Megan Mayhew-Bergman
Office
Axinn Center at Starr Library 201
Tel
(802) 443-2152
Email
mmayhewbergman@middlebury.edu
Office Hours
Fall 2022: Tues/Thurs 12:30-2:30, and by appointment via Zoom.

Courses Taught

Course Description

Writing: Poetry, Fiction, NonFiction
An introduction to the writing of poetry, short fiction, and nonfiction through analysis of writings by modern and contemporary poets and prose writers and regular discussion of student writing. Different instructors may choose to emphasize one literary form or another in a given semester. Workshops will focus on composition and revision, with particular attention to the basics of form and craft. This course is a prerequisite to CRWR 0380, CRWR 0385, CRWR 0370, and CRWR 0375. (This course is not a college writing course.) (Formerly ENAM 0170) 3 hrs. sem.

Terms Taught

Fall 2019, Fall 2020, Spring 2021, Fall 2021

Requirements

ART

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Course Description

Women in Conservation Writing
In this exploration of women's contributions to environmental literature, we will read Rachel Carson, Camille Dungy, Janisse Ray, Carolyn Finney, Natalie Diaz, Anne LaBastille, and Robin Wall Kimmerer, among others. We'll discuss the cultivation of voice and authority, cultural impact, and relationship to place. We will respond to the work critically and creatively, with each student drafting a body of work throughout the term. 3hrs. sem.

Terms Taught

Spring 2022

Requirements

ART, LIT

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Course Description

The Feminine Heroic
In this class we will explore the hero’s journey in literature as it relates to women and the natural world: who gets to go on the adventure, and who arrives home, transformed? How do race and gender complicate the traditional man-versus-nature narrative? We will discuss character agency, narrative authority, style, and structure — and look at texts where women undertake the journey, including work by Isak Dinesen, Annie Dillard, Camille Dungy, Rachel Carson, Anne LeBastille, Rahawa Haile, and Pam Houston. Students will generate creative and critical work. 3 hrs. sem.

Terms Taught

Fall 2019

Requirements

LIT

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Course Description

Workshop: Fiction
Study and practice in techniques of fiction writing through workshops and readings in short fiction and novels. Class discussions will be based on student manuscripts and published model works. Emphasis will be placed on composition and revision. (Approval required; please email a writing sample to cohen@middlebury.edu) (Formerly ENAM 0370) (Any 100-level CRWR course) (This course is not a college writing course) 3 hrs. sem.

Terms Taught

Spring 2020, Spring 2021

Requirements

ART, LIT

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Course Description

Advanced Nonfiction Workshop: Word and Image
This class examines the relationship between word and image on the page. We will read, discuss, and create interdisciplinary works. Texts include John Berger's Ways of Seeing; Sally Mann's Hold Still; Gordon Park's A Poet and His Camera; Leanne Shapton's Swimming Studies. We will also review the work of Rockwell Kent, Susan Sontag, Carrie Mae Weems, Zora Neale Hurston and the Federal Writers' Project. We will study interdisciplinary relationships between Auguste Rodin and the poet Rilke; poet Robert Frost and JJ Lankes; Gertrude Stein and Pablo Picasso. (One intro CRWR course, or by instructor approval) (formerly ENAM 0380) 3 hrs. sem.

Terms Taught

Spring 2020, Fall 2021, Spring 2022, Fall 2022

Requirements

ART, LIT

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Course Description

Special Project: Creative Writing
Approval Required.

Terms Taught

Winter 2020, Spring 2020, Fall 2020, Winter 2021, Spring 2021, Fall 2021, Winter 2022, Spring 2022, Fall 2022, Winter 2023, Spring 2023

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Course Description

Senior Thesis: Creative Writing
Discussions, workshops, tutorials for those undertaking one-term projects in the writing of fiction, poetry, or creative nonfiction.

