Profile of <span>William Vitek</span>
Office
23 Adirondack 201
Tel
(802) 443-5586
Email
wvitek@middlebury.edu
Office Hours
By appointment

Courses Taught

Course Description

The Perennial Turn
The work of repairing Earth—response-ably attending to life-nourishing human and more-than-human interrelationships—starts at scales of self and community. Power dynamics, thoughtways, humans and planet Earth changed when our ancestors began annually disrupting soil ecosystems and storing surplus food. We explore notions of perennial thinking and action through readings, direct experience, and work with local partners at the forefront of the perennial turn. Combining ancient and contemporary knowledges in science, history, philosophy, spirituality, and more, we investigate thinking more like a prairie than a plow. How might we regrow deep roots and craft ways that align with current understandings of Universe, Earth, life? How might we support resilient, multi-generational, place-based learning, doing, being? 3 hrs. sem., 1 hr. disc.

Terms Taught

Fall 2018, Fall 2019, Fall 2020, Fall 2021

Requirements

PHL

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Course Description

Independent Study
In this course, students (non-seniors) carry out an independent research or creative project on a topic pertinent to the relationship between humans and the environment. The project, carried out under the supervision of a faculty member with related expertise who is appointed in or affiliated with the Environmental Studies Program, must involve a significant amount of independent research and analysis. The expectations and any associated final products will be defined in consultation with the faculty advisor. Students may enroll in ENVS 0500 no more than twice for a given project. (Approval only)

Terms Taught

Spring 2022, Spring 2023

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Course Description

Walking Body, Walking Mind: Philosophy on the Hoof
Walking upright with a bipedal gait emerged in early humans between 1.9 and 3.7 million years ago. For the last few millennia and across many cultures and traditions walking has accompanied and inspired human endeavors of the mind and spirit. In this course we will engage the literatures of walking in the humanities and natural/social sciences, we will read and evaluate excerpts from classic “walking” texts in philosophy, religion, and eco-spirituality, and experience different modes of walking, including its social justice potential in resistance and reconciliation. Suitable footwear and clothing for walking/hiking in January in Vermont required. This course counts as a humanities cognate for Environmental Studies majors.

Terms Taught

Winter 2020

Requirements

PHL, WTR

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Course Description

Terms Taught

Spring 2021, Spring 2022, Spring 2023

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Course Description

Climate Change, Climate Justice: An Essential Conversation *
Pakistan under water, farmworkers picking berries in 115-degree heat, Puerto Rico without power. Climate change is here. And the iron law of climate change is: the less you did to cause it, the quicker and harder it hits you. That’s one reason why, over recent years, the U.S. and global climate movements have increasingly morphed into climate justice movements. And it’s why those communities that are hardest hit are in the forefront of the fight for change. By hearing directly from stakeholders and movement leaders, this course will focus on how we understand and measure climate impacts, what just response to the climate crisis might look like, and how activists and scientists are working to achieve those goals. Look at the ways we can show up and cultivate community. This course will provide participants with greater capacity to evaluate and advance climate justice efforts. Pass/Fail.

Terms Taught

Winter 2021

Requirements

WTR

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