Sections

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HARC0100A-S22

CRN: 20903

Intro to Global Visual Culture
An Introduction to Global Visual Culture
This course is an introduction to the visual cultures of the world, with an emphasis on how images, objects, and monuments are made, experienced, exchanged, and used by groups of people with diverse religious, socio-economic, and cultural backgrounds. We will focus on themes that have been taken up by different cultures and adapted over time, such as monumentality, the sacred, embodiment, science, and technology. Through a close study of these themes, we will consider how materials, cultures, and histories are transformed and negotiated through making and viewing works of art. In the process, we will challenge the art historical canon by shedding light on marginalized periods, regions, and artworks. 2 hrs. lect./1 hr. disc.

HARC0100X-S22

CRN: 20904

Intro to Global Visual Culture
Discussion
An Introduction to Global Visual Culture
This course is an introduction to the visual cultures of the world, with an emphasis on how images, objects, and monuments are made, experienced, exchanged, and used by groups of people with diverse religious, socio-economic, and cultural backgrounds. We will focus on themes that have been taken up by different cultures and adapted over time, such as monumentality, the sacred, embodiment, science, and technology. Through a close study of these themes, we will consider how materials, cultures, and histories are transformed and negotiated through making and viewing works of art. In the process, we will challenge the art historical canon by shedding light on marginalized periods, regions, and artworks. 2 hrs. lect./1 hr. disc.

HARC0100Y-S22

CRN: 20905

Intro to Global Visual Culture
Discussion
An Introduction to Global Visual Culture
This course is an introduction to the visual cultures of the world, with an emphasis on how images, objects, and monuments are made, experienced, exchanged, and used by groups of people with diverse religious, socio-economic, and cultural backgrounds. We will focus on themes that have been taken up by different cultures and adapted over time, such as monumentality, the sacred, embodiment, science, and technology. Through a close study of these themes, we will consider how materials, cultures, and histories are transformed and negotiated through making and viewing works of art. In the process, we will challenge the art historical canon by shedding light on marginalized periods, regions, and artworks. 2 hrs. lect./1 hr. disc.

HARC0100Z-S22

CRN: 21303

Intro to Global Visual Culture
Discussion
An Introduction to Global Visual Culture
This course is an introduction to the visual cultures of the world, with an emphasis on how images, objects, and monuments are made, experienced, exchanged, and used by groups of people with diverse religious, socio-economic, and cultural backgrounds. We will focus on themes that have been taken up by different cultures and adapted over time, such as monumentality, the sacred, embodiment, science, and technology. Through a close study of these themes, we will consider how materials, cultures, and histories are transformed and negotiated through making and viewing works of art. In the process, we will challenge the art historical canon by shedding light on marginalized periods, regions, and artworks. 2 hrs. lect./1 hr. disc.

HARC0130A-S22

CRN: 20825

Intro. to Architectural Design
Introduction to Architectural Design
Are you fascinated by buildings and interested in trying your hand at architectural design? This course will introduce you to principles of architecture and teach you the skills architects use to explore and communicate design ideas. We will consider urban and rural settings, sustainability, energy efficiency, functionality, comfort, and the role architecture plays in shaping community. Classroom instruction by a practicing architect will provide hands-on drawing, model-making, and materials research. Students will work to analyze existing buildings and design their own. Students seeking to improve their understanding of the built environment as well to develop their design-mind to reconcile social-ecological challenges are encouraged to take this course. No prior experience is needed.

HARC0201A-S22

CRN: 22549

Italian Renaissance
Italian Renaissance Art: 1350-1550
This course will focus on the art produced in Italy during the late fourteenth through the early sixteenth centuries. In addition to studying the chronological development of painting, sculpture, and architecture, we will consider such issues as artistic training, patronage, domestic life, and the literary achievements of this period of "rebirth." Focusing on urban environments such as Florence, Siena, Padua, Venice, Rome, and Urbino, we will give special attention to the manner in which artistic production was shaped by place. 3 hrs. lect.

HARC0204A-S22

CRN: 22550

Approaches to Islamic Art
Approaches to Islamic Art
A survey of major expressions of Islamic art from the inception of Islam to the present, from all parts of the Islamic world. This is not a traditional survey; rather, it focuses on key monuments and important examples of portable and decorative arts: mosques, tombs, palaces, manuscript illumination, calligraphy, metalwork, textiles, ceramics, etc. We will consider their meanings and functions in their respective socio-historical contexts, and we will also analyze the impact of patronage and region. We will try to understand what general principles unify the richness and diversity of Islamic art: what is Islamic about Islamic art? Finally, we will address the issue of contemporary Islamic art. (No prerequisites). 3 hrs. lect.

