offered in the upcoming term[s]

ANTH 0274 - Global Migration      

The Causes, Dynamics, and Consequences of International Migration
Whether they are asylum seekers, undocumented or legal migrants, large-scale movements of people across international borders raises important questions about human rights, nationality, and place. This global flow also presents unique challenges to both newcomers and residents of the receiving society as both sides contend with issues of loyalty, belonging, and identity. In this course we will examine these important issues using the United States as the primary (though not exclusive) context. Drawing upon historical and contemporary material, we will also discuss the social, cultural, political, and economic consequences of global migration.(formerly SOAN 0274) 3 hrs. lect./disc. AMR CMP NOR SOC

Fall 2020, Fall 2021

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ANTH 0275 - Cities of Hope and Despair      

Cities of Hope and Despair
Why have some cities outlasted empires and nation states while others exist on the edge of marginality and loss? In this course, we will use historical and contemporary examples to explore the rise and fall of urban centers around the world. What is the meaning of urbanity across cultures? What different purposes do cities serve? What challenges confront them, from climate change to gang warfare to new forms of human precarity? In this course we will also investigate how processes like colonialism, imperialism, and global migration shape the evolution of cities and how they exist in our imaginaries. 3 hrs. lect. CMP SOC

Spring 2021, Spring 2022

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EDST 0351 / ANTH 0351 - Education and Social Policy      

Education and Social Policy
School choice programs like charter and magnet schools are dramatically altering the educational landscape in the United States. In this course we will examine the premise that we can overcome the challenges of children living in poor neighborhoods by severing the traditional link between neighborhoods and schools and by providing access to extralocal high-quality schools. But who gets to exercise such choice? Does school choice result in better educational outcomes? We will also explore the relationship between school and neighborhood inequality. How do these two contexts work together to reproduce, intensify, or ameliorate spatial and educational inequities? (formerly SOAN/SOCI 0351) 3 hrs. lect./disc. AMR NOR SOC

Fall 2020

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EDST 0375 / ANTH 0375 - International Education      

International and Cross Cultural Education
Who gets to own knowledge? Who can acquire it? How do we construct advantage and disadvantage? Comparative and international education examines the intersection of culture and education and the ways they are inextricably related through history, politics, and literature. In this course we will explore major concepts, trends, and methodologies across disciplines, focusing on the effects of globalization, the maintenance and dissolution of borders, the commodification of knowledge, the social creation of meaning, and the consequences of those constructions. We will examine global educational traditions and realities on the ground in case studies of Western and developing nations. CMP SOC

Spring 2021, Spring 2022

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EDST 1040 / ANTH 1040 - School Lunches      

School Lunches
In this course we will chew through critical analysis on the production and consumption of school lunches. We will examine how diverse actors—state and national governments, big corporations, food service companies, celebrity chefs, community activists, and concerned parents—battle over what lands on the cafeteria tray. Using readings from the social sciences as well as food documentaries, we will explore how initiatives like school gardens and cooking classes shape child development and socialization. The laboratory component of this class will look beyond the U.S. context by making and eating meals served up to students around the world. Food preparation and consumption practices will be adjusted, as necessary, to comply with COVID restriction guidelines.(There will be a $50 lab fee for this course to cover the cost of ingredients needed for making school lunches from around the globe.) WTR

Winter 2022

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FYSE 1512 - Your Connected World      

Your Connected World
It’s not what you know. It’s who you know. In this course, we will examine how social networks—our links to other individuals and groups—form and why these networks matter. Do birds of a feather flock together? How do social networks shape our most personal decisions like who we fall in love with, the music we listen to, or the way we vote? How has the Internet, through virtual communities and social media, affected our ability to make, break, and transform our connections to others? We will answer these questions drawing from theories and research in the social sciences. 3 hrs. sem. CW SOC

Fall 2017

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FYSE 1577 - Schools and Inequality      

Schools and Inequality
In this course we will explore fundamental questions about the relationship between schools and society. What should be the normative goals of education? How do we explain educational disparities? We will look at theories on race, class, disability, gender, and sexuality to examine the role that schools play in reproducing or circumventing inequality in society. Drawing upon both domestic and international contexts, we will incorporate theories and methods from across the social sciences. 3 hrs. sem. CW SOC

Fall 2021

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IGST 0706 - MES Senior Thesis      

Middle East Studies Senior Thesis
(Approval Required)

