Additional Programs
First-Year Seminar International and Global Studies

Courses Taught

Course Description

Who Owns Culture? History, Culture and Decolonization
Modern European imperial states devoted considerable time and effort to creating the norms and forms of European life in their colonies. This involved establishing European schools, languages, literature, music, dress, and art as superior to the indigenous cultures of the colonies. During the era of decolonization many thinkers from the colonies began to argue that political emancipation would also require a cultural emancipation. To decolonize the state one had to decolonize one’s state of mind. How could this be achieved? Who “owns” culture? These and other questions will be pursued through the writings of Gandhi, Césaire, Fanon, Memmi, Thiong’o, and others. 3 hrs. sem.

Terms Taught

Fall 2019, Spring 2020, Fall 2021, Spring 2023

Requirements

CMP, CW, HIS

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Course Description

Introduction to International and Global Studies
This is the core course of the International and Global Studies major. It is an introduction to key international issues and problems that will likely feature prominently in their courses at Middlebury and study abroad. Issues covered will differ from year to year, but they may include war, globalization, immigration, racism, imperialism, nationalism, world organizations, non-governmental organizations, the European Union, the rise of East Asia, politics and society in Latin America, and anti-Americanism. 3 hrs. lect./disc.

Terms Taught

Fall 2020, Fall 2021, Fall 2022

Requirements

CMP

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Course Description

Borders, Migration, and Identification in Global Perspective
In this course we will investigate the concept and historical emergence of borders, their relation to mobility, and the identification regimes that grew up around them. After interrogating the implications of what a border can mean and the different forms it can take—ideal and material, of mind and body—we will focus our study on the historical origins of modern state borders, various representations of borders, and case studies that particularly highlight the importance of borders regarding the supervision and the sorting of movement. Topics of study will include cities, physical barriers, refugees, and passportization. Regions of study will include the United States, France, Israel, Angola, and Guantanamo Bay. 3 hrs. sem.

Terms Taught

Fall 2019, Spring 2021, Spring 2023

Requirements

CMP, HIS, SOC

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Course Description

European Studies Senior Thesis
(Approval Required)

Terms Taught

Winter 2020, Spring 2020, Spring 2022, Spring 2023, Spring 2024

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Course Description

The European Catastrophe, 1914-1945
The world wars of the twentieth century that originated in Europe have had obvious and undeniable consequences on modern history. From the perfection of mechanized warfare to the fall of the European imperial state system to the birth of bolshevism and fascism, this thirty-year war of the twentieth century scrambled the political, social, and cultural geography of Europe and ironically laid the groundwork for an enduring peace and inter-state unification in the postwar era. This course provides undergraduates with an introduction to the political, social, and cultural history of the period and will examine the origins and effects of the Great War, the polarization of politics in the interwar period, and the origins, execution, and consequences of World War II. 2 hrs lect/1 hr disc

Terms Taught

Spring 2019

Requirements

EUR, HIS

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Course Description

Policing the Globe
From the Casbah of Algiers to the streets of Ferguson, Missouri, police militarization has become one of the key features of the contemporary security state across much of the world. In order to better grasp this global phenomenon, we will adopt a global historical approach. We will trace the historical origins of police militarization by investigating the rise of modern police forces in the nineteenth century, the history of European colonialism, decolonization, and the Cold War. Finally, we will finish with a study of the contemporary policing of dissent. Students will select a contemporary topic in policing and write a research paper, make a podcast, create a website, or make a documentary video. (not open to students who have taken HIST 1044)

Terms Taught

Winter 2020, Winter 2021

Requirements

CMP, HIS, SOC, WTR

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Publications