HARC0218A-S22

CRN: 21766

History of Photography
History of Photography
In this course we will survey the history of photography from its beginnings in the early nineteenth century to the present. From its inception, the photograph created a global network of circulation as art, document, and portable knowledge. Moreover, photographs have been historically deployed across a number of disciplines, including science, medicine, criminal studies, law, journalism, anthropology, and the visual arts. Organized along chronological lines and looking at case studies in Europe, America, Africa, the Middle East, and Asia, the course will consider a range of genres, formal strategies, and contexts for photography. We will pay particular attention to the ways in which photographic images are mobilized to produce knowledge and disrupt conventional ways of seeing in the service of science, social reform, political activism, and aesthetics. Students will have the opportunity to work first hand with the photography collection at Middlebury College Museum of Art. 3 hrs. lect.

HARC0230A-S22

CRN: 20992

Modern Architecture
Modern Architecture
Rotating skyscrapers, green roofs, and avant-garde museums: how did we arrive in the architectural world of the early 21st century? In this course we will survey the major stylistic developments, new building types, and new technologies that have shaped European and American architecture since the late 18th century. Students will learn about the work of major architects as well as key architectural theories and debates. Special emphasis will be placed on the cultural and political contexts in which buildings are designed. 2 hrs. Lect./1 hr. disc.

HARC0231A-S22

CRN: 21221

Architecture & Environment
Architecture and the Environment
Architecture has a dynamic relationship with the natural and cultural environments in which it operates. As a cultural phenomenon it impacts the physical landscape and uses natural resources while it also frames human interaction, harbors community, and organizes much of public life. We will investigate those relationships and explore strategies to optimize them, in order to seek out environmentally responsive architectural solutions. Topics to be covered include: analysis of a building's site as both natural and cultural contexts, passive and active energy systems, principles of sustainable construction, and environmental impact. Our lab will allow us to study on site, "off-the-grid" dwellings, hay-bale houses, passive solar constructions and alternative communities, meet with "green" designers, architects, and builders, and do hands-on projects. 3 hrs. lect./3 hrs. lab.

HARC0231Z-S22

CRN: 22244

Architecture & Environment
Lab
Architecture and the Environment
Architecture has a dynamic relationship with the natural and cultural environments in which it operates. As a cultural phenomenon it impacts the physical landscape and uses natural resources while it also frames human interaction, harbors community, and organizes much of public life. We will investigate those relationships and explore strategies to optimize them, in order to seek out environmentally responsive architectural solutions. Topics to be covered include: analysis of a building's site as both natural and cultural contexts, passive and active energy systems, principles of sustainable construction, and environmental impact. Our lab will allow us to study on site, "off-the-grid" dwellings, hay-bale houses, passive solar constructions and alternative communities, meet with "green" designers, architects, and builders, and do hands-on projects. 3 hrs. lect./3 hrs. lab.

HARC0250A-S22

CRN: 22551

Baroque Art/Global Context
Baroque Art in a Global Context
Baroque art and architecture flourished in the courts of seventeenth-century Europe before spreading to the Americas, Asia, and Africa in the wake of global trade, colonialism, and religious proselytizing. In this course we will examine how this style of art and architecture was recontexualized and transformed when it came into contact with preexisting traditions overseas. Readings and discussions will compare artistic production across cultures by focusing not only on the forces that contributed to the broad reach of the Baroque, but also on the persistence of local artistic styles, which were challenged and nurtured by sustained intercultural contact. 3 hrs. lct.

HARC0267A-S22

CRN: 22933

Developing Built Environment
Developing the Built Environment: Economic, Social, and Ecological Factors
Underneath every city block, every building, is a parcel of land that was developed, or redeveloped many times. It could have been a park, a single house or an office tower. How do we decide what is built, and who decides? Building our environment begins with regulation and economics, but includes stakeholders with varying influence. Governments, neighbors, designers, activists, investors and capital markets all shape our world. In this course students will examine these choices critically, by analyzing sites and making decisions, project by project, and by connecting choices to larger debates about housing, conservation, spatial and environmental justice.

HARC0273A-S22

Cross-Listed As:
AMST0273A-S22

CRN: 22445

Art&Material Culture Am Home
Please register via AMST 0273A
Art and Material Culture of American (US) Middle-class home*
In this course we will consider the effects of technology and mechanical reproduction on the United States home, from prints to posters, houseplants to aquariums, mass-produced decorations to home-made crafts. We will also study the culture of at-home visual entertainments, from early “magic lanterns” and optical toys to the effects of televisions and computers on perception and social life. How do race, class, gender, and issues of labor and leisure inflect the middle-class domestic sphere and relate to social concerns outside the home? We will also examine the work of contemporary artists inspired by the aesthetics and social relationships of the United States middle-class home, including Martha Rosler, Mona Hatoum, and Laurie Simmons. 3 hrs. lect. AMR, ART, NOR