Winter 2021, Spring 2021, Winter 2022, Spring 2022

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INTD 0241 / SOAN 0241 - Nature vs. Nurture      

Nature vs. Nurture: Can Darwin and the Social Sciences Coexist?
In this course, we will tackle the contentious nature vs. nurture debate by bridging disciplinary divisions within the natural and social sciences. How can we use evolutionary thinking to understand social phenomena without falling into biologically deterministic explanations of human behavior? How can we use critical insights from the social sciences to better understand our evolution? A core component of this course is learning how evidence and theories within anthropology, biology, and sociology connect to best practices in the professional field of Cultural Resource Management. Lab practicums will provide hands-on experience framing archaeological data within natural and social contexts. 3 hrs. lect. SOC

Spring 2019

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SOAN 0105 - Society and the Individual      

Society and the Individual
This course examines the ideas and enduring contributions of the giants of modern social theory, including Karl Marx, Max Weber, Emile Durkheim, and Sigmund Freud. Readings will include selections from original works, as well as contemporary essays. Key issues will include the nature of modernity, the direction of social change, and the role of human agency in constructing the "good society." This course serves as a general introduction to sociology. 3 hrs. lect. (Sociology) SOC

Spring 2018

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SOAN 0215 - Sociology of Education      

Sociology of Education
In this course we will study education both as a social institution and as a social process. In our analysis of education and its relationship to the structure of society, we will pay particular attention to the intersection of gender, class, race, and ethnicity within schools. Our objective will be to explore the ways in which education might contribute to the reproduction of social inequalities, as well as its potential for social change. The substantive focus will be on American society. 3 hrs. lect. (Sociology) AMR CMP NOR SOC

Fall 2017, Fall 2018

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SOAN 0235 - The City and Its People      

The City and Its People
We all live somewhere, and increasingly we find ourselves living in an urban environment. In this course we will explore current topics in urban sociology, with particular emphasis on the power of place, culture, and community in U.S. cities. We will study the historical, cultural, and political conditions that have shaped contemporary U.S. cities, such as New York City, Chicago, and Los Angeles. We will examine how cities change and resist change through the lens of such subjects as migration, poverty, urban arts, crime, and education as it pertains to the city. Students will read a variety of ethnographic and sociological materials, in order to gain an understanding of the complexities of both urban life and processes of representation. 3 hrs. lect./disc. (Sociology) AMR NOR SOC

Fall 2018

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SOAN 0274 - Global Migration      

Global Flows: The Causes, Dynamics, and Consequences of International Migration
Whether they are asylum seekers, undocumented or legal migrants, large-scale movements of people across international borders raises important questions about human rights, nationality, and place. This global flow also presents unique challenges to both newcomers and residents of the receiving society as both sides contend with issues of loyalty, belonging, and identity. In this course we will examine these important issues using the United States as the primary (though not exclusive) context. Drawing upon historical and contemporary material, we will also discuss the social, cultural, political, and economic consequences of global migration. 3 hrs. lect./disc. (Sociology) AMR NOR SOC

Spring 2018, Spring 2019

More Information »

SOAN 0351 - Education and Social Policy      

Education and Social Policy
School choice programs like charter and magnet schools are dramatically altering the educational landscape in the United States. In this course we will examine the premise that we can overcome the challenges of children living in poor neighborhoods by severing the traditional link between neighborhoods and schools and by providing access to extralocal high-quality schools. But who gets to exercise such choice? Does school choice result in better educational outcomes? We will also explore the relationship between school and neighborhood inequality. How do these two contexts work together to reproduce, intensify, or ameliorate spatial and educational inequities? 3 hrs. lect./disc. (Sociology)/ AMR NOR SOC

Spring 2019

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SOAN 0500 - Advanced Individual Study      

Prior to registering for SOAN 0500, a student must enlist the support of a faculty advisor from the Department of Sociology/Anthropology. (Open to Majors only) (Approval Required) (Sociology or Anthropology)

Fall 2017, Winter 2018, Spring 2018, Fall 2018, Winter 2019, Spring 2019

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SOAN 0700 - One-Semester Senior Project      

One-Semester Senior Project
Under the guidance of a faculty member, a student will carry out an independent, one-semester research project, often based on original data. The student must also participate in a senior seminar that begins the first week of fall semester and meets as necessary during the rest of the year. The final product must be presented in a written report of 25-40 pages, due the last day of classes. (Sociology or Anthropology)

Fall 2017, Winter 2018, Spring 2018, Fall 2018, Winter 2019, Spring 2019

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SOAN 0710 - Multi-Semester Senior Project      

