David Colander
Tel
(802) 443-5302
Email
colander@middlebury.edu
Office Hours
By appointment.

David Colander is┬áCollege Professor at Middlebury College, Middlebury, Vermont. He has authored, co-authored, or edited 30 books and over 100 articles on a wide range of topics. These include Principles of Economics (McGraw-Hill), History of Economic Thought (with Harry Landreth) (Houghton Mifflin), Macroeconomics(with Ed Gamber)(Prentice Hall), Why Aren’t Economists as Important as Garbagemen? (Sharpe), and MAP: A Market Anti-Inflation Plan (with Abba Lerner) (Harcourt Brace Jovanovich). His books have been, or are being, translated into a number of different languages, including Bulgarian, Polish, Italian, Spanish, and Chinese.

He received his Ph.D. from Columbia University and has taught at Columbia University, Vassar College, the University of Miami, and Princeton University as well as Middlebury College. In 2001-2002 he was the Kelley Professor for Distinguished Teaching at Princeton University. He has also been a consultant to Time-Life Films, a consultant to Congress, a Brookings Policy Fellow, and a Visiting Scholar at Nuffield College, Oxford. He is listed in Who’s Who?, Who’s Who in Education?, etc.

He has been on the board of numerous economic societies and has been Vice President and President of the Eastern Economic Association and Vice-President of the History of Economic Thought Society. He is currently on the editorial boards of the Journal of the History of Economic Thought, Eastern Economic Journal, and Journal of Economic Perspectives. He is also series editor, with Mark Blaug, of Twentieth Century Economists for Edward Elgar Publishers.

His latest work focuses on economic education, complexity, and the methodology appropriate to applied policy economics.

Courses Taught

Course Description

Independent Study
Approval Required

Terms Taught

Fall 2018, Fall 2019, Fall 2020, Fall 2021, Fall 2022

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Course Description

Introduction to Business and Enterprise
This course provides students who have little to no background in business with a broad overview of business and enterprise in the economy. Students will learn about types of enterprises and a functional framework for understanding a business, including strategy, finance, production, and marketing. This framework will be used to analyze various businesses and non-profits, exploring the advantages and disadvantages of various structures. The course will give overviews of accounting and entrepreneurship, and explore policy and philosophical debates about the morality of for-profit business and the need for corporate responsibility. 3 hrs. lect.

Terms Taught

Fall 2018

Requirements

SOC

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