HARC0281 A-S22

Cross-Listed As:
AMST0281A-S22

CRN: 22779

Controversies in AmArt&Museums
Please register via AMST 0281A
Viewer Discretion Advised: Controversies in American Art & Museums, 1876-Present
What are the “culture wars,” and why do they matter? What ideas are considered too “obscene” for American audiences? In this course we will explore controversies and scandals sparked by public displays of art in the U.S. including: Eakins’s Gross Clinic (1876), seen as too “bloody” for an art exhibition; the U.S. Navy’s objections to Paul Cadmus’s painting of sailors (1934); censorship and NEA budget cuts (Mapplethorpe & Serrano, 1989); backlash to The West as America’s deconstruction of myths of the frontier (1991); tensions surrounding Colonial Williamsburg’s “slave auction” reenactment (1994); debates over the continued display (and occasional defacement) of Confederate monuments in the era of the Black Lives Matter Movement. (open to AMST, HARC and ART majors only, other by approval) 3 hrs. lect./disc.

HARC0301A-S22

CRN: 21511

Ways of Seeing
Ways of Seeing
In this course we will focus on the various methods and theories that can enrich and deepen our understanding of art, architecture, and visual culture. Students will hone their analytical skills, both verbal and written, often with recourse to objects from the College Museum and the campus at large. In general, this seminar will develop students’ awareness of objects of culture broadly construed, and sharpen their understanding of the scope and intellectual history of the field. To be taken during the sophomore or junior year as a prerequisite for HARC 0710 and HARC 0711. 3 hrs. sem.

HARC0338A-S22

Cross-Listed As:
GSFS0338A-S22

CRN: 22807

Gender and the Making of Space
Gender and the Making of Space
In this course we will investigate the complex relationship between gender and architecture, examining how the design of the built environment (buildings, urban spaces, etc.) can reinforce or undermine ideas about the respective roles of women and men in society, from the creation of masculine and feminine spaces to the gendered nature of the architectural profession. By looking at both visual evidence and textual sources we will also uncover how the social construction of gender roles and gendered spaces are, and continue to be, inflected by race, class, and sexuality. Not open to students who have taken FYSE 1407. 3 hrs. sem.

HARC0351A-S22

CRN: 22554

Hysterical Objects
Hysterical Documents: Fiction, History, and the Art Object
In 1827, Johann Wolfgang von Goethe mused: “But what else is a novel but an unheard-of event?” Goethe’s provocative staging of the unknown through narrative interlaces the plausible and the historical in a manner equally appropriate to much historical writing and broad swaths of the visual arts. In this course we will consider the different roles interpretation and imagination—fact, fiction, and the porous space between—play in our engagement with works of art.
We will read recent fiction, history, poetry and criticism as well as writing that purposefully sidesteps these categories not only to engage the limits of the archive and its objects but also to explore the critical and aesthetic possibilities of writing beyond the binary of fiction and nonfiction. Seminar; no prerequisites, though some exposure to art history would be useful.

HARC0352A-S22

Cross-Listed As:
RELI0352A-S22

CRN: 22260

The Good, the Bad, & the Ugly
The Good, Bad, and Ugly: Gods, Goddesses, and Demons in Indian Art
Indian mythology and epic literature abounds with stories of conflicts between the forces of good and evil. There are multiple forms of Hindu gods and goddesses who battle an array of evil and colorful demonic foes, and each cosmic battle embodies a profound philosophical lesson about relative values and complex moral choices. We will explore the meanings and myriad creative expressions of this rich terrain through a lively variety of artistic depictions—in mythological literature, painting, sculpture, drama, dance, television, film, graphic novels, and contemporary arts. (Not open to students who have taken FYSE 1023.) 3 hrs. sem.

HARC0356A-S22

CRN: 22555

Awe
Awe
What is the place of awe in contemporary experience? In our fractious and turbo-charged world, what are the objects and experiences that still have the power to bring us up short, leaving us slack-jawed and spellbound? This seminar will engage these questions in preparation for a cross-disciplinary exhibit at the Middlebury College Museum of Art in 2024. Grounding our conversation in early literary and artistic explorations of the sublime, we will also consider awe through the lenses of religion, scientific discovery, creativity, and the natural world. Definitions of awe almost invariably include references to fear, dread, even terror, so readings and class discussions will move well beyond the celebratory and reverential. There are no prerequisites for this course, and students from a wide range of majors and fields of interest are encouraged to enroll. Projects and written assignments will allow students to make direct contributions to the exhibition. 3 hrs. sem. This course is part of the Public Humanities Labs Initiative administered by the Axinn Center for the Humanities.*

HARC0362A-S22

CRN: 22851

Art, Migration, and Museums
Art, Migration, and Museums
Can artists and museums respond to the current refugee crisis? The 21stst century has witnessed the undeniable prevalence of the refugee, the migrant, and the politically displaced?—?categories produced by global capitalism’s uneven distribution of resources. Against this reality, artists and curators engage with representations of the disposed. In this course we will consider how the art world integrates the figure of the refugee into the traditionally reified space of the museum and examine the possibility of art to transcend barriers and generate empathy and solidarity. Possible topics include art programming and refugee integration; museum responses to the migrant crisis; migration and repatriation; boycott and divestment efforts.

