Lim Photo
Office
Munroe Hall 202
Tel
(802) 443-2428
Email
eunyungl@middlebury.edu
Office Hours
Winter Term: Mondays 9am-12pm
Additional Programs
Religion

Dr. Eunyung Lim is Assistant Professor of New Testament. Her research focuses on how images of children, women, and other minorities function in early Christian literature, with special emphasis on their sociocultural implications for both the ancient and the modern world. Her monograph, Entering God’s Kingdom (Not) Like a Little Child, illuminates the diverse ways early Christ followers associated childlikeness with God’s kingdom by situating the Gospel of Matthew, 1 Corinthians, and the Gospel of Thomas within ancient discourses and practices related to children. She holds both a Master of Divinity and a Doctor of Theology from Harvard University. Prior to her current appointment, Dr. Lim was an assistant professor of New Testament at the Lutheran School of Theology.

Courses Taught

Course Description

Global Security Studies Senior Thesis
(Approval Only)

Terms Taught

Spring 2023, Spring 2024

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Course Description

An Introduction to Biblical Literature
This course is a general introduction to biblical history, literature, and interpretation. It is designed for students who seek a basic understanding of the Bible on its own or as a foundation for further study in religion, art, literature, film, and other disciplines. It aims to acquaint students with the major characters, narratives, poetry, and compositional features of biblical literature and how these writings became Jewish and Christian scriptures. The course will also explore various approaches to reading the Bible, both religious and secular. 3 hrs. lect./disc.

Terms Taught

Spring 2023

Requirements

LIT, PHL

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Course Description

Gender and Sexuality in the Bible
What does the Bible say about sex, marriage, and homosexuality? While many people claim “the” biblical perspective on this question, the Bible offers various–often complicated–stories and teachings about gender and sexuality. In this course, we will closely read key biblical passages concerning God’s gender, marriage and divorce, family life, sexual violence, women’s social status, asceticism, and sexual orientation. Special attention will be paid to the ancient Mediterranean sociocultural milieu within which ancient Israelites and early Christians constructed their ideas and practices about sex and gender. We will ultimately ask: how might our nuanced understanding of gender and sexuality in the Bible inform contemporary debates on sexual difference, gender inequality, and sexuality and social leadership? 3 hrs. lect.

Terms Taught

Fall 2022

Requirements

CMP, LIT, PHL

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Course Description

Historical Jesus and the Gospels
Who was Jesus of Nazareth? How does the historical Jesus differ from Jesus Christ in the Gospels? In this course we will explore how early Christians remembered Jesus and developed traditions about him. We will read both canonical (Matthew, Mark, Luke, John) and non-canonical (e.g., Thomas, Mary, Peter) Gospels within their historical and literary contexts, focusing on Judaism, the Roman Empire, and Greco–Roman cultures. We will then examine the critical approaches modern scholars take to reconstruct the historical Jesus’ life. By comparing diverse portraits of Jesus both in ancient literature and in modern scholarship, we will evaluate such diversity’s implications for our intellectual and cultural life today. How does the historical Jesus matter and for whom? 3hrs. lect.

Terms Taught

Fall 2022

Requirements

HIS, MDE, PHL

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Course Description

The Bible and the Lives of Others
The Bible contains stories about marginalized people who carry in themselves rich theological ideas about suffering, love, and social justice. Yet, the question of how we as global citizens should read the Bible gives rise to the challenge of considering contested views on minorities in history. In this course we will investigate ways in which the Bible portrays women, children, slaves, foreigners, and people with disabilities, using feminist and minoritized hermeneutics. Asking how these portrayals have been interpreted in modern religio–political contexts, we will reflect upon the impact of biblical interpretation on the lives of others. What does it mean to listen to the voices from the margins in our culturally diverse and politically divided world? 3 hrs. seminar.

Terms Taught

Spring 2023

Requirements

CMP, LIT, PHL

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Course Description

Independent Research
(Approval Required)

Terms Taught

Fall 2022, Spring 2023, Fall 2023, Spring 2024

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Course Description

Senior Project
(Approval Required)

Terms Taught

Fall 2022, Spring 2023, Fall 2023, Spring 2024

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Course Description

Senior Research for Honors Candidates
Approval required

Terms Taught

Fall 2022, Spring 2023, Fall 2023, Spring 2024

View in Course Catalog