Multi-Semester Senior Project
Under the guidance of a faculty member, a senior will carry out an independent multi-semester research project, often based on original data. The student must also participate in a senior seminar that begins the first week of fall semester and meets as necessary during the rest of the year. The final product must be presented in a written report of 60-100 pages, due either at the end of the Winter Term or the Friday after spring break. (Sociology or Anthropology)

Fall 2017, Winter 2018, Spring 2018, Fall 2018, Winter 2019, Spring 2019

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SOCI 0215 - Sociology of Education      

Sociology of Education
In this course we will study education both as a social institution and as a social process. In our analysis of education and its relationship to the structure of society, we will pay particular attention to the intersection of gender, class, race, and ethnicity within schools. Our objective will be to explore the ways in which education might contribute to the reproduction of social inequalities, as well as its potential for social change. The substantive focus will be on American society. (formerly SOAN 0215) 3 hrs. lect. AMR CMP NOR SOC

Fall 2019

More Information »

SOCI 0235 - The City and Its People      

The City and Its People
We all live somewhere, and increasingly we find ourselves living in an urban environment. In this course we will explore current topics in urban sociology, with particular emphasis on the power of place, culture, and community in U.S. cities. We will study the historical, cultural, and political conditions that have shaped contemporary U.S. cities, such as New York City, Chicago, and Los Angeles. We will examine how cities change and resist change through the lens of such subjects as migration, poverty, urban arts, crime, and education as it pertains to the city. Students will read a variety of ethnographic and sociological materials, in order to gain an understanding of the complexities of both urban life and processes of representation. (formerly SOAN 0235) 3 hrs. lect./disc. AMR NOR SOC

Spring 2020

More Information »

SOCI 0274 - Global Migration      

Global Flows: The Causes, Dynamics, and Consequences of International Migration
Whether they are asylum seekers, undocumented or legal migrants, large-scale movements of people across international borders raises important questions about human rights, nationality, and place. This global flow also presents unique challenges to both newcomers and residents of the receiving society as both sides contend with issues of loyalty, belonging, and identity. In this course we will examine these important issues using the United States as the primary (though not exclusive) context. Drawing upon historical and contemporary material, we will also discuss the social, cultural, political, and economic consequences of global migration.(formerly SOAN 0274) 3 hrs. lect./disc. AMR NOR SOC

Fall 2019

More Information »

SOCI 0351 - Education and Social Policy      

Education and Social Policy
School choice programs like charter and magnet schools are dramatically altering the educational landscape in the United States. In this course we will examine the premise that we can overcome the challenges of children living in poor neighborhoods by severing the traditional link between neighborhoods and schools and by providing access to extralocal high-quality schools. But who gets to exercise such choice? Does school choice result in better educational outcomes? We will also explore the relationship between school and neighborhood inequality. How do these two contexts work together to reproduce, intensify, or ameliorate spatial and educational inequities? (formerly SOAN 0351) 3 hrs. lect./disc. AMR NOR SOC

Spring 2020

More Information »

SOCI 0500 - Advanced Individual Study      

Prior to registering for SOCI 0500, a student must enlist the support of a faculty advisor from the Department of Sociology. (Open to Majors only) (Approval Required)

Fall 2019, Winter 2020, Spring 2020, Fall 2020, Winter 2021, Spring 2021, Winter 2022, Spring 2022

More Information »

SOCI 0700 - One-Semester Project      

One-Semester Senior Project
Under the guidance of a faculty member, a student will carry out an independent, one-semester research project, often based on original data. The student must also participate in a senior seminar that begins the first week of fall semester and meets as necessary during the rest of the year. The final product must be presented in a written report of 25-40 pages, due the last day of classes.

Fall 2019, Winter 2020, Spring 2020, Fall 2020, Winter 2021, Spring 2021, Winter 2022, Spring 2022

More Information »

SOCI 0710 - Multi-Semester Senior Project      

Multi-Semester Senior Project
Under the guidance of a faculty member, a senior will carry out an independent multi-semester research project, often based on original data. The student must also participate in a senior seminar that begins the first week of fall semester and meets as necessary during the rest of the year. The final product must be presented in a written report of 60-100 pages, due either at the end of the Winter Term or the Friday after spring break.

Fall 2019, Winter 2020, Spring 2020, Fall 2020, Winter 2021, Spring 2021, Winter 2022, Spring 2022

More Information »