HARC0372A-S22

CRN: 22556

AS/Habitat: Design Dev.
AS/Habitat for Humanity Housing Unit: From Design Development to Bidding
Architectural Studies at Middlebury partners with Habitat for Humanity of Addison County for the design and realization of high-quality, energy-efficient, affordable housing. The objective of this interdisciplinary studio course is to develop the design of the housing unit from a conceptual level to the point that it can be bid upon competitively by contractors. This intensive process will be driven by a schedule of deliverables conceived to allow for construction to start in the following spring. Studio components include materials selection; energy analysis; code review, construction detailing; permitting; physical and digital modeling; engineering coordination; and construction specifications. This studio will continue into HARC 0373 (formerly INTD 0274) during WT: AS/Habitat for Humanity: Design Production. Students should expect a substantial amount of work outside of class time. (HARC 0330 or HARC 0371 or by permission) 3 hrs. lect./3hrs lab

HARC0510A-S22

CRN: 20063

Advanced Studies
Advanced Studies
Supervised independent work in art history, museum studies, or architectural studies. (Approval Required)

HARC0510B-S22

CRN: 20066

Advanced Studies
Advanced Studies
Supervised independent work in art history, museum studies, or architectural studies. (Approval Required)

HARC0510D-S22

CRN: 20322

Advanced Studies
Advanced Studies
Supervised independent work in art history, museum studies, or architectural studies. (Approval Required)

HARC0510E-S22

CRN: 20320

Advanced Studies
Advanced Studies
Supervised independent work in art history, museum studies, or architectural studies. (Approval Required)

HARC0510F-S22

CRN: 20323

Advanced Studies
Advanced Studies
Supervised independent work in art history, museum studies, or architectural studies. (Approval Required)

HARC0510G-S22

CRN: 20324

Advanced Studies
Advanced Studies
Supervised independent work in art history, museum studies, or architectural studies. (Approval Required)

HARC0510H-S22

CRN: 20325

Advanced Studies
Advanced Studies
Supervised independent work in art history, museum studies, or architectural studies. (Approval Required)

HARC0510K-S22

CRN: 20859

Advanced Studies
Advanced Studies
Supervised independent work in art history, museum studies, or architectural studies. (Approval Required)

HARC0530A-S22

CRN: 20069

Independent Architect. Design
Indep. Architect Design
Supervised independent work in architectural analysis and design. (Approval Required)

HARC0530B-S22

CRN: 20329

Independent Architect. Design
Indep. Architect Design
Supervised independent work in architectural analysis and design. (Approval Required)

HARC0530C-S22

CRN: 20584

Independent Architect. Design
Indep. Architect Design
Supervised independent work in architectural analysis and design. (Approval Required)

HARC0530D-S22

CRN: 20932

Independent Architect. Design
Supervised independent work in architectural analysis and design. (Approval Required)

HARC0540A-S22

CRN: 20973

Independent Museum Studies
Supervised Independent Work in Museum Studies
This practicum builds upon the Museum Assistants Program (MAP), the hands-on museum education program at the Middlebury College Museum of Art. In MAP, the Curator of Education trains students to conduct tours of the Museum’s permanent collection and of special exhibitions for audiences of peers, school groups, and the general public. Combining service learning with the opportunity to both support and learn more about the arts, students gain expertise in public speaking, art history, and public programming. HARC 0540 should be taken concurrently with the second semester of MAP. The class will culminate with a public presentation on a museum-related topic evaluated by a faculty member of the Department of History of Art & Architecture. (Approval required)

HARC0540B-S22

CRN: 21000

Independent Museum Studies
Supervised Independent Work in Museum Studies
This practicum builds upon the Museum Assistants Program (MAP), the hands-on museum education program at the Middlebury College Museum of Art. In MAP, the Curator of Education trains students to conduct tours of the Museum’s permanent collection and of special exhibitions for audiences of peers, school groups, and the general public. Combining service learning with the opportunity to both support and learn more about the arts, students gain expertise in public speaking, art history, and public programming. HARC 0540 should be taken concurrently with the second semester of MAP. The class will culminate with a public presentation on a museum-related topic evaluated by a faculty member of the Department of History of Art & Architecture. (Approval required)