Terms Taught

Spring 2020, Fall 2020, Spring 2021, Fall 2021, Spring 2022, Fall 2022, Spring 2023

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Course Description

Writing Place: Class and Conservation in the American South
In this course we will examine non-traditional conservationists and conservation writing in the American South, with a focus on Georgia and South Carolina. We will read Janisse Ray's Ecology of a Cracker Childhood; work about and by Carol Ruckduschel; John McPhee's Encounters with the Archdruid; work about MaVynee Betsch; and J. Drew Lanham's Home Place. We'll engage virtually with practicing southern conservationists, look for the ways scientists and self-taught scientists are leaning into underrepresented spaces, and, through our own writing, investigate meaningful and rich connections to place. This course counts as a humanities cognate for environmental studies majors.

Terms Taught

Winter 2021

Requirements

LIT, WTR

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Course Description

Special Project: Literature
Approval Required.

Terms Taught

Fall 2020, Spring 2021, Fall 2021, Winter 2022, Spring 2022

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Course Description

Senior Thesis: Critical Writing
Individual guidance and seminar (discussions, workshops, tutorials) for those undertaking one-term projects in literary criticism or analysis. All critical thesis writers also take the Senior Thesis Workshop (ENAM 700Z) in either Fall or Spring Term.

Terms Taught

Fall 2019, Spring 2020, Fall 2020, Spring 2021, Fall 2021, Spring 2022

View in Course Catalog

Course Description

Special Project: Literature
Approval Required. (Formerly ENAM 0500)

Terms Taught

Fall 2022, Spring 2023

View in Course Catalog

Course Description

Senior Thesis: Critical Writing
Individual guidance and seminar (discussions, workshops, tutorials) for those undertaking one-term projects in literary criticism or analysis. All critical thesis writers also take the Senior Thesis Workshop (ENAM 700Z) in either Fall or Spring Term. (Formerly ENAM 0700)

Terms Taught

Fall 2022, Spring 2023

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Course Description

Senior Independent Study
In this course, seniors complete an independent research or creative project on a topic pertinent to the relationship between humans and the environment. During the term prior to enrolling in ENVS 0700, a student must discuss and agree upon a project topic with a faculty advisor who is appointed in or affiliated with the Environmental Studies Program and submit a brief project proposal to the Director of Environmental Studies for Approval. The expectations and any associated final products will be defined in consultation with the faculty advisor. Students may enroll in ENVS 0700 as a one-term independent study OR up to twice as part of a multi-term project, including as a lead-up to ENVS 0701 (ES Senior Thesis) or ENVS 0703 (ES Senior Integrated Thesis). (Senior standing; Approval only)

Terms Taught

Fall 2020, Fall 2022

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Course Description

Senior Thesis
This course is the culminating term of a multi-term independent project, resulting in a senior thesis on a topic pertinent to the relationship between humans and the environment. Approval to enroll is contingent on successful completion of at least one term (and up to two) of ENVS 0700 and the approval of the student’s thesis committee. The project, carried out under the supervision of a faculty advisor who is appointed in or affiliated with the Environmental Studies Program, will result in a substantial piece of scholarly work that will be presented to other ENVS faculty and students in a public forum and defended before the thesis committee. (Senior standing; ENVS major; ENVS 0112, ENVS 0211, ENVS 0215, GEOG 0120, and ENVS 0700; Approval only)

Terms Taught

Spring 2020, Spring 2021, Spring 2022, Spring 2023

View in Course Catalog

Course Description

The Feminine Heroic
In this class we will explore the hero’s journey in literature as it relates to women and the natural world: who gets to go on the adventure, and who arrives home, transformed? How do race and gender complicate the traditional man-versus-nature narrative? We will discuss character agency, narrative authority, and structure — and look at texts where women undertake the journey, including work by Annie Dillard, Camille Dungy, Rachel Carson, Anne LeBastille, Rahawa Haile, and Pam Houston. We will work on reading critically, editing, and practicing the art of giving and receiving feedback. This class will provide students with opportunities to create both critical and creative work.

Terms Taught

Fall 2022

Requirements

CW, LIT

View in Course Catalog